FACTOID # 5: Minnesota and Connecticut are both in the top 5 in saving money and total tax burden per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Trinity College (Connecticut)

Trinity College

Established 1823
Type Private
Endowment $380,409,784
President James F. Jones, Jr.
Dean Rena Fraden
Faculty 187
Students 2188
Location Hartford, Connecticut, United States
Campus Urban
Colors Blue & Gold
Mascot Bantam
Website http://www.trincoll.edu

Trinity College is a private liberal arts college in Hartford, Connecticut. Founded in 1823, it is the second oldest college in the state of Connecticut after Yale University. It was ranked in the top 30 liberal arts colleges in the US News and World Report 2007 rankings. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... When used by itself in a sentence, the term Hartford can refer to one of several places in the United States. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The Blue & Gold The Blue & Gold is the school newspaper of the Taipei American School. ... A mascot, originally a fetish-like term for any person, animal, or thing supposed to bring luck, is now something—typically an animal or human character—used to represent a group with a common public identity, such as a school, professional sports team (the name often corresponds with the mascot... Binomial name Gallus gallus (Linnaeus, 1758) Bantam is the name given to any small fowl but most commonly small types of chickens. ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, images, videos and other digital assets and hosted on a particular domain or subdomain on the World Wide Web. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

Contents

Campus

The first buildings completed on the current campus, were Seabury and Jarvis halls in 1878. Together with Northam Towers, these make up what is known as the "Long Walk". These buildings are the earliest examples of Collegiate Gothic architecture in the United States, built to plans drawn up by William Burges, with F.H.Kimball as supervising architect. William Burges William Burges (1827-1881) was an English architect and designer with influences which continue today. ...


Trinity's other landmark is its distinctive chapel. The Trinity College Chapel, referred to by Trinity students simply as "the Chapel," was built in the 1930's to replace Trinity's original chapel, located in Seabury Hall (now a lecture hall). The Chapel's facade is made almost entirely of limestone and it seamlessly blends into the adjacent Downes Memorial Clock Tower. The Chapel, due to its location on Trinity's Gallows Hill, is the highest (but not tallest) building in the city of Hartford. Its architects, Frohman Robb and Little, were also responsible for the National Cathedral in Washington, DC, and the two buildings share a resemblance.

Trinity College at Hartford, Connecticut
Trinity College at Hartford, Connecticut

Another distinctive feature of Trinity's campus is its central green known as the Main Quad, which is bound on the west by the Long Walk, on the east by the Lower Long Walk, on the north by the Chapel, and on the south by various dormitories. While a central green is a feature of many college campuses, Trinity's is notable for its unusually large size, running the entire length of the Long Walk and with no paved or unpaved walkways traversing it. This makes the Quad ideal for outside study and leisure. Steep hills on its north-eastern edge also make the Quad ideal for sledding in the winter months. Trees on the Quad have been planted in a 'T' configuration (for Trinity) with the letter's base located at the statue of Bishop Brownell and its top running the length of the Long Walk. Tradition holds that the trees were intended to distinguish Trinity's campus from Yale's. Also located on the Quad are two cannons used on the USS Hartford, flagship of Admiral David Farragut during the civil war. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1083 KB)Trinity College at Hartford, Connecticut File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1083 KB)Trinity College at Hartford, Connecticut File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


The whole of Trinity's campus is set out on a 100-acre parcel of land that is bound on the south by New Britain Avenue, on the west by Summit Street, on the east by Broad Street, and on the north by Allen Place. Trinity's former northern border, Vernon Street, has been transferred from the city of Hartford to Trinity College and closed off at one end (Broad Street), creating a cul-de-sac within Trinity's borders. Each border street has a distinct character: Summit Street, cut off from the city by a 60-foot rock ledge and a park, almost has the feel of a country road; Allen Place is purely residential; New Britain Avenue is a typical inner-city street with shops and apartments. Broad Street, formerly a rundown haven for prostitutes and gangs, has been revitalized in recent years with the creation of the Learning Corridor. Completed in 2001, and located on what was formerly an abandoned bus depot adjacent to Trinity's campus, the Learning Corridor is a collection of K-12 public magnet schools co-created by Trinity and the governments of Hartford and Connecticut.


Trinity's campus is notable for having no through-streets running through it. The only exception until its recent closure was Vernon Street, at the north end of the campus. Since the street was transferred to the school from the city Trinity has done much to reinvigorate a street that was once fairly run-down. It has been widened and repaved, light posts have been installed about every ten feet (inviting the student-bestowed nickname "Runway V") as well as granite crosswalks, curbs, benches, and fenceposts. Vernon Street is also considered to be the social heart of campus, it is the location of most of the campus cultural houses and Greek organizations, as well as the new Vernon Social Center.


Important buildings on campus

  • Mather Hall – located just south of Hamlin Hall (the southern terminus of the long walk), Mather Hall is the main student center of Trinity College. The building contains the main dining hall as well as “The Cave” dining hall, a post office and student mail boxes, a coffee house, as well as meeting rooms and a large auditorium.
  • Raether Library and Information Technology Center – Trinity's main library was originally built at the southeast corner of the main quad in the 1950's to replace the library in Williams Memorial. Additional wings were constructed in the 1970's and again in 2002, at which time the building was given its present name. The latest renovations include a large atrium, grand reading room, three new computing centers, a media center, private study rooms, and a "Peter B's" cafe. The library's holdings crossed the one million volume mark in 2005.
The Trinity College Raether Library in a December snow storm
The Trinity College Raether Library in a December snow storm
  • Seabury Hall – This section of the Long Walk contains classrooms, professors offices, and four dance studios, and is scheduled for renovation to begin in May 2007.
Trinity College Life Science Center in the Summertime
Trinity College Life Science Center in the Summertime
  • Jarvis Hall – This section of the Long Walk contains single, double and quad dorms, primarily for freshmen and sophomores. It is rumored that the doubles were originally designed for students while the singles across the hallway were intended for their servants. In actuality, the single rooms were single bedrooms, which opened into living areas, which are currently the doubles and the hallway, and six rooms retain this layout. Jarvis Hall is scheduled for a 13-month renovation beginning May 2007, immediately following graduation, which will return the structure to a layout more like how it was originally built.
  • Northam Towers – This tower, with its distinctive archway, connects Jarvis and Seabury Halls. It contains upperclassman housing.
  • Austin Arts Center – The AAC was designed in the 1960’s it may be rebuilt in coming years to meet current needs.
  • Albert C. Jacobs Life Sciences Center – Built in 1967 in the architectural style of Brutalism, LSC was designed to be an abstract representation of the Long Walk. The building is slated for demolition and replacement by a state-of-the-art facility in the next decade.
  • Math, Computing, and Engineering Center – MCEC is located on the Life Sciences Quad (named for the Life Sciences Center, which dominates the quad) it is made of brick and sandstone. It housed the computing center until it was moved to the renovated library.
William Burges's original plan for the campus of Trinity College
William Burges's original plan for the campus of Trinity College

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2448x1632, 818 KB) Summary Author: Reid Offringa The Trinity College Library during a snow in December of 2003 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2448x1632, 818 KB) Summary Author: Reid Offringa The Trinity College Library during a snow in December of 2003 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1632x2448, 1170 KB) Summary July of 2004 Life Science Center of Trinity College in Hartford, CT Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Trinity College (Connecticut) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1632x2448, 1170 KB) Summary July of 2004 Life Science Center of Trinity College in Hartford, CT Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Trinity College (Connecticut) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Brutalism is an architectural style that spawned from the Modernist architectural movement and which flourished from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... Image File history File links Burgesplan. ... Image File history File links Burgesplan. ... William Burges William Burges (1827-1881) was an English architect and designer with influences which continue today. ...

Trinity College and Hartford

Location in urban Hartford affords Trinity advantages over other liberal arts colleges, which typically are located either in rural or suburban environments. Also, Hartford’s status as state capital of Connecticut (the capitol itself is within walking distance of campus) provides students with many opportunities for internships and special learning opportunities. Downtown Hartford is also in the process of revitalizing. With a new entertainment district and the Connecticut Convention Center nearing completion, downtown is slowly becoming popular again with Trinity students. A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ...


Trinity and the community

Along with Trinity, the Learning Corridor, Hartford Hospital, and the The Institute of Living make up the Southside Institutions Neighborhood Alliance, or SINA. SINA has been instrumental in creating affordable housing in Hartford’s Frog Hollow and Barry Square neighborhoods as well as in the creation of the Learning Corridor and the Trinity College Boys and Girls Club, the only Boys and Girls Club located on and run by a college or university. Hartford Hospital was formed in 1854 after the State of Connecticut granted a charter for the Formation of Hartford Hospital following a boiler explosion and resulting fire at the Fales and Grey Car Works resulting in 21 deaths and 50 people seriously injured. ... The Institute of Living (IOL) is a mental health center in Hartford, Connecticut affiliated with Hartford Hospital. ... ...


Trinity students are actively involved in the community through outreach programs and community service projects. Many students work or volunteer at the Boys and Girls Club or at one of the Montessori Schools of the Learning Corridor. Trinity has made an effort, especially since the inauguration of current president James F. Jones, Jr., to include the community in its own internal improvements. The two most visible examples of this are the availability of Trinity’s library, computer resources and the new Community Sports Complex to Hartford residents. The new sports complex will function both as a rink for Trinity’s ice hockey teams and as a public skating rink. Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ...


Academics at Trinity College

Selectivity

Trinity College is ranked as one of the nation's top liberal arts colleges, with US News and World Report ranking the school in its top 30. Recently the Wall Street Journal ranked Trinity as the 43rd highest "feeder school" for the top graduate school programs. Data compiled by the National Science Foundation lists Trinity as a liberal arts college that educates disproportionately high numbers of future scientists. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ...


Trinity College is a highly selective and respected institution, which attracts students from all over the world with its reputation. Further, Trinity has established partnerships with premier academic institutions worldwide, along with global sites on every inhabited continent.


Areas of study

Trinity College currently offers the following majors:


American studies or American civilization is an interdisciplinary field dealing with the study of the United States. ... Anthropology is the study of the anatomical and mental composition of humanity through the examination of historical and present geographical distribution, cultural history, acculturation, cultural relationships, and racial classifications. ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Chemistry - the study of atoms, made of nuclei (center particles) and electrons (outer particles), and the structures they form. ... Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes and transformations in living organisms. ... Classics, particularly within the Western University tradition, when used as a singular noun, means the study of the language, literature, history, art, and other aspects of Greek and Roman culture during the time frame known as classical antiquity. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A kindergarten classroom in Afghanistan. ... Engineering is the design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology, syntax, morphology, semantics... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... History studies the past in human terms. ... International relations (IR) is an academic and public policy field, a branch of political science, dealing with the foreign policy of states within the international system, including the roles of international organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... Jewish studies also known as Judaic studies is a subject area of study available at many colleges and universities in the Western World. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... Allegory of Music on the Opéra Garnier Music is an art form that involves organised sounds and silence. ... Drawing of the cells in the chicken cerebellum by S. Ramón y Cajal Neuroscience is a field that is devoted to the scientific study of the nervous system. ... This article is 58 kilobytes or more in size. ... Physics (Greek: (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the fundamental laws of the universe and their precise formulation in a mathematical framework. ... Political science is the field of the social sciences concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behavior. ... Psychology is an academic or applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes such as perception, cognition, emotion, personality, behavior, and interpersonal relationships. ... Public policy is a course of action or inaction chosen by public authorities to address a problem. ... Lady Justice is a personification of the law. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Image of a woman on the Pioneer plaque sent to outer space. ... Gender often refers to the distinctions between males and females in common usage. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Contributions to the Arts

A student run film festival, known for the stalwart efforts of its creators.
A student run film festival, known for the stalwart efforts of its creators.

Cinestudio is one of the premier art cinemas in Connecticut, known for its diverse selection, 1930's-style design, and frequent rotation of the film schedule. A recent article in the Hartford Advocate described this non-profit organization, which depends solely on grants and the efforts of volunteer workers who are paid in free movies. Cinestudio has been located in the Clement Chemistry Building since it was founded in the 1970's, and was one of the few theaters to play A Clockwork Orange when it first came out. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (660x636, 67 KB) Summary Title: The Eyeball: A Film Festival in Hartford, CT on April 20th Author: Reid Offringa Source: Eyeball Myspace page Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (660x636, 67 KB) Summary Title: The Eyeball: A Film Festival in Hartford, CT on April 20th Author: Reid Offringa Source: Eyeball Myspace page Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Cinestudio is host to the annual Eyeball Film Festival, in which young film makers premier their latest works in front of their peers. The festival has judges, each schooled in film from a different perspective, who judge the student's films.


History of Trinity College

Early history

Trinity was founded in the spring of 1823 as Washington College, in downtown Hartford, receiving its current name in 1845. Because of the social dominance of rival Congregationalists in Connecticut and because Trinity's founder and first president, the Rt. Rev. Thomas Brownell, was an Episcopal bishop, the college had some early difficulties obtaining its charter from the state. A condition imposed by the charter was that, despite its Episcopal roots, the college must prohibit any imposition of religious standards on students, faculty members, or other members of the college. A year after opening, Trinity moved to its first campus, which consisted of two Greek Revival-style buildings, one housing a chapel, library, and lecture rooms and the other a dormitory. Within a few years the student body grew to nearly one hundred, a size that was rarely exceeded until the 20th century. Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επίσκοπος, transliterated epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... This article is about a title or office in religious bodies. ...


A new campus

In 1872 Trinity College was persuaded (the degree of free will at work in the college’s move is disputed) by the State of Connecticut to move from its downtown “College Hill” location (now Capitol Hill, the site of the state capitol building) to its current 100-acre campus a mile to the southwest. However, although the college sold its land overlooking the Park River and Bushnell Park in 1872, it did not complete its move to its Gallows Hill campus until 1878. Trinity’s first plan for the Gallows Hill site proved to be too ambitious (and too expensive) to be completely built. Only one section of the proposed campus plan, the Long Walk, was ever completed. Park River refers to several different things. ... The Pond at Bushnell Park in Hartford, Connecticut. ...


Trinity in the twentieth century

Trinity ended the nineteenth century as an institution primarily serving the Hartford area. The founding of the University of Hartford in 1877, however, allowed Trinity to focus on becoming a regional institution rather than a local one. The early years of the century were primarily growth years for Trinity. Enrollment was increased to 500 men and in 1932 under President Ramsen Ogilby the impressive gothic chapel which is the symbol of Trinity College was completed. The chapel replaced the Seabury chapel which had become too small for the student body. The late 1960’s were a time of great change for Trinity as well. In 1968 the trustees of Trinity College voted to make a commitment to enroll (with financial aid as needed) a much larger number of minority students. It is interesting to note that this decision was preceded by a siege of the administrative offices in the Downes and Williams Memorial buildings during which Trinity students would not allow the president or trustees to leave until they agreed to the aforementioned resolution. Less than one year later, in order to keep pace with sister institutions, Trinity became co-educational and admitted its first female students, as transfers from Vassar College. Today, women make up about 51 percent of Trinity's student body. The University of Hartford, often called UHA or UHart, was founded in 1877, and is a private, independent, and nonsectarian coeducational university located in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, highly selective liberal arts college situated in Poughkeepsie, New York. ...


Trinity College presidents

  • James F. Jones, Jr. 2004 -
  • Borden W. Painter, Jr. '58, H'95 2003 – 2004
  • Richard H. Hersh 2002 – 2003
  • Ronald R. Thomas H'02, Acting President 2001 – 2002
  • Evan S. Dobelle H'01 1995 – 2001
  • Borden W. Painter, Jr. '58, H'95, Acting President 1994 – 1995
  • Tom Gerety 1989 – 1994
  • James Fairfield English, Jr., '48 1981 – 1989
  • Theodore Davidge Lockwood '48 1968 – 1981
  • Albert Charles Jacobs H'68 1953 – 1968
  • Arthur Howard Hughes, Acting President 1951 - 1953
  • George Keith Funston '32 1945 – 1951
  • Arthur Howard Hughes M'38, H'46, Acting President 1943 – 1945
  • Remsen Brinckerhoff Ogilby 1920 – 1943
  • Henry Augustus Perkins, Acting President 1915 – 1916 (brother of Emily Pitkin Perkins Baldwin)
  • Flavel Sweeten Luther '70 1919 – 1920
  • George Williamson Smith H'87 1904 - 1919
  • Thomas Ruggles Pynchon '41 1883 - 1904
  • John Brocklesby, Acting President 1874 1874 - 1883
  • Abner Jackson '37 1867 - 1874
  • John Brocklesby, Acting President 1866 - 1867
  • John Barrett Kerfoot H'65 1864 - 1866
  • John Brocklesby H'45, Acting President 1864
  • Samuel Eliot H'57 1861 - 1864
  • John Brocklesby, Acting President 1860 - 1861
  • Daniel Raynes Goodwin 1853 - 1860
  • John Williams '35 1848 - 1853
  • Silas Totten 1837 - 1848
  • Nathaniel Sheldon Wheaton 1831 - 1837
  • Thomas Church Brownell 1824 - 1831

James F. Jones is the 21st president of Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. ... Evan Samuel Dobelle (born April 22, 1945) is an educator and politician. ... Emily Pitkin (Perkins) Baldwin was the wife of Connecticut Governor & US Sentaor Roger Sherman Baldwin. ...

Trivia

  • The first WebZine ever published was started at Trinity College in 1992, the Trinity Journal.
  • Trinity's president since 2004 has been James F. Jones Jr. formerly of Kalamazoo College in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Among his accomplishments during his first year was the ground-breaking for a new community/college ice hockey complex on New Britain Avenue.
  • Trinity was a men's college until 1969 when it became coeducational. The first female students at Trinity were transfer students from Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York.
  • Trinity has one of the finest electron microscopy facilities of any small college in the nation. Trinity was one of the first academic institutions in the US to establish an undergraduate Neuroscience Program, a program initiated in 1992. It also was one of the first to establish undergraduate research as a staple of its science curricula.
  • The college mascot is the Bantam.
  • Trinity is a member of the New England Small College Athletic Conference or NESCAC.
  • The Trinity Football team (1877-present) is one of the oldest college football teams in America, and until their 40-16 loss to Williams College on September 30th, 2006, held the longest active winning streak in NCAA Football at 31 games.
  • The Trinity Men's Squash Team have held the CSA Potter's Cup National Championship title for nine consecutive years (1999 - 2007).
  • The catalytic converter was invented at Trinity College.
  • The Trinity campus lies 17 miles from a straight line drawn between Yale and Harvard.
  • The male character Cassidy in the famous opening sequence of Jaws (film) was a caricature of the stereotypical Trinity student. The College received its greatest mass media plug in the scene where Cassidy says, "Na, Hartford, I go to Trinity. My folks live in Greenwich."
  • Although considered a stereotypical "preppy and privileged" New England college with a homogeneous student body, many of Trinity's top students in recent years have come from decidedly diverse backgrounds. In 2006, Trinity's Valedictorian was Dilian Kovachev, a Bulgarian national, while Salutatorian honors went to Jason Percy, a 28 year old father of two who balanced full-time work with full-time studies while at Trinity. In 2004 Valedictorian honors went to Nhon H. Trinh of Vietnam, and in 2005 Bozidar Marinkovic of Serbia and Montenegro and Assia Svinarova of Bulgaria were Valedictorian and Salutatorian, resepctively.
  • The anaerobic sealant Loctite was invented at Trinity College, by Vernon Krieble. [2]
  • Gallows Hill, now site of the Ogilby Hall dormitory on Vernon Street, was named for the loyalist executions that took place there during the American Revolution. The Gallows Hill Lounge, adjacent to McCook Academic Building, is named for this site.
  • Cinestudio, the only student-run, for-profit movie theater on a college campus, is located at Trinity College.
  • MyTunes was invented at Trinity by Bill Zeller [3]
  • In the 1800s, "Number Fifty" and "Number Forty-Nine" were Trinity College slang for privies, Jarvis Hall having forty-eight dormitory rooms.[1]
  • The Bistro (an a la carte dining facility) serves sandwiches named to honor past and present administrators.

The Trinity Journal is generally accepted to have been the first WebZine ever published. ... Kalamazoo College is a small, private liberal arts college located in Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States. ... Nickname: The Mall City Location of Kalamazoo within Kalamazoo County, Michigan Coordinates: Counties Kalamazoo County  - Mayor Hannah McKinney Area    - City 65. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, highly selective liberal arts college situated in Poughkeepsie, New York. ... Poughkeepsie City of Poughkeepsie Town of Poughkeepsie Poughkeepsie, Arkansas This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The electron microscope is a microscope that can magnify very small details with high resolving power due to the use of electrons rather than light to scatter off material, magnifying at levels up to 500,000 times. ... A mascot, originally a fetish-like term for any person, animal, or thing supposed to bring luck, is now something—typically an animal or human character—used to represent a group with a common public identity, such as a school, professional sports team (the name often corresponds with the mascot... Binomial name Gallus gallus (Linnaeus, 1758) Bantam is the name given to any small fowl but most commonly small types of chickens. ... The New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) is an athletic conference consisting of eleven highly selective liberal arts colleges located in New England and New York. ... The Bantam The football team of Trinity College in Connecticut, known as the Bantams, compete in the New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC), a league of small liberal arts colleges. ... Williams College is a private, coeducational, highly selective (18% admission rate in 2006) liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... Catalytic converter on a Saab 9-5. ... YALE (Yet Another Learning Environment) is an environment for machine learning experiments and data mining. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Jaws is a 1975 horror–thriller film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on Peter Benchleys best-selling novel of the same name, which was inspired in turn by the Jersey Shore Shark Attacks of 1916. ... Loctite is an adhesive used to prevent screws and bolts from coming unscrewed. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that... myTunes is a program that allows Windows users to download music from an iTunes music share over a network, circumventing restrictions in iTunes that only allow streaming music. ...

Notable Trinity College Graduates

Some of the most notable Trinity students and graduates include: The following is a list of people affiliated with Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. ...

Edward Albee, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1961 Edward Franklin Albee III (born March 12, 1928) is an American playwright known for works including Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Zoo Story, and The Sandbox. ... Charles McLean Andrews (1863–1943) was an American historian and professor. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Jonah James Bayliss (born August 13, 1980, in North Adams, Massachusetts) is a Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Laramie Project is a play written by Moisés Kaufman and members of the Tectonic Theater Project. ... Tucker Carlson, from a December 6, 2004 broadcast of CNNs Crossfire. ... >Tucker is a television program on MSNBC, hosted by Tucker Carlson. ... MSNBC, a combination of MSN and NBC, is a 24-hour cable news channel in the United States and Canada, and a news website. ... Thomas Matthew Tom Chappell (born 1943) is an American businessman and manufacturer and co-founder of Toms of Maine in 1970. ... Toms of Maine is a leading maker of natural personal care products, such as toothpaste, made without artificial or animal ingredients and without animal testing. ... Edward Miner Gallaudet (1837-1917), son of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, was a famous early educator of the deaf in Washington, DC. He founded the first college for the deaf in 1864 which later became Gallaudet University. ... Stephen Gyllenhaal (pronounced JILL-en-hall), born October 4, 1949 in Cleveland, Ohio, is an American film and television director and member of the Gyllenhaal family. ... Dr. Dean Hamer Dr Dean Hamer is a geneticist, who, as of 2005 is the director of the Gene Structure and Regulation Unit at the U.S. National Cancer Institute (part of the National Institutes of Health). ... The genetic factors influencing sexual orientation are controversial, and research in this area is ongoing. ... The God gene hypothesis states that some human beings bear a gene which gives them a prediposition to episodes interpreted by some as religious revelation. ... Barbara Kennelly Barbara Bailey Kennelly (born July 10, 1936) was a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from Connecticut. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Mary McCormack in The West Wing episode The Wedding Mary McCormack (born February 8, 1969 in Plainfield, New Jersey) is an American television and film actress. ... Thomas Joseph Meskill, a Representative from Connecticut, was born in New Britain, Hartford County, Conn. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... D. Holmes Morton is an American physician specializing in genetic disorders of Old Order Amish and Mennonite children. ... The Doctor by Samuel Luke Fildes This article is about the term physician, one type of doctor; for other uses of the word doctor see Doctor. ... The Albert Schweitzer Prize for Humanitarianism was established in 1986 by Albert Toepfer, an international grain merchant from Hamburg, Germany, to advance the cause of humanitarianism by recognizing exemplary contributions to humanity and the environment. ... Jane Maria Swift (born February 24, 1965) is an American politician from Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... George Frederick Will (born May 4, 1941) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning, conservative American newspaper columnist, journalist, and author. ... The Trinity Tripod is the primary student newspaper of Trinity College (Connecticut) in Hartford, CT. Since Spring 2006 the Tripod has been arranged with six sections, in order, News, Opinions, Features, Arts, Announcements, and Sports. ... James Longenbach is an American critic and poet. ... The University of Rochester is a private, coeducational and nonsectarian research institution located in Rochester, New York. ...

Fraternities and sororities

Officially, approximately 20% of the student body are affiliated with a Greek organization. During the late 1980's and 1990s, under pressure from the college administration, many of the single-sex fraternities and sororities merged and formed co-educational Greek organizations. Trinity is now the last NESCAC school to recognize any fraternities. Among those currently on campus are:

Several other Greek organizations, while active, are not officially affiliated with the school. They include: Alpha Delta Phi (ΑΔΦ) is a Greek-letter fraternity in the United States and Canada. ... // Cleo of Alpha Chi Cleo Coat of Arms Background The CLEO Literary Society was founded at Trinity College (Connecticut) in 1877. ... Psi Upsilon (ΨΥ, Psi U) is the fifth oldest college fraternity, founded at Union College in 1833. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Alpha Chi Rho (ΑΧΡ) is a mens collegiate fraternity founded on June 4th, 1895 at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut by the Reverend Paul Ziegler, his son Carl Ziegler, and Carls friends William Rouse, Herbert T. Sherriff and William A.D. Eardeley. ... St. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ...

  • Pi Kappa Alpha (Pike). The Epsilon Alpha chapter was established in 1953. (not officially affiliated with the school)
  • Zeta Omega Eta: the Alpha chapter was founded at Trinity College in 2003.
  • Theta Delta Sigma The co-ed, multicultural Greek society was colonized at Trinity in 2005.

Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...

Areas of Leisure

Coffee houses

  • The Underground Coffee House: Located below Mather dining hall, The Underground is a popular spot for students to relax, study, and participate in cultural events. The Underground hosts "Open Mic Night" every Thursday, which invites poets, musicians, and professors to perform music or recite poetry. It is the only completely student-run business on campus and is well-known for its inviting atmosphere and friendly staff.
  • Gallows Hill Lounge: Once an intimate coffee house with a miniature Barnes and Nobles attached, this Hallden Hall location is currently a popular student lounge with a free coffee machine.
  • Peter B's Cafe: Located on the first floor of the library, Peter B's offers a wide variety of caffeinated beverages and baked goods. The cafe is a popular location for meetings between students and professors.

A typical Barnes & Noble bookstore. ...

Restaurants

  • Alchemy Juice Bar: A few doors down from Trinity's hockey rink, Alechemy serves 100% organic vegetarian and vegan food and drink, including smoothies, sandwhiches, soups, and coffee. The small restaurant also has an oxygen bar and hosts yoga lessons.
  • Timothy's: A small restaurant off the west side of campus.
  • The Tap: A popular campus bar also located just a few storefronts from Trinity's Community Sports Complex hockey rink.

Cultural Organizations

Among Trinity's cultural organizations are:


The Muslim Students Association (MSA), Asian American Student Association (AASA), The Biology Club, The Caribbean Students’ Association (CSA), Encouraging Respect of Sexualities (EROS), The French Club, The German Club, Hillel Society, Newman Club, IMANI, The International Student Organization (ISO), The Italian Club, La Voz Latina (LVL), The Multicultural Affairs Council (MAC), MOCA (Men of Color Association), The Portuguese Club, The Russian Club, The Spanish Club, SUSHI (Students to Unite Science and Humanitarian Interests), The Trinity Chemistry Society, The Trinity College Black Women’s Organization (TCBWO), and The Venetian Club. Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life (Hillel International) is the largest Jewish campus organization in the world. ...


Residence Halls

Trinity College houses its students in 25 dorms organized into 4 "areas," each with a local area coordinator, who is responsible for administering the area.

  • Area 1 ("Crescent Street"):
    • Stowe
    • Clemens
    • Anadama
    • Wiggins
    • Little
    • Frohman-Robb
    • Crescent Street Apartments
  • Area 2 ("South Campus"):
    • Summit Suites
    • Jackson
    • Smith
    • Wheaton
    • Funston
    • Jones
    • Elton
  • Area 3 ("The Long Walk"):
    • Jarvis
    • Northam Towers
    • Cook
    • Goodwin-Woodward
  • Area 4 ("Vernon Street"):
    • Boardwalk
    • Park Place
    • Vernon
    • High Rise
    • North Campus
    • Hansen
    • Doonesbury
    • Ogilby

Notes and References

  1. ^ Hall, Benjamin Homer (1856). College Words and Customs. Cambridge (England): John Bartlett. , also online at Project Gutenberg[1]

External links

  • TrinColl.Info, Trinity College Wiki Encyclopedia
  • Trinity College - official website
  • Raether Library and Information Technology Center
  • Trinity's Electron Microscopy Facility
  • Trinity College's Human Rights Program
  • The Trinity Tripod - student newspaper
  • Cinestudio
  • The Eyeball: A Film Festival An annual Student Film Festival
  • WRTC 89.3 FM - Radio Trinity College
  • NESCAC Nation - The Unofficial Fan Site for the NESCAC Fans, Alums, and Current Students

  Results from FactBites:
 
Trinity College - MX University's Best Trinity College Resources (816 words)
Trinity College - A college of excellence - Open to all - In a disciplined,...
Trinity College is an Anglican College founded in a liberal educational tradition.
Trinity, a comprehensive university in Washington, DC - Undergraduate and Gr...
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m