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Encyclopedia > Trinity College, Oxford
Colleges and halls of the University of Oxford
Trinity College

A number of educational institutions carry the name Trinity College, some independent, others constituent colleges of a larger university. ... The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. ... A Permanent Private Hall at the University of Oxford is an educational institution affiliated to the University — not as a full College, but able to award Oxford University degrees. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... This photo is of Trinity College, Oxford. ...

                     
College name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity in the University of Oxford, of the foundation of Sir Thomas Pope (Knight)
Named after The Holy Trinity
Established 1555
Sister college Churchill College, Cambridge
President Sir Ivor Roberts KCMG MA
JCR president Richard Williams
Undergraduates 288
MCR president Olga Shvarova
Graduates 119


Location of Trinity College within central OxfordCoordinates: 51°45′18″N 1°15′24″W / 51.754914, -1.256599
Homepage
Boat Club


The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity in the University of Oxford, of the foundation of Sir Thomas Pope (Knight)[1], or Trinity College for short, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. It stands on Broad Street, next door to Balliol and Blackwells, and opposite Turl Street. It is enclosed by an iron palisade, rather than a wall, giving the college a more open and accessible appearance than many others in Oxford. The college occupies a spacious site, including four major quadrangles, and is particularly known for its large lawn and attractive gardens, which include a small area of woodland. Despite its size, the college is relatively small in terms of student numbers, with about 300 undergraduates. This article concerns the holy Trinity of Christianity. ... Events Russia breaks 60 year old truce with Sweden by attacking Finland February 2 - Diet of Augsburg begins February 4 - John Rogers becomes first Protestant martyr in England February 9 - Bishop of Gloucester John Hooper is burned at the stake May 23 - Paul IV becomes Pope. ... Most of the colleges of the University of Cambridge have sister colleges in the University of Oxford (and vice versa). ... College name Churchill College Motto Forward Named after Sir Winston Churchill Established 1960 Location Storey’s Way Admittance Men and women Master Sir David Wallace Undergraduates 440 Graduates 210 Sister college Trinity College, Oxford Official website Boat Club website Churchill College Main Entrance Churchill College is one of the constituent... In some universities in the United Kingdom—particularly collegiate universities—the student body is organised into one or more of the following: A Junior Common Room (JCR) A Middle Common Room (MCR) A Senior Common Room (SCR) In addition to this, each of the above phrases may also refer to... In some universities in the United Kingdom—particularly collegiate universities—the student body is organised into one or more of the following: A Junior Common Room (JCR) A Middle Common Room (MCR) A Senior Common Room (SCR) In addition to this, each of the above phrases may also refer to... Image File history File links Blue_pog. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Historical view of Broad Street looking east towards (left to right) the Clarendon Building, and the Sheldonian Theatre and the Old Ashmolean Building. ... and of the Balliol College College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister college St Johns College, Cambridge Master Andrew Graham JCR President Helen Lochead Undergraduates 403 MCR President Chelsea Payne Graduates 228 Location of Balliol College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Balliol College (pronounced... Looking south along Turl Street towards All Saints with Lincoln College on the left. ...


As well as being generally attractive, Trinity's buildings also have many notable features. On the top of the West Tower sit four female statues, which represent Astronomy, Geometry, Medicine, and Theology. The Chapel, though relatively modest in size compared to some of its Oxford counterparts, is also of particular note, being the first College chapel to be designed entirely in the neoclassical style. The noted architect Sir Christopher Wren is said to have assisted in its design.[2] Christopher Wren only made a few adjustments to the final design plans, which included changing the urns on top of the chapel to burning torches to represent the eternal thirst for knowledge. For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Geometry (disambiguation). ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... Christopher Wren. ...


As of 2006, Trinity had an estimated financial endowment of £68 million. [3] A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ...

Contents

Durham College

Coat of Arms of Trinity College

The site where Trinity College now stands was originally occupied by Durham College. This college had been founded in 1286, at around the same time as the oldest colleges that survive until today. Durham College was built for Benedictine monks from the Cathedral Church in the city of Durham, and was built around a single quadrangle, now known as the Durham Quadrangle. The only major surviving building from the Durham College foundation is the east range of Durham Quad, containing the Old Library, which dates from 1421, although elements of the pre-Reformation fabric also survive on the opposite side of the quad, at either end of the seventeenth-century Hall. Durham College was originally dedicated to the Virgin, St Cuthbert, and the Trinity, and it is thought that Trinity College took its name from the last element of this dedication. Image File history File links Trinity_crest. ... Image File history File links Trinity_crest. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... For the college, see Benedictine College. ... Durham Cathedrals famous Sanctuary Knocker on the North Door Ground plan of Durham Cathedral Legend of the founding of Durham depicted on cathedral The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham, which is almost always referred to as Durham Cathedral, in the city... Durham (IPA: locally, in RP) is a small city and main settlement of the City of Durham district of County Durham in North East England. ... In Roman times, Vestal Virgins were strictly celibate or they were punished by death. ... Cuthbert of Lindisfarne (c. ... This article is about the Christian Trinity. ...


History

Dining hall at Trinity College
Dining hall at Trinity College

Trinity College was founded in 1555 by Sir Thomas Pope, on land bought following the abolition of Durham College during the period of Protestant Reformation, whose buildings housed the original foundation. Pope was a Catholic who had no surviving children, and he hoped that by founding a college he would be remembered in the prayers of its students. It is, in fact, quite difficult to forget him, as his remains are still encased beside the chapel alter. The original foundation provided for a president, twelve fellows, and twelve scholars, and for up to twenty undergraduates. The fellows were required to take Holy Orders and to remain unmarried. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 3174 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Trinity College, Oxford ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 3174 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Trinity College, Oxford ... Sir Thomas Pope (c. ... Catholic deacon candidates prostrate before the altar of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles during a 2004 diaconate ordination liturgy In a general sense, the term Holy Orders refers to those in the Christian religion who have been ordained in Apostolic Succession. ...


Sir Ivor Roberts, formerly HM Ambassador to Italy, succeeded The Hon. Michael Beloff QC as President on 26th September 2006. Peter Brown, Tutor in Classics, assumed the position of Pro-President during the interregnum, as indeed he had during Hilary Term 2006 when the ex-President was on sabbatical. Sir Ivor's dog is called 'Dido'. Ivor Roberts could refer to one of several people: Ivor Roberts, the British actor and television presenter Ivor Roberts, the British ambassador to Italy This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Notable former students

See also Former students of Trinity College.

For other persons named John Aubrey, see John Aubrey (disambiguation). ... Robert Laurence Binyon (August 10, 1869 at Lancaster – March 10, 1943 at Reading, Berkshire) was an English poet, dramatist and art scholar. ... Sir George Bowen Sir George Ferguson Bowen (Chinese Translated Name 寶雲) (November 2, 1821 - February 21, 1899) was a British colonial governor who became the 9th Governor of Hong Kong. ... James Bryce, right, with Andrew Carnegie; Bryce served as a trustee of the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland James Bryce, 1st Viscount Bryce, OM, GCVO, FRS, PC (May 10, 1838 - January 22, 1922), was a British jurist, historian and politician. ... For other persons named Richard Burton, see Richard Burton (disambiguation). ... Time magazine cover featuring Joyce Cary, October 20, 1952 This article is about the male author Joyce Cary. ... Justin Cartwright is a novelist. ... Noel Godfrey Chavasse (VC and bar, MC) (November 9, 1884–August 4, 1917) was a British soldier who is one of only three people to be awarded a Victoria Cross twice. ... Lionel Chetwynd (born January 1, 1940 in Hackney in London, England, UK) is a Canadian-American screenwriter, motion picture and television film director and producer. ... Kenneth Clark presenting the BBC TV series Civilisation. ... The Rt. ... Vincent Cronin (born May 24, 1924 in Tredegar, Wales) is a British historical, cultural, and biographical writer whose works have been widely translated into European languages. ... Charles Anthony Raven Crosland (29 August 1918 - 19 February 1977) was a member of the Labour Party and an important socialist theorist. ... Born September 8, 1979 in Edinburgh. ... Sir John Denham (1615 - 1669), poet, son of the Chief Baron of Exchequer in Ireland, was born in Dublin, and educated at Oxford He began his literary career with a tragedy, The Sophy (1641), which seldom rises above mediocrity. ... Rayner Goddard, Baron Goddard, Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales 1946-1958 Rayner Goddard, Baron Goddard (April 10, 1877–May 29, 1971) was Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales from 1946 to 1958 and known for his heavy sentencing and reactionary views. ... David Green (born November 12, 1948, London) is a Film Director and TV Producer. ... Basil Harwood (11 April 1859–3 April 1949) was an English organist and composer. ... The Right Honourable Sir David James George Hennessy, 3rd Baron Windlesham, Bt, CVO, PC (born 28 January 1932) is a Conservative politician in the United Kingdom, and currently holds visiting professorships at various universities. ... Flight Lieutenant Richard H. Hillary (born 20 April 1919 in Sydney, Australia - died 8 January 1943) was a Battle of Britain pilot who died during World War II. He is best known for his book The Last Enemy, based upon his experiences during the Battle of Britain. ... Sir Cyril Norman Hinshelwood was an English physical chemist. ... Mamoru Imura is a Japanese inventor[1], music composer, and chief executive officer of VitaCraft and VitaCraft Japan. ... Henry Ireton Henry Ireton (1611 - November 26, 1651), was an English general in the army of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... Miles Kington (born 1941) is a British journalist, jazz musician and broadcaster. ... Walter Savage Landor (January 30, 1775 - September 17, 1864), English writer, eldest son of Walter Landor and his wife Elizabeth Savage, was born at Warwick. ... Robert Robin Leigh-Pemberton, Baron Kingsdown, KG (born 5 January 1927) is a current cross-bencher on the House of Lords, and formerly a lawyer and banker. ... William Lisle Bowles (September 24, 1762 - April 7, 1850) was an English poet and critic. ... Thomas Lodge (c. ... Alfred Edward Woodley Mason (7 May 1865 - 22 November 1948) was a British author. ... Edward Powys Mathers (1892-1939) was a translator and poet, and editor with J. C. Mardrus of The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night (his English translation of the Mardrus adaptation appeared in 1923). ... Norris Dewar McWhirter, CBE (August 12, 1925 – April 19, 2004) was a writer, political activist, co-founder of the Freedom Association, and a television presenter. ... Alan Ross McWhirter (12 August 1925 - 27 November 1975), known as Ross McWhirter, was, with his twin brother, Norris McWhirter, co-founder of the Guinness Book of Records. ... John Middleton Murry (August 6, 1889 - 1957) was an English author and writer. ... This article is about the physicist; for the naturalist see Henry Nottidge Moseley Henry Moseley at work. ... J H Newman age 23 when he preached his first sermon. ... Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford (April 13, 1732–August 5, 1792), more often known by his earlier title, Lord North, was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782, and a major actor in the American Revolution. ... Sir Arthur Lionel Pugh Norrington (1899–1982), was a publisher, President of Trinity College, Oxford, vice-chancellor of Oxford University and originator of the Norrington Table. ... Sir Angus James Bruce Ogilvy, KCVO (14 September 1928 – 26 December 2004) was a British businessman best known as the husband of Princess Alexandra of Kent, a first cousin of Queen Elizabeth II. [1] Sir Angus also is remembered for his role in a scandal involving the breaking of sanctions... William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham PC (15 November 1708 – 11 May 1778) was a British Whig statesman who achieved his greatest fame as Secretary of State during the Seven Years War (known as the French and Indian War in North America) and who was later Prime Minister of Great... William Gifford Palgrave (1826–1888) was an Arabic scholar, born at Westminster, England. ... Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch (November 21, 1863 - May 12, 1944) was a British writer, who published under the pen name of Q. Born in Cornwall, he was educated at Newton Abbot College, at Clifton College, and Trinity College, Oxford and later became a lecturer there. ... Terence Rattigan — British Playwright Sir Terence Mervyn Rattigan (June 10, 1911 – November 30, 1977) was one of Englands most important 20th century dramatists. ... Canon George Rawlinson (23 November 1812 – 7 October 1902), was a 19th century English scholar and historian. ... Michael Maclagan, CVO, FSA, FRHistS (14 April 1914--13 August 2003) was a long-serving officer of arms. ... John Somers, 1st Baron Somers (4 March 1651-26 April 1716), was Lord Chancellor of England under King William III. He was born near Worcester, the eldest son of John Somers, an attorney in large practice in that town, who had formerly fought on the side of the Parliament, and... James Stanhope, 1st Earl Stanhope (c. ... Martin Stevens (31 July 1929 - 10 January 1986) was a Conservative Party (UK) politician. ... Peter Stothard (born February 28, 1951) is a British newspaper editor, currently for the Times Literary Supplement, but of The Times itself from 1992 to 2002, and before that, from 1989 to 1992, of its United States section. ... John Jeremy Thorpe (born April 29, 1929) is a British politician, who was leader of the Liberal Party from 1967 to 1976. ... Simon Tolkien (born 1959) is a British barrister and novelist. ... Andrew Guy Tyrie (born 15 January 1957) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... Peter Wildeblood (19 May 1923 - 14 November 1999) was a British-Canadian journalist, novelist, playwright, and gay rights campaigner. ...

Fictional former students

The cover of the Scribner Paperback Fiction Edition, 1995. ... Tiger Tanaka is the head of the Japanese Secret Service, who aids James Bond in finding and defeating Ernst Stavro Blofeld, using a team of ninja-like warriors to invade the villain´s lair in an inactive volcano. ...

Academics and teachers

See also Fellows of Trinity College.

Sir Henry Stuart Jones (May 15, 1867 - June 29, 1939) was a British academic and Fellow of Trinity College, Oxford University, where he held an appointment from 1920 to 1927 as Camden Professor of Ancient History. ... Ronald Syme Sir Ronald Syme (11 March 1903 – 4 September 1989), New Zealand-born historian, was the preeminent classicist of the 20th century. ... Thomas Warton, the Younger Thomas Warton (January 9, 1728 – May 21, 1790) was an English literary historian and critic, as well as a poet. ... Sir Cyril Norman Hinshelwood OM FRS (June 19, 1897 – October 9, 1967) was an English physical chemist. ... Sir Hans Adolf Krebs (August 25, 1900 – November 22, 1981) was a German, later British medical doctor and biochemist. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Michael Maclagan, CVO, FSA, FRHistS (14 April 1914--13 August 2003) was a long-serving officer of arms. ...

References

  1. ^ Clare Hopkins, Trinity : 450 years of an Oxford college community (Oxford, 2005). ISBN 978-0-19-951896-8.
  2. ^ Trinity College Chapel. College website. Retrieved on 2007-04-14.
  3. ^ Oxford College Endowment Incomes, 1973-2006 (updated July 2007)

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • History of the College
  • Virtual Tour of Trinity
  • Trinity College JCR
  • Trinity College MCR
  • Trinity College Orchestra
  • Trinity College Boatclub
  • Trinity Commemoration Ball 2008
This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Trinity College, Cambridge (Pepys' Diary) (3344 words)
Trinity College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England.
The college was founded by Henry VIII in 1546, from the merger of two existing colleges: Michaelhouse (founded by Hervey de Stanton in 1324), and King’s Hall (established by Edward II in 1317 and refounded by Edward III in 1337).
Trinity is sometimes suggested to be the second, third or fourth wealthiest landowner in the UK (or in England) - after the Crown Estate, the National Trust and the Church of England.
Trinity College, Oxford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (419 words)
Durham College was built for Benedictine monks from the Cathedral Church in the city of Durham, and was built around a single quadrangle, known nowadays as the Durham Quadrangle.
Durham College was originally dedicated to the Trinity, The Virgin and St Cuthbert, and it is thought that Trinity College took its name from this dedication.
Trinity College was founded in 1555 by Sir Thomas Pope.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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