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Encyclopedia > Tripoli, Lebanon

Coordinates: 34°26′N, 35°51′E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Tripoli
طرابلس
A residential district in eastern Tripoli
Coordinates: 34°26′N, 35°51′E
Time zone +2 (UTC)
 - Summer (DST) +3 (UTC)
Website: Tripoli-Lebanon.com
This page refers to Tripoli, the city in Lebanon. For the Libyan capital city of the same name, see Tripoli. For other uses, see Tripoli (disambiguation).

Tripoli (Lebanese Arabic: طرابلس Ṭrāblos or Ṭrēblos, locally Ṭrōbles, Standard Arabic (transliterated): Ṭarābulus; Greek: Τρίπολις, Tripolis) is the second-largest city in Lebanon, located north of Batroun and Cape Lithoprosopon. Tripoli is the capital of the North Governorate and a qada of the same name. The city is located 85 km north of the capital Beirut and can be described as the Eastern-most port of Lebanon. Tripoli is home to the Lebanese Red Cross first aid, medical & social, and youth center as well as mobile clinics.[1] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 643 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) en: Tripoli, Lebanon - a view of eastern part of the city at a hillslope climbing east fron the Nahr Abu Ali river sl... Map of Lebanon from de wiki/CIA World Factbook. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... ... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... ... Tripoli (Arabic: طرابلس Tarābulus) is the capital city of Libya. ... Tripoli is: The capital of Libya, see Tripoli A city in Lebanon, see Tripoli, Lebanon A medieval Crusader State, centred on Tripoli, Lebanon, see County of Tripoli A city in Arcadia, Greece, see Tripoli, Greece A city in Iowa, USA see Tripoli, Iowa A polishing compund used in the jewellery... Lebanese or Lebanese Arabic is the colloquial form of Arabic spoken in Lebanon. ... Modern Standard Arabic is the dialect of Arabic used in almost all writing and in formal spoken contexts. ... Transliteration is the practice of transcribing a word or text written in one writing system into another writing system. ... The coastal city of Batroun (Arabic: البترون) located in northern Lebanon is one of the oldest cities of the world. ... Lithoprosopon, also known today by the name of Râs ach-Chaq’a’ is a cape in north Lebanon, situated between the ancient cities of Batroun and Tripoli. ... North Governorate North Governorate (Arabic: الشمال; transliterated: ash-Shamal) is one of the governorates of Lebanon. ... KAZA (Channel 54) is a Azteca America television station affiliate in the Los Angeles area. ... For other uses, see Beirut (disambiguation). ... The Anarchist Black Cross was originally called the Anarchist Red Cross. The band Redd Kross was originally called Red Cross. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...



In ancient times, this was the center of a Phoenician confederation which included Tyre, Sidon and Arados, hence the name Tripoli, from the Greek meaning "triple city". Later, it was controlled successively by the Assyrians, Persians, Romans, Arabs, Crusaders, Mamelukes, and Ottomans. The Crusaders established the County of Tripoli there in the twelfth century. Phoenician sarcophagus found in Cadiz, Spain; now in Archaeological Museum of Cádiz. ... The Triumphal Arch Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... , Sidon or Saida, (Arabic صيدا á¹¢aydā) is the third-largest city in Lebanon. ... Harbor in Arwad Arwad viewed from the air Arwad – formerly Arado (Greek: Άραδο), Arados (Greek: Άραδος), Arvad, Arpad, Arphad, Antiochia in Pieria (Greek: Αντιόχεια της Πιερίας), Latin: Aradus, and also transliterated from the Arabic as Ar-Ruad – located in the Mediterranean Sea, is the only island in Syria. ... It has been suggested that Assyrian people be merged into this article or section. ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire. ... Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predomiantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Maronite, Alawite Islam, Druze, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism An Arab (Arabic: ) is any member of the Semitic group of people whose cultural, linguistic, and in certain cases, ancestral origins trace back to... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–22 Mehmed VI... Armenian Cilicia and Crusader States The County of Tripoli was the last of the four major Crusader states in the Levant to be created. ...


Today it is the second-largest city and second-largest port, in Lebanon, with approximately 500,000 inhabitants,[2] mainly Sunnis.[3] The city borders the city of El Mina which is the port outlet of Tripoli district. The two cities are geographically conjoined to form the Greater Tripoli. Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Seaport, a painting by Claude Lorrain, 1638 The Port of Wellington at night. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... El-Mina (الميناء) is an ancient city situated at the seashore of North Lebanon. ...

Contents

Names and etymology

Tripoli
Tripoli

Tripoli had a number of different names as far back as the Phoenician age. In the Amarna letters the name "Derbly" was mentioned, and in other places "Ahlia" or "Wahlia" are mentioned (14th century BC).[4] In an engraving concerning the invasion of Tripoli by the Assyrian King Ashurnasirpal II (888-859 BC), it is called Mahallata or Mahlata, Mayza, and Kayza.[5] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1228x829, 398 KB) Summary Photo taken by Saul Kaiserman with a SONY CLIE in Spring 2004. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1228x829, 398 KB) Summary Photo taken by Saul Kaiserman with a SONY CLIE in Spring 2004. ... EA 161, letter by Aziru, leader of Amurru, (stating his case to pharaoh), one of the Amarna letters in cuneiform writing on a clay tablet. ... An Assyrian winged bull, or lemmasu. ... Ashurnasirpal II, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California Ashurnasirpal II was king of Assyria from 884 BC-859 BC. Ashurnasirpal succeeded his father, Tukulti-Ninurta II, in 884 BC. He conquered Mesopotamia and the territory of what is now the Lebanon, adding them to the growing Assyrian empire. ...


Under the Phoenicians, the name Athar was used to refer to Tripoli.[6] When the Greeks settled in the city they called it "Tripoli", meaning "three cities".[7] The Arabs called it a variety of names, including the Princedom of Tripoli, the State of Tripoli, and the Eastern Tripoli Kingdom. In addition, the names Tarabulus, or Atrabulus, and Tarablus al-Sham, were also used. The Crusaders settled in Tripoli for about 180 years and made it the capital of the County of Tripoli. The city was also simply named "Triple". Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predomiantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Maronite, Alawite Islam, Druze, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism An Arab (Arabic: ) is any member of the Semitic group of people whose cultural, linguistic, and in certain cases, ancestral origins trace back to... Armenian Cilicia and Crusader States The County of Tripoli was the last of the four major Crusader states in the Levant to be created. ...


Today, Tripoli is also known as Al-Fayha'a, derived from the Arabic verb Faha which is used to indicate the spread of a certain smell. Tripoli was best known with its vast orange orchards. During the season of blooming, the pollen of orange flowers gets carried by the air spreading a splendid odour that can be felt anywhere in the city and its suburbs, hence the name al-Fayha'a.[8] Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ...


History

There is evidence of an early settlement in Tripoli that dates back as early as 1400 BC. In the 9th century BC, the Phoenicians established a trading station in Tripoli and later, under Persian rule, the city became the center of a confederation of the Phoenician city states of Sidon, Tyre, and Arados Island. under Hellenistic rule, Tripoli was used as a naval shipyard and the city enjoyed a period of autonomy at the end of this period. It came under the Roman rule around 64 BC. In 551 AD, an earthquake and tidal wave destroyed the Byzantine city of Tripoli along with other Mediterranean coastal cities. The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... , Sidon or Saida, (Arabic صيدا Ṣaydā) is the third-largest city in Lebanon. ... The Triumphal Arch Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... Harbor in Arwad Arwad viewed from the air Arwad – formerly Arado (Greek: Άραδο), Arados (Greek: Άραδος), Arvad, Arpad, Arphad, Antiochia in Pieria (Greek: Αντιόχεια της Πιερίας), Latin: Aradus, and also transliterated from the Arabic as Ar-Ruad – located in the Mediterranean Sea, is the only island in Syria. ... The term Hellenistic (established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen) in the history of the ancient world is used to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire. ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ...


During Umayyad rule, Tripoli became a commercial and shipbuilding center. It achieved semi-independence under Fatimid rule, when it developed into a center of learning. The Crusaders laid siege to the city at the beginning of the 12th century and where able to finally enter it in 1109. This caused extensive destruction and the burning of Tripoli's famous library, Dar al-Ilm (House of Knowledge), with its thousands of volumes. During the Crusaders' rule the city became the capital of the "Country of Tripoli". In 1289, it fell to the Mamluks and the old port part of the city was destroyed. A new inland city was then built near the old castle. During the Ottoman rule from 1516 to 1918, it retained its prosperity and commercial importance. Tripoli and all of Lebanon was placed under French mandate from 1920 until 1943 when Lebanon achieved independence. The Courtyard of the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, one of the grandest architectural legacies of the Umayyads. ... The Fatimids, Fatimid Caliphate or al-FātimiyyÅ«n (Arabic الفاطميون) is the Shia dynasty that ruled over varying areas of the Maghreb, Egypt, and the Levant from 5 January 910 to 1171. ... The Crusaders (formerly the Canterbury Crusaders) are a New Zealand Rugby Union team based in Christchurch, New Zealand that competes in the Super 14 (formerly the Super 12). ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–22 Mehmed VI...


See also

Krak des Chevaliers Gothic cloister by the fortress yard Krak des Chevaliers (also Crac des Chevaliers, fortress of the knights in a mixture of Arabic and French) was the headquarters of the Knights Hospitaller in Syria during the Crusades. ... Raymond IV of Toulouse (c. ... The Siege of Tripoli lasted from 1102 until July 12, 1109. ... Armenian Cilicia and Crusader States The County of Tripoli was the last of the four major Crusader states in the Levant to be created. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.dm.net.lb/redcross/our_centers.html
  2. ^ TRIPOLI
  3. ^ Syria/Lebanon By Wolfgang Gockel, Helga Bruns. p 190.
  4. ^ Les Peuples Et Les Civilisations Du Proche Orient by Jawād Būlus. p. 308.
  5. ^ Wanderings -2: History of the Jews by Chaim Potok. P. 169.
  6. ^ History of Syria, Including Lebanon and Palestine By Philip Khuri Hitti. p. 225.
  7. ^ Lebanon in Pictures By Peter Roop, Sam Schultz, Margaret J. Goldstein. p. 17.
  8. ^ Names of Tripoli through the history

Philip Khuri Hitti was a western scholar of Islam. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Tripoli, Lebanon
  • www.tripoli-city.org Tripoli's most prominent history scholar moderates this site
  • Tripoli-Lebanon.com
  • Tripoli Culture and Events
  • Tripoli History
  • Actuplebanon.com : pictures of Tripoli, Beirut, Lebanon

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tripoli (Lebanon) - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Tripoli (Lebanon) (199 words)
The second largest city in Lebanon, after Beirut, Tripoli is the terminus of the pipeline from Iraq, the site of Lebanon's second airport, and a centre of trade for north Lebanon and northwest Syria.
and was the capital of Tripolis, a Phoenician federation of three cities (Sidon, Tyre, and Aradus).
It was taken by the Crusaders in 1109 after a five-year siege, retaken by the Mamelukes in 1289 and destroyed in the process.
Tripoli, Lebanon (898 words)
Tripoli is the largest city, the principal sea port, and the largest commercial and manufacturing centre in Libya.
Tripoli, a large modern seaport, is located in the northwest of Libya on the Mediterranean coast.
From the Phoenicians Tripoli passed into the hands of the rulers of Cyrenaica (Barca), from whom it was wrested by the Carthaginians.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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