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Encyclopedia > Tritone
tritone
Inverse tritone
Name
Other names augmented fourth, diminished fifth
Abbreviation TT
Size
Semitones 6
Interval class 6
Just interval 7:5, 10:7, 45:32...
Cents
Equal temperament 600
Just intonation 583, 617, 590...
The augmented fourth between C and F# forms a tritone.
The augmented fourth between C and F# forms a tritone.

The tritone (tri- or three and tone) is a musical interval that spans three whole tones. The tritone is the same as an augmented fourth, which in 12-tone equal temperament is enharmonic to a diminished fifth. It is often used as the main interval of dissonance in Western harmony, and is important in the study of musical harmony. "Any tendency for a tonality to emerge may be avoided by introducing a note three whole tones distant from the key note of that tonality" [1]. The word tritone may refer to: Tritone, the musical interval The term is also sometimes used in telephony to describe the special information tones, a sequence of three tones played to indicate a technical announcement. ... In music theory, the word inversion has several meanings. ... A semitone (also known in the USA as a half step) is a musical interval. ... In music, specifically, musical set theory an interval class, or unordered pitch-class interval, is an interval measured by the distance between its two pitch classes ordered so they are as close as possible. ... In music, just intonation, also called rational intonation, is any musical tuning in which the frequencies of notes are related by ratios of whole numbers. ... The cent is a logarithmic unit of measure used for musical intervals. ... An equal temperament is a musical temperament — that is, a system of tuning intended to approximate some form of just intonation — in which an interval, usually the octave, is divided into a series of equal steps (equal frequency ratios). ... In music, just intonation, also called rational intonation, is any musical tuning in which the frequencies of notes are related by ratios of whole numbers. ... Two notes forming a tritone - made with GNU LilyPond This image is ineligible for copyright and therefore in the public domain, because it consists entirely of information that is common property and contains no original authorship. ... Tri- is a prefix for three, as in triple, triangle, and tricycle. Internal Link Bi Quad Quint ... Pitch is the perceived fundamental frequency of a sound. ... In music theory, an interval is the difference (a ratio or logarithmic measure) in pitch between two notes and often refers to those two notes themselves (otherwise known as a dyad). ... A major second is one of three commonly occuring musical intervals that span two diatonic scale degrees; the others being the minor second, which is one semitone smaller, and the augmented second, which is one semitone larger. ... An equal temperament is a musical temperament — that is, a system of tuning intended to approximate some form of just intonation — in which an interval, usually the octave, is divided into a series of equal steps (equal frequency ratios). ... In music, an enharmonic is a note which is the equivalent of some other note, but spelled differently. ... In music, a consonance (Latin consonare, sounding together) is a harmony, chord, or interval considered stable, as opposed to a dissonance, which is considered unstable. ... Occident redirects here. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ...

Contents

Definition and nomenclature

Only the augmented fourth consists of three whole tones in meantone temperament. This is where the term is derived. Calling the diminished fifth a "tritone" is parlance. Writers often use the term tritone to mean specifically half of an octave from a given tone, without regard to what system of tuning it may belong to. Two tritones add up to six whole tones, which in meantone temperament is a diesis less than an octave, but in equal temperament, where the diesis is tempered out, it is equal to a perfect octave. A common symbol for tritone is TT. It is also sometimes called a tritonus, the name used in German. An equal-tempered tritone may be heard here. Meantone temperament is a system of musical tuning. ... A diesis is a musical interval. ... An equal temperament is a musical temperament — that is, a system of tuning intended to approximate some form of just intonation — in which an interval, usually the octave, is divided into a series of equal steps (equal frequency ratios). ... For other uses, see Octave (disambiguation). ...


The equal-tempered tritone (a ratio of √2:1 or 600 cents) is unique in being its own octave inversion. Note that in other meantone tunings, the augmented fourth and the diminished fifth are distinct intervals because neither is exactly half an octave. In any meantone tuning near to 29 comma meantone the augmented fourth will be near to the ratio 75 and the diminished fifth to 107, which is what these intervals are taken to be in septimal meantone temperament. In 31 equal temperament, for example, the diminished fifth, or tritone proper, is 580.6 cents, whereas a 75 is 582.5 cents. The square root of 2 is equal to the length of the hypotenuse of a right triangle with legs of length 1. ... The cent is a logarithmic unit of measure used for musical intervals. ... In music theory, the word inversion has several meanings. ... Meantone temperament is a system of musical tuning. ... In music, septimal meantone temperament, also called standard septimal meantone or simply septimal meantone, refers to the tempering of 7-limit musical intervals by a meantone temperament tuning in the range from fifths flattened by the amount of fifths for 12 equal temperament to those as flat as 19 equal... In music, 31 equal temperament, called 31-tet, 31-edo, or 31-et, is the scale derived by dividing the octave into 31 equally large steps. ...


The tritone interval is used in the musical/auditory illusion known as the tritone paradox. The Deutsch tritone paradox is an auditory illusion created by Diana Deutsch (creator of a number of auditory illusions) to test the Shepard scale if proximity information was removed. ...


Common uses

The tritone occurs naturally between the 4th and 7th scale degrees of the major scale (for example, from F to B in the key of C major). It is also present in the natural minor scale as the interval formed between the second and sixth scale degrees (for example, from D to A♭ in the key of C minor). The melodic minor scale, having two forms, presents a tritone in different locations when ascending and descending (when the scale ascends, the tritone appears between the third and sixth scale degrees and the fourth and seventh scale degrees, and when the scale descends, the tritone appears between the second and sixth scale degrees). Supertonic chords using the notes from the natural minor mode will thus contain a tritone, regardless of inversion. In music theory, the major scale or Ionian scale is one of the diatonic scales. ... C major (often just C or key of C) is a musical major scale based on C, with pitches C, D, E, F, G, A, B and C. Its key signature has no flats/sharps (see below: Diatonic Scales and Keys). ... Also see: C major, or C-sharp minor. ...


The dominant seventh chord contains a tritone within its tone construction: it occurs between the third and seventh above the root. In addition, augmented sixth chords, some of which are enharmonic to dominant seventh chords, contain tritones spelled as augmented fourths (for example, the German sixth, from A to D♯ in the key of A minor); the French sixth chord can be viewed as a superposition of two tritones a major second apart. A seventh chord is a chord or triad which has a note the seventh above the tonic in it. ... In music the root (basse fondamentale) of a chord is the note or pitch upon which that chord is perceived or labelled as being built or hierarchically centered upon. ... The interval of an augmented sixth normally resolves outwards by semitone to an octave An augmented sixth chord contains the interval of an augmented sixth above its bass. ... Also see: A major, or A-sharp minor. ...


In tonal music the tritone normally resolves inward to a major third: Tonality is the character of music written with hierarchical relationships of pitches, rhythms, and chords to a center or tonic. ...


Tritone resolution inward

Tritone resolution inward to a major third.
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

The diminished triad also contains a tritone in its construction, deriving its name from the diminished fifth interval (i.e. a tritone). The half-diminished seventh chord contains the same tritone, while the fully diminished seventh chord, like the French sixth chord, is made up of two superposed tritones, here a minor third apart. Other chords built on these, such as ninth chords, often include tritones (as diminished fifths). Generally speaking, a diminished chord is a chord which has a diminished fifth in it. ... The half-diminished seventh chord (also known as a minor seventh flat five) is created by taking the root, minor third, diminished fifth and minor seventh (1, â™­3, â™­5 and â™­7) of any major scale; for example, C half-diminished would be (C Eâ™­ Gâ™­ Bâ™­). In diatonic harmony, the... A seventh chord is a chord or triad which has a note the seventh above the tonic in it. ... Extended chords are tertian chords (built from thirds) or triads with notes extended, or added, beyond the seventh, including all the thirds in between the seventh and the extended note. ...


In all of the sonorities mentioned above, used in functional harmonic analysis, the tritone pushes towards resolution, generally resolving by step in contrary motion. In music, a step is a linear or successive interval between two pitches which are consecutive scale degrees. ... In music theory, contrary motion is the general movement of two melodic lines or pitches in opposite directions. ...


The tritone is also one of the defining features of the Locrian mode, being featured between the first and fifth degrees. The Locrian mode is a musical mode or diatonic scale. ...


Compared to other commonly occurring intervals like the major second or the minor third, the augmented fourth and the diminished fifth (both two valid enharmonic interpretations of the tritone) are considered awkward intervals to sing. Western composers have traditionally avoided using it explicitly in their melody lines, often preferring to use passing tones or extra note skipping instead of using a direct leap of an augmented fourth or diminished fifth in their melodies. However, as time went by, composers have gradually used the tritone more and more in their music, disregarding its awkwardness and exploiting its expressiveness.[citation needed]


Historical uses

The tritone is a restless interval, classed as a dissonance in Western music from the early Middle Ages through the end of the common practice period. This interval was frequently avoided in medieval ecclesiastical singing because of its dissonant quality. The first explicit prohibition of it seems to occur with In music, a consonance (Latin consonare, sounding together) is a harmony, chord, or interval considered stable, as opposed to a dissonance, which is considered unstable. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... In music the common practice period is a long period in western musical history spanning from well before the classical era (as identified in much modern history of music), dated, on the outside, as 1600-1900. ...

"the development of Guido of Arezzo's Hexacordal system which made B flat a diatonic note, namely as the 4th degree of the hexachordal on F. From then until the end of Renaissance the tritone, nicknamed the "diabolus in musicā" was regarded as an unstable interval and rejected as a consonance".[2] Statue of Guido in Arezzo Guido of Arezzo or Guido Aretinus or Guido da Arezzo or Guido Monaco or Guido DArezzo (991/992 – after 1033) was a music theorist of the Medieval era. ...

The name diabolus in musica ("the Devil in music") has been applied to the interval from at least the early 18th century. Georg Philipp Telemann in 1733 notes that "mi contra fa ... welches die alten den Satan in der Music nenneten" ("mi against fa, which the ancients called 'Satan in music'"), while Johann Mattheson in 1739 writes that the "alten Solmisatores dieses angenehme Intervall mi contra fa oder den Teufel in der Music genannt haben" ("older singers with solmization called this pleasant interval 'mi contra fa' or 'the devil in music'").[3] Although both of these authors cite the association with the devil as from the past, there are no known citations of this term from the Middle Ages, as is commonly asserted.[4] However Denis Arnold, in the referential The New Oxford Companion to Music, suggests that the nickname was already applied early in the medieval music itself: This is an overview of the Devil. ... Georg Philipp Telemann. ... See also: 1732 in music, other events of 1733, 1734 in music, list of years in music. ... Johann Mattheson (September 28, 1681 – April 17, 1764) was a German composer, writer, lexicographer, and music theorist. ... See also: 1738 in music, other events of 1739, 1740 in music, list of years in music. ...

"It seems first to have been designated as a 'dangerous' interval when Guido of Arezzo developed his system of hexachords and with the introduction of B flat as a diatonic note, at much the same time acquiring its nickname of 'Diabolus in Musica' ('the devil in music')".[5] Statue of Guido in Arezzo Guido of Arezzo or Guido Aretinus or Guido da Arezzo or Guido Monaco or Guido DArezzo (991/992 – after 1033) was a music theorist of the Medieval era. ...

Because of that original symbolic association with the devil and its avoidance, this interval came to be heard in Western cultural convention as suggesting an "evil" connotative meaning in music. Today the interval continues to suggest an "oppressive", "scary", or "evil" sound. However, suggestions that singers were excommunicated or otherwise punished by the Church for invoking this interval are likewise fanciful. At any rate, avoidance of the interval for musical reasons has a long history, stretching back to the parallel organum of the Musica Enchiriadis. In all these expressions, including the commonly cited "mi contra fa est diablous in musica", the "mi" and "fa" refer to notes from two adjacent hexachords. For instance, in the tritone B-F, B would be "mi", that is the third scale degree in the "hard" hexachord beginning on G, while F would be "fa", that is the fourth scale degree in the "natural" hexachord beginning on C. Excommunication is a religious censure used to deprive or suspend membership in a religious community. ... Organum (pronounced , though the stress is now sometimes incorrectly put on the second syllable) is a technique of singing developed in the Middle Ages, and is an early form of polyphonic music. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In music, a hexachord is a collection of six tones. ...


Later in history with the rise of the Baroque and Classical music era, that interval came to be perfectly accepted, but yet was used in a specific controlled way, notably through the principle of the tension/release mechanism of the tonal system. In that system (which is the fundamental musical grammar of Baroque and Classical music), the tritone is one of the defining intervals of the dominant-seventh chord and two tritones separated by a minor third give the fully-diminished seventh chord its characteristic sound. In minor, the diminished triad (comprising two minor thirds which together add up to a tritone) appears on the second scale degree, and thus features prominently in the progression iio-V-i. Often, the inversion iio6 is used to move the tritone to the inner voices as this allows for stepwise motion in the bass to the dominant root. In three-part counterpoint, free use of the diminished triad in first inversion is permitted, as this eliminates the tritone relation to the bass.[6] Tonality is a system of writing music according to certain hierarchical pitch relationships around a key center or tonic. ...


It is only with the Romantic music and modern classical music that composers started to use it totally freely, without functional limitations notably in an expressive way to exploit the evil connotations which are culturally associated to it (e.g., Liszt's use of the tritone to suggest hell in his Dante Sonata). The tritone was also exploited heavily in that period as an interval of modulation for its ability to evoke a strong reaction by moving quickly to distantly related keys. Later on, in twelve-tone music, serialism, and other 20th century compositional idioms it came to be considered as a neutral interval.[7] In some analyses of the works of 20th century composers, the tritone plays an important structural role; perhaps the most noted is the axis system, proposed by Ernő Lendvai, in his analysis of the use of tonality in the music of Béla Bartók.[8] The expression romantic music and the homophone phrase Romantic music have two essentially different meanings. ... 20th century classical music was extremely diverse, ranging from the late Romantic style of Sergei Rachmaninoff to the complete serialism of Pierre Boulez, and from the simple triadic harmonies of minimalist composers such as Philip Glass to the musique concrète of Pierre Schaeffer and the microtonal music adopted by Harry... Franz Liszt (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) was a virtuoso pianist and composer. ... A work for solo piano by Franz Liszt. ... In music, modulation is most commonly the act or process of changing from one key (tonic, or tonal center) to another. ... In music the axis system, proposed by ErnÅ‘ Lendvai (1971, p. ... Erno Lendvai was one of the first theorists to write on the appearance of the golden section and Fibonacci series and how these are implemented in Bartoks music. ... Bartok redirects here. ...


Tritones also became important in the development of jazz tertian harmony, where triads and seventh chords are often expanded to become 9th, 11th, or 13th chords, and the tritone often occurs as a substitute for the naturally occurring interval of the perfect 11th. Since the perfect 11th (i.e. an octave plus perfect fourth) is typically perceived as a dissonance requiring a resolution to a major or minor 10th, chords that expand to the 11th or beyond typically raise the 11th a half step (thus giving us an augmented 11th, or an octave plus a tritone from the root of the chord) and present it in conjunction with the perfect 5th of the chord. Also in jazz harmony, the tritone is both part of the dominant chord and its substitute dominant (also known as the sub V chord). Because they share the same tritone, they are possible substitutes for one another. This is known as tritone substitution. For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... In jazz music a tritone substitution is the use in a chord progression of a dominant seventh chord (major/minor seventh chord) that is three steps (a tritone) away from the original dominant seventh chord. ...


Notable occurences of the tritone

In classical music

  • Antonio Vivaldi uses the tritone in the movement "Gratias Agimus Tibi" in the bass part for Gloria in Excelsis Deo.
  • The beginning of Act II in Beethoven's opera Fidelio, where the timpani are tuned a tritone apart, to A and E-flat, instead of the usual perfect fifths, to set the mood for the dark dungeon.
  • Saint-Saëns literally made the tritone "the Devil in music" in Danse Macabre. In it, the violin soloist uses scordatura, tuning the top string down a half step (from E to E-flat). This creates a tritone with the open A string, giving the sound of Death tuning his fiddle for the dance.
  • Rimsky-Korsakov uses the tritone in the opening theme of the first movement of Scheherazade (Bb to E) to depict the evil sultan.
  • The tritone plays a major role in Jean Sibelius's Symphony No. 3 in C Major, op. 52, and even more so in the dark and austere Symphony No. 4 in A minor, op. 63.
  • Claude Debussy's Ce qu'a vu le vent d'Ouest exploits tritones throughout the entire piece.
  • The tritone is the very foundational interval of the new harmonic language Alexander Scriabin developed in the latter half of his career, and dozens of his pieces from about Op. 30 onwards either use successive chords with roots a tritone apart, or use the tritone itself as a prominent interval in many chords. This tritone relationship evolved into a full substitute in this new language for the traditional tonic-dominant tonal relationship, to the extent that the tritone interval became a consonance in Scriabin's usage, not needing resolution.
  • Mars – The Bringer of War, the first movement from Gustav Holst's suite The Planets, uses the tritone as an effect to describe the horrors of warfare.
  • Carl Ruggles’s Sun Treader uses the tritone prominently in its non-Schoenberian atonal polyphonic syntax, usually alternating either with the perfect fourth or fifth.
  • The tritone of C and F-sharp is a prominent interval in Benjamin Britten's War Requiem, signifying the theme of conflict and reconciliation.
  • Liszt's Dante Sonata

Vivaldi redirects here. ... Gloria in Excelsis Deo (Latin for Glory to God in the highest) is the title and beginning of the Great Doxology used in the Roman Catholic Mass, Divine Service of the Lutheran Church and in the services of many other [1] Christian churches. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Fidelio (Op. ... A timpanist in the United States Air Forces in Europe Band. ... The perfect fifth or diapente is one of three musical intervals that span five diatonic scale degrees; the others being the diminished fifth, which is one semitone smaller, and the augmented fifth, which is one semitone larger. ... Charles Camille Saint-Saëns (IPA: [ʃaʁl. ... Danse Macabre (first performed in 1875) is the name of opus 40 by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns. ... A scordatura (literally Italian for mistuning) is an alternate tuning used for the open strings of a string instrument. ... Sibelius redirects here. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... The Symphony No. ... Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin (Russian: Александр Николаевич Скрябин, Aleksandr Nikolajevič Skriabin; sometimes transliterated as Skryabin or Scriabine (6 January 1872 [O.S. 26 December 1871]—27 April 1915) was a Russian composer and pianist. ... In music the root (basse fondamentale) of a chord is the note or pitch upon which that chord is perceived or labelled as being built or hierarchically centered upon. ... The tonic is the first note of a musical scale, and in the tonal method of music composition it is extremely important. ... In music, the dominant is the fifth degree of the scale. ... In music, a consonance (Latin consonare, sounding together) is a harmony, chord, or interval considered stable, as opposed to a dissonance, which is considered unstable. ... Resolution in western tonal music theory is the need for a sounded note and/or chord to move from a dissonance or unstable sound to a more final or stable sounding one, a consonance. ... Gustav Holst Gustav Holst (September 21, 1874, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire - May 25, 1934, London) [1] [2] was an English composer and was a music teacher for over 20 years. ... This page is about the orchestral suite by Gustav Holst. ... American composer Charles Sprague Ruggles (March 11, 1876 - October 24, 1971), better known as Carl, wrote finely-crafted pieces using dissonant counterpoint, a term coined by Charles Seeger to describe Ruggles music. ... Britten redirects here. ... The War Requiem, Op. ...

In popular music

  • Black Sabbath's guitarist Tony Iommi used a tritone as the entire basis for his song Black Sabbath. He plays a tritone exclusively until halfway through the song.
  • The Black Sabbath tritone was used by guitarist Randy Rhoads at the beginning of his guitar solo on the Ozzy Osbourne song Over the Mountain.
  • The introduction and the main riff for most of Metallica's Harvester of Sorrow gets its menacing sound from the tritone.
  • Omar Rodriguez-Lopez of The Mars Volta makes extensive use of the tritone in the large majority of his compositions.
  • Nu metal band Korn uses tritone in great amount in its works especially on their first album Korn.
  • Thrash metal band Slayer's 1998 album is entitled Diabolus in Musica and the song Bitter Peace features the tritone.
  • The intro to the song Purple Haze by the Jimi Hendrix Experience uses a tritone in which Hendrix plays a B-flat octave while bassist Noel Redding plays an E octave.
  • The intro to the song YYZ by Rush uses the tritone C-F-sharp several times over before entering the main riff.
  • The intro to the song Last Entertainment by the Swiss technical Thrash Metal band Coroner uses an A-D-flat tritone.
  • The intro to the song Charlie by Red Hot Chili Peppers uses a series of tritones: F-B, B-F, B-flat-E, and E-B-flat.
  • Many King Crimson songs (for example, Red) make extensive use of tritones.
  • One of the intro riffs in the song "As I Am" by Dream Theater uses the C-F-sharp tritone
  • Buckethead makes extensive use of tritones in his rapid solos to give them a "robotic" and "unnatural" feel. Sometimes, like in the song Jordan, he'll perform a solo using only tritones.
  • The tritone is a particularly important interval in heavy metal and in particular black metal.[citation needed]
  • The bass line to Busta Rhymes song Woo-Ha uses a tritone.
  • Mr. Bungle frequently use tritones in their music so much to the point that the double tritone chord was informally named the Mr. Bungle chord.
  • Primus makes frequent use of tritones throughout their music, one of the most notable ones being "Jerry Was A Race Car Driver".
  • Marilyn Manson's song Beautiful People uses the tritone throughout all of the song.
  • Keith Emerson uses a tritone in the intro to Emerson, Lake & Palmer's "The Barbarian."
  • The main riff of Cave from the band Muse use a tritone
  • Spanish band "Mago de oz" (Wizard of Oz)in this album "Gaia II" Features a song call "Diabuls in musica" as a way to invoke the devil to the real word, the tritone features in the song also.

For other uses, see Black Sabbath (disambiguation). ... Frank Anthony Tony Iommi (born February 19, 1948, in Aston, Birmingham, England) is a guitarist best known for his tenure in the heavy metal band Black Sabbath. ... Black Sabbath is a song by the heavy metal pioneers of the same name. ... For other uses, see Black Sabbath (disambiguation). ... For the talk radio host, see Randi Rhodes, or for the guitar model, see Jackson Randy Rhoads. ... Ozzy redirects here. ... Over the Mountain is a song off of heavy metal musician Ozzy Osbournes album Diary of a Madman. ... Riff is also an alternate spelling of Rif, a region of Morocco. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... Harvester of Sorrow is the sixth song from the Metallica album . ... Omar Alfredo Rodriguez-Lopez (born September 1, 1975 in Bayamón, Puerto Rico) is the composer, lead guitarist and producer for the progressive rock group The Mars Volta and the former guitarist for the post-hardcore outfit At the Drive-In. ... The Mars Volta is an American progressive rock group founded by Cedric Bixler-Zavala and Omar Rodríguez-López in 2001. ... Nu metal (also called aggro metal, or nü metal using the traditional heavy metal umlaut) is a musical genre that has origins in the mid 1990s. ... This article is about the band. ... Singles from Korn Released: January, 1995 Released: 1995 Released: 1995 Released: 1995 Released: 1995 Korn (type-set KoЯn) is the self-titled debut album by Korn, released on October 11, 1994 through Immortal/Epic Records and has sold over 3,000,000 copies in the US alone. ... Thrash metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music, one of the extreme metal subgenres that is characterised by high speed riffing and aggression. ... For other uses, see Slayer (disambiguation). ... Diabolus in Musica is the eighth album by the thrash metal band Slayer. ... For other meanings of Purple Haze, see Purple Haze (disambiguation). ... Jimi Hendrix James Marshall Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 - September 18, 1970) was an American guitarist, singer, songwriter and producer who is widely considered to be the most important electric guitarist in the history of popular music. ... Noel David Redding (25 December 1945 – 11 May 2003) was a rock & roll guitarist best known as the bassist for The Jimi Hendrix Experience. ... ) YYZ is an instrumental rock piece by Rush, from the 1981 album Moving Pictures. ... Rush is a Canadian rock band originally formed in August 1968, in the Willowdale neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario; presently comprised of bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ... Thrash metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music, one of the extreme metal subgenres that is characterised by high speed riffing and aggression. ... Coroner is a Swiss thrash metal band. ... Charlie is a song by the Red Hot Chili Peppers. ... The Red Hot Chili Peppers are a Grammy-award winning American alternative rock band formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1983. ... This article is about the musical group. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dream Theater is an American progressive metal band formed in 1985 under the name Majesty by John Myung, John Petrucci and Mike Portnoy while they attended Berklee College of Music in Boston, before they dropped out to support the band. ... This article is about the avant-garde metal composer and musician. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... This article is about the musical genre. ... Trevor Smith (born on May 20, 1972), better known as Busta Rhymes, is an American hip hop musician and actor. ... Mr. ... The Mr. ... Primus (disambiguation) has multiple meanings, generally derived from the Latin word meaning the first one. // Primus (band), a rock trio. ... This article is about the person. ... Keith Noel Emerson (born 2 November 1944 in Todmorden, Yorkshire) is a British keyboard player and composer. ... Emerson, Lake & Palmer (ELP) were an English progressive rock group. ... For the rock band, see Muse (band). ...

In popular entertainment

  • West Side Story, the musical by Leonard Bernstein, uses the tritone throughout as part of a characteristic motif that appears almost everywhere in the music. For instance, it opens the song Maria, and becomes the bassline for Cool.
  • An episode of Charmed entitled "We All Scream for Ice Cream" has an ice cream truck playing a tritone to attract demons so that the ice cream man can kill them.
  • When Jack Butler (Satan's guitarist played by Steve Vai) finishes his final solo before the classical duel in the 1986 film Crossroads, he ends it with a diminished fifth, because it is sometimes associated with the Devil.
  • Bill Bailey commented on the augmented 4th on his stand-up tour Tinselworm in 2007. He was experimenting with various ideas for making doorbell jingles, and noted that it works highly effectively as a doorbell, inducing a sense of unease.

The theme to the Fox Television series "The Simpsons" features a tritone prominently throughout, most notably in the bassline. For other uses, see West Side Story (disambiguation). ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Maria is a popular song. ... Cool is a song from the musical West Side Story. ... For other uses, see Charm. ... Steven Steve Siro Vai (born June 6, 1960 in Carle Place, New York) is an American instrumental rock guitarist, songwriter, vocalist and producer. ... Crossroads is a 1986 cult film inspired by the legend of Robert Johnson. ... This is an overview of the Devil. ... For other uses, see Bill Bailey (disambiguation). ...


In literature

  • Connie Palmen[9], a Dutch writer, refers to the phenomenon repeatedly throughout her novel Lucifer[10] (ISBN 044609998).

Connie Palmen is a novelist from The Netherlands. ...

References

  1. ^ Brindle, Reginald Smith (1966). Serial Composition. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-311906-4.
  2. ^ Sadie, Stanley (1980). "Tritone " in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (1st ed.). MacMillan, pp.154-155, ISBN 0-333-23111-2)
  3. ^ Reinhold Hammerstein, Diabolus in Musica: Studien zur Ikonographie der Musik im Mittelalter, Bern: Francke Verlag, 1974. p. 7.
  4. ^ F. J. Smith, "Some aspects of the tritone and the semitritone in the Speculum Musicae: the non-emergence of the diabolus in music," Journal of Musicological Research 3 (1979), pp. 63-74, at 70.
  5. ^ Arnold, Denis (1983) « Tritone » in The New Oxford Companion to Music, Volume 1: A-J,Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-311316-3
  6. ^ Jeppesen, Knud: "The Polyphonic Style of the Sixteenth Century", Dover, 1992, ISBN 0-486-27036-X (pbk)
  7. ^ Persichetti, V., "Twentieth-Century Harmony: Creative Aspects and Practice", W. W. Norton & Company, 1961, ISBN 0-393-09539-8
  8. ^ Lendvai, Ernő. Béla Bartók: An Analysis of His Music. London: Kahn and Averill, 1971, p.1-16)
  9. ^ See http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connie_Palmen
  10. ^ Dutch review at http://www.nrc.nl/kunst/article681634.ece

External links

  • Tritone paradox and Shepard Tones
  • BBC News Magazine article about the tritone
  • Satan's all-time greatest hit: Will Hodgkinson on the devil's interval
  • Tritone article by JazzPianoLessons.com

Shepard tone illustration A Shepard tone is a sound consisting of a superposition of tones separated by octaves. ...

See also

The following is a list of intervals of meantone temperament. ... Equal-tempered refers to 12-tone equal temperament. ... In music theory, the term interval describes the difference in pitch between two notes. ... For other uses, see Unison (disambiguation). ... The perfect fourth or diatessaron, abbreviated P4, is one of two musical intervals that span four diatonic scale degrees; the other being the augmented fourth, which is one semitone larger. ... The perfect fifth or diapente is one of three musical intervals that span five diatonic scale degrees; the others being the diminished fifth, which is one semitone smaller, and the augmented fifth, which is one semitone larger. ... For other uses, see Octave (disambiguation). ... A major second is one of three commonly occuring musical intervals that span two diatonic scale degrees; the others being the minor second, which is one semitone smaller, and the augmented second, which is one semitone larger. ... A major third is the larger of two commonly occuring musical intervals that span three diatonic scale degrees. ... The musical interval of a major sixth is the relationship between the first note (the root or tonic) and the sixth note in a Major scale. ... The musical interval of a Major seventh the first note (the root or tonic) and the seventh, the leading tone, in a major scale. ... A minor second is the smallest of three commonly occuring musical intervals that span two diatonic scale degrees; the others being the major second and the augmented second, which are larger by one and two semitones respectively. ... A minor third is the smaller of two commonly occurring musical intervals compounded of two steps of the diatonic scale. ... A minor sixth is the smaller of two commonly occuring musical intervals that span six diatonic scale degrees. ... The musical interval of a minor seventh the first note (the root or tonic) and the seventh in a minor scale. ... This article is about the musical interval. ... The musical interval of a minor third is the relationship between the first note (the root or tonic) and the third note in a minor scale. ... This article is about the musical interval. ... An augmented fifth is one of three musical intervals that span five diatonic scale degrees. ... An augmented sixth is one of three musical intervals that span six diatonic scale degrees. ... In music, the interval of a diminished second is an interval of a minor second, or diatonic semitone, diminished by a chromatic semitone. ... In music, a diminished third is the interval produced by flattening a minor third by a chromatic semitone. ... A major third is the larger of two commonly occurring musical intervals that span three diatonic scale degrees. ... This article is about the musical interval. ... A seventh chord is a chord or triad which has a note the seventh above the tonic in it. ... A major seventh is the larger of two commonly occurring musical intervals that span seven diatonic scale degrees. ... A neutral second is a musical interval half-way between a minor second and a major second. ... A neutral third is a musical interval between a minor third and a major third. ... A semitone (also known in the USA as a half step) is a musical interval. ... In music, the septimal minor third, also called the subminor third (by eg Helmholtz) is the musical interval exactly or approximately equal to a 7/6 ratio of frequencies. ... A seventh chord is a chord consisting of a triad plus a note forming an interval of a seventh above the chords root. ... A semitone (also known in the USA as a half step) is a musical interval. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
How was the tritone used? (0 words)
However, at least by the epoch of Perotin and his successors, while the tritone was typically classified in the 13th century as a "perfect discord" (along with m2 and M7), it nevertheless occurs, as do these intervals, quite frequently and prominently in practice.
Indeed, there are many 13th-century cadences where the tritone serves basically as a "counterfeit fourth or fifth," and Boen suggests that similar progressions may sometimes have occurred in the 14th century as well.
In a medieval context, where fifths and fourths are the most complex stable intervals, the tritone is unique among the usual intervals in neither being itself stable, nor in being to resolve to any stable interval by conjunct contrary motion: compare 2-4, 3-1 or 3-5, 6-8 or 6-4, and 7-5.
Neptune's Moon Triton (1455 words)
Triton is the only large satellite in the solar system to circle a planet in a retrograde direction -- in a direction opposite to the rotation of the planet.
Triton appears to be roughly 10% darker than in images taken by the Voyager 2 spacecraft.
With Triton's long seasons, the southern summer has been progressing, and the south pole has received increasing sunlight; thus, it is probable that much of the frost covering the region in 1989 has evaporated, some of which may have condensed at the equator (hence the bright region there).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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