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Encyclopedia > Trooping the Colour
Mounted Bands at Trooping the Colour 2006. The rider of the black-and-white drum horse, working the reins with his feet, crosses drumsticks above his head in salute.
Mounted Bands at Trooping the Colour 2006. The rider of the black-and-white drum horse, working the reins with his feet, crosses drumsticks above his head in salute.

Trooping the Colour is a military ceremony performed by regiments of the Commonwealth and the British Army. It has been a tradition of British infantry regiments for centuries and it was first performed during the reign of Charles II. Since 1805 the ceremony has been carried out on the British Sovereign's birthday,[1] which since King George VI has been regularly held on a Saturday in June.[2] British regiment A regiment is a military unit, consisting of a variable number of battalions - commanded by a colonel. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2007 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Kamalesh Sharma Appointed 24 November 2007 Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I Infantry or footmen are very highly disciplined and trained soldiers who fight primarily with small arms(rifles), but are trained to use everything from their bare hands to missle systems in order to neutralize... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George) (December 14, 1895 - February 6, 1952) was the third British monarch of the House of Windsor, reigning from December 11, 1936 to February 6, 1952. ...


On battlefields, a regiment's colours, or flags, were used as rallying points. Consequently, regiments would have their ensigns slowly march with their colours between the soldiers' ranks so that they would recognise what their regiments' colours looked like. // Origins The practice of carrying standards, to act both as a rallying point for troops, and to mark the location of the commander, is thought to have originated in Egypt some 5,000 years ago. ... Ensign is a junior rank of commissioned officer in the militaries of some countries, normally in the infantry or navy. ...


The importance of the colours was not confined to control during battle. They represented a regiment's direct link and service to the sovereign, as well as to the fallen soldiers and officers of that regiment. Its loss, or the capture of an enemy colour, were respectively considered the greatest shame, or the greatest glory available on a battlefield. As such, regimental colours are venerated and paid the highest compliments by officers and soldiers of all ranks, second only to the sovereign.


Only battalions of infantry regiments of the line carry colours, the Royal Artillery's colours for example, are their guns. Rifle regiments did not form a line and thus never carried colours. Their battle honours are carried on their drums. The exception to this is the Honourable Artillery Company who have both a stand of colours and guns. Armorial bearings of the HAC, granted in 1821 The Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) is the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior[2] in the Territorial Army [3] . // The HAC can trace its history as far back as 1296, but it received a Royal Charter...


Trooping the Colour is an old ceremony whereby the battalion would fall in by companies and the colour-party would "troop" or march the colours through the ranks so that every man would see that the colours were intact. This was done before and after every battle. This ceremony has been retained through time and is today largely ceremonial.

The Sovereign's Official Birthday

In the United Kingdom, Trooping the Colour has become closely identified with the Queen's Official Birthday, and is also known as the Queen's birthday parade.[3] It has marked the official birthday of the sovereign since 1748, and has occurred annually since 1820 (except in bad weather, periods of mourning and other exceptional circumstances). Edward VII moved Trooping the Colour to its June date, because of the vagaries of British weather. In Jersey the Lieutenant-Governor hosts a reception for the public at Government House to mark the Queens Official Birthday, at which he announces the names of recipients of Birthday Honours The Queens Official Birthday (sometimes known as the Queens Birthday) is celebrated as a public holiday... Edward VII King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VII (Albert Edward) (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was the first British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ...


Trooping the Colour allows the Household Division (i.e., the Foot Guards and the Household Cavalry) and King's Troop to pay a personal tribute to the Sovereign with great pomp and pageantry. Crowds at Buckingham Palace, around the Victoria Memorial and lining The Mall listen to the military bands before and after the ceremony. Events at Buckingham Palace after the Queen's return include another march past, a 41-gun salute in the adjacent Green Park, and a flypast by the Royal Air Force. This is followed by the usual daily Changing of the Guard. Household Division is a term used principally in the Commonwealth of Nations to describe a grouping of a country’s most elite or historically senior military units, or those military units that provide ceremonial or protective functions associated directly with the Head of state. ... Foot guards is a term used to describe elite infantry regiments. ... Dismounted Blues and Royals (left) and Life Guards (right) preparing to line the route of the Garter procession at Windsor Castle Household Cavalry is used across the Commonwealth to describe the cavalry of the Household Divisions, a country’s most elite or historically senior military groupings or those military groupings... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... The Victoria Memorial is a memorial of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom, who also carried the title of Empress of India. ... The Mall, looking towards Buckingham Palace The Mall (/mæl/) in London is the road running from Buckingham Palace at its western end to Admiralty Arch and on to Trafalgar Square at its eastern end, where it crosses Spring Gardens, which was where the Metropolitan Board of Works and for... Military Band marching A military band is a group of soldiers assigned to musical duties. ... Green Park, London Green Park (officially The Green Park) is one of the Royal Parks of London. ... The Red Arrows and Concorde conclude a special flypast over Buckingham Palace on 4 June, 2002 celebrating the Queens Golden Jubilee. ... RAF redirects here. ... Contents // Categories: Stub | London attractions ...


The Queen has attended Trooping the Colour in every year of her reign except when prevented by a rail strike in 1955. Her 80th birthday in 2006 was marked by the largest ever flypast of 49 planes led by the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight and culminating with the Red Arrows. It was followed by the only feu de joie ("fire of joy") fired in her presence. The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight is a Royal Air Force flight which provides an aerial display group comprising an Avro Lancaster, a Supermarine Spitfire and a Hawker Hurricane. ... Red Arrows Hawk at speed during a display The Red Arrows, officially known as the Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, is the aerobatics display team of the Royal Air Force, based at RAF Scampton, United Kingdom. ... A feu de joie (French: fire of joy) is a gun salute, described as a running fire of guns, on unique or recurring occasions of public rejoicing of nation and/or ruling dynasty. ...


On 13 June 1981, six blank shots were fired towards the Queen. The incident occurred 15 minutes after the Queen left Buckingham Palace, riding down The Mall on her 19-year old horse Burmese. As soon as the assault became apparent the Sovereign's Escort of the Household Cavalry was ordered by the Gold Stick in Waiting to "close up" around Her Majesty. Lance-Corporal Alexander Galloway of the Scots Guards pulled the attacker into the Mall, where he was seized by police. A ceremonial office dating from 1678 which is held jointly by the colonels of the Life Guards and the Blues and Royals regiments of the Household Cavalry of the Household Division of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. ... The Scots Guards are a regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division, and have a long and proud history stretching back hundreds of years. ...


The Queen regained control of her mount, and continued to Horse Guards.


The attacker, Marcus Sarjeant, a seventeen-year old former air cadet, became the first person since 1966 to be prosecuted under the Treason Act 1842.[4] Marcus Sarjeant (born 1964, from Capel le Ferne, near Folkestone, Kent) fired six blank shots at Queen Elizabeth II as she rode down The Mall to the Trooping the Colour ceremony in 1981, when he was aged 17. ... The Treason Act 1842 is a British law which was passed early in the reign of Queen Victoria. ...


The ceremony

A company of Welsh Guards, recognisable by the leeks on their collars and five-button groupings on their jackets, denoting their status as the most junior of the five Foot Guards regiments.
A company of Welsh Guards, recognisable by the leeks on their collars and five-button groupings on their jackets, denoting their status as the most junior of the five Foot Guards regiments.

Each year in June, there are three Trooping the Colour Parades, with the first two effectively functioning as rehearsals for the Queen's Birthday Parade. The Major General's Review and the Colonel's Review are scheduled on the Saturdays two and one weeks preceding the Queen's Birthday Parade respectively. The Queen's Official Birthday also sees the announcement of the Birthday Honours List (one of the two Honours lists of the year, the other being the New Year's Honours List). The Welsh Guards is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division. ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... The honours system of the United Kingdom is a means of rewarding personal bravery, achievement or service to the country. ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ...


Nos. 1-6 Guards - six companies of Foot Guards, comprising 70 men and 3 officers each - march on to the field perimeter. The Sovereign arrives and carries out Inspection of the Troops (to slow and quick march music). Foot guards is a term used to describe elite infantry regiments. ...


The Massed Bands troop, marching and countermarching in slow and quick time.


A lone drummer breaks away and approaches no. 1 Guard. At Drummer's Call, no. 1 Guard - referred to as "Escort For the Colour" - marches to the centre to the tune British Grenadiers and obtains the colour from the Colour Party. Now known as "Escort to the Colour", no. 1 Guard position themselves by no. 6 Guard while the Massed Bands execute their legendary "spinwheel". The Escort then slowly troops their regimental colour down the lines of nos. 6-2 Guards, finishing back in their original position on the right of the line.


Having re-formed into divisions, Guards 1-6 march around Horse Guards Parade in slow and quick time, to neutral and regimental marches (the latter used as they pass the Queen). Similarly, to music from the Mounted Bands, Household Cavalry and King's Troop pass the Queen in walk past and then sitting trot. Horse Guards Parade, London Horse Guards Parade is a large parade ground off Whitehall in central London. ... Dismounted Blues and Royals (left) and Life Guards (right) preparing to line the route of the Garter procession at Windsor Castle Household Cavalry is used across the Commonwealth to describe the cavalry of the Household Divisions, a country’s most elite or historically senior military groupings or those military groupings...


The Massed Bands play the Queen back to Buckingham Palace. Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ...


March On

A detail of Guardsmen bearing marker flags marches onto the parade ground and marks the positions of nos. 1-6 Guards. These marker flags are the respective company colours from each regiment.


The six Foot Guards companies march on to the perimeter of the field, led by their regimental bands. (They are referred to as No. 1 Guard, No. 2 Guard, etc.) Of these six Guards, it is No. 1 Guard whose colour will be trooped. Importantly, No. 1 Guard are known at this point as "Escort For the Colour." Foot guards is a term used to describe elite infantry regiments. ...


Nos. 1-5 Guards align in ranks of two on the west side of the parade ground facing Horse Guards Building; No. 6 Guard lines up perpendicular to them on the north side, thus making an "L" shape. The Massed Bands are on the east side. Adjacent to No. 6 Guard is the Colour Party (a Colour Sergeant holding the Colour which will be trooped, accompanied by two other guardsmen). The King's Troop, the Household Cavalry, and their Mounted Bands, form up behind Nos. 1-5 Guards on the edge of St. James's Park. Colour Sergeant (CSgt or C/Sgt) is an non-commissioned rank in the Royal Marines, ranking above Sergeant and below Warrant Officer Class 2. ... St. ...


Since the Foot Guards are in their full dress and the Mounted Bands in state dress uniform, the assembled ranks of Household Troops make a colourful spectacle.


Arrival of the Sovereign

Elizabeth II riding to Trooping the Colour for the last time in 1986 on her horse Burmese. Since then, she has travelled in a phaeton.
Elizabeth II riding to Trooping the Colour for the last time in 1986 on her horse Burmese. Since then, she has travelled in a phaeton.

Junior members of the Royal Family arrive in two barouche carriages. No. 3 Guard opens ranks to allow the carriages to pass. They enter Horse Guards Building, where they view the ceremony from a central first floor window in the Duke of Wellington's old office. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x790, 197 KB) Summary Photograph of Queen Elizabeth II riding to trooping the colour July 1986. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x790, 197 KB) Summary Photograph of Queen Elizabeth II riding to trooping the colour July 1986. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... A phaeton A Jump-seat type phaeton. ... This article is about the monarchy-related concept. ... A barouche was a fashionable type of horse-drawn carriage in the 19th century. ... Horse Guards viewed across Horse Guards Parade Horse Guards is a large building in the Palladian style between Whitehall and Horse Guards Parade. ... Italic text His Grace Field Marshal the Most Noble Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ...


The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh (Colonel of the Grenadier Guards) drive down The Mall in Queen Victoria's 1842 ivory-mounted phaeton drawn by two Windsor Grey horses. (The phaeton is on view at various times of the year in the Royal Mews.) The Sovereign's Escort consists of the Mounted Bands and the Household Cavalry. The Royal Procession includes the other Royal Colonels: the Prince of Wales (Welsh Guards), Duke of Kent (Scots Guards) and Princess Royal (Blues and Royals). Prince Philip redirects here. ... The Mall, looking towards Buckingham Palace The Mall (/mæl/) in London is the road running from Buckingham Palace at its western end to Admiralty Arch and on to Trafalgar Square at its eastern end, where it crosses Spring Gardens, which was where the Metropolitan Board of Works and for... A phaeton A Jump-seat type phaeton. ... The term Windsor Grey is given to gray horses used by the Royalty of the United Kingdom to draw carriages and coaches in various ceremonial processions and, since 1986, when The Queen is Trooping the Colour They are stabled in the Royal Mews. ... The Royal Mews is the mews (stables and in recent times also the garage) of the British Royal Family in London. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... Duke of Kent is a title which has been created various times in the peerages of Great Britain and the United Kingdom, most recently as a royal dukedom for the fourth son of King George V of the United Kingdom. ... Princess Anne, the current Princess Royal Princess Royal is a style customarily (but not automatically) awarded by a British monarch to his or her eldest daughter. ...


As the Royal Carriage arrives on Horse Guards Parade, the Royal Standard is released and flown from the roof of Horse Guards building. The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh dismount at the Saluting Base and receive a Royal Salute. The Royal Salute is one of the two salutes given by the Guard of Honor, second being the general salute. ...


Inspection of the Line

The Queen inspects her Guards in Queen Victoria's ivory-mounted phaeton of 1842.
The Queen inspects her Guards in Queen Victoria's ivory-mounted phaeton of 1842.

To music from the Massed Bands, the Queen re-enters the phaeton and is driven before and behind the long line of assembled guards. As she passes in front of the Foot Guards, in their L-formation as Guards Nos. 1 to 6, a slow air is played. Queen Victoria redirects here. ... A phaeton A Jump-seat type phaeton. ... Foot guards is a term used to describe elite infantry regiments. ...


When the carriage turns around the rear of No. 6 Guard, the music changes to a quick march. The carriage conveys the Queen back up the line so that she can observe the Household Cavalry and King's Troop lined up on the edge of St. James's Park.


BBC television commentaries every year emphasise the Queen's knowledge of the attributes of her Guards, and single out "steadiness" as a highly prised quality for a guardsman. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


The marches played by the Massed Bands always carry a flavour of the regiment whose colour is being trooped in any given year and therefore lend the inspection a unique atmosphere. In 2007 the pieces were "Royal Procession" (Ellerby) and "No. 7 Company" (Jones).


Massed Bands Troop

Massed Bands of the Foot Guards, 16 June, 2007
Massed Bands of the Foot Guards, 16 June, 2007

On the Queen's return to the Saluting Base, the command "Troop!" is given. (This is not to be confused with the trooping of the colour, which occurs later in the ceremony.) The senior drum major orders the Massed Bands to march and countermarch the length of the parade ground in slow and quick time. Foot guards is a term used to describe elite infantry regiments. ... A high school drum major uses hand gestures to lead his band. ...


The slow march is traditionally a waltz from Giacomo Meyerbeer's opera, Les Huguenots. The band reaches the Colour Party and countermarches. The drum major calls a halt and then orders a quick march (in 2007, "Blue Red Blue" by Ellis), during which a lone drummer breaks away from the Massed Bands, marching to two paces to the right of No. 1 Guard. Giacomo Meyerbeer Giacomo Meyerbeer (September 5, 1791 – May 2, 1864) was a noted German-born opera composer, and the first great exponent of Grand Opera. ... Les Huguenots is a French opera by Giacomo Meyerbeer. ...


Drummer's Call and Formation of 'Escort For the Colour'

Now the Trooping of the Colour phase starts. The lone drummer plays eight bars of a drum call, signalling the Captain of No. 1 Guard to cede his command to the Subaltern. No. 1 Guard then moves into close order in preparation for the march off. For other uses, see Captain (disambiguation). ... A subaltern is a military term for a junior officer. ...


'Escort for the Colour' obtains the Colour

An orderly takes the pace stick from the Regimental Sergeant-Major, who is standing at the rear of the 'Escort For the Colour'. This allows the Sergeant-Major to draw his sword (the only time a British warrant officer ever does so on parade). Led by the Subaltern with the Ensign behind him, and the Regimental Sergeant-Major at the rear of the company, the 'Escort For the Colour' quick marches towards the Colour Party, to the tune of "The British Grenadiers". Twenty steps away from the Colour Party, the music halts and four paces later, the 'Escort for the Colour' halts. A pace stick is a long stick usually carried by non-commissioned officer drill instructors in the British Armed Forces and Commonwealth armies as a symbol of authority and as an aid to military drill. ... Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 1 in the British Army and Royal Marines. ... For Warrant Officers in the United States military, see Warrant Officer (United States). ... The British Grenadiers was a marching song for the grenadier units of the British military from the 17th Century to the 19th Century. ...


Followed by the ensign, the sergeant major marches towards the Colour Party. After saluting the colour with his sword, the sergeant-major takes it from the colour sergeant, who is then free to slope arms. The sergeant-major about-turns, marches to the Ensign, and presents the colour to him. The ensign salutes the colour with his sword, sheathes the sword without taking his eyes of the colour and takes possession of the colour. The 'Escort For the Colour' now becomes the 'Escort To the Colour'.


Trooping the Colour

The 'Escort To the Colour' presents arms and the four NCOs at either end of No. 1 Guard turn outward and port arms as symbolic maximum protection for the Colour. The Massed Bands play the first six bars of "God save the Queen".


The 'Escort To the Colour' now slopes arms, as does the Colour Party (the colour sergeant and his two guardsmen). The colour sergeant takes position to the right and to the rear of the escort. The Colour Party, the ensign, and the sergeant-major march back to the escort; the sergeant-major takes position to the left and to the rear of the Escort.


The Escort To the Colour slow marches down towards no. 6 Guard to the position for starting the Trooping. During this, the Massed Bands perform a unique anti-clockwise "spinwheel" manoeuvre to reorient themselves in restricted space, while playing the slow march, "Escort To the Colour". Once the Escort is in place for the Trooping, the Field Officer in Brigade Waiting (a Lieutenant-Colonel) orders the entire parade (excepting the Escort) to present arms. The Field Officer in Brigade Waiting holds an appointment in the Royal Household. ... Lieutenant Colonel (Lieutenant-Colonel in English from the French grades spelling) is a rank of commissioned officer in the armies and most marine corps and air forces of the world, typically ranking above a Major and below a Colonel. ...


The 'Escort To the Colour' then slowly troops the colour down the entire length of Nos. 6-2 Guards, as the Massed Bands play "The Grenadiers' Slow March." The colour itself is borne in front of the Guards, but the ranks of the 'Escort' interweave with their ranks. For Nos. 6-2 Guards, who maintain the 'present arms' position, the long trooping, especially on a hot day, requires stamina. (When the colour passes the spectators, members of the British and foreign armed services, and military attaches of the Diplomatic Corps salute the colour, as is customary in the British Army.)


Eventually the 'Escort' arrives back at its original position as no. 1 Guard - from where it first marched off in quick time. The Captain, who had temporarily ceded his command to the Subaltern, resumes his command over No. 1 Guard by ordering them to present arms, thus bringing the 'Escort' back in line with Nos. 2-6 Guards. The entire parade is now ordered by the Field Officer in Brigade Waiting to slope arms, thus bringing an end to the Trooping itself.


Form Divisions

The leading group, behind the white horse, is No. 1 Guard ("Escort to the Colour"). They are followed by Nos. 2-6 Guards in similar formation.]] The Field Officer in Brigade Waiting gives the command, "Officers, take post." Nos. 1 to 5 Guard then "retire", about-turning and right-forming into review formation. Nos. 1 to 5 Guard then about-turn again as the Corps of Drums play, as for example in 2007, "Hazlemere" (Birkett). (Since No. 6 Guard is standing at right angles to the other five companies it does not need to execute this movement. Also, as No. 6 Guard is always formed on the left of the line by the Coldstream Guards if present, by tradition they do not recognise the command to "retire".)


Once intervals are established, the Field Officer in Brigade Waiting salutes the Queen and informs her that the Foot Guards are ready to slow-march, then commands, "Guards will march past in slow and quick time!"


Foot Guards March Past in Slow and Quick Time

A neutral slow march (i.e. a march that is not affiliated to one of the Guards regiments), begins the slow circuit of Nos. 1-6 Guards around Horse Guards Parade. In 2007, this was "Royal Heritage" (arr Jones). The Guards are preceded by the Field Officer and his Second-in-Command, who salute the Queen with their swords and eyes right. Second in Command is a 2006 action film directed by Simon Fellows, starring Jean-Claude Van Damme. ...


When each of Nos. 1-6 Guards passes the Queen at the Saluting Base, the music changes to the appropriate Regimental Slow March. They shift to "eyes right" and their officers salute with swords. The leading company, No. 1 Guard - the Escort to the Colour - has a particular honour. The ensign lowers the colour - the 'flourish'. The Queen acknowledges it with a bow of the head, and the Royal Colonels salute the regiment. Once past the Saluting Base, the Colour is raised again - the 'recovery' - and an "eyes front" is ordered.


Passing the Queen, each company salutes and is acknowledged by the Queen and the Royal Colonels. Once No. 6 Guard has passed the Saluting Base, a neutral slow march concludes the slow march past. (In 2007, "Thieving Magpie/Dogies March" [arr Ridings]).


Nos. 1-6 Guards now complete a circuit of Horse Guards Parade in quick time. This time the colour is at the rear of the Escort (No. 1 Guard), protected by the Colour Party. Again, their regimental marches are played as each Guard passes before the Queen with eyes right. However, this being a quick march, the officers do not salute with swords. Something which doesn't happen every year but only when the Scots or Irish Guards troop is the moving of the regimental pipers to the front of the massed band ready for the march past in quick time. This is something which the Queen decreed should happen when either of these two regiments troop their colours. If there are pipers present when another regiment troops then the pipers remain at the rear of the massed band. As with the slow march past, neutral marches start and conclude this section. (In 2007, these were "Coldstream Guards March" [arr Jones] and "The Coldstream Colonel" [Scott].)


After the March Past the Massed Bands, led by the Corps of Drums, march away - in 2007, to "Flag and Empire" (Turpin).


Mounted Troops March Past

Blues and Royals, one of the two regiments forming the Household Cavalry, in their characteristic red plumes and dark blue uniforms.
Blues and Royals, one of the two regiments forming the Household Cavalry, in their characteristic red plumes and dark blue uniforms.

The Mounted Bands of the Household Cavalry, in their state dress uniform, take the field. It is the turn of the Mounted Troops to complete two circuits of Horse Guards Parade. For the horses, slow and quick time correspond to a walk march and a sitting trot, respectively. As with the Foot Guards, neutral marches bracket the regimental quick and slow marches, with salutes being given to the Queen and by her and the Royal Colonels to the colours they pass. The King's Troop, whose guns are acknowledged as their colours, lead the Household Cavalry (Life Guards and Blues and Royals), because the Royal Horse Artillery takes precedence over all other units when on parade with its guns. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 418 pixel Image in higher resolution (2466 × 1287 pixel, file size: 750 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Trooping of colour, June 17, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 418 pixel Image in higher resolution (2466 × 1287 pixel, file size: 750 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Trooping of colour, June 17, 2006. ... Dismounted Blues and Royals (left) and Life Guards (right) preparing to line the route of the Garter procession at Windsor Castle Household Cavalry is used across the Commonwealth to describe the cavalry of the Household Divisions, a country’s most elite or historically senior military groupings or those military groupings... The Life Guards is the senior regiment of the British Army. ... A Trooper of the Blues and Royals on mounted duty in Whitehall, London The Blues and Royals (Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons) are a cavalry regiment of the British Army, part of the Household Cavalry. ...


"The Keel Row" is traditionally played for the sitting trot, and much dust is raised by the horses. Once the slow and quick circuits are completed, the National Anthem accompanies a final Royal Salute. Forming divisions once more (with, in 2007, "The Adjutant" played by the Corps of Drums), the Guards prepare to march off.


Marching Off

With the Massed Bands leading the way, the Queen places herself at the head of her Guards. The Foot Guard forms up in company formations of six ranks each and follows the Queen up the Mall to Buckingham Palace. The Household Cavalry follows the Foot Guards. Dismounted Blues and Royals (left) and Life Guards (right) preparing to line the route of the Garter procession at Windsor Castle Household Cavalry is used across the Commonwealth to describe the cavalry of the Household Divisions, a country’s most elite or historically senior military groupings or those military groupings...


The Markers march off.


After the ceremony

The Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the ceremony, 16 June, 2007
The Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the ceremony, 16 June, 2007

Each year when the Queen returns to Buckingham Palace, two detachments of the new Queen's Guard enter the forecourt, forming up opposite the old Queen's Guard. Standing with the Duke of Edinburgh on a Saluting Base in the central gateway she receives the salute as the remainder of the Guards and then the mounted troops file past to their regimental marches, played by the Massed and Mounted Bands respectively. This spectacle is appreciated by crowds in front of the Palace and by the Royal Family from the balcony. Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... This article is about the monarchy-related concept. ...


The Queen is then driven in the phaeton carriage into the palace, passing between the Old and New Queen's Guards. The usual daily ceremony of Changing of the Guard continues on the forecourt.


The King's Troop fire a 41-gun salute in Green Park. Another gun salute is also fired at the Tower of London. Green Park, London Green Park (officially The Green Park) is one of the Royal Parks of London. ... A salute is a gesture or other action used to indicate respect. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is an historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ...


Finally The Queen appears together with the Royal Family on Buckingham Palace balcony for a flypast. The Red Arrows and Concorde conclude a special flypast over Buckingham Palace on 4 June, 2002 celebrating the Queens Golden Jubilee. ...


Regimental Marches of the Foot Guards

Slow Marches

HANDEL was the code-name for the UKs National Attack Warning System in the Cold War. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... Le Nozze di Figaro, is a comic opera composed in 1786 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, with libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte, based on a stage comedy by Beaumarchais. ... Men of Harlech or The March of the Men of Harlech (Welsh: Rhyfelgyrch Gwyr Harlech) is a song and military march which is traditionally said to describe events during the seven year long siege of Harlech Castle between 1461 and 1468. ...

Quick Marches

The British Grenadiers was a marching song for the grenadier units of the British military from the 17th Century to the 19th Century. ... Highland Laddie, also known as Hielan Laddie, is the name of an ancient Scottish popular folk tune. ... Statue of Saint Patrick Saint Patrick (died March 17, 462, 492, or 493), is the patron saint of Ireland. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ...

Definition list

Each year a battalion of one of the five Foot Guards regiments is selected to troop its colours in the ceremony. When nos. 1-6 Guards form up at the beginning of the parade, the selected battalion is no. 1 Guard, and referred to as 'Escort For the Colour' (later 'Escort TO the Colour'.) Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ... Foot guards is a term used to describe elite infantry regiments. ... A regiment is a military unit, larger than a company and smaller than a division. ...


Since 1993, the 2nd Battalions of the Grenadier Guards, Coldstream Guards and Scots Guards have been in "suspended animation" - they are represented in the parade by the three incremental companies. It is a great honour for a young officer to be selected to carry the colour in this ceremony, as historically only the most courageous Ensigns were assigned to carry the regiment's colours in battle. Nowadays the honour is normally given to Second Lieutenants who are good at drill and ceremonial and are physically fit. In 2007, Second Lieutenant F J C Mills was the Ensign. The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ... The Coldstream Guards is a regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division or Household Division. ... The Scots Guards are a regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division, and have a long and proud history stretching back hundreds of years. ... The Guards Division of the British Army contains a total of five battalions, one from each of the five regiments of Foot Guards. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... It has been suggested that Drill (military) be merged into this article or section. ... Ensign of the Imperial Japanese Navy. ...


The number of military personnel who participate in the Trooping the Colour ceremony in London has declined over the years due to defence budget cuts in Household Division battalions as well as the battalions' commitments to military and peacekeeping operations overseas. For example, the Welsh Guards, who trooped their colour in 2006, and will do so again in June 2008, had returned from Iraq and are scheduled to redeploy to Bosnia later in 2006. This gives some of the units little time to practice ceremonial functions. However, the format of the ceremony has remained the same over the centuries following routines of old battle formations used in the era of musket warfare. Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ...

Definition List
Guards nos. 1-6
6 Guards of the Foot Guards are lined up in L-shape along two sides of Horse Guards Parade. Each "Guard" consists of around 70 non-commissioned Officers and Guardsmen, and 3 Officers (Captain, Subaltern, Ensign).
Escort For The Colour
denotes no. 1 Guard, whose Colour is being trooped. Later in the ceremony, they become Escort TO the Colour.
Colour Party
the Colour Sergeant and two other Guardsmen of no. 1 Guard who are holding the Colour at the start of the ceremony.
Sovereign's Escort
the Household Cavalry who escort the Queen to Horse Guards Parade.
Saluting Base
where the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh stand to take the salute.
Neutral March
march music which is not associated with any particular regiment. It is used at the beginning and end of each March Past in the ceremony.
Regimental March
each regiment has its own signature Quick and Slow March.
Foot Guards
the five Foot Guards Regiments, in order of seniority, are: Grenadier, Coldstream, Scots, Irish, Welsh.
Massed Bands
all five Foot Guards regimental bands, corps of drums and occasionally pipes and drums
Corps of Drums
in the UK, denotes a military band of fifes, drums and sometimes also bugles.
Household Cavalry
Life Guards and Blues and Royals.
Mounted Bands of the Household Cavalry
the combined musicians of the two Household Cavalry regiments, mounted on horses, wearing state dress, and led by two drumhorses.
Royal Salute
includes the playing of the National Anthem, "God Save the Queen".
Spinwheel
a complicated manoeuvre by the Massed Bands to turn 90°.

Horse Guards Parade, London Horse Guards Parade is a large parade ground off Whitehall in central London. ... Colour Sergeant (CSgt or C/Sgt) is an non-commissioned rank in the Royal Marines, ranking above Sergeant and below Warrant Officer Class 2. ... Dismounted Blues and Royals (left) and Life Guards (right) preparing to line the route of the Garter procession at Windsor Castle Household Cavalry is used across the Commonwealth to describe the cavalry of the Household Divisions, a country’s most elite or historically senior military groupings or those military groupings... Foot guards is a term used to describe elite infantry regiments. ... Dismounted Blues and Royals (left) and Life Guards (right) preparing to line the route of the Garter procession at Windsor Castle Household Cavalry is used across the Commonwealth to describe the cavalry of the Household Divisions, a country’s most elite or historically senior military groupings or those military groupings... The Life Guards is the senior regiment of the British Army. ... A Trooper of the Blues and Royals on mounted duty in Whitehall, London The Blues and Royals (Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons) are a cavalry regiment of the British Army, part of the Household Cavalry. ... The Royal Salute is one of the two salutes given by the Guard of Honor, second being the general salute. ...

List of regiments trooping the colour

Since only one colour can be trooped down the ranks at a time, each year a battalion of one of the five Foot Guards regiments is selected to troop its colours. Foot guards is a term used to describe elite infantry regiments. ...


2007: No. 7 Company, Coldstream Guards The Irish Guards did not appear in this Trooping. In addition, the 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards was originally scheduled to troop their Colour but an operational deployment prevented this.
2006: 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards. The Irish Guards did not appear in this Trooping.
2005: 1st Battalion, Irish Guards. The Welsh Guards did not appear in this Trooping.
2004: 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards
2003: 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards
2002: 1st Battalion, Scots Guards. The Welsh Guards and Irish Guards did not appear in this Trooping.
2001: Nijmegan Company, Grenadier Guards
2000: No. 7 Company, Coldstream Guards
1999: 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards
1998: 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards
1997: F Company, Scots Guards. The Welsh Guards did not appear in this Trooping.
1996: 1st Battalion, Irish Guards
1995: 1st Battalion, Scots Guards
1994: Nijmegan Company, Grenadier Guards
1993: 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards
1992: 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards
1991: 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards
1990: 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards
The Coldstream Guards is a regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division or Household Division. ... The Welsh Guards is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division. ... This article deals with the current British Army regiment, for historical regiments, see Historical Irish Guards regiments. ... The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ... The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ... The Scots Guards are a regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division, and have a long and proud history stretching back hundreds of years. ... The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ... The Coldstream Guards is a regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division or Household Division. ... The Coldstream Guards is a regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division or Household Division. ... The Welsh Guards is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division. ... The Scots Guards are a regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division, and have a long and proud history stretching back hundreds of years. ... This article deals with the current British Army regiment, for historical regiments, see Historical Irish Guards regiments. ... The Scots Guards are a regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division, and have a long and proud history stretching back hundreds of years. ... The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ... The Coldstream Guards is a regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division or Household Division. ... The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ... The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ... The Welsh Guards is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division. ...


Canada

In Canada the Trooping the Colour ceremony takes place, with a trooping of the Queen's Colour, only for the Queen, members of the Royal Family, the Governor General, or a Lieutenant-Governor, on Remembrance Day, or in honour of the Queen's Birthday, on Victoria Day.[5] This article is about the monarchy of Canada, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see Commonwealth realm... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada, or (masculine): Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state. ... In Canada, the lieutenant-governor (often without a hyphen[1], pronounced ), in French lieutenant-gouverneur/lieutenant-gouverneure (always with a hyphen), is the Canadian Monarchs, or Crowns, representative in a province, much as the Governor General is her representative at the national level. ... Wreaths of artificial poppies used as a symbol of remembrance Remembrance Day (Australia, Canada, United Kingdom), also known as Poppy Day (Malta and South Africa), Veterans Day (United States), and Armistice Day (France, New Zealand, and many other Commonwealth countries; and the original name of the day internationally) is a... Queen Elizabeth II in Canada for her official birthday, Victoria Day 2005, Edmonton, Alberta Victoria Day (French: Fête de la Reine) is a Canadian statutory holiday celebrated on the last Monday before or on May 24 in honour of both Queen Victorias birthday and the current reigning Canadian...


References

Notes

  1. ^ Trooping The Colour
  2. ^ Celebrating the Queen's 80th Birthday > One Queen, two birthdays
  3. ^ Queen's birthday parade | The Sun |HomePage|News
  4. ^ BBC ON THIS DAY | 14 | 1981: Queen's 'fantasy assassin' jailed
  5. ^ Department of National Defence; Cadet Instructor Cadre; Pg. 38

Bibliography

  • Her Majesty The Queen's Birthday Parade. Saturday 17th June 2006. Official programme.
  • n.a. The Guards : Changing of the Guard, Trooping the Colour, The Regiments. Norwich: Jarrold Publishing, 2005. A Pitkin Guide. (This revised edition published 1990. Originally published by Macmillan Press Ltd., 1972) ISBN 0-85372-476-8
  • Trooping the Colour. BBC 1 and 2 television coverage, 11 June 2005, 17 June 2006 and 16 June 2007.

For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...

External links

  • Photos from Trooping the Colour 2006 from the official 80th birthday site of the Queen
  • Order of Trooping the Colour
  • Information about the Trooping the Colour from the UK Army homepage

  Results from FactBites:
 
Trooping The Colour (299 words)
The troops participating in the parade are drawn of fully trained, operational troops from the Household Division.
The Queen's Colour of a battalion of Foot Guards is 'trooped' (carried along the ranks) each year before the Sovereign.
A feature of guard mounting was for the colours of the battalion to be carried (or 'trooped') slowly down the ranks so that they could be seen and recognised by the soldiers.
Trooping the Colour History (483 words)
It became customary to carry these colours down the ranks at the end of a day's march and to solemnly accompany them to the 'billet' where they were kept for the night.
The aim of the ceremony was to familiarise each man with the coloured flags that identified his unit, and to guarantee all ranks would recognise their assembly point, especially when stationed in an unfamiliar town.
Consequently, the colours came to express the spirit of the regiment and were held in the highest regard.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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