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Encyclopedia > Trieste
Comune di Trieste

Municipal coat of arms
Country Flag of Italy Italy
Region Friuli-Venezia Giulia
Province Trieste (TS)
Mayor Roberto Dipiazza (since 2001)
Elevation m (7 ft)
Area 84 km² (32 sq mi)
Population (as of December 31, 2004)
 - Total 207,069
 - Density 2,465/km² (6,384/sq mi)
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 45°38′N, 13°48′E
Gentilic Triestini
Dialing code 040
Postal code 34100
Frazioni See list
Patron San Giusto
 - Day November 3
Website: www.comune.trieste.it

Trieste
Trieste (Italy)

Trieste (Italian: Trieste; Slovenian, Serbian, and Croatian: Trst; German: Triest) is a city and port in northeastern Italy right on the border with Slovenia. Trieste is located at the head of the Gulf of Trieste on the Adriatic Sea. With a population of 207,069 (2001) it is the capital of the autonomous region Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Trieste province. Trieste can mean: Trieste, a city in Italy Province of Trieste, a province in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region of Italy Free Territory of Trieste, a free state that existed between 1945 and 1954 (formally until 1977) Bathyscaphe Trieste, a deep-sea submersible Category: ... Image File history File links Trieste-Stemma. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... Trieste (It. ... Roberto Dipiazza (born February 1, 1953 in Aiello del Friuli, Province of Udine) is an Italian entrepreneur and politician, mayor of Muggia (in the Province of Trieste) in 1996-2001, and since 2001, mayor of Trieste. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Italy_Regions_(including_Pelagie_Islands). ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Gulf of Trieste and the littoral The Gulf of Trieste (Italian: Golfo di Trieste, Slovene: TržaÅ¡ki zaliv, German: Golf von Triest ) is a shallow bay of the Adriatic Sea, in the extreme northern part of the Mediterranean Sea. ... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Trieste flourished as part of Austria, from 1382 (the Austro-Hungarian Empire from 1867) until 1918 when it was among Central Europe's most prosperous Mediterranean seaports as well as a capital of literature and music. However, the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and Trieste's annexation to Italy after World War I led to a decline in its economic and cultural importance. Year 1382 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Official languages Latin, German, Hungarian Established church Roman Catholic Capital & Largest City Vienna pop. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ...


Today, Trieste is a border town. The population is an ethnic mix of the neighboring regions; The dominant local Venetian dialect of Trieste is called Triestine ("Triestin" - pronounced /triˈɛstin/, in Italian "Triestino"). This dialect and the official Italian language are spoken in the city center while Slovenian is spoken in several of the immediate suburbs. The Venetian and the Slovenian languages are considered autochthonous to the area. There are also a small number of German-speakers. For dialects of programming languages, see Programming language dialect. ... The Triestine dialect is an Italian dialect local to the city of Trieste. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... An autochthonous language is an indigenous language, one resident for a considerable length of time in a territory or region spoken by an autochthonous group. ...


The economy depends on the port and on trade with its neighboring regions. Throughout the Cold War Trieste was peripheral, but it is rebuilding some of its former influence. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


Places of tourist interest in Trieste include numerous examples of Art Nouveau and neoclassical architecture from its Austrian past, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, the International School for Advanced Studies and Trieste University. Vitebsk Railway Station one of the finest examples of Art Nouveau architecture. ... The Cathedral of Vilnius (1783), by Laurynas Gucevičius. ... ICTP Main building The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics operates under a tripartite agreement among the Italian Government, UNESCO, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (both agencies of the United Nations) to foster advanced studies and research, especially in developing countries. ... Postgraduate training and leading-edge research in various areas of Physics, Mathematics, and Neurosciences are the objectives of SISSA, the International School for Advanced Studies of Trieste. ... The University of Trieste (Italian Università degli Studi di Trieste, UNITS) is a medium-sized university in Trieste in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region of Italy. ...

Contents

History

Quay along the Adriatic.
Quay along the Adriatic.
View of city centre and the surrounding hills.
View of city centre and the surrounding hills.
View of downtown Trieste from Via dei Porta.
View of downtown Trieste from Via dei Porta.
Austrian map of Trieste, 1888.
Austrian map of Trieste, 1888.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1488x1984, 595 KB) Summary Claudio Sapienza 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1488x1984, 595 KB) Summary Claudio Sapienza 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1190 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Trieste ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1190 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Trieste ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2608 × 1952 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2608 × 1952 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Karte_Triest. ... Image File history File links Karte_Triest. ...

Ancient era

The area of what is now Trieste was settled by the Carni, an Indo-European tribe (hence the name Carso) since the 3rd millennium BC. Subsequently the area was populated by the Histri, an Illyrian people, who remained the main civilization until the 2000 BC, when the Palaeo-Veneti arrived. The Proto-Indo-Europeans are the hypothetical speakers of the reconstructed Proto-Indo-European language, a prehistoric people of the Chalcolithic and early Bronze Age. ... An image of Italian Karst (Monfalcone). ... The 3rd millennium BC spans the Early to Middle Bronze Age. ... Rovinj, on the western coast of Croatian Istria. ... Location of Illyria Illyria (Albanian Iliria Land of the Free; Ancient Greek ; Latin Illyria [1] (see also Illyricum) was in Classical antiquity a region in the western part of todays Balkan Peninsula, founded by the tribes and clans of Illyrians, an ancient people who spoke the Illyrian languages. ... (Redirected from 2000 BC) (21st century BC - 20th century BC - 19th century BC - other centuries) (3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC) Events 2064 - 1986 BC -- Twin Dynasty wars in Egypt 2000 BC -- Farmers and herders travel south from Ethiopia and settle in Kenya. ... Veneti may mean: The Adriatic Veneti, Enetoi in Greek, a bygone people of north-eastern Italy who spoke an Italic language. ...


By 177 BC, the city was under the governance of the Roman republic. Trieste was granted the status of a colony under Julius Caesar, who recorded its name as Tergeste in his Commentarii de bello Gallico (51 BC). After the end of the Western Roman Empire (in 476), Trieste remained a Byzantine military centre. In 788 it became part of the Frank kingdom, under the authority of their count-bishop. From the year 1081 the city came loosely under Aquileia's patriarchy, developing into a free commune at the end of the 12th century. Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC - 170s BC - 150s BC140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC Years: 182 BC 181 BC 180 BC 179 BC 178 BC - 177 BC - 176 BC 175 BC 174... This article refers to the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For alternate meanings, see Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 56 BC 55 BC 54 BC 53 BC 52 BC 51 BC 50 BC 49 BC 48... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Events August - The usurper Basiliscus is deposed and Zeno is restored as Eastern Roman Emperor. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... Events Charlemagne conquers Bavaria. ... The Frankish Empire was the territory of the Franks, from the 5th to the 10th centuries, from 481 ruled by Clovis I of the Merovingian Dynasty, the first king of all the Franks. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Events Corfu taken from Byzantine Empire by Robert Guiscard, Italy Byzantine emperor Nicephorus III is overthrown by Alexius I Comnenus, ending the Middle Byzantine period and beginning the Comnenan dynasty Alexius I helps defend Albania from the Normans (the first recorded mention of Albania), but is defeated at the Battle... Aquileia (Friulian Aquilee, Slovene Oglej) is an ancient Roman town of Italy, at the head of the Adriatic at the edge of the lagoons, about 10 km from the sea, on the river Natiso (modern Natisone), the course of which has changed somewhat since Roman times. ... Defensive towers at San Gimignano, Tuscany, bear witness to the factional strife within communes. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ...


Austria

After two centuries of war against the nearby major power, the Republic of Venice (who occupied it briefly from 1369 to 1372), the burghers of Trieste petitioned Leopold III von Habsburg, Duke of Austria to become part of his domains. (The agreement of cessation was signed in October 1382, at the St. Bartholomew's church in the village of Šiška (apud Sisciam), today one of the city quarters of Ljubljana.) The citizens, however, maintained a certain degree of autonomy well until the 17th century. Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... Events King Charles V of France renounces the treaty of Brétigny and war is declared between France and England. ... In this year, the city of Aachen, Germany begins adding a Roman numeral Anno Domini date to a few of its coins. ... Leopold III (born November 1, 1351 in Vienna; died July 9, 1386 in Sempach) from the Habsburg family was a Duke of Austria, Styria and Carinthia. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... For other uses, see October (disambiguation). ... Michelangelos The Last Judgement shows Saint Bartholomew holding the knife of his martyrdom and his flayed skin. ... Masouleh village, Gilan Province, Iran. ... Å iÅ¡ka The most populous of the city quarters of Ljubljana, the capital city of Slovenia. ...   (IPA: ) is the capital and largest city of Slovenia. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ...


Trieste grew into an important port and trade hub. It was constituted a free port within the Austrian domains by Emperor Charles VI and remained a free port from 1719 until July 1, 1891. The reign of his successor, Maria Theresa of Austria, marked for Trieste in particular the beginning of a flourishing era. A free port (porto franco) or free zone (US: Foreign-Trade Zone) is a port or area with relaxed jurisdiction with respect to the country of location. ... Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI Charles VI, (German Karl VI; in full Karl Josef Franz)Holy Roman Emperor (October 1, 1685 – October 20, 1740) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1711 to 1740 and the second son of Leopold I with his third wife, Eleonore-Magdalena of Pfalz-Neuburg. ... // Events January 23 - The Principality of Liechtenstein is created within the Holy Roman Empire April 25 - Daniel Defoe publishes Robinson Crusoe June 10 - Battle of Glen Shiel Prussia conducts Europes first systematic census Miners in Falun, Sweden find an apparently petrified body of Fet-Mats Israelsson in an unused... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Not to be confused with Maria Theresa of Austria (1816-1867). ...


The city was occupied by French troops three times during the Napoleonic Wars, in 1797, 1805 and 1809. In the latter occasion it was annexed to the Illyrian Provinces by Napoleon. In this period Trieste lost its autonomy (even when it was returned to the Austrian Empire in 1813), and status of free port was interrupted. Combatants Austria[a] Portugal Prussia[a] Russia[b] Sicily[c] Sardinia  Spain[d]  Sweden[e] United Kingdom French Empire Holland[f] Italy Etruria[g] Naples[h] Duchy of Warsaw[i] Confederation of the Rhine[j] Bavaria Saxony Westphalia Württemberg Denmark-Norway[k] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Illyrian Provinces (French Provinces illyriennes) were formed in 1809 when Austria ceded with the Treaty of Schoenbrunn its lands Carinthia, Carniola, Croatia southwest of the river Sava, Gorizia and Trieste to France after the defeat at the Battle of Wagram. ... Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des... Anthem Volkshymne (Peoples Anthem) The Austrian Empire Capital Vienna Language(s) German Hungarian Romanian Czech Slovakian Slovenian Croatian Serbian Italian Polish Ruthenian Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy History  - Established 1804  - Ausgleich 1867 The Crown of the Austrian Emperor The Austrian Empire (German: ) was a modern era successor empire founded... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Following the Napoleonic Wars, Trieste continued to prosper as the Imperial Free City of Trieste (Reichsunmittelbare Stadt Triest) and it became capital of the Austrian Littoral region, the so-called Küstenland. In the Holy Roman Empire, an imperial free city (in German: freie Reichsstadt) was a city formally responsible to the emperor only — as opposed to the majority of cities in the Empire, which belonged to a territory and were thus governed by one of the many princes (Fürsten) of... The Reichsfreiheit or Reichsunmittelbarkeit (adjectives reichsfrei, reichsunmittelbar) was a special, privileged status a city or region could attain in the Holy Roman Empire. ... The Austrian Littoral (German: , Italian: , Slovenian: Avstrijsko primorje) or Küstenland (Litorale, Primorska) was a crown land (Kronland) within the Austrian Empire (later Austria-Hungary) from 1813 to 1918. ...


The city's role as the principal Austrian commercial port and shipbuilding center was later emphasized by the foundation of the Austrian Lloyd merchant shipping line in 1836, whose headquarters stood at the corner of the Piazza Grande and Sanita. By 1913 Austrian Lloyd had a fleet of 62 ships comprising a total of 236,000 tons.[1] Lloyd Triestino or Triestian Lloyd is a shipping company based in Trieste, Italy. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The modern Austro-Hungarian Navy also used Trieste's shipbuilding facilities and as a base. The construction of the first major trunk railway in the Empire, the Vienna-Trieste Austrian Southern Railway, was completed in 1857, a valuable asset for trade and the supply of coal. This article is about the Royal Navy of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. ... I do not want to change this (the following) article, but mind that the Austro-Hungarian monarchy was formed some years after the railroad from Vienna to Trieste, accross Slovenia, was built! The Austrian Southern Railway (German Südbahn) was a former railway company during the time of the Austro... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


In the beginning of the 20th century, Trieste was a buzzing cosmopolitan city frequented by artists such as James Joyce, Italo Svevo and Umberto Saba. The city was part of the so-called Austrian Riviera and a very real part of Mitteleuropa. The particular Friulian dialect, called Tergestino, spoken until the beginning of the 19th century, had been gradually supplanted by Triestine (i.e., a Venetian dialect) and other tongues, including Italian, German and Slovenian. While Triestine was the language of the major part of the population, German was the language of the Austrian bureaucracy and Slovenian was the language of the surrounding villages. Viennese architecture and coffeehouses still dominate the streets of Trieste today. This article is about the writer and poet. ... Aron Ettore Schmitz (December 19, 1861 – September 13, 1928), better known by the pseudonym Italo Svevo, was an Italian businessman and author of novels, plays, and short stories, who converted to Roman Catholicism after marrying Livia Veneziani. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Austrian Riviera (German Österreichische Riviera, Italian Riviera Austriaca) is a description for the coastal strip of former Austrian Littoral, a Habsburg crown land which, until the end of World War I in 1918, ran along the northeastern Adriatic Coast. ... The approximate area of Mitteleuropa Mitteleuropa (Central/Middle Europe) is a German term approximately equal to Central Europe. ... Friulian (friulano in Italian, Furlan in Friulian) is a Romance language belonging to the Rhaetian languages family, spoken in the north-east of Italy (Friuli-Venezia Giulia province) by about 600,000 people. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... A sign in Venetian reading Here we also speak Venetian Venetian or Venetan is a Romance language spoken by over five million people,[1] mostly in the Veneto region of Italy. ...


Annexation to Italy

Together with Trento, Trieste was the main seat of the irredendist movement, which aimed to the annexion to Italy of all the lands they claimed were historically inhabited by culturally Italian people. After World War I ended and Austria-Hungary disintegrated, Trieste was transferred to Italy (1920) along with the whole Julian March (Venezia Giulia). The annexation, however, brought a loss of importance for the city, with the new border depriving it of a true hinterland. The Slovenian ethnic group ( at the time about the 25% of the population) was also suppressed by the Fascist Regime. This led to a period of inner strain which culminated on April 13, 1920, when a group of Italian nationalists burnt the Narodni dom (National House), the cultural centre of Trieste's Slovenians. Trento (Italian: Trento; German: Trient; Latin: Tridentum; Note that many of the regions Italian languages/dialects use Trent or Trènt) is an Italian city located in the Adige River valley in Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol. ... irredentism is position advocating annexation of territories administered by another state on the grounds of common ethnicity and/or prior historical possession, actual or alleged. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Venezia Giulia, also known as Julijska krajina in Slovenian, Vignesie Julie in Friulian Carsia Iulia in Latin, Julisch Venetien in German and Julian March, is a geographical, political and cultural region of Southeastern Europe, nestled on what is now the border between Italy, Slovenia and Croatia. ... Slovenians or Slovenes (Slovenian Slovenci, singular Slovenec, feminine Slovenka) are a South Slavic people primarily associated with Slovenia and the Slovenian language. ... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Second World War

After the constitution of the Italian Social Republic, on September 23, 1943, Trieste was nominally absorbed into this entity. The Germans, however, annexed it to the Operation Zone of the Adriatic Littoral, which also included Gorizia and Ljubljana and was led by Austrian Friedrich Rainer. Under the Nazi occupation, the sole concentration camp on Italian soil was constructed in a suburb of Trieste, at the Risiera di San Sabba (Rižarna), on April 4, 1944. The city also suffered from the partisan activity and from Allied bombardments. Anthem Giovinezza (The Youth)¹ Capital Salò Language(s) Italian Religion Roman Catholicism Government Republic Head of State Benito Mussolini Historical era World War II  - Established September 23, 1943  - Disestablished April 25, 1945 ¹ External link The Italian Social Republic (Repubblica Sociale Italiana or RSI) was a Nazi puppet state led by... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Operation Zone of the Adriatic Littoral (German: ; Italian: ), was a Nazi German puppet district on the Adriatic coast including parts of present-day Italy, Slovenia, and Croatia during World War II. It was administered as part of the Reichsgau of Carinthia. ... Gorizia (Slovenian: Gorica, German: Görz, Friulian: Gurize) is a small town at the foot of the Alps, in northeastern Italy, on the border with Slovenia. ...   (IPA: ) is the capital and largest city of Slovenia. ... Friedrich Rainer (born 28 July 1903 in Sankt Veit an der Glan; died 19 July 1947 (date unconfirmed) in Ljubljana, Yugoslavia – now in Slovenia) was a Nazi Gauleiter and an Austrian Landeshauptmann of Salzburg and Carinthia. ... It has been suggested that Internment be merged into this article or section. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up partisan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the independent states that comprised the Allies. ...


Yugoslav and New Zealand involvement

On April 30, 1945, the Italian anti-fascist Comitato di Liberazione Nazionale (CLN) of don Marzari and Fonda Savio, with 3500 volunteers, incited a revolt against the Nazis. On May 1, Yugoslav partisans of Tito's army arrived and liberated most of Trieste from the Nazis. The 2nd New Zealand Division continued its advance along Route 14 around the north coast of the Adriatic to Trieste and arrived at the city on the next day. The German forces eventually capitulated on the evening of May 2. is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Comitato di Liberazione Nazionale (CLN) was the underground political entity of Italian Partisans during the German occupation of Italy in the last years of the Second World War. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Josip Broz Tito (May 7, 1892 - May 4, 1980) was the ruler of Yugoslavia between the end of World War II and his death in 1980. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ...


Italian city

In 1947, Trieste became an independent state as the Free Territory of Trieste and was governed for several years by the Allied Military Government, comprising American and (mainly) British forces headed by Sir Terence Airey. This state was de facto dissolved in 1954: the city of Trieste, dubbed Zone A, went to Italy, while the southern part of the territory (Zone B), comprising Istria and some parts of the Karst went to Yugoslavia. The annexation to Italy was officially proclaimed on October 26 of that year. Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Zone A and Zone B of the Free Territory of Trieste Capital Trieste Language(s) Italian, Slovenian, Croatian Government Republic Historical era Cold War  - Established September 15, 1947  - Partition October 26, 1954  - Treaty of Osimo October 11, 1977 Area  - 1947 738 km2 285 sq mi Population  - 1947 est. ... Lieutenant-General Sir Terence Sydney Airey (9 July 1900 - 26 March 1983) was an officer in the British Army. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The border questions with Yugoslavia and the status of the ethnic minorities were settled definitively in 1975 with the Treaty of Osimo. Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Transport

The Porto Vecchio, also showing Trieste Centrale railway station
The Porto Vecchio, also showing Trieste Centrale railway station
Trieste Centrale railway station
Trieste Centrale railway station
Buses of Trieste Trasporti parked on Piazza Unità d'Italia
Buses of Trieste Trasporti parked on Piazza Unità d'Italia
A car of the Opicina Tramway
A car of the Opicina Tramway

Image File history File links Porttrieste_old. ... Image File history File links Porttrieste_old. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 433 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Trieste Ferrovie dello Stato Metadata This... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 433 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Trieste Ferrovie dello Stato Metadata This... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 542 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Trieste ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 542 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Trieste ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 651 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Motrice tramviaria n° 407 in piazza Oberdan a Trieste il 23 aprile 2005 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 651 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Motrice tramviaria n° 407 in piazza Oberdan a Trieste il 23 aprile 2005 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file...

Maritime transport

Trieste's location on the coast and its long term former status as part of the Austrian and Austro-Hungarian empires meant that the Port of Trieste became the major commercial port for large portions of landlocked central Europe. In the 19th century, a whole new port district known as the Porto Nuovo was built to the northeast of the city centre.[2] Official languages Latin, German, Hungarian Established church Roman Catholic Capital & Largest City Vienna pop. ... The Porto Vecchio The Porto Nuovo Headquarter (Lloyd Tower) The Free Port of Trieste, is an Italian port on North Adriatic Sea in Trieste, Italy. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In modern times, Trieste's importance as a port has declined, both because of the annexation by Italy, with its greater choice of better located ports, and because of competition from the nearby new port of Koper in Slovenia. However, there is significant commercial shipping to the container terminal, steel works and oil terminal, all of which are located to the south of the city centre.[2] Area: 311. ...


Rail transport

The fact that Trieste was a major port for central Europe, and the consequent need to transport people and goods long distances meant that railways came early. The first line to reach the city was the Sudbahn in 1857. This line stretched 1400 km to Lviv (in today's Ukraine) via Ljubljana (in Slovenia), Sopron (in Hungary), Vienna (in Austria), and Kraków (in Poland), crossing the backbone of the Alps by the Semmering Pass near Graz. This line approaches Trieste through the village of Villa Opicina, only a few kilometres from the city centre but over 300 metres higher. In order to lose this height, the line undertakes a 32 km detour to the north before terminating at Trieste Centrale station.[2] 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... KM, Km, or km may stand for: Khmer language (ISO 639 alpha-2, km) Kilometre Kinemantra Meditation Knowledge management KM programming language KM Culture, Korean Movie Maker. ... “Lvov” redirects here. ...   (IPA: ) is the capital and largest city of Slovenia. ... For the historical county in the Kingdom of Hungary named Sopron / Ödenburg, Sopron (county). ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Krakow (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Semmering is a mountain pass in the Eastern Northern Limestone Alps connecting Lower Austria and Styria between which it forms a natural border. ... The Grazer Schloßberg Clock Tower Graz [graːts] (Slovenian: Gradec IPA: /gra. ... The train station in Villa Opicina. ...


A second transalpine railway was opened to Trieste in 1906, with the opening of the Transalpina Railway from Vienna via Jesenice and Nova Gorica. This line also approached Trieste via Villa Opicina, but then took a rather shorter loop to the south to arrive at Trieste's other main railway terminus, Trieste Campo Marzio station, some distance to the south of Centrale station. This southern loop no longer carries a regular passenger service, and Campo Marzio station is now a railway museum. [2] 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Area: 75. ... Area: 309. ...


In order to facilitate freight traffic between the two stations, and the adjoining port areas, a temporary line known as the Rivabahn was built along the waterfront in 1887. This line survived until 1981, when it was replaced by the Galleria di Circonvallazione, a 5.7 km rail tunnel route under and to the east of the city. Freight service from the port area includes container services to northern Italy and to Budapest, together with truck carrying services to Salzburg and Frankfurt.[2] 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of the Austrian state of Salzburg. ... For other uses, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ...


Passenger rail service to Trieste now largely consists largely of trains to Venice, which make connection with services to Rome and Milan at Mestre, with a few through trains to Rome and Milan. These trains reach Centrale station via a line around the head of the Gulf of Trieste which connects with the Sudbahn's northerly loop. International through services between Italy and Slovenia (and places beyond) now bypass Trieste itself, calling instead at Villa Opicina.[2] For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Type Anti-tank Nationality Joint France/Germany Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA, Bharat Dynamics (under license) Date of design 70s Production period since 1972 Service duration since 1972 Operators 41 countries Variants MILAN 1, MILAN 2, MILAN 2T, MILAN 3, MILAN... Watchtower of Mestre. ... Gulf of Trieste and the littoral The Gulf of Trieste (Italian: Golfo di Trieste, Slovene: Tržaški zaliv, German: Golf von Triest ) is a shallow bay of the Adriatic Sea, in the extreme northern part of the Mediterranean Sea. ...


Air transport

Trieste is served by the nearby Friuli Venezia Giulia Airport, located at Ronchi near Monfalcone at the head of the Gulf of Trieste. Friuli Venezia Giulia Airport (IATA: TRS, ICAO: LIPQ), also known as Trieste Airport or Ronchi dei Legionari Airport, is an airport located in Ronchi dei Legionari (Gorizia), near Trieste, the capital and biggest city of the Italian region Friuli Venezia Giulia. ... Monfalcone is a small coastal city on the North-East of Italy, Gulf of Trieste. ...


Local transport

Local public transport in Trieste is operated by Trieste Transporti, which operates a network of some 60 bus routes and two boat services. They also operate the Opicina Tramway, a unique hybrid tramway and funicular railway that provides a more direct connection between the city centre and Villa Opicina.[3] Autobus redirects here. ... For other uses, see Boat (disambiguation). ... Tram de Opcina on Piazza Oberdan in Trieste The Opicina Tramway (Italian Tranvia di Opicina, Triestine Tram de Opcina) is an unusual hybrid tramway and funicular railway in the city of Trieste, Italy. ... A tram system, tramway, or street railway is a railway on which trams (streetcars, trolleys) run. ... Angels Flight, Los Angeles, California with gantlet track configuration Duquesne Incline, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with full length parallel tracks The Gütschbahn in Lucerne, Switzerland – from an 1893 guidebook A funicular, also called funicular railway, inclined railway, inclined plane, or, in the United Kingdom, a cliff railway, is a system of...


Main sights

San Giusto Cathedral in Trieste.
San Giusto Cathedral in Trieste.
Serbian Orthodox Church of San Spiridione.
Serbian Orthodox Church of San Spiridione.
The Castle of Miramare.
The Castle of Miramare.
Piazza dell'Unità.
Piazza dell'Unità.

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1728x2304, 1263 KB) Summary St. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1728x2304, 1263 KB) Summary St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1285 KB) Summary Trieste, Serb-orthodox church of San Spiridione Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Trieste Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1285 KB) Summary Trieste, Serb-orthodox church of San Spiridione Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Trieste Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x1024, 212 KB) Castello di Miramare Source: de, photograph and upload by de:Benutzer:Walwegs, Oct. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x1024, 212 KB) Castello di Miramare Source: de, photograph and upload by de:Benutzer:Walwegs, Oct. ... Image File history File links Trieste_Town_Hall. ... Image File history File links Trieste_Town_Hall. ...

Castles

Castle of Miramare

The Castle was built from 1856 to 1860 to a design by Carl Junker on the orders of Archduke Maximilian. Miramare Castle The Miramare Castle (Italian: Castello di Miramare; German: Schloss Miramar) is a 19th century castle, built for Austrian Archduke Maximilian and his wife, Charlotte of Belgium, on the Gulf of Trieste near Trieste, northeastern Italy. ... Maximilian I, Emperor of Mexico (Emperador Maximiliano I de México) (July 6, 1832 – June 19, 1867) (born Ferdinand Maximilian Joseph) was a member of Austrias Imperial Habsburg-Lorraine family. ...


The Castle gardens provide a setting of outstanding beauty with a variety of trees, chosen by and planted on the orders of Maximilian, that today make a remarkable collection.


Features of particular attraction in the gardens include two ponds, one noted for its swans and the other for lotus flowers, the Castle annexe ("Castelletto"), a nearby a bronze statue of Maximilian, and a small chapel in which is kept a cross made from the remains of the "Novara", the flagship on which Maximilian, brother of Emperor Franz Josef, set sail to become Emperor of Mexico. Franz Joseph I (in Hungarian I. Ferenc József, in English Francis Joseph I) (August 18, 1830 – November 21, 1916) of the Habsburg Dynasty was Emperor of Austria, Apostolic King of Hungary, King of Bohemia from 1848 until 1916 and a German prince (Deutscher Fürst). ...


Castle of San Giusto

Designed on the remains of previous castles on the site, it took almost two centuries to build. The stages of the development of the Castle's defensive structures are marked by the central part built under Frederick III (1470-1), the round Venetian bastion (1508-9), the Hoyos-Lalio bastion and the Pomis, or "Bastione fiorito" dated 1630. Emperor Frederick III Frederick III of Habsburg (Innsbruck, September 21, 1415 – August 19, 1493 in Linz) was elected as German King as the successor of Albert II in 1440. ...


The Castle - in which several rooms, including the Sala Caprin, are open to the public - houses a Museum displaying historical weapons and is regularly used for the staging of exhibitions, events and, in the summer, open-air shows. A walk on the Castle ramparts and bastions gives a complete panorama of the city of Trieste, its hills and the sea.


Churches

  • The Cathedral of San Giusto.
  • The Serb-Orthodox Temple of Holy Trinity and St. Spiridio (1869). The building adopts the Greek-Cross plan with five cupolas in the Byzantine tradition.
  • Basilica of San Silvestro (11th century)
  • Church of Santa Maria Maggiore (1682)
  • Church of San Nicolò dei Greci (1787). This church by the architect Matteo Pertsch (1818), with bell-towers on both sides of the facade, follows the Austrian late baroque style.
  • Israelite Temple of Trieste (1912)

Detail of the façade of San Giusto. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... Year 1682 (MDCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Matteo Pertsch Matteo Pertsch (German: ) (1769 - April 11, 1834) was a classical architect who is responsible for many historic structures in Trieste, Italy. ... Synagogue of Trieste The monumental Israelite Temple of Trieste was built between 1908 and 1912, and bears the brilliant hallmark of christian architects Ruggero and Arduino Berlam. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Archaeological remains

  • Arch of Riccardo (33 BC). It is an Augustan gate built in the Roman walls in 33. It stands in Piazzetta Barbacan, in the narrow streets of the old town. It's called Arco di Riccardo ("Richard's Arch") because is believed to have been crossed by King Richard of England in the return journey from the Crusades.
  • Basilica Forense (2nd century)
  • Palaeochristian basilica

Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC - 30s BC - 20s BC 10s BC 0s 10s 20s Years: 38 BC 37 BC 36 BC 35 BC 34 BC 33 BC 32 BC 31 BC 30 BC 29 BC... Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ... The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ...

Roman theatre

Trieste or Tergeste, which probably dates back to the protohistoric period, was enclosed by walls built in 33–32 BC on Emperor Octavius’s orders. The city developed greatly during the 1st and 2nd centuries.


The Roman theatre lies at the foot of the San Giusto hill, and faces the sea. The construction partially exploits the gentle slope of the hill, and most of the construction work is in stone. The topmost portion of the amphitheatre steps and the stage were presumably made of wood. The Colosseum in Rome, Italy. ...


The statues that adorned the theatre (which was brought to light in the '30s) are now preserved at the Town Museum. Three inscriptions from the Trajan period mention a certain Q. Petronius Modestus, a person who was closely connected with the development of the theatre, which was erected during the second half of the 1st century. This article is about the Roman Emperor. ...


Caves

In the whole Trieste province there are 10 speleological groups (24 in Friuli-Venezia Giulia). The Trieste plateau (Altopiano Triestino), called Kras or the Carso and covering an area of roughly 200 km² within Italy has approximately 1500 caves of various sizes (67 are more than 99 m deep). Among the most famous are the Grotta Gigante, the largest tourist cave in the world, with a single cavity large enough to contain St Peter's in Rome, and the Cave of Trebiciano (350 m deep) at the bottom of which flows the Timavo River. This river dives underground at Škocjan Caves in Slovenia (they are on UNESCO list) and flows about 30 km before emerging about 1 km from the sea in a series of springs near Duino reputed by the Romans to be an entrance to Hades. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... An image of Italian Karst (Monfalcone). ...


Others

  • The Risiera di San Sabba (Risiera di San Sabba Museum)', a national monument. It is a testimonial of the only Nazi extermination camp in Italy.
  • The Foibe ,also sort of national monuments(foiba of "Basovizza" is a national monument).Those are a testimonial of the extermination of Italian people by Comunist troops, during second war and immediately afterwards.

People were killed and subsequently occulted in those places by Comunist troops , particularly under the command of marshall Tito (ex-Communist Yugoslavia's marhall) National Socialism redirects here. ... Location of some foibe Foiba (plural foibe) is the name adopted to define deep natural sinkholes common in Carso, a karstic district located between Italy and Slovenia. ... Communism is a term that can refer to one of several things: a social and economic system, an ideology which supports that system, or a political movement that wishes to implement that system. ... Communism is a term that can refer to one of several things: a social and economic system, an ideology which supports that system, or a political movement that wishes to implement that system. ...

  • The Trieste Joyce Museum
  • Civico Museo di Storia Naturale di Trieste (natural history museum) contains fossils of early man.

Civico Museo di Storia Naturale di Trieste is a natural history museum in Trieste Official Site Short account in English Categories: | ... Genera The hominids are the members of the biological family Hominidae (the great apes), which includes humans, chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. ...

Literature

Many famous writers lived and created their major works in Trieste.


Italian writers

Aron Ettore Schmitz (December 19, 1861 – September 13, 1928), better known by the pseudonym Italo Svevo, was an Italian businessman and author of novels, plays, and short stories, who converted to Roman Catholicism after marrying Livia Veneziani. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Enzo Bettiza (1927, Split, Croatia) is a Dalmatian-born Italian novellist, journalist and politician. ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... Claudio Magris, Warsaw (Poland), March 9, 2005. ... Born in Trieste in 1957 into a family related to the famous writer Italo Svevo, Susanna Tamaro grew up with her maternal grandmother, who became her guardian when her parents separated immediately after she was born. ...

German writers

Robert Hamerling (March 24, 1830 - July 13, 1889), Austrian poet, was born at Kirchenberg-am-Walde in Lower Austria, of humble parentage. ... Rainer Maria Rilke (4 December 1875 – 29 December 1926) is considered one of the German languages greatest 20th century poets. ... Duino castle Duino (Devin in Slovenian, Tybein in German) in the coastal part of the Municipality of Duino-Aurisina, lies in the region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia in the province of Trieste, in north-east Italy. ...

Slovenian writers

Igo Gruden (April 18, 1893 - November 29, 1948) was a Slovene poet. ... Vladimir Bartol (1903–1967) was a Slovene writer, most famous for his novel Alamut, published in 1938 and translated into numerous languages, becoming the most popular work of Slovene literature around the world. ... Boris Pahor (b. ...

Other writers

For other persons named Richard Burton, see Richard Burton (disambiguation). ... This article is about the writer and poet. ... Jan Morris CBE (born James Humphrey Morris on 2 October 1926, in Clevedon, Somerset, England, but by heritage and adoption Welsh) is a British historian and travel writer. ...

Other famous people

Princess Mathilde Mathilde Bonaparte, (May 27, 1820 – January 2, 1904), was a daughter of Napoleons brother Jerome Bonaparte and his second wife Catharina of Württemberg. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Jérôme Bonaparte (November 15, 1784 - June 24, 1860) was the youngest brother of Emperor Napoleon I of France. ... Ludwig Eduard Boltzmann (Vienna, Austrian Empire, February 20, 1844 – Duino near Trieste, September 5, 1906) was an Austrian physicist famous for his founding contributions in the fields of statistical mechanics and statistical thermodynamics. ... Biaggio Chianese (born October 28, 1961 in Trieste) is a retired boxer from Italy, who won the bronze medal at both the 1986 World Amateur Boxing Championships and the 1987 European Amateur Boxing Championships in the mens heavyweight (+ 91 kg) division. ... Franko Luin, Swedish type designer, born on April 6th, 1941 in Trieste, Italy, of Slovene nationality. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alberto Randegger (April 13, 1832 - December 18, 1911) was an Italian-born composer and conductor best known for promoting opera in England. ... Ivan Rendić (born in Imotski, August 27, 1849 - died June 29, 1932) was a Croatian sculptor. ... For other uses, see Abdus Salam (disambiguation). ... Denis Sciama was a British cosmologist and a Fellow of the Royal Society. ... Alex Staropoli Alessandro Staropoli (born 9th January, 1970 in Trieste, Italy) is the keyboard player and one of the co-founders of the Italian symphonic metal band Rhapsody Of Fire. ... Rhapsody of Fire (formerly known as Thundercross and - more recently - Rhapsody) is an Italian Symphonic power metal band. ... Viktor Sulčič, in Argentina also known as Víctor (or Victorio) Sulcic, a Slovenian born Argentine architect, born in 1895 in Križ (in Italian Santa Croce) near Trieste, died in 1973 in Buenos Aires. ... Vittorio Vidali (1900, Trieste—1983; aka Vittorio Vidale, Enea Sormenti, Jacobo Hurwitz Zender, Carlos Contreras, Comandante Carlos) was an Italian-born Stalinist assassin and what is commonly called a communist agent. Outside of Spain (where Vidali is said to have killed 400), he is known primarily for orchestrating the deaths... Image:Luca Turilli. ... Rhapsody of Fire (formerly known as Thundercross and - more recently - Rhapsody) is an Italian Symphonic power metal band. ...

Other Trivia

  • The first men to reach the bottomest point in the oceans (the Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench), used a special bathyscaphe named Trieste in 1960.
  • The city was honored with a reference to a starship named the Trieste in the Star Trek: The Next Generation first season episode "11001001". The ship was stationed sixty-six hours away from Starbase 74 during the Bynar supernova incident. The starship name was related to the special minisub (bathyscaphe Trieste) of Jacques Piccard that touched in 1960 the bottom of the Pacific ocean, "boldly reaching" new frontiers for humankind.
  • Listed as a location for filming of the popular Francis Ford Coppola movie, The Godfather: Part II (released December 1974).

This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article is about the geographical feature. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... 11001001 is a first season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, first broadcast February 1, 1988. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, the Bynars are a highly intelligent species who have become almost machine-like due to a constant connection with their homeworld Bynauss master computer. ... The bathyscaphe Trieste Trieste was a Swiss designed deep-diving research bathyscaphe (deep boat) with a crew of two people, which reached a record-breaking depth of about 10,900 m (about 35,760 ft), in the deepest part of the oceans, the Challenger Deep, in 1960. ... Jacques Piccard (born July 28, 1922) is a Belgian explorer and engineer, known for having developed underwater vehicles for studying ocean currents. ...

See also

The University of Trieste (Italian Università degli Studi di Trieste, UNITS) is a medium-sized university in Trieste in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region of Italy. ... The Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) (National Institute for Nuclear Physics) is the coordinating institution for nuclear, particle and astroparticle physics in Italy. ... Nuclear physics is the branch of physics concerned with the nucleus of the atom. ... The Central European Initiative or CEI, is a cultural and scientific international cooperative of at present 17 countries, founded in 1991/92 as a successor of the Pentagonale group1. ... The ICGEB was promoted by UNIDO (United Nations Industrial Development Organisation) as a centre of excellence for research and training in genetic engineering and biotechnology for the benefit of developing countries. ... For other uses, see Abdus Salam (disambiguation). ... ICTP Main building The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics operates under a tripartite agreement among the Italian Government, UNESCO, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (both agencies of the United Nations) to foster advanced studies and research, especially in developing countries. ... Postgraduate training and leading-edge research in various areas of Physics, Mathematics, and Neurosciences are the objectives of SISSA, the International School for Advanced Studies of Trieste. ... ELETTRA Synchrotron Light Laboratory is a national synchrotron laboratory located in Basovizza on the outskirts of Trieste, Italy. ... The Teatro Comunale Giuseppe Verdi is located in Trieste, Italy. ... Trieste Astronomical Observatory - Headquarters The Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste (Trieste Astronomical Observatory) is located in Trieste, Italy. ... Unione Sportiva Triestina is an Italian football club based in Trieste, in the region of Venezia Giulia. ... Il Piccolo is the main regional daily newspaper of Friuli Venezia Giulia, Italy . ...

References

  1. ^ Hubmann, Franz, & Wheatcroft, Andrew (editor), The Habsburg Empire, 1840 -1916, London, 1972, ISBN 0-7100-7230-9
  2. ^ a b c d e f Ammann, Christian; Juvanec, Maj. "Discovering Trieste", Today's Railways, Platform 5 Publishing Ltd, May 2007, pp. 29-31. 
  3. ^ Trieste Trasporti S.p.A.. Trieste Trasporti S.p.A.. Retrieved on April 27, 2007.

is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Trieste - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2039 words)
Trieste (Latin Tergeste, Italian Trieste, German and Friulian Triest, Slovenian and Croatian Trst and Hungarian Trieszt) is a city and port in northeastern Italy right on the border with Slovenia.
Trieste is located at the head of the Gulf of Trieste on the Adriatic Sea.
With a population of 211,184 (2001) it is capital of the autonomous region Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Trieste province.
Bathyscaphe Trieste - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (584 words)
Trieste was a deep-diving research bathyscaphe ("deep boat") with a crew of two people.
Transported to the Naval Electronics Laboratory's facility in San Diego, it was extensively modified and then used in a series of deep-submergence tests in the Pacific Ocean during the next few years, including a dive to the Mariana Trench, the deepest known part of the ocean, in January 1960.
Trieste departed San Diego on October 5, 1959 on the way to Guam by the freighter Santa Maria to participate in Project Nekton — a series of very deep dives in the Mariana Trench.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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