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Encyclopedia > Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity College heraldic shield
                     
Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity
Motto Virtus vera nobilitas
Virtue is true Nobility
Named after The Holy Trinity
Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546)
Established 1546
Sister College(s) Christ Church
Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow
Location Trinity Street
Undergraduates 660
Postgraduates 430
Homepage Boat Club
The Great Gate
The Great Gate
Great Court with fountain
Great Court with fountain


Trinity College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England. Trinity is larger than any other college in Cambridge or Oxford, with around 660 undergraduates, 430 graduates, and over 160 Fellows[1]. It is also the wealthiest Oxbridge college by far[2] with an estimated financial endowment of approx. £700 million[3] in addition to which, Trinity's land is insured for approx. £266.5 million (this does not include all fixed assets)[4]. Trinity considers itself to be "a world-leading academic institution with an outstanding record of education, learning and research" [5], and on a per-student basis, is one of the best-endowed educational institutions in the world[citation needed]. Download high resolution version (1239x1426, 565 KB)Trinity College Crest - flat version This is the flat (unembossed) version. ... This article concerns the holy Trinity of Christianity. ... Kings Hall was once one of the constituent colleges of Cambridge, and the 2nd to be founded, in 1317. ... Full name The Hall and College of Michaelhouse Motto Named after St. ... // Events Spanish conquest of Yucatan Peace between England and France Foundation of Trinity College, Cambridge by Henry VIII of England Katharina von Bora flees to Magdeburg Science Architecture Michelangelo Buonarroti is made chief architect of St. ... Most of the colleges of the University of Cambridge have sister colleges in the University of Oxford (and vice versa). ... College name Christ Church Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister College Trinity College Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR President William Dorsey Undergraduates 426 MCR or GCR President {{{MCR President}}} Graduates 154 Home page Boat Club Christ Church (Latin: Ædes Christi, the temple or house of Christ... The Right Honourable Martin John Rees, Baron Rees of Ludlow, FRS (born 23 June 1942) is a professor of astronomy. ... The First and Third Trinity Boat Club is the rowing club of Trinity College in Cambridge, England. ... Download high resolution version (794x1024, 261 KB)The Great Gate is the main entrance to Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Download high resolution version (794x1024, 261 KB)The Great Gate is the main entrance to Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Download high resolution version (1181x768, 371 KB)The Great Court at Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Download high resolution version (1181x768, 371 KB)The Great Court at Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Trinitys Great Court looking north, showing the Kings Gate, Chapel, Fountain and the Great Gate Great Court is the main court of Trinity College, Cambridge, and reputed to be the largest enclosed court in Europe. ... This is a list of the colleges within the University of Cambridge. ... The University of Cambridge, located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Shown within Cambridgeshire Geography Status: City (1951) Region: East of England Admin. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A fellow in the broadest sense is someone who is an equal or a comrade. ... Oxbridge is a name used to refer to the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ...


The college is a major landowner, including holdings in the port of Felixstowe, and the Cambridge Science Park. Trinity has a very strong academic tradition, with members having won thirty-one Nobel Prizes (more than most countries, with the exception of the United States, Germany, and France, and not counting the United Kingdom[6]), five Fields Medals (mathematics), one Abel Prize (mathematics) and two Templeton Prizes (religion). Trinity has many distinguished alumni – the most notable being Sir Isaac Newton. Statistics Population: 29,349 (2001 Census) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TM306345 Administration District: Suffolk Coastal Shire county: Suffolk Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Suffolk Historic county: Suffolk Services Police force: Suffolk Constabulary Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: East of England... The Cambridge Science Park is the oldest and most famous science park in the United Kingdom. ... Nobel Prize medal. ... The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... The Abel Prize is awarded annually by the King of Norway to outstanding mathematicians. ... The Templeton Prize for Progress Toward Research or Discoveries about Spiritual Realities was until 2001 awarded for Progress in Religion. ... Sir Isaac Newton in Knellers portrait of 1689. ...


Trinity has many college societies, and its rowing club is the First and Third Trinity Boat Club. Trinity's May Ball, named after the Boat Club, is the largest and most traditional of Cambridge's May Balls. A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... The First and Third Trinity Boat Club is the rowing club of Trinity College in Cambridge, England. ... The bridge over the River Cam at Clare College during its 2005 May Ball. ...


The first formalized version of the rules of football, known as the Cambridge Rules, was drawn up by Cambridge student representatives of leading public schools at Trinity College in 1848[1][2]. The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... The Cambridge Rules, were a code of football drawn up at Cambridge University in 1848 by H. de Winton and J. C. Thring. ...

Contents

History

Close-up of Great Gate with statue of Henry VIII
Close-up of Great Gate with statue of Henry VIII

The college was founded by Henry VIII in 1546, from the merger of two existing colleges: Michaelhouse (founded by Hervey de Stanton in 1324), and King’s Hall (established by Edward II in 1317 and refounded by Edward III in 1337). Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Trinity College, Cambridge. ... For the play, see Henry VIII (play). ... For the play, see Henry VIII (play). ... // Events Spanish conquest of Yucatan Peace between England and France Foundation of Trinity College, Cambridge by Henry VIII of England Katharina von Bora flees to Magdeburg Science Architecture Michelangelo Buonarroti is made chief architect of St. ... Full name The Hall and College of Michaelhouse Motto Named after St. ... Hervey de Stanton (12??-13??) was a Chancellor of the Exechequer to King Edward II. He also was a founder of Michaelhouse College at the University of Cambridge, one of the predecessors to Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Events Publication of Defensor pacis by Marsilius of Padua Mansa Kankan Musa I, ruler of the Mali Empire arrives in Cairo on his hajj or pilgrimage to Mecca. ... Kings Hall was once one of the constituent colleges of Cambridge, and the 2nd to be founded, in 1317. ... Edward II, (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... Events The Great Famine of 1315-1317. ... Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was one of the most successful English kings of medieval times. ... March 16 - Edward, the Black Prince is created Duke of Cornwall, becoming the first English Duke Beginning of the Hundred Years War (c. ...


At the time, Henry had been wiping out and seizing church lands from abbeys and monasteries. The universities of Oxford and Cambridge, being both religious institutions and quite rich, expected to be next in line. The king duly passed an Act of Parliament that allowed him to suppress (and confiscate the property of) any college he wished. The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge, located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... In Westminster System parliaments, an Act of Parliament is a part of the law passed by the Parliament. ...


The universities used their contacts to plead with his sixth wife, Catherine Parr. The queen persuaded her husband not to close them down, but to create a new college. The king did not want to use royal funds, so he instead combined two colleges (King’s Hall and Michaelhouse) and seven hostels (Physwick (formerly part of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge), Gregory’s, Ovyng’s, Catherine’s, Garratt, Margaret’s, and Tyler’s) to form Trinity. This, combined with lands confiscated from the Church, caused Trinity to be the richest and biggest college. 70. ... Kings Hall was once one of the constituent colleges of Cambridge, and the 2nd to be founded, in 1317. ... Full name The Hall and College of Michaelhouse Motto Named after St. ... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348, refounded 1557 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Sir Christopher Hum Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, generally known...


Most of the college’s major buildings date from the 16th and 17th centuries. Thomas Nevile, who became Master of Trinity in 1593, rebuilt and re-designed much of the college. This work included the enlargement and completion of Great Court, and the construction of Nevile’s Court between Great Court and the river Cam. Nevile’s Court was completed in the late 17th century when the Wren Library, designed by Sir Christopher Wren, was built. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Thomas Nevile was an English clergyman and academic who was Dean of Peterborough (??-1597) and Canterbury (1597-??), Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge (1582-93), and Master of Trinity College, Cambridge (1593-1615). ... Events May 18 - Playwright Thomas Kyds accusations of heresy lead to an arrest warrant for Christopher Marlowe. ... Trinitys Great Court looking north, showing the Kings Gate, Chapel, Fountain and the Great Gate Great Court is the main court of Trinity College, Cambridge, and reputed to be the largest enclosed court in Europe. ... Neviles Court is a court in Trinity College, Cambridge, created by a bequest by the colleges master, Thomas Nevile. ... The River Cam is a tributary of the River Great Ouse in the east of England. ... The exterior of the Wren Library The Wren Library is the library of Trinity College in Cambridge. ... Christopher Wren. ...


In the 20th century, Trinity College and King’s College were for decades the main recruiting grounds for the Cambridge Apostles, an elite, intellectual secret society. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Full name The Kings College of Our Lady and St Nicholas in Cambridge Motto Veritas Et Utilitas Truth and usefulness Named after Henry VI Previous names - Established 1441 Sister College(s) New College Provost Prof. ... Trinity College Great Court. ...


Buildings and Grounds

King’s Hostel (1377-1416, various architects)
Located to the north of Great Court, behind the Clock Tower, this is (along with the King’s Gate), the sole remaining building from King’s Hall.
Great Gate
The Great Gate is the main entrance to the college, leading to the Great Court. A statue of the college founder, Henry VIII, stands in a niche above the doorway. In his hand he holds a table leg instead of the original sword and myths abound as to how the switch was carried out and by whom. In 1704, the University’s first astronomical observatory was built on top of the gatehouse. Beneath the founder's statue are the coats of arms of Edward III, the founder of King's Hall, and his five sons of who survived to maturity, as well as William of Hatfield, who died as an infant.[3]
Great Court (principally 1599-1608, various architects)
The brainchild of Thomas Nevile, who demolished several existing buildings on this site, including almost the entirety of the former college of Michaelhouse. The sole remaining building of Michaelhouse was replaced by the current Kitchens (designed by James Essex) in 1770-1775. See 360° panorama of Great Court from the BBC.
A view across Nevile's Court towards the Wren Library
Nevile’s Court (1614, unknown architect)
Located between Great Court and the river, this court was created by a bequest by the college’s master, Thomas Nevile, originally ⅔ of its current length and without the Wren Library. The appearance of the upper floor was remodelled slightly 2 centuries later.
Bishop’s Hostel (1671, Robert Minchin)
A detached building to the south-west of Great Court, and named after John Hacket, Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry. Additional buildings were built in 1878 by Arthur Blomfield.
Wren Library (1676-1695, Christopher Wren)
Located at the west end of Nevile’s Court, the Wren is one of Cambridge’s most famous and well-endowed libraries. Among its notable possessions are two of Shakespeare’s First Folios, a 14th-century manuscript of The Vision of Piers Plowman, and letters written by Sir Isaac Newton. Below the building are the pleasant Wren Library Cloisters, where students may enjoy a fine view of the Great Hall in front of them, and the river and Backs directly behind.
New Court (or King’s Court; 1825, William Watkins)
Located to the south of Nevile’s Court, and built in Tudor-Gothic style, this court is notable for the large tree in the centre. Many other “New Courts” in the colleges were built at this time to accommodate the new influx of students.
Whewell’s Courts (1860 & 1868, Anthony Salvin)
Located across the street from Great Court, these two courts were entirely paid for by William Whewell, the then master of the college. The north range was later remodelled by W.D. Caroe. Note: Whewell is pronounced “Hugh-well”.
Angel Court (1957-1959, H. C. Husband)
Located between Great Court and Trinity Street.
Wolfson Building (1968-1972, Architects Co-Partnership)
Located to the south of Whewell’s Court, on top of a podium above shops, this building resembles a brick-clad ziggurat, and is used exclusively for first-year accommodation. Having been renovated during the academic year 2005-06, it is once again in use.
Blue Boar Court (1989, MacCormac Jamieson Prichard and Wright)
Located to the south of the Wolfson Building, on top of podium a floor up from ground level, and including the upper floors of several surrounding Georgian buildings on Trinity, Green and Sidney Street.
Burrell’s Field (1995, MacCormac Jamieson Prichard[4])
Located on a site to the west of the main College buildings, opposite the Cambridge University Library.

There are also College rooms above shops in Bridge Street and Jesus Lane, behind Whewell’s Court. Kings Hall was once one of the constituent colleges of Cambridge, and the 2nd to be founded, in 1317. ... Trinitys Great Court looking north, showing the Kings Gate, Chapel, Fountain and the Great Gate Great Court is the main court of Trinity College, Cambridge, and reputed to be the largest enclosed court in Europe. ... For the play, see Henry VIII (play). ... Events Building of the Students Monument in Aiud, Romania. ... The University of Cambridge has three large astronomy departments as follows: The Institute of Astronomy, concentrating on theoretical astronomy and optical, infrared and x-ray observations The Cavendish Astrophysics Group, concentrating on radio and submillimetre observations and instrumentation, observational cosmology and all aspects of astronomical interferometry, and operating the Mullard... MolÄ—tai Astronomical Observatory An observatory is a location used for observing terrestrial and/or celestial events. ... Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was one of the most successful English kings of medieval times. ... Trinitys Great Court looking north, showing the Kings Gate, Chapel, Fountain and the Great Gate Great Court is the main court of Trinity College, Cambridge, and reputed to be the largest enclosed court in Europe. ... Thomas Nevile was an English clergyman and academic who was Dean of Peterborough (??-1597) and Canterbury (1597-??), Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge (1582-93), and Master of Trinity College, Cambridge (1593-1615). ... Full name The Hall and College of Michaelhouse Motto Named after St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1632x1232, 412 KB) A view of Wren Library across Neviles Court, Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1632x1232, 412 KB) A view of Wren Library across Neviles Court, Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Neviles Court is a court in Trinity College, Cambridge, created by a bequest by the colleges master, Thomas Nevile. ... The exterior of the Wren Library The Wren Library is the library of Trinity College in Cambridge. ... Neviles Court is a court in Trinity College, Cambridge, created by a bequest by the colleges master, Thomas Nevile. ... Thomas Nevile was an English clergyman and academic who was Dean of Peterborough (??-1597) and Canterbury (1597-??), Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge (1582-93), and Master of Trinity College, Cambridge (1593-1615). ... The exterior of the Wren Library The Wren Library is the library of Trinity College in Cambridge. ... John Hacket (1592 - 1670) was an English churchman, Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry from 1661 until his death. ... The exterior of the Wren Library The Wren Library is the library of Trinity College in Cambridge. ... Sir Christopher Wren, (20 October 1632–25 February 1723) was a 17th century English designer, astronomer, geometrician, and the greatest English architect of his time. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Page from a 14th century Psalter, showing drolleries on the right margin and a plowman at the bottom. ... Categories: Stub | 1799 births | 1881 deaths ... William Whewell William Whewell (May 24, 1794 – March 6, 1866) was an English polymath, scientist, Anglican priest, philosopher, theologian and historian of science. ... William Douglas Caroe (1857 – 1938) was a British architect, particularly of churches. ... MacCormac Jamieson Prichard is a large British architectural practice based in London. ... Burrells Field is a part of Trinity College, Cambridge, between Queenss Road and Grange Road. ... MacCormac Jamieson Prichard is a large British architectural practice based in London. ... Cambridge University Library The 12-storey tower is used as storage and has no reader access Cambridge University Library is the centrally-administered library of the University of Cambridge in England. ...

Fellows’ Garden 
Located on the west side of Queens Road, opposite the drive that leads to the Backs.
Master’s Garden 
Located behind the Masters’ Lodge.
Old Fields 
Located on the western side of Grange Road, next to Burrell’s Field, with sports (badminton, etc) facilities.
New Fields

Traditions

King’s Gate with clock tower in Great Court
King’s Gate with clock tower in Great Court

The Great Court Run Download high resolution version (512x768, 164 KB)Clock tower in Trinity Great Court (Cambridge) Photo by Bob Tubbs I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Download high resolution version (512x768, 164 KB)Clock tower in Trinity Great Court (Cambridge) Photo by Bob Tubbs I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Trinitys Great Court looking north, showing the Kings Gate, Chapel, Fountain and the Great Gate Great Court is the main court of Trinity College, Cambridge, and reputed to be the largest enclosed court in Europe. ...


The Great Court Run is an attempt to run round the perimeter of Great Court (approximately 367 metres), in the 43 seconds during the clock striking twelve. Students traditionally attempt to complete the circuit on the day of the Matriculation Dinner. It is a rather difficult challenge and the only people believed to have actually completed the run in time are Lord Burghley in 1927 and Sebastian Coe when he beat Steve Cram in a charity race in October 1988. Until the mid 1990s, the run was traditionally attempted by first year students, at midnight following their Matriculation Dinner. Following a number of accidents to drunk undergraduates running on slippery cobbles, the college now organises a more formal Great Court Run, at 12 noon: the challenge is only open to freshers, many of whom compete in fancy dress. Trinitys Great Court looking north, showing the Kings Gate, Chapel, Fountain and the Great Gate Great Court is the main court of Trinity College, Cambridge, and reputed to be the largest enclosed court in Europe. ... David George Brownlow Cecil Burghley, 6th Marquess of Exeter (February 9, 1905 – October 22, 1981) was a British athlete, winner of 400 m hurdles at the 1928 Summer Olympics. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sebastian Newbold Coe, Baron Coe, OBE (born September 29, 1956) is a British athlete, and Conservative Party politician. ... Steve Cram MBE (born October 14, 1960) was a British athlete who vied with fellow British athletes Sebastian Coe and Steve Ovett during their domination of middle distance running in the 1980s. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Open-Air Concerts


One Sunday each June (the exact date depends on the university term), the College Choir perform a short concert immediately after the clock strikes noon. Known as Singing from the Towers, half of the choir sings from the top of Great Gate, while the other half sings from the top of the Clock Tower (approximately 60 metres away), giving a strong antiphonal effect. Midway through the concert, a brass band performs from the top of Queen’s Tower. Later that same day, the College Choir gives a second open-air concert, known as Singing on the River, where they perform madrigals (and arrangements of popular songs) from a raft of punts on the river. This article is about the musical term. ... A madrigal is a setting for 3–6 voices of a secular text, often in Italian. ... Punting while dressed for Cambridge graduation This article concentrates on the history and development of punts and punting in England, for other usages see the disambiguation pages at punt and punter. ... The River Cam is a tributary of the River Great Ouse in the east of England. ...


Mallard


Another tradition relates to a duck (known as the Mallard), which resides in the rafters of the Great Hall. Students occasionally move the duck from one rafter to another (without permission from the college), having been photographed with the mallard as proof. This is considered difficult and access to the Hall outside meal-times is prohibited. In addition, the rafters are high so it has not been attempted for several years. During the Easter term of 2005, several pigeons entered the Hall through the windows in the pinnacle, and one knocked the Mallard off its rafter. It was found intact on the floor, and revealed to not be made out of wood as previously believed. It is currently held by the College catering staff. It is unknown whether it will be reinstated.


Bicycles and chair legs


For many years it was the custom for students to place a bicycle high in branches of the tree in the centre of New Court. Usually invisible except in winter, when the leaves had fallen, such bicycles tended to remain for several years before being removed by the authorities. The students then inserted another bicycle. Similarly, the sceptre held by the statue of Henry VIII mounted above the medieval Great Gate was replaced with a chair leg as a prank many years ago. It has remained there to this day: when in the 1980s students exchanged the chair leg for a bicycle pump, the College replaced the chair leg.


College Rivalry


The college remains a great rival of St John’s who are their main competitor in sports and academia (John’s is also built right next door to Trinity). This has given rise to a number of anecdotes and myths. It is often cited as the reason why the courts of Trinity generally have no J staircases, despite including other letters in alphabetical order. Burrell’s Field has a J staircase but New, Great, Whewell’s, Nevile’s and Blue Boar Courts skip the letter. The reason is more one of tradition and the absence of the letter J in the Roman alphabet. There are also two small muzzle-loading cannons on the bowling green pointing in the direction of John’s, though this orientation may be coincidental. Full name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto - Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist, Cambridge, named after John the Evangelist Previous names - Established 1511 Sister College Balliol College Master Prof. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ...


Minor Traditions


Trinity College undergraduate gowns are dark blue, as opposed to the black favoured by most other Cambridge colleges. The porters always wear black bowler hats – most other college porters do not. As with other Cambridge colleges, the grass in courtyards are generally out-of-bound for everyone except the fellows. Only one of two meadows on “the Backs” (riverside area behind the college) are accessible to students. Other lawns are accessible to graduates in formal gowns. The majority of colleges of the Universities of Cambridge, Oxford and Durham have members of staff called Porters. ... The bowler hat is a hard felt hat with a rounded crown created for Thomas Coke, 2nd Earl of Leicester of Holkham, in 1850. ...


Scholarships and Prizes

The Scholars, together with the Master and Fellows, make up the Foundation of the College.


Research Scholars receive funding for graduate studies. They are given first preference in the assignment of college rooms.


The Senior Scholars consist of those who attain a degree with First Class honors or higher in the first or penultimate part of an undergraduate tripos, but also, those who obtain an extremely good First in their first year. For example in the Mathematics tripos a result in the top ten would be required to gain this position early. The college pays them a stipend of £250 a year and also allows them to choose rooms directly following the research scholars. The British undergraduate degree classification system is a grading scheme for undergraduate degrees (bachelors degrees and some masters degrees) in the United Kingdom. ... The University of Cambridge, England, divides the different kinds of honours bachelors degree by Tripos, a word which has an obscure etymology, but which may be traced to the three-legged stool candidates once used to sit on when taking oral examinations. ...


The Junior Scholars are precisely those who are not senior scholars but still obtained a first in the 1st year. Their stipend is £175/year. They are given preference in the room ballot over 2nd years who are not scholars.


These scholarships are tenable for the academic year following that in which the result was achieved. The room choices affected are always those after the year of the scholarship since said choices take place during it. If a scholarship is awarded but the student does not continue at Trinity then only a quarter of the stipend is given. However all students who achieve a first are awarded an additional £200 prize upon announcement of the results.


For completeness, we note that rooms are chosen in the order; Research Scholars, Senior Scholars, Non-Scholar 3rd Years, External Research Students, Junior Scholars, Non-Scholar 2nd Years and then 1st Years (although some better quality accommodation is reserved for 1st years).


All final year undergraduates who achieve first-class honours in their final exams are offered full financial support for proceeding with a Master’s degree. Other support is available for PhD degrees. The College also offers a number of other bursaries and studentships open to external applicants. The highly regarded right to walk on the grass in the college courts is exclusive to Fellows of the college and their guests. Scholars do however have the right to walk on Scholar’s Lawn, but only in full academic dress. A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate (or graduate) course of one to three years in duration. ... Aquatint of a Doctor in Divinity at the University of Oxford, in the scarlet and black academic robes corresponding to his position. ...


Trinity in Camberwell

Trinity College has a long-standing relationship with the Parish of St George’s, Camberwell, in South London. Students from the College have helped to run holiday schemes for children from the parish since 1966. The relationship was formalized in 1979 with the establishment of Trinity in Camberwell as a registered charity (Charity Commission no. 279447) which exists ‘to provide, promote, assist and encourage the advancement of education and relief of need and other charitable objects for the benefit of the community in the Parish of St George’s, Camberwell, and the neighbourhood thereof.’ Camberwell is a district of London in the London Borough of Southwark. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... Camberwell is a district of London in the London Borough of Southwark. ...


Legends

Many apocryphal stories have been told about the college’s wealth. Trinity is sometimes suggested to be the second, third or fourth wealthiest landowner in the UK (or in England) - after the Crown Estate, the National Trust and the Church of England. (A variant of this legend is repeated in the Tom Sharpe novel Porterhouse Blue.) This story is frequently repeated by tour guides. In 2005, Trinity's annual rental income from its properties was reported to be £20 million plus. In comparison, the National Trust's rental income in 2004-5 was around £25 million. (See Trinity College's riches) Crown land is a designated land belonging to the Crown, the equivalent of an entailed estate that passed with the monarchy and could not be alienated from it. ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Tom Sharpe (born March 30, 1928) is an English satirical author, born in London and educated at Lancing College and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. ... // Porterhouse Blue is a novel written by Tom Sharpe, first published in 1974. ... There are a number of popular legends associated with Cambridge University and its history, often recounted by punt guides to tourists whilst cruising the River Cam. ...


A second legend is that it is possible to walk from Cambridge to Oxford on land solely owned by Trinity. Several varieties of this legend exist - others refer to the combined land of Trinity College, Cambridge and Trinity College, Oxford, or of Trinity College, Cambridge and Christ Church, Oxford. All are most certainly false. Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... College name Trinity College Named after The Holy Trinity Established 1555 Sister College Churchill College President Sir Ivor Roberts KCMG MA JCR President Kushal Banerjee Undergraduates 298 MCR President Andrew Ng Graduates 105 Homepage Boatclub Trinity College (in full: The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity in the University... College name Christ Church Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister College Trinity College Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR President William Dorsey Undergraduates 426 MCR or GCR President {{{MCR President}}} Graduates 154 Home page Boat Club Christ Church (Latin: Ædes Christi, the temple or house of Christ...


Trinity has a tradition of maintaining extensive wine cellars beneath Great Court and Whewell's Court, the size and value of which is the subject of rumour[5]. A Wine cellar is a storage room for wine in bottles or barrels, or more rarely in carboys, amphoras or plastic containers. ...


Trinity also lays claim to the invention of an English, less sweet, version of crème brûlée sometimes known as “Trinity burnt cream”[6], although the college catering department refers to it as "Trinity Creme Brulee."[7] Crème brûlée (French, burnt cream, pronounced (IPA) in English; in French) is a dessert consisting of a custard-like base whose sugar topping has been burnt into a delicate, glass-like caramelized layer. ...


Notable alumni

Also see Category:Alumni of Trinity College, Cambridge, and Category:Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge This is a selective list of notable alumni of Trinity College, Cambridge sorted into chronological order: George Gascoigne 1525-1577 Poet, dramatist - Jocasta, The Glasse of Government John Dee 1527-1608 Alchemist, geographer, mathematician Sir Edward Coke 1552-1634 Lawyer, politician; Chief Justice of the Kings Bench Sir Francis...


Trinity Nobel Prize winners

1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... See also Rayleigh fading Rayleigh scattering Rayleigh number Rayleigh waves Rayleigh-Jeans law External links Nobel website bio of Rayleigh About John William Strutt MacTutor biography of Lord Rayleigh Categories: People stubs | 1842 births | 1919 deaths | Nobel Prize in Physics winners | Peers | British physicists | Discoverer of a chemical element ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Sir Joseph John Thomson Sir Joseph John Thomson (18 December 1856 – 30 August 1940), often known as J. J. Thomson, was an English physicist, the discoverer of the electron. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Ernest Rutherford Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson, PC, OM, FRS (August 30, 1871 – October 19, 1937), was a New Zealand nuclear physicist. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Sir William Henry Bragg OM, Cantab, OKW (Westward, Cumbria, England July 2, 1862 – March 10, 1942) was an English physicist and chemist, educated at King Williams College, Isle of Man, and Trinity College, Cambridge. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Sir William Lawrence Bragg CH, FRS, (March 31, 1890 - July 1, 1971) was a Australian physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1915. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Charles Glover Barkla (June 7, 1877 – October 23, 1944) was a British physicist. ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Niels (Henrik David) Bohr (October 7, 1885 – November 18, 1962) was a Danish physicist who made fundamental contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum mechanics. ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Francis William Aston (born Birmingham, September 1, 1877; died Cambridge, November 20, 1945) was a British physicist who won the 1922 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the invention of the mass spectrometer. ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Archibald Vivian Hill CH CBE (September 26, 1886–June 3, 1977) was a British physiologist, one of the founders of the diverse disciplines of biophysics and operations research. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Rt. ... 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sir Owen Willans Richardson (April 26, 1879 - February 15, 1959) was a British physicist, and was a professor at Princeton University from 1906 to 1913. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins (1861 - 1947) was an English biochemist. ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... Edgar Douglas Adrian, 1st Baron Adrian (born London, 30 November 1889, died London, 4 August 1977) was a British electrophysiologist and recipient of the 1932 Nobel Prize for Physiology, won jointly with Sir Charles Sherrington for work on the function of neurons. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sir Henry Hallett Dale (June 9, 1875 - July 23, 1968) was an English scientist. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Joe has no friends what-so-ever Sir George Paget Thomson FRS (May 3, 1892 – September 10, 1975) was a Nobel-Prize-winning, English physicist who discovered the wave properties of the electron by electron diffraction. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell OM FRS (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970), was a British philosopher, logician, and mathematician, working mostly in the 20th century. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Ernest Thomas Sinton Walton (October 6, 1903 – June 25, 1995) was an Irish physicist, the winner of the 1951 Nobel Prize for Physics along with Sir John Douglas Cockcroft. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Richard Laurence Millington Synge (born Liverpool, October 28, 1914, died Norwich, August 18, 1994) was a British biochemist, and winner of the 1952 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the invention of partition chromatography. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... Alan Lloyd Hodgkin photo: taken 1963 Nobel prize photo Sir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin, OM, KBE, FRS (February 5, 1914 – December 20, 1998) was a British physiologist and biophysicist, who won the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work with Andrew Fielding Huxley on the basis of nerve... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... Andrew Huxley at Trinity College, Cambridge, July 2005 Family tree Sir Andrew Fielding Huxley, OM, FRS (born 22 November 1917, Hampstead, London, England, UK) is a British physiologist and biophysicist, who won the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work with Alan Lloyd Hodgkin on the basis... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Brian David Josephson (born Cardiff, Wales, UK, January 4, 1940) is a British physicist whose discovery of the Josephson effect as a 22-year-old graduate student won him the 1973 Nobel Prize for Physics, which he shared with Leo Esaki and Ivar Giaever. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Sir Martin Ryle (September 27, 1918 – October 14, 1984) was a British radio astronomer who developed revolutionary radio telescope systems (see e. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... James Edward Meade (June 23, 1907, Swanage, Dorset – December 22, 1995, Cambridge) was an English economist and winner of the 1977 Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel jointly with the Norwegian Bertil Ohlin for their Pathbreaking contribution to the theory of international trade and... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Semenov (on the right) and Kapitsa (on the left), portrait by Boris Kustodiev, 1921 Pyotr Leonidovich Kapitsa (Russian Пётр Леонидович Капица) (July 9, 1894 – April 8, 1984) was a Soviet/Russian physicist who discovered superfluidity with some contribution from John F. Allen and Don Misener in 1937. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Walter Gilbert Walter Gilbert (born March 21, 1932) is an American physicist, biochemist, entrepreneur, and molecular biology pioneer. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Aaron Klug, OM, FRS (born 11 August 1926 in Zelvas, Lithuania) is a Lithuanian-born British chemist and biophysicist, and winner of the 1982 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his development of crystallographic electron microscopy and his structural elucidation of biologically important nucleic acid-protein complexes. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Indian-American physicist. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... James Alexander Mirrlees (born July 5, 1936, Minnigaff, Scotland) is a Scottish economist and winner of the 1996 Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Sir John Anthony Pople (October 31, 1925 – March 15, 2004) was a theoretical chemist. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Amartya Sen Dr. Amartya Kumar Sen CH (Hon) (Bengali: Ômorto Kumar Shen) (born 3 November 1933 in Santiniketan, India), is an economist and a winner of the Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences (sometimes referred to informally as the Nobel Prize for Economics) in 1998, for his work on...

College Officials

List of Masters

The head of Trinity College is the Master. The first Master was John Redman who was appointed in 1546. The role is a Royal appointment and in the past was sometimes made by the Monarch as a favour to an important person. Nowadays the Fellows of the College, and to a lesser extent the Government, choose the new Master and the Royal role is only nominal. A complete list of the Masters of Trinity is below. // Events Spanish conquest of Yucatan Peace between England and France Foundation of Trinity College, Cambridge by Henry VIII of England Katharina von Bora flees to Magdeburg Science Architecture Michelangelo Buonarroti is made chief architect of St. ...

John Whitgift (c. ... John Still (c. ... Thomas Nevile was an English clergyman and academic who was Dean of Peterborough (??-1597) and Canterbury (1597-??), Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge (1582-93), and Master of Trinity College, Cambridge (1593-1615). ... Doctor John Richardson (born Linton, Cambridgeshire — died 1625) was Master of Trinity College, Cambridge from 1615 until his death. ... Dr Thomas Comber (b. ... Thomas Hill DD, (died 1653), was an English Puritan divine. ... John Arrowsmith (29 March 1602 Gateshead – February 1659 Cambridge) was educated at St Johns College, Cambridge. ... John Wilkins. ... Henry Ferne (1602 York – March 16, 1662 Chester) was awarded a D.D. in 1643. ... John Pearson (February 28, 1612 - July 16, 1686), English divine and scholar, was born at Great Snoring, Norfolk. ... Isaac Barrow (October 1630 - May 4, 1677) was an English divine, scholar and mathematician who is generally given minor credit for his role in the development of modern calculus; in particular, for his work regarding the tangent; for example, Barrow is given credit for being the first to calculate the... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... John Montagu (cir 1655–1728) was a son of the famous admiral, Edward Montagu, 1st Earl of Sandwich, killed at the Battle of Solebay. ... Richard Bentley (January 27, 1662 – July 14, 1742) was an English theologian, Classics scholar and critic. ... Robert Smith (1689 - February 2, 1768) was an English mathematician. ... Bishop John Hinchcliffe (1732–1794) was Master of Trinity College, Cambridge, 1768-89, Bishop of Peterborough, 1769-94, and Dean of Durham, 1788-94. ... Thomas Postlethwaite (1731–May 4, 1798 Bath) was the son of Richard Postlethwaite of Crosslands, Lancashire. ... Bishop William Lort Mansel (2 April 1753 Pembroke – 27 June 1820 Trinity College, Cambridge) was Master of Trinity College, Cambridge from 1798 to his death in 1820. ... Charles Manners-Sutton, 1st Viscount Canterbury Christopher Wordsworth (June 9, 1774 - February 2, 1846), English divine and scholar, youngest brother of the poet William Wordsworth, and was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he became a fellow in 1798. ... William Whewell William Whewell (May 24, 1794 – March 6, 1866) was an English polymath, scientist, Anglican priest, philosopher, theologian and historian of science. ... William Hepworth Thompson (27 March 1810 - 1 October 1886) was an English classical scholar and Master of Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Henry Montagu Butler (July 2, 1833 Gayton Northamptonshire – January 14, 1918 Cambridge) was an English academic who was educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Sir Joseph John Thomson Sir Joseph John Thomson (18 December 1856 – 30 August 1940), often known as J. J. Thomson, was an English physicist, the discoverer of the electron. ... George Macaulay Trevelyan (February 16, 1876 – 1962) was an English historian, son of Sir George Otto Trevelyan and great-nephew of Thomas Macaulay. ... Edgar Douglas Adrian, 1st Baron Adrian (born London, 30 November 1889, died London, 4 August 1977) was a British electrophysiologist and recipient of the 1932 Nobel Prize for Physiology, won jointly with Sir Charles Sherrington for work on the function of neurons. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... Sir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin (February 5, 1914 _ December 20, 1998) was a British physiologist and biophysicist, who won the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work with Andrew Fielding Huxley on the basis of nerve action potentials, the electrical impulses that enable the activity of an... Andrew Huxley at Trinity College, Cambridge, July 2005 Family tree Sir Andrew Fielding Huxley, OM, FRS (born 22 November 1917, Hampstead, London, England, UK) is a British physiologist and biophysicist, who won the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work with Alan Lloyd Hodgkin on the basis... Sir Michael Francis Atiyah, OM, FRS (born 22 April 1929) is a mathematician who was born in London. ... Amartya Sen Dr. Amartya Kumar Sen CH (Hon) (Bengali: Ômorto Kumar Shen) (born 3 November 1933 in Santiniketan, India), is an economist and a winner of the Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences (sometimes referred to informally as the Nobel Prize for Economics) in 1998, for his work on... The Right Honourable Martin John Rees, Baron Rees of Ludlow, FRS (born 23 June 1942) is a professor of astronomy. ...

List of Deans of Chapel

  • Harry Williams -1969
  • John Robinson 1969-1983
  • John Bowker 1984-1991
  • Arnold Browne 1991-2006
  • Michael Banner 2006-present

This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... John Bowker is a professor of divinity at Gresham College, London. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Student numbers from 2006 projections in the Trinity College Annual Record, Winter 2005. The largest college claim includes fellows as college members. Excluding fellows, Trinity would be second largest of the Cambridge colleges.
  2. ^ Bloomberg.com (2005-12-1). Cambridge and Oxford Adopt U.S. Methods to Win Alumni Donations. Retrieved on 2006-06-19.. By way of comparison, the second wealthiest college in Cambridge (St. John's) has an estimated endowment of c. £250 million, and the richest college in Oxford (St. John's) has about £200 million.
  3. ^ Odgers Ray & Berndtson (2005-11). Job advertisement for new Trinity College Senior Bursar (PDF) pp. 4. Retrieved on 2006-06-19. Of this amount approx. £75 million is part of the college's Amalgamated Trust Funds, which is dedicated for specific purposes.
  4. ^ Varsity report (PDF) (2006-11). Retrieved on 2006-11-20.
  5. ^ University of Cambridge (2006-05-10). Job advertisement for new Trinity College Junior Bursar, Cambridge University Reporter. Retrieved on 2006-06-19.
  6. ^ Nobel laureates by country#Laureate count per nation

2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... Laureates of the Nobel Prize listed by country. ...

Related pages

Shown within Cambridgeshire Geography Status: City (1951) Region: East of England Admin. ... The University of Cambridge, located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Full name The Hall and College of Michaelhouse Motto Named after St. ... Kings Hall was once one of the constituent colleges of Cambridge, and the 2nd to be founded, in 1317. ... Trinitys Great Court looking north, showing the Kings Gate, Chapel, Fountain and the Great Gate Great Court is the main court of Trinity College, Cambridge, and reputed to be the largest enclosed court in Europe. ... Neviles Court is a court in Trinity College, Cambridge, created by a bequest by the colleges master, Thomas Nevile. ... The exterior of the Wren Library The Wren Library is the library of Trinity College in Cambridge. ...

External links

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Colleges of the University of Cambridge Arms of the University

Christ's | Churchill | Clare | Clare Hall | Corpus Christi | Darwin | Downing | Emmanuel | Fitzwilliam | Girton | Gonville and Caius | Homerton | Hughes Hall | Jesus | King's | Lucy Cavendish | Magdalene | New Hall | Newnham | Pembroke | Peterhouse | Queens' | Robinson | St Catharine's | St Edmund's | St John's | Selwyn | Sidney Sussex | Trinity | Trinity Hall | Wolfson Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... This is a list of the colleges within the University of Cambridge. ... Download high resolution version (800x982, 127 KB)made by me in Inkscape. ... Full name Christs College Motto Souvent me Souvient I Often Remember Named after Christ Previous names Gods-house (1437), Christs College (1505) Established 1505 Sister College(s) Wadham College Master Prof. ... Full name Churchill College Motto Forward Named after Sir Winston Churchill Previous names - Established 1960 Sister College(s) Trinity College Master Sir John Boyd Location Storeys Way Undergraduates 440 Postgraduates 210 Homepage Boatclub Churchill College Main Entrance Churchill College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of... Full name Clare College Motto - Named after Elizabeth de Clare Previous names University Hall (1326), Clare Hall (1338), Clare College (1856) Established 1326 Sister College(s) Oriel College St Hughs College Master Prof. ... Full name Clare Hall Motto - Named after Clare College Previous names - Established 1966, 1984 Sister College St Cross College President Prof. ... Full name The College of Corpus Christi and the Blessed Virgin Mary in Cambridge Motto There is a toast, Floreat antiqua domus (May the old house flourish), from which the colleges nickname, Old House, is derived Named after The citys Guilds of Corpus Christi and the Blessed Virgin... Full name Darwin College Motto - Named after The Darwin Family Previous names - Established 1964 Sister College(s) Wolfson College Master Prof. ... Full name Downing College Motto Quaerere Verum Seek the truth Named after Sir George Downing Previous names - Established 1800 Sister College(s) Lincoln College Master Prof. ... Full name Emmanuel College Motto - Named after Immanuel Previous names - Established 1584 Sister College(s) Exeter College Master The Lord Wilson of Dinton Location Regent Street Undergraduates 494 Postgraduates 98 Homepage Boatclub Emmanuel front court and the Wren chapel Emmanuel College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge... Full name Fitzwilliam College Motto Ex antiquis et novissimis optima The best of old and new Named after Fitzwilliam Museum, named after Richard Fitzwilliam, named after Fitzwilliam Street, original location Previous names Fitzwilliam Hall [Non collegiate] (1869), Fitzwilliam House [Non collegiate] (1924) Established 1966 Sister College(s) St Edmund Hall... Full name Girton College Motto - Better is wisdom than weapons of war (Alumni) Named after Girton Village Previous names The College for Women (1869), Girton College (1872) Established 1869 Sister College(s) Somerville College Mistress Professor Dame Marilyn Strathern Location Huntingdon Road Undergraduates 503 Postgraduates 201 Homepage Boatclub Girton College... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348, refounded 1557 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Sir Christopher Hum Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, generally known... Full name The Moron Motto Respice inem Look to the end, and keep on going Named after Homerton town Previous names See article Established 1976 Sister College(s) None Principal Dr Kate Pretty Location Hills Road Undergraduates 539 Postgraduates 681 Homepage Boatclub Homerton College is in the vicinity of the... Full name Hughes Hall Motto Disce ut Servus Named after Miss Elizabeth Phillips Hughes Previous names - Established 1885 Sister College(s) None President Prof. ... Full name The College of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint John the Evangelist and the glorious Virgin Saint Radegund, near Cambridge Motto Facias Prosperum Iter Named after Jesus Lane & Jesus Parish Previous names - Established 1496 Sister College(s) Jesus College Master Prof. ... Full name The Kings College of Our Lady and St Nicholas in Cambridge Motto Veritas Et Utilitas Truth and usefulness Named after Henry VI Previous names - Established 1441 Sister College(s) New College Provost Prof. ... Full name Lucy Cavendish College Motto - Named after Lucy Cavendish Previous names - Established 1965 Sister College None President Dame Veronica Sutherland Location Lady Margaret Road Undergraduates 106 Graduates 116 Homepage Boatclub Lucy Cavendish College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge with a focus on the needs of... Full name The College of Saint Mary Magdalene Motto Garde ta Foy Keep your Faith Named after Mary Magdalene Previous names Buckingham College Established 1428 Sister College(s) Magdalen College Master Duncan Robinson Location Magdalene Street Undergraduates 335 Postgraduates 169 Homepage Boatclub Magdalene College (pronounced ) was founded in 1428 as... Full name New Hall Motto - Named after - Previous names - Established 1954 Sister College St Annes College President Anne Lonsdale Location Huntingdon Road Undergraduates 377 Graduates 74 Homepage Boatclub New Hall is a womens college in the University of Cambridge. ... Full name Newnham College Motto - Named after Its location in the village of Newnham Previous names Newnham Hall Established 1871 Sister College(s) Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford Principal The Lady ONeill of Bengarve Location Sidgwick Avenue Undergraduates 396 Postgraduates 120 Homepage Boatclub A view of the Clough and Kennedy... Full name Pembroke College Motto - Named after Countess of Pembroke, Mary de St Pol Previous names Marie Valence Hall (1347), Pembroke Hall (?), Pembroke College (1856) Established 1347 Sister College(s) Queens College Master Sir Richard Dearlove Location Trumpington Street Undergraduates ~420 Postgraduates 194 Homepage Boatclub Pembroke College is a... Full name Peterhouse Motto - Named after St Peter Previous names The Scholars of the Bishop of Ely St Peter’s College Established 1284 Sister College(s) Merton College Master The Lord Wilson of Tillyorn Location Trumpington Street Undergraduates 253 Postgraduates 125 Homepage Boatclub The chapel cloisters, through which Old Court... Full name The Queens College of Saint Margaret and Saint Bernard in the University of Cambridge Motto Floreat Domus May this House Flourish Named after - Previous names - Established 1448 Sister College(s) Pembroke College President Lord Eatwell Location Silver Street Undergraduates 490 Postgraduates 270 Homepage Boatclub The Gatehouse, as... Full name Robinson College Motto - Named after Sir David Robinson Previous names - Established 1977 Sister College St Catherines College Warden (Anthony) David Yates Location Grange Road Undergraduates 390 Graduates 96 Homepage Boatclub Robinson College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Cambridge. ... Full name Collegium sive aula D. Catharinæ in Universitate Cantabrigiensi Motto   For the wheel! (unofficial) Named after St Catharine of Alexandria Previous names Katharine Hall (1473-1860) Established 1473 Sister College(s) Worcester College Master (From 1st January, 2007) Prof. ... Full name Saint Edmunds College Motto per revelationem et rationem through revelation and reason Named after St Edmund of Abingdon Previous names St. ... Full name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto Souvent me Souvient I Often Remember Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist, Cambridge, named after John the Evangelist Previous names Incorporates part of what was Merton Hall which no longer exists Established... Full name Selwyn College Motto ΑΝΔΡΙΖΕΣΘΕ quit ye like men Named after George Augustus Selwyn Previous names - Established 1882 Sister College(s) Keble College Master Prof. ... Full name Sidney Sussex College Motto Dieu me garde de calomnie God preserve me from calumny Named after Lady Frances Sidney, Countess of Sussex Previous names - Established 1596 Sister College(s) St Johns College Master Prof. ... Full name College of Scholars of the Holy Trinity of Norwich Motto - Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names - Established 1350 Sister College(s) University College All Souls College Master Prof. ... Full name Wolfson College Motto Ring True Named after The Wolfson Foundation Previous names University College, Wolfson College (1972) Established 1965 Sister College Linacre College President Dr Gordon Johnson Location Barton Road Undergraduates 90 Graduates 510 Homepage Boatclub Wolfson College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Trinity College, Cambridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3334 words)
Trinity College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England.
Trinity is the largest of all the colleges in Cambridge (and indeed Oxbridge), with around 660 undergraduates, 430 graduates, and over 160 Fellows.
The college was founded by Henry VIII in 1546, from the merger of two existing colleges: Michaelhouse (founded by Hervey de Stanton in 1324), and King's Hall (established by Edward II in 1317 and refounded by Edward III in 1337).
Trinity College, Cambridge - Wikipedia (3375 words)
Trinity are o puternică tradiţie academică, având printre absolvenţii săi 31 de deţinători ai Premiului Nobel, cinci deţinători ai distincţiei Fields Medal şi unul al premiului Abel (ambele în matematică).
Trinity College and King's College were for decades the main recruiting grounds for the Cambridge Apostles, an elite, intellectual secret society that once boasted members of real distinction but which is now considered to likely no longer exist.
Trinity is sometimes suggested to be the second or third largest landowner in the UK (or in England) - after the Crown Estate and the Church of England.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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