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Encyclopedia > Triptolemus
Greek deities
series
Primordial deities
Titans and Olympians
Aquatic deities
Personified concepts
Other deities
Chthonic deities
Hades and Persephone,
Gaia, Demeter, Hecate,
Iacchus, Trophonius,
Triptolemus, Erinyes
Heroes and the Dead

Triptolemus ("threefold warrior"; also Buzyges), in Greek mythology always connected with Demeter of the Eleusinian Mysteries, might be accounted the son of King Celeus of Eleusis in Attica, or, according to Apollodorus (Library I.v.2), the son of Gaia and Okeanos—another way of saying he was "primordial man". // Greek mythology consists in part in a large collection of narratives that explain the origins of the world and detail the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek Τιτάν, plural Τιτάνες) were a race of powerful deities that ruled during the legendary Golden Age. ... The twelve gods of Olympus. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... MuSE is an acronym that stands for Multiple Streaming Engine. ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... In mythology chthonic (from Greek χθονιος-pertaining to the earth; earthy) designates, or pertains to, gods or spirits of the underworld, especially in Greek mythology. ... ... Persephone, the Maiden: the late Archaic Kore of Antenor from the Acropolis, Athens In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, PersephónÄ“) was the queen of the Underworld, the Kore or young maiden, and the daughter of Demeter. ... Gaia (pronounced //[citation needed], sometimes also // or //) (land or earth, from the Greek ; variant spelling Gaea—see also Ge from ) is a Greek goddess personifying the Earth. ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter; for other uses, see Demeter (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hecate (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Iacchus is an uncertain person. ... Trophonius (the Latinate spelling) or Trophonios (in the transliterated Greek spelling) was a Greek hero or daimon or god - it was never certain which one - with a rich mythological tradition and an oracular cult at Lebadaea in Boeotia. ... In Greek mythology the Erinyes or Eumenides (the Romans called them the Furies) were female personifications of vengeance. ... Heroine, the feminine of hero, should not be confused with heroin, the drug. ... // Greek mythology consists in part in a large collection of narratives that explain the origins of the world and detail the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines. ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter; for other uses, see Demeter (disambiguation). ... The Eleusinian Mysteries were annual initiation ceremonies for the cult of Demeter and Persephone based at Eleusis in ancient Greece. ... Celeus was a king in Greek mythology. ... Eleusis (Game) The cardgame invented by Robert Abbott in 1962, and later popularized in 1977 by Martin Gardner in his Mathematical Games column in Scientific American magazine. ... This article is about Attica in Greece. ... Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... Gaia, also spelled as Gaya, Gæa, Gaea, Gaïa, or Ge, can refer to any one of the following. ... Oceanus or Okeanos refers to the ocean, which the Greeks and Romans regarded as a river circling the world. ...


While Demeter was searching for her daughter, having taken the form of an old woman called Doso, she received a hospitable welcome from Celeus. He asked her to nurse Demophon—"killer of men", a counterpart to Triptolemus— and Triptolemus, his sons by Metanira. As a gift to Celeus, because of his hospitality, Demeter planned to make Demophon immortal by burning away his mortal spirit in the family hearth every night. She was unable to complete the ritual because Metanira walked in on her one night. Instead, Demeter chose to teach Triptolemus the art of agriculture and, from him, the rest of Greece learned to plant and reap crops. He flew across the land on a winged chariot while Demeter and Persephone cared for him, and helped him complete his mission of educating the whole of Greece in the art of agriculture. This article is about the grain goddess Demeter; for other uses, see Demeter (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Doso was an alias of Demeter. ... In Greek mythology, Demophon referred to two different kings: one of Eleusis and the other, Athens Demophon was a son of King Celeus and Queen Metanira. ... In Greek mythology, Metanira was a Queen of Eleusis and wife of Celeus. ... Persephone, the Maiden: the late Archaic Kore of Antenor from the Acropolis, Athens In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, PersephónÄ“) was the queen of the Underworld, the Kore or young maiden, and the daughter of Demeter. ...


When Triptolemus taught Lyncus, King of the Scythians, the arts of agriculture, Lyncus refused to teach it to his people and then tried to kill Triptolemus. Demeter turned him into a lynx. Triptolemus was equally associated with the bestowal of hope for the afterlife associated with the expansion of the Eleusinian Mysteries (Kerenyi 1967 p 123). In Greek mythology, King Lyncus (lynx) of the Scythians was taught the arts of agriculture by Triptolemus but he refused to teach it to his people and then tried to kill Triptolemus. ... Scythian warriors, drawn after figures on an electrum cup from the KulOba kurgan burial near Kerch. ... The range of the lynx. ...

Enlarge
Triptolemus standing between Demeter and Kore, relief from the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

In the archaic Homeric Hymn to Demeter, Triptolemus was briefly mentioned one of the original priests of Demeter, one of the first men to learn the secret rites and mysteries of Eleusinian Mysteries: Diocles, Eumolpos, Celeus and Polyxeinus were the others mentioned of the first priests. The role of Triptolemus in the Eleusinian mysteries was exactly defined: "he had a cult of his own, apart from the Mysteries. One entered his temple on the way to the closed-off sacred precinct, before coming to the former Hekataion, the temple of Artemis outside the great Propylaia." (Kerenyi). In the 5th-century bas-relief in the National Museum, Athens, which probably came from his temple, the boy Triptolemus stands between the Two Goddesses Demeter and the Kore, and receives from Demeter the ear of grain (of gold, now lost). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1653, 508 KB) Summary Relief votif en marbre pentélique trouvé à Éleusis, dédié au sanctuaire de Déméter et de Korè. Il représente les deux déesses éleusiniennes dans une scène du rituel des mystères. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1653, 508 KB) Summary Relief votif en marbre pentélique trouvé à Éleusis, dédié au sanctuaire de Déméter et de Korè. Il représente les deux déesses éleusiniennes dans une scène du rituel des mystères. ... Façade of the National Archaeological museum of Athens The so-called mask of Agamemnon, one of the best known pieces shown in the museum Jockey of Artemision The National Archaeological museum of Athens houses some of the most important artifacts from a variety of archaeological locations around Greece. ... The Homère Caetani bust at the Louvre, a 2nd century Roman copy of a 2nd century BC Greek original. ... The Eleusinian Mysteries were annual initiation ceremonies for the cult of Demeter and Persephone based at Eleusis in ancient Greece. ... In Greek mythology, Diocles, or Díoklês was one of the first priests of Demeter and one of the first to learn the secrets of the Eleusinian Mysteries. ... In Greek mythology, Eumolpus was the son of Poseidon and Chione (or Hermes and Aglaulus). ... Celeus was a king in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Polyxeinus was one of the first priests of Demeter and one of the first to learn the secrets of the Eleusinian Mysteries. ... The Artemis of Versailles, a Roman copy of a Hellenistic marble sculpture, now at the Louvre Museum. ... Persephone, the Maiden: the late Archaic Kore of Antenor from the Acropolis, Athens In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, PersephónÄ“) was the queen of the Underworld, the Kore or young maiden, and the daughter of Demeter. ...


Porphyry (On Abstinence IV.22) ascribes to Triptolemus three commandments for a simple, pious life: "Honor your parents", "Honor the gods with fruits"—for the Greeks "fruits" would include the grain— and "Spare the animals" (Kerenyi, p128). Porphyry (c. ...


Triptolemus is also depicted as a young man with a branch or diadem placed in his hair, usually sitting on his winged chariot, adorned with serpents. His attributes include a plate of grain, a pair of wheat or barley ears and a scepter. Serpent is a word of Latin origin (serpens, serpentis) that is normally substituted for snake in a specifically mythic or religious context, in order to distinguish such creatures from the field of biology. ...


Celeus or the peasant Dysaules may be substituted for Triptolemus as the primordial Eleusinian recipient of the first gifts of the Mysteries.


Reference

  • Kerenyi, Karl, 1967. "Eleusis: Aretypal Image of Mother and Daughter (Princeton:Bollingen Series LXV.4)

One of the founders of modern studies in Greek mythology, Karl (Carl, Károly) Kerényi (January 19, 1897 - April 14, 1973) was born in Hungary but became a citizen of Switzerland in 1943. ...

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Triptolemus

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Triptolemus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (531 words)
Triptolemus ("threefold warrior"; also Buzyges), in Greek mythology always connected with Demeter of the Eleusinian Mysteries, might be accounted the son of King Celeus of Eleusis in Attica, or, according to Apollodorus (Library I.v.2), the son of Gaia and Okeanos—another way of saying he was "primordial man".
Triptolemus was equally associated with the bestowal of hope for the afterlife associated with the expansion of the Eleusinian Mysteries (Kerenyi 1967 p 123).
Triptolemus is also depicted as a young man with a branch or diadem placed in his hair, usually sitting on his winged chariot, adorned with serpents.
Triptolemus - definition of Triptolemus in Encyclopedia (290 words)
Triptolemus was a character in Greek mythology, a son of King Celeus of Eleusis.
In the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, Triptolemus was one of the original priests of Demeter, one of the first people to learn the secret rites and mysteries of her cult.
Triptolemus is depicted as a young man with a branch or diadem placed in his hair, usually sitting on his winged chariot, adorned with snakes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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