FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Troll" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Troll
Trolls with an abducted princess (John Bauer, 1915).
Trolls with an abducted princess (John Bauer, 1915).

A troll is a fearsome member of a mythical anthropomorph race from Norse mythology. Originally more or less the nordic equivalents of giants, although often smaller in size, the different depictions have come to range from the fiendish giants – similar to the ogres of England (also called Trolls at times, see Troller's Gill) – to a devious, more human-like folk of the wilderness, living underground in hills, caves or mounds. In Orkney and Shetland tales, trolls are called trows, adopted from the Norse language when these islands were settled by Vikings. Troll can have several different meanings: A Troll is a fictitious, mythological creature. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1356x1267, 3365 KB) Namn: Name: Konstnär / Artist: John Bauer Källa: Illustration av Walter Stenströms Pojken och trollen eller Äventyret i Bland tomtar och troll, 1915 Source: Illustration of Walter Stenströms The boy and the trolls or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1356x1267, 3365 KB) Namn: Name: Konstnär / Artist: John Bauer Källa: Illustration av Walter Stenströms Pojken och trollen eller Äventyret i Bland tomtar och troll, 1915 Source: Illustration of Walter Stenströms The boy and the trolls or... Tyr and Fenrir, by John Bauer (1911) The Changeling, by John Bauer (1913) Trolls with an abducted princess, by John Bauer (1915) John Bauer (1882–1918) was a Swedish illustrator best known for Bland Tomtar och Troll (Among Elves and Trolls), an annual Christmas book for children published in Sweden. ... The word mythology (from the Greek μυολογία mythología, from mythologein to relate myths, from mythos, meaning a narrative, and logos, meaning speech or argument) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use the supernatural to interpret natural events and... Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... Jack the Giant-Killer by Arthur Rackham. ... This article is about the mythological creature. ... Trollers Gill Trollers Gill is a limestone gorge, close to the village of Appletreewick in the Yorkshire Dales (grid reference SE068619). ... Location Geography Area Ranked 16th  - Total 990 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Kirkwall ISO 3166-2 GB-ORK ONS code 00RA Demographics Population Ranked 32nd  - Total (2005) 19,590  - Density 20 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Orkney Islands Council http://www. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 12th  - Total 1,466 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Lerwick ISO 3166-2 GB-ZET ONS code 00RD Demographics Population Ranked 31st  - Total (2005) 22,000  - Density 15 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Shetland Islands Council http://www. ... A trow or trowe is a mythical creature of the Orkney and Shetland islands, which may have been based on the Scandinavian troll. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ...


Nordic literature, art and music from the romantic era and onwards has adapted trolls in various manners – often in the form of an aboriginal race, endowed with oversized ears and noses. From here, as well as from Scandinavian fairy tales such as Three Billy Goats Gruff, trolls have achieved international recognition, and in modern fantasy literature and role-playing games, trolls are featured to the extent of being stock characters. Romantics redirects here. ... Three Billy Goats Gruff is a famous traditional fairy tale of Norwegian origin, in which three goats cross a bridge, under which is a fearsome troll who tries to prevent them from crossing it. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... A stock character is a fictional character that relies heavily on cultural types or stereotypes for its personality, manner of speech, and other characteristics. ...

Contents

Scandinavian folklore

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...

History

A troll woman meets a man in the forest. She looks like a young farmer woman, but her tail is peeking out under her skirt. From Svenska folksägner (1882).
Stones with roughly man-like features could be explained by folklore as trolls petrified by sunlight or curses. This one can be seen on Hamarøy, Norway.
Stones with roughly man-like features could be explained by folklore as trolls petrified by sunlight or curses. This one can be seen on Hamarøy, Norway.

The meaning of the word troll is unknown. It might have had the original meaning of supernatural or magical with an overlay of malignant and perilous. Another likely suggestion is that it means "someone who behaves violently". In old Swedish law, trolleri was a particular kind of magic intended to do harm. It should also be noted that North Germanic terms such as trolldom (witchcraft) and trolla/trylle (perform magic tricks) in modern Scandinavian languages does not imply any connection with the mythical beings. Moreover, in the sources for Norse mythology, troll can signify any uncanny being, including but not restricted to the Norse giants (jötnar). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (936x1269, 904 KB) Summary A troll woman meets a man cutting wood in the forest. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (936x1269, 904 KB) Summary A troll woman meets a man cutting wood in the forest. ... Natural Troll, Hamarøy, Norway, June 2002, by Michael Haferkamp The Troll can be found at the coast of the island of Hamarøy (opposite to the Lofoten) at postion 68° 7′ N 15° 24′ E. Access to this area requires some climbing along the coastline rocks. ... Natural Troll, Hamarøy, Norway, June 2002, by Michael Haferkamp The Troll can be found at the coast of the island of Hamarøy (opposite to the Lofoten) at postion 68° 7′ N 15° 24′ E. Access to this area requires some climbing along the coastline rocks. ... County Nordland District Salten Municipality NO-1849 Administrative centre Oppeid Mayor (2003) Jan-Folke Sandnes (H) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 103 1,031 km² 921 km² 0. ... Look up Supernatural in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ... The North Germanic languages make up one of the three branches of the Germanic languages, a sub-family of the Indo-European languages, along with the West Germanic languages and the East Germanic languages. ... “Witch” redirects here. ... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... The giants Fafner and Fasolt seize Freyja in Arthur Rackhams illustration to Richard Wagners version of the Norse myths. ...


In Skáldskaparmál, the poet Bragi Boddason encounters a troll-woman who hails him with this verse (in Old Norse): The second part of the Younger Edda of Snorri Sturluson the Skáldskaparmál or language of poetry is effectively a dialogue between the Norse god of the sea, Ægir and Bragi, the god of poetry, in which both Norse mythology and discourse on the nature of poetry are intertwined. ... Bragi, in Norse mythology, is the god of poetry. ... Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ...

Troll kalla mik
tungl sjötrungnis,
auðsug jötuns,
élsólar böl,
vilsinn völu,
vörð náfjarðar,
hvélsvelg himins –
hvat's troll nema þat? [1]
They call me Troll;
Gnawer of the Moon,
Giant of the Gale-blasts,
Curse of the rain-hall,
Companion of the Sibyl,
Nightroaming hag,
Swallower of the loaf of heaven.
What is a Troll but that? [2]

The ambiguous original sense of the word troll appears to have lived on for some time after the Old Norse literature was documented. This can be seen in terms such as sjötrollet (the sea troll) as a synonym for havsmannen (the sea man) – a protective spirit of the sea and a sort of male counterpart to the female sjörå (see huldra). A huldra and Näcken. ...


There are many places in Scandinavia that are named after trolls, such as the Swedish town Trollhättan (Troll's bonnet) and the legendary mountain Trollkyrka (Troll church). The most famous in Norway are Trollfjorden, Trollheimen, Trollhetta, Trollstigen, Trolltindan and Trollveggen. Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe which includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ... The page covers both the municipality and the town Trollhättan Waterfalls in Trollhättan Trollhättan Municipality is a Municipality in western Sweden where the City Trollhättan is the seat. ... Trollkyrka (Trolls church) is a tall and secluded mountain in the heart of the National Park of Tiveden, Sweden, which served until the 19th century as a pagan sacrificial ground (horgr, see also blót). ... Speilsalen, a natural formation of the glacier in late summer Location of Trollheimen in Norway Trollheimen is a mountain range in Møre og Romsdal and Sør-Trøndelag counties in central Norway. ... Trollhetta is a mountain in Trollheimen, Norway. ... Trollstigen, August 2004 Trollstigen Viewing platform Trollstigen October 2006 Trollstigen (English: ) is a road in Rauma, Norway. ... The Troll Wall (Norwegian: Trollveggen) is part of the mountain massif Trolltindene in the Romsdal valley on the Norwegian west coast. ...


The Jætte Trolls

Gradually, forming of two main traditions regarding the use of troll can be discerned. In the first tradition, the troll is large, brutish and a direct descendant from the Norse jötnar. They are often described as ugly or having beastly features like tusks or cyclopic eyes. This is the tradition which has come to dominate fairy tales and legends (see below), but it is also the prominent concept of troll in Norway. As a rule of thumb, what would be called a "troll" in Norway would in Denmark and Sweden be a "giant" (jætte or jätte, related to jötunn/jotunn in Jotunheimen). View from Knutshøi towards central Jotunheimen Jotunheimen is a mountain range in southern Norway covering an area of roughly 3,500 km². It is part of the long Scandinavian Mountains range. ...


In some Norwegian accounts, such as the middle age ballade Åsmund Frægdegjevar [1], the trolls live in a far northern land called Trollebotten – the concept and location of which seems to coincide with the Old Norse Jötunheimr. Jotunheim is the world of the giants (two types: rock and frost, collectively called Jotuns) in the Norse Mythology. ...


The Vitterfolk Trolls

The second tradition is most prominent in southern Scandinavia. Conversely, what would be called trolls in southern Sweden and Denmark would be called huldrefolk in Norway and vitterfolk in northern Sweden (see wight). The south-Scandinavian term probably originate in a generalization of the terms haugtrold (mound-troll) or bergtroll (mountain-troll), as trolls in this tradition are residents of the underground. Wight is a Middle English word for a creature or a living being, especially a human being. ...


These trolls are very human-like in appearance. Sometimes they had a tail hidden in their clothing, but even that is not a definite. Many of these trolls had a single lock of hair that no human could comb, whereas the rest was generally messy. A frequent way of telling a human-looking troll in folklore is to look at what it is wearing: Troll women in particular were often too elegantly dressed to be human women moving around in the forest. They could attract human males to do their bidding, or simply as mates or pets. Later these would be found wandering, decades later, with no memory of what had happened to them in a troll woman's care.


More often than not, though, the trolls kept themselves invisible, and then they could travel on the winds, such as the wind-troll Ysätters-Kajsa, or sneak into human homes. Sometimes you could only hear them speak, shout and make noise, or the sound of their cattle. Similarly, if you were out in the forest and smelled food cooking, you knew you were near a troll dwelling. The trolls were also great shapeshifters, taking shapes of objects like fallen logs or animals like cats and dogs. A fairly frequent notion is that the trolls liked to appear as rolling balls of yarn. Ysätters-Kajsa was a wind-troll, that people used to believe in, in the Swedish province of Närke. ...


Whereas the large, ogrish trolls often appear as a solitary being, the "small" trolls were thought to be social beings who lived together, much like humans except out in the forest. They kept animals, cooked and baked, were excellent at crafts and held great feasts. Like many other species in Scandinavian folklore, they were said to reside in underground complexes, accessible from underneath large boulders in the forests or in the mountains. These boulders could be raised upon pillars of gold. In their living quarters, they hoard gold and treasures. Opinion varied as to whether or not the trolls were thoroughly bad or not, but often they treated people as they were treated. Trolls could cause great harm if vindictive or playful, though, and regardless of other things they were always heathen. Trolls were also great thieves, and liked to steal from the food that the farmers had stored. They could enter the homes invisibly during feasts and eat from the plates so that there was not enough food, or spoil the making of beer and bread so that it failed or did not end up plentiful enough. GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ...


The trolls sometimes abducted people to live as slaves or at least prisoners among them. These poor souls were known as bergtagna ("those taken to/by the mountain"), which also is the Scandinavian word for having been spirited away. To be bergtagen does not only refer to the disappearance of the person, but also that upon returning, he or she has been struck with insanity or apathy caused by the trolls. Anyone could be taken by the trolls, even cattle, but at the greatest risk were women who had given birth but not yet been taken back to the church.


Occasionally, the trolls would even steal a new-born baby, leaving their own offspring – a (bort)byting ("changeling") – in return. Trolls with the changeling they have raised, John Bauer, 1913. ...


To ward off the trolls you could always trust in Christianity: Church bells, a cross or even words like "Jesus" or "Christ" would work against them. Like other Scandinavian folklore creatures they also feared steel. Apart from that they were hunted by Thor, one of the last remnants of the old Norse mythology, who threw Mjolnir, his hammer, causing lightning bolts to kill them. Though Mjolnir was supposed to return to Thor after throwing, these hammers could later be found in the earth (actually Stone Age axes) and be used as protective talismans. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... Drawing of an archeological find of a gold plated hammer in silver. ... Stone Age fishing hook. ...


Fairytales and legends

While the everyday folklore consisted mostly of short anecdotes describing things that had (supposedly) happened to local people, fairytales are narratives that rarely claim to be true in the same way. Many of the fairytales featuring trolls were written in the late 19th century to early 20th century, reflecting the romanticism of the time, and published in fairytale collections like Tomtar och Troll. These tales, and illustrations by artists like John Bauer and Theodor Kittelsen, would come to form the ideas most people have of trolls today. The term neo-romanticism is used to cover a variety of movements in music and painting. ... Tyr and Fenrir, by John Bauer (1911) The Changeling, by John Bauer (1913) Trolls with an abducted princess, by John Bauer (1915) John Bauer (1882–1918) was a Swedish illustrator best known for Bland Tomtar och Troll (Among Elves and Trolls), an annual Christmas book for children published in Sweden. ... Kittelsen is known for his drawings of trolls. ...


Legends from the Middle Ages and earlier also feature a kind of trolls of more horrifying dimensions. This might reflect a past view of trolls as distinctly bad creatures that would soften in later folklore (see the above), or just be another example of fantastic tales demanding fantastic dimensions. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...


In fairytales and legends trolls are less the people living next to humans and more frightening creatures. Particularly in these tales they come in any size and can be as huge as giants or as small as dwarves. They are often regarded as having poor intellect (especially the males, whereas the females may be quite cunning), great strength, big noses, long arms, and as being hairy and not very beautiful (Once again, females often constitute the exception, with female trolls frequently being comely). In Scandinavian fairy tales trolls sometimes turn to stone if exposed to sunlight, a myth generally attributed to pareidolia found in naturally eroded rock outcrops. Jack the Giant-Killer by Arthur Rackham. ... This page is about a mythological race. ... Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe which includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... The term pareidolia (pronounced or ), referenced in 1994 by Steven Goldstein,[1] describes a psychological phenomenon involving a vague and random stimulus (often an image or sound) being perceived as significant. ...


Asbjørnsen and Moe's collection feature a number of traditional fairy tales where trolls hold princesses captive, such as The Three Princesses of Whiteland, Soria Moria Castle, and Dapplegrim, and two where trolls invade homes on Christmas Eve to make merry, Tatterhood and The Cat on the Dovrefell. Female trolls may conspire to force the prince to marry their daughters, as in East of the Sun and West of the Moon, or practice witchcraft, as in The Witch in the Stone Boat, where a troll usurps a queen's place, or The Twelve Wild Ducks, where she turns twelve princes into wild ducks. In other tales, the hero matches wits with the troll: Boots and the Troll, and Boots Who Ate a Match With the Troll. Edition from 1896. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Soria Moria by Theodor Kittelsen Soria Moria Castle is a Norwegian fairy tale collected by Peter Christen Asbjørnsen and Jørgen Moe in Norske Folkeeventyr. ... Dapplegrim is a Norwegian fairy tale collected by Asbjørnsen and Moe. ... The Christmas Eve (1904-05), watercolor painting by the Swedish painter Carl Larsson (1853-1919) Christmas Eve, the evening of December 24th, the preceding day or vigil before Christmas Day, is treated to a greater or a lesser extent in most Christian societies as part of the Christmas season. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Cat on the Dovrefell is a Norwegian fairy tale collected by Asbjørnsen and Moe. ... East of the Sun and West of the Moon is a Norwegian fairy tale, collected by Peter Christen Asbjørnsen and Jørgen Moe. ... The Witch in the Stone Boat is an Icelandic fairy tale. ... The Twelve Wild Ducks is a Norwegian fairy tale collected by Asbjørnsen and Moe. ... Boots and the Troll is a Norwegian fairy tale collected by Asbjørnsen and Moe. ... Boots Who Ate a Match With the Troll is a Norwegian fairy tale collected by Asbjørnsen and Moe. ...


The following excerpts from the Danish Ballad of Eline of Villenskov describe the physical aspects of trolls within Scandinavian mythology:

There were seven and a hundred Trolls,
They were both ugly and grim,
A visit they would the farmer make,
Both eat and drink with him.
Out then spake the tinyest Troll,
No bigger than an emmet was he,
Hither is come a Christian man,
And manage him will I surelie

Origin of the myth

In the genre of paleofiction, the distinguished Swedish-speaking Finnish paleontologist Björn Kurtén has entertained the theory (e.g. in Dance of the Tiger) that trolls are a distant memory of an encounter with Neanderthals by our Cro-Magnon ancestors some 40,000 years ago during their migration into northern Europe. Spanish paleoanthropologist Juan Luis Arsuaga provides evidence for these types of encounters in his book, The Neanderthal's Necklace (El collar del Neandertal, 1999 ). The theory that Neanderthals and Cro-Magnons occupied the same area of Europe at the same time in history has been theorized based on fossil evidence. Other researchers believe that they just refer to neighboring tribes. The problem with this theory of Trolls is that there are theories and evidence underbuilding that bigger areas in Europe and the Middle East were inhabited by these two groups at the same time. Encounters can have happened due to nomadic tribes and long distance hunting, etc. Nonetheless there are no coherent research showing a phenomena or histories of "troll-like beings" in all these places reducing the post facto of Neanderthals preceding Trolls as nothing more than faintly plausible for the beholder of today. Paleontology, palaeontology or palæontology (from Greek: paleo, ancient; ontos, being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils. ... Björn Olof Lennartson Kurtén (1924 – 1988) was a distinguished vertebrate paleontologist. ... Dance of the Tiger is a short novel published in 1980 written by Björn Kurtén that deals with the interaction between Neanderthals and Cro-Magnons. ... Binomial name Homo neanderthalensis King, 1864 The Neanderthal or Neandertal was a species of genus Homo (Homo neanderthalensis) that inhabited Europe and parts of western Asia from about 230,000 to 29,000 years ago (in the Middle Palaeolithic, early Stone Age). ... For the avant garde collective, see Cromagnon (band). ... Juan Luis Arsuaga Ferreras (Madrid, 1959) doctor and bachelor in Biological Sciences in the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, hes the head of department of professors of Palaeontology Department in this university too . ... For other uses, see Fossil (disambiguation). ...


Another explanation for the troll myth is that the trolls represent the remains of the forefather-cult which was ubiquitous in Scandinavia until the introduction of Christianity in the 10th and 11th centuries. In this cult the forefathers were worshipped in sacred groves, by altars or by gravemounds. One of the customs associated with this practice was to sit on top of a gravemound at night, possibly in order to make contact with the deceased. With the introduction of Christianity however, the religious elite sought to demonize the pagan cult, and denounced the forefathers as evil. For instance, according to Magnus Håkonsen's laws from 1276 it is illegal to attempt to wake the "mound-dwellers". It is in these laws that the word troll appears for the first time, denoting something heathen and generally unfavourable.


This fits with the trolls in Norse sagas who are often the restless dead, to be wrestled with or otherwise laid to rest.


Nordic art, music and literature

Edvard Grieg, the most important Norwegian composer of the later 19th century, wrote several pieces on trolls, including a score based on Henrik Ibsen's Peer Gynt, with the famous In the Hall of the Mountain King, and March Of The Trolls. Regarding his motivations, Grieg wrote: "The peculiar in life was what made me wild and mad...dwarf power and untamed wildness...audacious and bizarre fantasy." Grieg's former home, Troldhaugen ("The Troll's Hill"), is now a museum. [2][3] Edvard Grieg Edvard Hagerup Grieg (15 June 1843 – 4 September 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist who composed in the romantic period. ... In the Hall of the Mountain King (Norwegian: ) is a piece of orchestral music, Opus 23, composed by Edvard Grieg for Henrik Ibsens play Peer Gynt, which premiered in Oslo on February 24, 1876. ... Home of the legendary composer Edvard Grieg. ...


Like Grieg, conductor Johan Halvorsen was a nationalist Norwegian composer. He wrote, The Princess and the Giant Troll, The Trolls enter the Blue Mountain, and Dance of the Little Trolls. Geirr Tveitt was heavily influenced by Grieg's romanticism and cultural exploration of Scandinavian folklore and Norwegian folk-music. Tveitt's Troll Tunes, includes works such as Troll-Tuned Hardanger Fiddle, and The Boy With The Troll-Treasure. Tragically, 80% of Tveitt's oeuvre was destroyed in a fire. Johan Halvorsen (March 15, 1864–December 4, 1935) was a Norwegian composer, conductor and musician. ... Geirr (Nils) Tveitt (October 19, 1908–February 1, 1981) was one of Norways most distinguished composers in the 20th century. ... Romantics redirects here. ... Scandinavian folklore is the folklore of Sweden, Norway and Denmark. ...


In Swedish children's literature, trolls are not naturally evil, but primitive and misunderstood. Their misdeeds are due to a combination of basic and common human traits, such as envy, pride, greed, naïveté, ignorance and stupidity. In some early 20th century fairy tales, by Elsa Beskow, trolls are also depicted as an aboriginal race of hunters and gatherers who are fleeing the encroaching human civilization. Where man makes a road, the trolls disappear. Elsa Beskow (née Maartman) (February 11, 1874 - June 30, 1953) was a Swedish author and illustrator of childrens books. ...


Young Scandinavian children usually understand the concept of trolls, and a way to teach children to brush their teeth is to tell them to get rid of the very small "tooth trolls" that otherwise will make holes in their teeth. This is a pedagogic device used to explain bacteria by the Norwegian author Thorbjørn Egner in his story Karius and Baktus. Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe which includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ... A lie-to-children is an expression that describes a form of simplification of material for consumption by children. ... Phyla/Divisions Actinobacteria Aquificae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chlamydiae/Verrucomicrobia Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Nitrospirae Omnibacteria Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Bacteria (singular, bacterium) are a major group of living organisms. ... Thorbjørn Egner (1912–1990) was a Norwegian playwright, songwriter and illustrator known for his books, plays and musicals for children. ...


The Swedish-speaking Finnish author Tove Jansson has reached a world-wide audience with her Moomintrolls. Areas where Finland-Swedish populations are found shown in yellow Finland-Swedish is a general term for the closely related cluster of dialects of Swedish spoken in Finland by Finland-Swedes as a first language. ... Tove Marika Jansson ( ; August 9, 1914 – June 27, 2001) was a Finnish novelist, painter, illustrator and comic strip author. ... The Moomins, comic book cover by Tove Jansson. ...


There is some speculation that the famous story Rumpelstiltskin originated from a troll folk tale which bears many similarities. While the original story of the troll involves a preacher contracting a troll to build a church as opposed to a woman needing to spin straw into gold, the central element of a bargain which is satisfied by guessing the name of the involved party, and the subsequent death of the troll or being whose name is guessed is central to both stories. (see Fin (troll)) Illustration of Rumpelstiltskin from Andrew Langs The Blue Fairy Book, ca. ... Fin is a troll in a legend from Kalundborg, Zealand, Denmark. ...


All the music of Finnish Folk Metal band Finntroll is based on Trolls, usually in a somewhat tongue-in-cheek manner, presented as a naturalist, alcohol-loving and viciously anti-human (henceforth anti-Christian) race. Folk metal is a diverse collection of music, encompassing a wide variety of different styles and approaches. ... Finntroll is a folk metal band from Finland. ... Troll statue in the forest near Geilo, Norway A troll is a member of a fearsome humanoid race from Scandinavian folklore, and its predecessor Norse mythology, as in The Three Billy Goats Gruff [1], the well-known Scandinavian folk tale in which a troll living under a bridge torments some...


Gallery

Gallery of trolls as imagined by various Nordic artists.

See also:

This is a sculpture called Troll that smells christianblood and is made by Niels Hansen Jacobsen (1861-1941). ...

Trolls in America

"The Troll." A statue under the north end of the Aurora Bridge in the Fremont neighborhood of Seattle, Washington, USA.
"The Troll." A statue under the north end of the Aurora Bridge in the Fremont neighborhood of Seattle, Washington, USA.

Scandinavian folk-tales involving trolls such as "Three Billy Goats Gruff" are familiar to other European and European-derived cultures. In the US and Canada, the old belief in trolls is paralleled by a modern belief in Bigfoot and Sasquatch. Many statues of trolls adorn the downtown business district of Mount Horeb, Wisconsin, leading to the town being dubbed The Troll Capital. There is also a neighborhood on the northeast side of Fargo, North Dakota which is named Trollwood. Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 869 KB)Photograph of the Fremont Troll under the north end of the Aurora bridge in Seattle, Washington, USA. Taken on May 31, 2003 by Jim Harper. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 869 KB)Photograph of the Fremont Troll under the north end of the Aurora bridge in Seattle, Washington, USA. Taken on May 31, 2003 by Jim Harper. ... The Fremont Troll lives beneath a bridge in Seattle. ... Categories: Stub | Bridges in Washington | Cantilever bridges | Seattle, WA ... Fremont Fremont is a neighborhood in Seattle, Washington. ... “Seattle” redirects here. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... It has been suggested that Evidence regarding Bigfoot be merged into this article or section. ... Sasquatch can refer to different topics: A Sasquatch is another name for Bigfoot. ... Mount Horeb is a village located in Dane County, Wisconsin. ... Location in North Dakota Coordinates: Country United States State North Dakota County Cass County Founded 1871 Mayor Dennis Walaker Area    - City 98. ...


Residents of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, known as Yoopers, refer to their lower-peninsula counterparts as "trolls," because they live "Under the Bridge" (Referring to the Mackinac Bridge.) The Upper Peninsula of Michigan is the northern of the two major land masses that comprise the U.S. state of Michigan. ... The Mackinac Bridge (pronounced , with a silent c), is a suspension bridge spanning the Straits of Mackinac to connect the non-contiguous Upper and Lower peninsulas of the U.S. state of Michigan. ...


Northern Central California (Sacramento, Stockton, Lodi, Modesto, Yuba City and Marysville) hispanic residents tell their children tales of the "Colupe" (KOH-LOOPIE) the little man that lives in the walls which comes out at night stealing away the breath of its sleeping victims. This story was made famous in Stephen King's movie "Cat's Eye".


The Bitterbynde trilogy by Cecilia Dart-Thornton features brief appearances trolls/trows and other fae creatures of European folklore. The main character, Imrhien, dances with a troll woman. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Cecilia Dart-Thornton is an Australian author of fantasy novels, most notably the Bitterbynde Trilogy. ... A trow or trowe is a mythical creature of the Orkney and Shetland islands, which may have been based on the Scandinavian troll. ...


References

  • Folktro från förr, Ebbe Schön (2001), ISBN 91-7203-420-3
  • Troll och människa, Ebbe Schön (1999), ISBN 91-27-06873-0
  • Svensk folktro A-Ö, Ebbe Schön (1998), ISBN 91-518-2892-8
  • Trollmakter og godvette, Olav Bø (1987), ISBN 82-521-2923-4
  • Camilla Asplund Ingemark's, The Genre of Trolls. The Case of a Finland-Swedish Folk Belief Tradition is the first doctoral dissertation in Finland on traditional forest trolls. Her research describes trolls according to the folklore of Swedish-speaking Finns. Ingemark compares the style and content of troll tales in folklore with biblical stories.

Ebbe Schön (1929 -) is a Swedish author and folklorist. ... Ebbe Schön (1929 -) is a Swedish author and folklorist. ... Ebbe Schön (1929 -) is a Swedish author and folklorist. ...

See also

Fin is a troll in a legend from Kalundborg, Zealand, Denmark. ... Grendel is one of three antagonists, along with Grendels mother and the dragon, in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf (c. ... The Moomins, comic book cover by Tove Jansson. ... This article is about the mythological creature. ... Patent troll is a pejorative term used for a person or company that enforces its patents against one or more alleged infringers in a matter considered unduly aggressive or opportunistic (see List of patent trolls for examples). ... Rölli-Peikko (Rölli the Troll) is a character from Finnish Television potrayed by Rauli Allan Allu Tuppurainen. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.dokpro.uio.no/ballader/lister/alfa_titler/tittel_326.html
  2. ^ http://www.naxos.com/mainsite/default.asp?pn=Composers&char=G&ComposerID=432
  3. ^ http://www.naxos.com/scripts/newreleases/blurbs_reviews.asp?catNum=5110060&filetype=About%20this%20Recording&language=English

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
Internet troll - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6926 words)
A troll would then also be able to increase his or her influence in an entire online community by simply using those other self serving nicks to increase the attention towards his or her most favored account.
Trolling can be described as a breaching experiment, originally conceived of by sociologist Harold Garfinkel, which, because of the use of an alternate persona, allows for normal social boundaries and rules of etiquette to be tested or otherwise broken, without serious consequences.
Trolls can also, in some circumstances, be a source of genuine humour, which depends entirely upon whether the troll is a good or a bad troll.
Troll - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4708 words)
In Sweden, trolls adopted many of the fairy-like traits of the land-wights (vättar, compare Icelandic landvættir) and thus came to be inclined to thieving and the abduction of humans which, in the case of infant abductees, was substituted with a changeling.
Female trolls may conspire to force the prince to marry their daughters, as in East of the Sun and West of the Moon, or practice witchcraft, as in The Witch in the Stone Boat, where a troll usurps a queen's place, or The Twelve Wild Ducks, where she turns twelve princes into wild ducks.
The green Forest Trolls of Zul'Aman (the Hinterlands), the icy blue Ice Trolls of Northrend and Khaz Modan, the large Dark Trolls of Ashenvale, the mysterious Desert Trolls of Tanaris, and the numerous Jungle Trolls.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m