FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Trinity Church, New York
Trinity Church
Trinity Church
Close-up of Trinity Church
Close-up of Trinity Church
Trinity Church, at the corner of Broadway and Wall Street in New York City, viewed from the World Trade Center
Trinity Church, at the corner of Broadway and Wall Street in New York City, viewed from the World Trade Center
A glimpse of New York from Trinity Church steeple. June 15, 1872.
A glimpse of New York from Trinity Church steeple. June 15, 1872.
For other churches with this name, please see Trinity Church (disambiguation).

Trinity Church is a historic Anglican (now Episcopal) parish in New York City, with a church at the intersection of Wall Street and Broadway. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x1536, 254 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x1536, 254 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x1536, 321 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x1536, 321 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ... Trinity Church, Broadway and Wall Street, New York, NY, 1980, by Rick Dikeman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Trinity Church, Broadway and Wall Street, New York, NY, 1980, by Rick Dikeman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The World Trade Center in New York City (sometimes informally referred to as the WTC) was a complex of seven buildings designed by Japanese-American architect Minoru Yamasaki and leased by Larry Silverstein from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey around a central plaza, near the south... Download high resolution version (513x760, 98 KB)A glimpse of New York from Trinity Church steeple. ... Download high resolution version (513x760, 98 KB)A glimpse of New York from Trinity Church steeple. ... Trinity Church is a common name for churches of many Christian denominations, especially in the Anglican Communion. ... The term Anglican (from Anglia, the Latin name for England) describes the people and churches that follow the religious traditions developed by the established Church of England. ... The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington DC is the National Cathedral of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. ... Nickname: The Big Apple Motto: Official website: City of New York Location [[Image:|250px|250px|Location of City of New York, New York]] Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R... For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City, and is the oldest north-south main thoroughfare in the city, dating to the first New Amsterdam settlement. ...


In 1696, Governor Benjamin Fletcher approved the purchase of land in Lower Manhattan by the Anglican community for construction of a new church. The parish received its charter from King William III of England on May 6, 1697. Its land grant specified an annual rent of one peppercorn due to the English crown. Benjamin Fletcher (1640-1703) was colonial governor of New York from 1692 to 1697. ... William III of England (14 November 1650 – 8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland and William III of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and a Protestant Prince of Orange from his birth, King of England and King of Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scots... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... Events September 20 - The Treaty of Ryswick December 2 – St Pauls Cathedral opened in London Peter the Great travels in Europe officially incognito as artilleryman Pjotr Mikhailov Use of palanquins increases in Europe Christopher Polhem starts Swedens first technical school. ... Black pepper is a seasoning produced from the fermented, dried, unripe red berries, called peppercorn, of the plant Piper nigrum. ...


The first church was constructed in 1698, with assistance from the pirate Captain Kidd. In 1705 Queen Anne of England increased the parish's land holdings to 215 acres (870,000 m²). In 1709, William Huddleston founded Trinity School as the charity school of the church, and classes were originally held in the steeple of the church. In 1754, King's College (now Columbia University) was chartered by King George II of Great Britain and instruction began with eight students in a school building nearby the church. William Captain Kidd (1645–May 23, 1701) was a notorious pirate. ... Events Construction begins on Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England. ... Anne Queen of Great Britain and Ireland Anne (6 February 1665–1 August 1714), became Queen of England and Scotland on 8 March 1702. ... // Events January 12 - Two-month freezing period begins in France - The coast of the Atlantic and Seine River freeze, crops fail and at least 24. ... Trinity School Labore et virtute (Labor and virtue)   Trinity School is an independent K-12 private school located in New York City and is a member of the Ivy Preparatory School League. ... Columbia University is a private university in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City and a member of the Ivy League. ... George II (George Augustus) (10 November 1683–25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ...


During the American Revolutionary War the clergy were Loyalists, while the parishioners included members of the first and second Continental Congresses. The first church building was destroyed in 1776 by a fire that started in the "Fighting Cocks" Tavern, just six days after almost all the city's volunteer firemen had followed General Washington north. After British evacuation at war's end, the New York state legislature ratified the charter of Trinity Church in 1784, deleting the provision requiring loyalty to the King of England. The church began to hold services at St. Paul's Chapel, where George Washington attended thanksgiving services after his inauguration. (St. Paul's chapel is the oldest public building in continuous use in New York City.) Combatants American Revolutionaries, France, Netherlands, Spain, allies British Empire, allies Commanders George Washington Comte de Rochambeau Nathanael Greene William Howe Henry Clinton Charles Cornwallis The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was the military component of the American Revolution. ... The Continental Congress is the label given to three successive bodies of representatives: The First Continental Congress met from September 5, 1774 to October 26, 1774. ... This article is about the year 1776. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the successful Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War from 1775 to 1783, and later became the first President of the United States, an office to which he was elected, unanimously, twice and remained in from...


Construction on the second Trinity Church building began in 1788; it was consecrated in 1790. The structure was torn down after being weakened by heavy snows during the winter of 1838/1839.


The third Trinity Church was consecrated on May 21, 1846. It is a Gothic Revival structure designed by architect Richard Upjohn, and it dominated the skyline of New York: at the time of its completion its 281-foot spire and cross was the highest point in New York. May 21 is the 141st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (142nd in leap years). ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Richard Upjohn (1802 - 1878) was a U.S. (English-born) architect. ...


There are three burial grounds closely associated with Trinity Church. The first Trinity Church Cemetery is Trinity Churchyard, at Wall Street and Broadway, in which are interred Alexander Hamilton, William Bradford, Robert Fulton, and Albert Gallatin. The second is Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum on upper Riverside Drive at 155th Street, formerly the location of John James Audubon's estate, in which are interred John James Audubon, Alfred Tennyson Dickens, John Jacob Astor, and Clement Clarke Moore. The third is the Churchyard of St. Paul's Chapel. Trinity Church Cemetery consists of three separate burial grounds associated with Trinity Church in Manhattan, New York, USA. The first was established in the Churchyard located at 74 Trinity Place at Wall Street and Broadway. ... For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... A portrait of Alexander Hamilton by John Trumbull, 1792. ... William Bradford (May 20, 1663- May 23, 1752) was an early British printer in North America, and the head of a family that included leading publishers for 140 years. ... Robert Fulton Robert Fulton (November 14, 1765 – February 24, 1815) was a US engineer and inventor, who was widely credited with developing the first steam-powered ship. ... Albert Gallatin Abraham Alfonse Albert Gallatin (January 29, 1761–August 12, 1849) was an ethnologist, linguist, American politician, diplomat, and Secretary of the Treasury. ... Riverside Drive is a scenic north-south thoroughfare in New York City. ... John James Audubon John James Audubon (April 26, 1785 – January 27, 1851) was a Franco-American ornithologist, naturalist, and painter. ... John James Audubon John James Audubon (April 26, 1785 – January 27, 1851) was a Franco-American ornithologist, naturalist, and painter. ... John Jacob (originally Johann Jakob) Astor (July 17, 1763 - March 29, 1848) made a fortune in fur trading and real estate. ... Clement Clarke Moore, (July 15, 1779 – July 10, 1863), is best known as the credited author of A Visit From St. ...


On July 9, 1976, the church was visited by Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom, and she was presented with a symbolic "back rent" of 279 peppercorns. July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1976 calendar). ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born 21 April 1926, is Queen of sixteen independent nations known as the Commonwealth Realms (and has previously been Queen of sixteen others). ...


The parish has a large number of realty holdings, including 26 commercial buildings in Lower Manhattan and 470 acres (1.9 km²) of land in Connecticut.


Ever since 1993, Trinity church has played the main place the High School Of Economics and finance holds their senior graduation ceremonies. The school is appropiately located on Trinity Place (a few blocks away from the church).


The 2004 movie National Treasure gave more populairity and more attention to this church as it was the site of scene where they found the "Treasure". 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed. ... This is for the movie. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Trinity Church

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Trinity School Labore et virtute (Labor and virtue)   Trinity School is an independent K-12 private school located in New York City and is a member of the Ivy Preparatory School League. ... Columbia University is a private university in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City and a member of the Ivy League. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

External links

  • Trinity Church Official Site.
  • Trinity Church and the schoolhouse of Trinity School (circa 17??)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Trinity Church, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (650 words)
A glimpse of New York from Trinity Church steeple.
In 1709, William Huddleston founded Trinity School as the charity school of the church, and classes were originally held in the steeple of the church.
The second is Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum on upper Riverside Drive at 155th Street, formerly the location of John James Audubon's estate, in which are interred John James Audubon, Alfred Tennyson Dickens, John Jacob Astor, and Clement Clarke Moore.
New York Architecture Images- TRINITY CHURCH (2085 words)
The basilica plan church is built in the English Perpendicular Gothic Style of the 14th century, signaling the arrival of Gothic Revival ideals brought from England to New York in the mid 19th century.
Trinity Church, which was burned during the Revolutionary War, saw the official end of the conflict and is the resting place of many martyrs of the revolution, including Alexander Hamilton.
The burning of Trinity left St. Paul's chapel further north as the center of religious life in the city during the remainder of the war, and as New York served as the capital of the new nation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m