FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Trier" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Trier

Coordinates: 49°45′N 6°38′E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Trier
Coat of arms of Trier Location of Trier in Germany

Country Germany
State Rhineland-Palatinate
District urban district
Population 101,685 (2006-12-19)
Area 117.14 km²
Population density 853 /km²
Elevation 124 m
Coordinates 49°45′ N 6°38′ E
Postal code 54290-54296
Area code 0651
Licence plate code TR
Mayor Klaus Jensen (SPD)
Website trier.eu

Trier (French: Trèves; Luxembourgish Tréier) is a city in Germany on the banks of the Moselle River. It is the oldest city in Germany, founded in or before 16 AD.[1] Trier is not the only city claiming to be Germany's oldest, but it is the only one that bases this assertion on having the longest history as a city, as opposed to a mere settlement or army camp. Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_Trier. ... Image File history File links Lage_der_kreisfreien_Stadt_Trier_in_Deutschland. ... This is an alphabetical list of countries of the world, including independent states (both those that are internationally recognised and generally unrecognised), inhabited dependent territories and areas of special sovereignty. ... Germany is a Federal Republic made up of 16 States, known in German as Länder (singular Land). ... The Rhenish Palatinate (Rheinpfalz, sometimes Lower Palatinate or Niederpfalz) occupies rather more than a quarter of the German Bundesland (federal state) of Rhineland-Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz) and contains the towns of Ludwigshafen, Kaiserslautern, Neustadt an der Weinstrasse, Pirmasens, Landau and Speyer. ... There are 439 German districts (Kreise), administrative units in Germany. ... This is a list of urban districts in Germany. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... The metre, or meter (U.S.), is a measure of length. ... See Cartesian coordinate system or Coordinates (elementary mathematics) for a more elementary introduction to this topic. ... German Postleitzahl map of the first two digits Postal codes in Germany, known as Postleitzahl (pl. ... see also Telephone numbering plan of Germany for further codes including service numbers, cell phones etc. ... German car number plates (Kfz-Kennzeichen) show the place where the car carrying them is registered. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Social Democratic Party of Germany Spectral Power Density ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, typically common to a particular domain name or subdomain on the World Wide Web on the Internet. ... Luxembourgish, Luxemburgish, or Luxembourgian (Luxembourgish: Lëtzebuergesch, French: , German: , Walloon: ) is a West Germanic language spoken in Luxembourg. ... The Moselle (French Moselle, German Mosel, Luxembourgish Musel, Dutch Moezel, from Latin Mosella, little Meuse) is a river flowing through France, Luxembourg and Germany, joining the Rhine river at Koblenz. ...


Trier lies in a valley between low vine-covered hills of ruddy sandstone in the west of the state of Rhineland-Palatinate, near the German border with Luxembourg and within the important Mosel-Saar-Ruwer wine-growing region. The Rhenish Palatinate (Rheinpfalz, sometimes Lower Palatinate or Niederpfalz) occupies rather more than a quarter of the German Bundesland (federal state) of Rhineland-Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz) and contains the towns of Ludwigshafen, Kaiserslautern, Neustadt an der Weinstrasse, Pirmasens, Landau and Speyer. ... Mosel-Saar-Ruwer is a German wine-growing-region in the valleys of the rivers Moselle, Saar and Ruwer near Trier, Rhineland-Palatinate. ... A glass of red wine This article is about the alcoholic beverage. ...


Trier is the seat of the former Archbishopric of Trier - now Bishop of Trier, as well as being home to the University of Trier, the University of applied sciences of Trier (Fachhochschule Trier), the administration of the Trier-Saarburg district and the seat of the ADD (Aufsichts- und Dienstleistungsdirektion), which until 1999 was the borough authority of Trier. The Archbishopric of Trier was one of the important ecclesiastical principalities of the Holy Roman Empire. ... University of Trier, Faculty building The modern University of Trier, in the German city of Trier was founded in the year 1970. ... Trier-Saarburg is a district in the west of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


With an approximate population of 100,000, Trier was until 2005 ranked fourth alongside Kaiserslautern among the state's largest cities, after Mainz, Ludwigshafen am Rhein and Koblenz. The nearest large cities in Germany are Saarbrücken, some 80 km southeast, and Koblenz, about 100 km northeast. The closest city to Trier is the capital of Luxembourg, some 50 km to the southwest. 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is the article about the city, for the district see Kaiserslautern (district)   is a city in southwest Germany, located in the Bundesland of Rheinland-Pfalz at the edge of the Palatine Forest (Pfälzer Wald). ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... Map of Germany showing Ludwigshafen am Rhein Panorama from the west Ludwigshafen am Rhein is a city in Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, with about 162,000 inhabitants. ... Map of the Koblenz region Koblenz (also Coblenz in pre-1926 German spellings; French Coblence) is a city situated on both banks of the Rhine at its confluence with the Moselle, where the Deutsches Eck (German Corner) and its monument ( Emperor William I on horseback) are situated. ... Saarbrücken [] is the capital of the Saarland Bundesland in Germany. ...


Trier is one of the five "central places" of the state of Rhineland-Palatinate. Along with Luxembourg, Metz and Saarbrücken, fellow constituent members of the QuattroPole union of cities, it also forms a central place of the greater region encompassing Saar-Lor-Lux (Saarland, Lorraine and Luxembourg), Rhineland-Palatinate and Wallonia. Central Place Theory is a geographical theory that seeks to explain the size and spacing of human settlements. ... For other uses of Metz, see Metz (disambiguation) City motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) City proper (commune) Région Lorraine Département Moselle (57) Mayor Jean-Marie Rausch Area 41. ... Saarland is one of the 16 states of Germany. ... Location Administration Capital Metz Regional President Jean-Pierre Masseret (PS) (since 2004) Départements Meurthe-et-Moselle Meuse Moselle Vosges Arrondissements 19 Cantons 157 Communes 2,337 Statistics Land area1 23,547 km² Population (Ranked 11th)  - January 1, 2005 est. ... Wallonia (French: Wallonie, German: Wallonien, Walloon: Walonreye, Dutch: Wallonië) or the Walloon Region (French: Région Wallonne, Dutch: Waals Gewest) is the predominantly French-speaking region that constitutes one of the three federal regions of Belgium, with its capital at Namur. ...

Contents

Geography

View of the city from the Mariensäule monument
View of the city from the Mariensäule monument

Trier sits in a hollow midway along the Moselle valley, with the most significant portion of the city on the right bank of the river. Wooded and vineyard-covered slopes stretch up to the Hunsrück plateaux in the South and the Eifel in the North. The border with the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg is some 15 km distant. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2731x400, 260 KB) Trier_Panorama_Mariensaeule Taken by Stefan Kühn File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Trier ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2731x400, 260 KB) Trier_Panorama_Mariensaeule Taken by Stefan Kühn File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Trier ... The Moselle (French Moselle, German Mosel, Luxembourgish Musel, Dutch Moezel, from Latin Mosella, little Meuse) is a river flowing through France, Luxembourg and Germany, joining the Rhine river at Koblenz. ... A vineyard Vineyard with bird netting Wine grapes with netting as protection against birds A vineyard (vignoble in French, vigna or vigneto in Italian, vinha in Portuguese, viña or viñedo in Spanish, Weinberg in German) is a place where grapes are grown for making wine, raisins, or table... A typical view of the Hunsrück countryside. ... The Eifel is a hilly region in Germany. ... Motto: Luxembourgish: Mir wëlle bleiwe wat mir sinn (English: We wish to remain what we are) Anthem: Ons Hémécht (Our Homeland) Royal anthem: De Wilhelmus 1 Capital (and largest city) Luxembourg Official languages French, German, Luxembourgish (de jure since 1984) Government Grand duchy  - Grand Duke Grand Duke...


Neighbouring municipalities

Listed in clockwise order, beginning with the northernmost; all municipalities belong to the Trier-Saarburg district Trier-Saarburg is a district in the west of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ...


Schweich, Kenn and Longuich (all part of the Verbandsgemeinde Schweich an der Römischen Weinstraße), Mertesdorf, Kasel, Waldrach, Morscheid, Korlingen, Gutweiler, Sommerau and Gusterath (all in the Verbandsgemeinde Ruwer), Hockweiler, Franzenheim (both part of the Verbandsgemeinde Trier-Land), Konz (Verbandsgemeinde Konz), Igel, Trierweiler, Aach, Newel, Kordel (Eifel), Zemmer (all in the Verbandsgemeinde Trier-Land) Coat of arms Schweich at the Moselle River is a town in the district Trier-Saarburg, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... A Verbandsgemeinde (plural Verbandsgemeinden) is an administrative unit unique to the German Bundesland (federal state) of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... Mertesdorf is a village near Trier in Germany. ... Kasel is a village near Trier in Germany. ... Waldrach is a village near Trier in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Ruwer is a municipality (a convention community called Verbandsgemeinde Ruwer) with more than 18000 inhabitants at the river Ruwer near Trier in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Konz is a city in southwestern Germany (Rhineland-Palatinate) where the Saar river meets the Mosel river. ... Aach is a municipality in the German state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ...


Organisation of city districts

The Trier urban area is divided into 19 city districts. For each district there is an Ortsbeirat (local council) of between 9 and 15 members, as well as an Ortsvorsteher (local representative). The local councils are charged with hearing the important issues that impact upon the district, although the final decision on any issue rests with the city council. The local councils nevertheless have the freedom to undertake limited measures within the bounds of their districts and their allocated budgets.



The districts of Trier together with their official numbers and their associated sub-districts (in parentheses):

  • 11 Mitte-Gartenfeld
  • 12 Nord (Nells Ländchen, Maximin)
  • 13 Süd (St. Barbara, St. Matthias)
  • 21 Ehrang
  • 202 Quint
  • 22 Pfalzel
  • 23 Biewer
  • 24 Ruwer-Eitelsbach
  • 31 West-Pallien
  • 32 Euren (Herresthal)
  • 33 Zewen (Oberkirch)
  • 41 Olewig
  • 42 Kürenz (Alt-Kürenz, Neu-Kürenz)
  • 43 Tarforst
  • 44 Filsch
  • 45 Irsch
  • 46 Kernscheid
  • 51 Feyen-Weismark
  • 52 Heiligkreuz (Alt-Heiligkreuz, Neu-Heiligkreuz)
  • 53 Mariahof

History

History of the city

Prehistory

The first traces of human settlement in the area of the city show evidence of linear pottery settlements dating from the early Neolithic period. The Linear Pottery culture or (German) Linearbandkeramik (abbr. ... The Neolithic, or New Stone Age, was a period in the development of human technology that is traditionallly the. ...


According to legend, Trier was founded by Trebeta, the son of the Assyrian King Ninus, around 2000 BC: some 1300 years before the rise of Rome.[2] Trebeta was the legendary son of Ninus (Nimrod) by a wife prior to his marriage to Queen Semiramis, according to the Gesta Treverorum (and possibly other sources). ... For other uses, see Assyria (disambiguation). ... Ninus, was accepted in texts arising in Hellenistic period and later as the eponymous founder of Nineveh, and thus the city itself personified. ... Area under Roman control  Roman Republic  Roman Empire  Western Empire  Eastern Empire Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a city-state founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ...


Since the last pre-Christian centuries, members of the Celtic tribe of the Treveri settled in the area of today's Trier. Celts redirects here. ... The Treveri tribe of Gaul inhabited the lower valley of the Moselle, within the southern fringes of the vast Arduenna Silva (Ardennes Forest). ...


Roman Empire

The Romans under Julius Caesar first subdued the Treveri in 58 to 50 BC. No later than 16 BC, at the foot of the Petrisberg, upon which a military camp had been set up in 30 BC and abandoned again a few months later, the Romans founded the city of Augusta Treverorum ("City of Augustus in the land of the Treveri"). The honour of being named after the Emperor was one shared only by Augsburg and Augst in northern Switzerland. Following the reorganisation of the Roman provinces in Germany in 16 BC, the Emperor Augustus decided that the city should become capital of the province of Belgica [3]. Download high resolution version (1000x681, 105 KB)Porta Nigra in the city of Trier (from German wikipedia, uploaded there by Stefan Kühn) de:Bild:Porta_Nigra_Landseite. ... Download high resolution version (1000x681, 105 KB)Porta Nigra in the city of Trier (from German wikipedia, uploaded there by Stefan Kühn) de:Bild:Porta_Nigra_Landseite. ... Trier: The Porta Nigra, viewed from outside The Porta Nigra (black gate), a UNESCO world heritage site in Trier, Germany, is a large Roman gatehouse with two four-storied towers, projecting as near semi-circles on the outer side. ... See also Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... Gaius Julius Caesar[1] (Latin pronunciation ; English pronunciation ; July 12 or July 13, 100 BC – March 15, 44 BC), often simply referred to as Julius Caesar, was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... The Treveri tribe of Gaul inhabited the lower valley of the Moselle, within the southern fringes of the vast Arduenna Silva (Ardennes Forest). ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 63 BC 62 BC 61 BC 60 BC 59 BC 58 BC 57 BC 56 BC 55... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 55 BC 54 BC 53 BC 52 BC 51 BC 50 BC 49 BC 48 BC 47... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 21 BC 20 BC 19 BC 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15 BC 14 BC 13 BC 12 BC 11 BC... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC - 30s BC - 20s BC 10s BC 0s 10s 20s Years: 35 BC 34 BC 33 BC 32 BC 31 BC 30 BC 29 BC 28 BC 27 BC 26 BC... The Treveri tribe of Gaul inhabited the lower valley of the Moselle, within the southern fringes of the vast Arduenna Silva (Ardennes Forest). ... Augsburg is a city in south-central Germany. ... Augst is a municipality in the district of Liestal, in the canton of Basel-Country, Switzerland. ... Map of the Roman Empire, with the provinces, after 120. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 21 BC 20 BC 19 BC 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15 BC 14 BC 13 BC 12 BC 11 BC... Augustus (Latin: IMP•CAESAR•DIVI•F•AVGVSTVS;[1] September 23, 63 BC–August 19, AD 14), known as Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (English Octavian; Latin: C•IVLIVS•C•F•CAESAR•OCTAVIANVS) for the period of his life prior to 27 BC, was the first and among the most important of... The Roman Province of Gallia Belgica in 58 BCE The Roman Province of Gallia Belgica around 120 CE Gallia Belgica was a Roman province located in what is now the southern part of the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, northeastern France, and western Germany. ...


From the second half of the third century onwards, Trier was the seat of an archbishopric; the first bishop being Eucharius. From 271 to 274 AD, Trier was the capital of the breakaway Gallic Empire under the emperors Tetricus I and II. In the year 275 AD, the city was destroyed in an invasion by the Alamanni. From 293 to 395 AD, Trier was one of the residences of the Western Roman Emperor (see also Late Antiquity). The Archbishopric of Trier was one of the important ecclesiastical principalities of the Holy Roman Empire. ... Saint Eucharius is venerated as the first bishop of Trier. ... Events Goths forced to withdraw across the Danube Roman Emperor Aurelian withdraws troops to the Danube frontier, abandoning Dacia. ... Events The Gallic Empire (Gaul and Britain) is reconquered by Roman Emperor Aurelian With the conquests of the Palmyran Empire (272) and the Gallic Empire, the Roman Empire is united again Births Deaths Pope Felix I Cao Fang, emperor of the Kingdom of Wei Categories: 274 ... The Gallic Empire (in Latin, imperium Galliarum) is the modern name for the independent realm that lived a brief existence during the Roman Empires Crisis of the Third Century, from 260 to 274. ... Tertricus Coin Caius Pius Esuvius Tetricus was emperor of the Gallic Empire from 270/271 to 273, following the murder of Victorinus. ... Caius Pius Esuvius Tetricus was emperor of the Gallic Empire from 270/271 to 273, following the murder of Victorinus. ... Events Eutychian elected pope (probable date) September 25 - Marcus Claudius Tacitus appointed emperor by the senate Births Eusebius of Caesarea (approximate date) Saint George, soldier of the Roman Empire and later Christian martyr (or 280, approximate date). ... area settled by the Alamanni, and sites of Roman-Alamannic battles, 3rd to 6th century The Alamanni, Allemanni, or Alemanni were originally an alliance of Germanic tribes located around the upper Main, land that is today part of Germany. ... Events March 1 - Diocletian and Maximian appoint Constantius Chlorus and Galerius as Caesars. ... Events After the death of emperor Theodosius I, the Roman Empire is divided in an eastern and a western half. ... The Western Roman Empire is the western half of the Roman Empire after its division by Diocletian in 286. ... Late Antiquity is a rough periodization (c. ...

Model of the imperial roman city Augusta Treverorum in 4 AD (seen from the direction of the Porta Nigra).
Model of the imperial roman city Augusta Treverorum in 4 AD (seen from the direction of the Porta Nigra).

Under the rule of Constantine the Great (306337 AD), the city was rebuilt and buildings such as the Palastaula (known today as the Constantine Basilica) and the Imperial Baths were constructed. In 326 AD, sections of the imperial family's private residential palaces were extended and converted to a large double basilica, the remains of which are still partly recognisable in the area of the Trier Cathedral (German: Trierer Dom) and the church "Liebfrauenkirche". Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 912 KB) Beschreibung: Augusta_Treverorum Quelle: selbst erstellt im Rheinisches Landesmuseum Trier Fotograf: Stefan Kühn From http://upload. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 912 KB) Beschreibung: Augusta_Treverorum Quelle: selbst erstellt im Rheinisches Landesmuseum Trier Fotograf: Stefan Kühn From http://upload. ... Trier: The Porta Nigra, viewed from outside The Porta Nigra (black gate), a UNESCO world heritage site in Trier, Germany, is a large Roman gatehouse with two four-storied towers, projecting as near semi-circles on the outer side. ... Head of Constantines colossal statue at Musei Capitolini Gaius Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[1] (February 27, 272–May 22, 337), commonly known as Constantine I, Constantine the Great, or (among Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic[2] Christians) Saint Constantine, was a Roman Emperor, proclaimed Augustus by his troops on... Events July 25 - Constantine I proclaimed Roman Emperor by his troops. ... Events February 6 - Julius is elected pope. ... Events September 14 - Discovery of the (alleged) True Cross by Vatican City, where St. ... Cathedral of Trier Cathedral at night The Cathedral of Trier is the main religious building in Trier, [[Germany History Categories: | ...


From 318 AD onwards, Trier was the seat of the Gallic prefecture (the Praefectus Praetorio Galliarium), one of the two highest authorities in the Western Roman Empire, which governed the western Roman provinces from Morocco to Britain. Emperor Constantius II resided here from 328 to 340 AD. From 367 AD, under Valentinian I, Trier once more became an imperial residence (lasting until the death of Theodosius I in 395 AD) and was also the largest city north of the Alps. It was for a few years (383388 AD) the capital of Magnus Maximus, who ruled most of the western Empire. In 407 AD, shortly after the invasion of Gaul by the Vandals, Alans and Suebi, the Gallic prefecture was relocated to Arles, on the Rhône. Events Gregory the Illuminator appoints his son Aristax as successor in the Patriarchate of Armenia. ... The Western Roman Empire is the western half of the Roman Empire after its division by Diocletian in 286. ... Flavius Iulius Constantius, known in English as Constantius II, (7 August 317 - 3 November 361) was a Roman Emperor (337 - 361) of the Constantinian dynasty. ... Events May 9: Athanasius is elected bishop of Alexandria Births Valens, Roman Emperor Wong Tai Sin Deaths April 17: Alexander I, Patriarch of Alexandria Categories: 328 ... Events Constantine II attacks his brother Constans near Aquileia, aiming for sole control of the western half of the Roman Empire, but is defeated. ... Events First Listing of the New Testament by St Athanasius of Alexandria. ... Medallion of Valentinian I. Solidus minted by Valens in ca. ... An engraving depicting what Theodosius may have looked like, ca. ... Events After the death of emperor Theodosius I, the Roman Empire is divided in an eastern and a western half. ... The West face of the Petit Dru above the Chamonix valley near the Mer de Glace. ... Events By Place Roman Empire January 19 - Arcadius is elevated to Emperor. ... // Events Bahram IV becomes king of Persia. ... Magnus Maximus. ... // Events Gunderic becomes king of the Vandals and the Alans after the death of his father Godgisel Gratianus of Britain is assassinated and Constantine III takes his place at the head of the mutinous Roman garrison in Britain. ... Map of Gaul circa 58 BC Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... The Vandals traditional reputation: a colored steel engraving of the Sack of Rome (455) by Heinrich Leutemann (1824-1904), c 1860-80 Vandal and Vandali redirect here. ... The Alans, Alani, Alauni or Halani were an Iranian nomadic group among the Sarmatian people, warlike nomadic pastoralists of varied backgrounds, who spoke an Iranian language and to a large extent shared a common culture. ... Suebi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Coordinates Administration Country France Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (Subprefecture) Arrondissement Arles Canton Chief town of 2 cantons: Arles-Est and Arles-Ouest Intercommunality Agglomeration community of Arles-Crau-Camargue-Montagnette Mayor Hervé Schiavetti  (PS) (2001-2008) Statistics Altitude 0 m–57 m... The Rhônes course. ...

The Imperial Baths
The Imperial Baths

Roman Trier had been subjected to attacks by Germanic tribes from 350 AD onwards, but these had been repulsed by Emperor Julian. After the invasions of 407 the Romans were able to reestablish the Rhine frontier and hold northern Gaul tenuously until the end of the 450s, when control was finally lost to the Franks and local military commanders claiming to represent central Roman authority. During this period Trier was repeatedly sacked and captured by the Franks (possibly in 413 and 421 AD), as well as by the Huns under Attila in 451 AD. The city became definitively part of Frankish territory (Francia Rhinensis) in 475 AD (see also Arbogast). As a result of the conflicts of this period, Trier's population decreased from an estimated 80,000 in the 4th century to 5,000 at the beginning of the 6th century. Download high resolution version (2592x1424, 671 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2592x1424, 671 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Events January 18 - Magnentius proclaimed Emperor by the army in Autun. ... Flavius Claudius Iulianus (331–June 26, 363), was a Roman Emperor (361–363) of the Constantinian dynasty. ... For other uses, see Franks (disambiguation). ... Events May 8 - Honorius signs an edict providing tax relief for the provinces of Italy that have been plundered by the Visigoths. ... Events February 8 - Constantius III becomes Co_Emperor of the Western Roman Empire June 7 - Roman Emperor Theodosius II marries Aelia Eudocia, formerly known as Athenais. ... The Huns were a Turkic confederation of Central Asian equestrian nomads or semi-nomads. ... Attila (c. ... Events April 7 - The Huns sack Metz June 20 - Attila, king of the Huns is defeated at Troyes by Aëtius in the Battle of Chalons. ... See also 475 (number) Events Orestes forces western Roman emperor Julius Nepos to flee and declares his son Romulus Augustus to be emperor. ... Flavius Arbogastes (d. ...


Middle Ages

By the end of the 5th century AD, Trier was under Frankish rule, first controlled by the Merovingian dynasty, then by the Carolingians. As a result of the Treaty of Verdun in 843, by which the grandsons of Charlemagne divided his empire into three parts, Trier was incorporated into the Kingdom of Lorraine (Lotharingia). After the death of Lothair II, ruler of Lorraine, Trier in 870 became part of the East Frankish Empire, later called Germany, under Henry I. Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 - 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... For other uses, see Franks (disambiguation). ... There are other articles with similar names; see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... Also see: France in the Middle Ages. ... Divisions of the Treaty of Verdun. ... Events Treaty of Verdun divides the Carolingian empire between the 3 sons of Louis the Pious. ... A portrait of Charlemagne by Albrecht Dürer that was painted several centuries after Charlemagnes death. ... Lorraine coat of arms location of the Lorraine province Lorraine (French: Lorraine; German: Lothringen) is a historical area in present-day northeast France. ... Lothair (825 - August 8, 869), was the second son of the emperor Lothair I. On his fathers death in 855, he received for his kingdom a district lying west of the Rhine, between the North Sea and the Jura mountains, which was called Regnum Lotharii and early in the... Events February 28 - End of the Fourth Council of Constantinople. ... East Francia was the land of Louis the German after the Treaty of Verdun of 843, which divided the Carolingian Empire of the Franks. ... Heinrich I depicted as The Bamberg Knight Henry I, the Fowler (German: Heinrich der Finkler or Heinrich der Vogler) (876 - July 2, 936), was Duke of Saxony from 912 and king of the Germans from 919 until his death in 936. ...

The Trier Cathedral (Trierer Dom)
The Trier Cathedral (Trierer Dom)

From 902 AD, when power passed into the hands of the archbishops, Trier was administered by the Vogt of the archbishopric, which developed its own seal in 1149. The Archbishop of Trier was, as chancellor of Burgundy, one of the seven Electors of the Holy Roman Empire, a right which originated in the 12th or 13th century, and which continued until the French Revolution. From the 10th century AD and throughout the Middle Ages, Trier made several attempts to achieve autonomy from the Holy Roman Empire, but was ultimately unsuccessful. In 1212, the city received a charter from Emperor Otto IV, which was confirmed by Conrad IV. In 1309, however, it was forced to once again recognise the authority of the Archbishop, who was at that time the imposing Baldwin of Luxemburg, son of the Count of Luxemburg. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1440x1278, 431 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Trier Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1440x1278, 431 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Trier Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Events Births Deaths Categories: 902 ... Vogt is a word of Germanic languages(except for English), originated from latin language vocatius, refers to: People named Vogt: Alfred Elton (A. E.) van Vogt Andrea Vogt Berti Vogts Erik Vogt Howard C. Vogts Jørgen Herman Vogt Karl Vogt Paul Vogt Roland Vogt Tom Vogt Other: Funker Vogt... Seal on envelope A seal is an impression printed on, embossed upon, or affixed to a document (or any other object) in order to authenticate it, in lieu of or in addition to a signature. ... Events Castle of Carimate destroyed. ... The Archbishopric of Trier was one of the important ecclesiastical principalities of the Holy Roman Empire. ... région of Bourgogne, see Bourgogne. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... The double-headed eagle A portrait of Charlemagne wearing the crown of the Holy Roman Empire (15th century painting by Albrecht Dürer) The Holy Roman Empire was a mainly Germanic conglomeration of lands in Central Europe during the Middle Ages and the early modern period. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... i heart kate young The French Revolution was a period of major political and social change in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The double-headed eagle A portrait of Charlemagne wearing the crown of the Holy Roman Empire (15th century painting by Albrecht Dürer) The Holy Roman Empire was a mainly Germanic conglomeration of lands in Central Europe during the Middle Ages and the early modern period. ... Events The first Great Fire of London burns most of the city to the ground Battle of Navas de Tolosa Childrens crusade Crusaders push the Muslims out of northern Spain In Japan, Kamo no Chōmei writes the Hōjōki, one of the great works of classical Japanese... Otto IV of Brunswick (died 1218) was King of Germany (1208-1215) and Holy Roman Emperor from 1209 - 1215. ... Conrad IV, Conrad of Hohenstaufen (April 25, 1228 Andria, Italy – May 21, 1254, Lavello), was king of Jerusalem (as Conrad II) 1228–1254, of Germany 1237–1254, and of Sicily (as Conrad I) 1250–1254. ... Events August 15 - The city of Rhodes surrenders to the forces of the Knights of St. ...


Elected in 1307 AD when he was only 22 years old, Baldwin was the most important Archbishop and Prince-Elector of Trier in the Middle Ages. He was the brother of the German King and Emperor Henry VII and his grandnephew Charles would later become German King and Emperor as Charles IV. He used his family connections to add considerable territories to the Electorate of Trier and is also known to have built many castles in the region. When he died in 1354, Trier was a prospering city. Events July - The Knights Hospitaller begin their conquest of Rhodes. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Henry VII, (In German: Heinrich), ca. ... Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor. ... Events End of reign of John VI Cantacuzenus, as Byzantine emperor. ...


Trier's status as an archbishopric city was confirmed in 1364 AD by Emperor Charles IV and by the Reichskammergericht; The city's dream of self-rule came definitively to an end in 1583. Until the demise of the old empire, Trier remained the capital of its eponymous Electorate of Kurtrier, although not the residence of its head of state, the Prince-Elector. At its head was a court of lay assessors, which was expanded in 1443 by Archbishop Jacob I to include bipartisan mayors. Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1359 1360 1361 1362 1363 - 1364 - 1365 1366 1367 1368 1369 See also: 1364 state leaders Events Charles V becomes King of France. ... Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor. ... The Reichskammergericht was the highest judicial institution in the Holy Roman Empire, founded in 1495 by the Reichstag in Worms. ... 1583 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Events Albanians, under Skanderbeg, defeat the Turks John Hunyadi defeats Turks at the Battle of Nis Vlad II Dracul begins his second term as ruler of Wallachia, succeeding Basarab II. Births January 27 - Albert, Duke of Saxony (died 1500) February 23 - Matthias Corvinus of Hungary (died 1490) May 17 - Edmund...


The Dombering (curtain wall of the Cathedral) having been secured at the end of the 10th century AD, Archbishop Theoderich I and his successor Arnold II later set about surrounding the city by walls. This curtain wall, which followed the path now taken by the Alleenring, enclosed 1.38 square kilometres. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ...

Place of pilgrimage: St. Matthias benedictine abbey.
Place of pilgrimage: St. Matthias benedictine abbey.

Many abbeys and monasteries were founded in the early Frankish time, including St. Maximin, St. Martin, St. Irminen, St. Maria ad Martyres/St.Mergen and others. The only important abbey that survived wars and secularization by the French at the beginning of 1800 AD is the Benedictine abbey St. Matthias in the south of Trier. Here, the first three bishops of Trier, Eucherius, Valerius and Maternus are buried alongside the apostle Matthew. This is the only tomb of an apostle to be located in Europe north of the Alps, thus making Trier together with Rome in Italy (burial place of St. Peter the apostle) and Santiago de Compostela in Spain (tomb of St. James) one of three major places of pilgrimage in Europe for Catholics. In 882 AD, Trier was sacked by the Vikings, who burnt most churches and abbeys. This was the end of the systematically built Roman Trier. Image File history File linksMetadata St_matthias_tr. ... Image File history File linksMetadata St_matthias_tr. ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... Monastery of St. ... For other uses, see Franks (disambiguation). ... Secularization or secularisation is a process of transformation as a society slowly migrates from close identification with the local institutions of religion to a more clearly separated relationship. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... In the New Testament Acts of the Apostles, the author of Luke records that Matthias was the Apostle chosen by the remaining eleven apostles to replace Judas Iscariot, following Judas betrayal of Jesus and his suicide (Acts 1:21 - 26). ... Several people in history were named Eucherius: Saint Eucherius of Lyon, 5th century bishop Saint Eucherius of Orléans, 8th century bishop This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Saint Valerius (d. ... Maternus was the first Christian bishop of Cologne, Germany (in the 4th century) who comissioned a Roman temple where the Cologne Cathedral would later be built. ... Matthew the Evangelist (מתי, Gift of the LORD, Standard Hebrew and Tiberian Hebrew: Mattay; Septuagint Greek: Μαθθαιος, Matthaios) is an important Christian figure best known as one of Jesus Twelve Apostles. ... The Twelve Apostles (, apostolos, Liddell & Scott, Strongs G652, someone sent forth/sent out) were men that according to the Synoptic Gospels and Christian tradition, were chosen from among the disciples (students) of Jesus for a mission. ... World map exhibiting the location of Europe. ... The West face of the Petit Dru above the Chamonix valley near the Mer de Glace. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban... Saint Peter, also known as Simon ben Jonah/BarJonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Kepha — original name Simon or Simeon (Acts 15:14) — was one of the Twelve Apostles whom Jesus chose as his original disciples. ... Location map of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia Santiago de Compostela (also Saint James of Compostela) is the capital of the autonomous community of Galicia. ... Saint James the Great (d. ... Pilgrim at Mecca In religion and spirituality, a pilgrimage is a long journey or search of great moral significance. ... Events Carloman, King of the West Franks becomes sole king upon the death of his brother. ... The term Viking commonly denotes the ship-borne explorers, traders, and warriors of the Norsemen (literally, men from the north) who originated in Scandinavia and raided the coasts of the British Isles, France and other parts of Europe as far east as the Volga River in Russia from the late...


Modern age

In 1473 AD, Emperor Frederick III and Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy convened in Trier. In this same year, a university was founded in the city but was destined to be abolished in 1797. Events Ottoman sultan Mehmed II defeats the White Sheep Turkmens lead by Uzun Hasan at Otlukbeli Axayacatl, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan invades the territory of neighboring Aztec city of Tlatelolco. ... Detail of Aeneas Piccolomini Introduces Eleonora of Portugal to Frederick III by Pinturicchio (1454-1513) Frederick III of Habsburg (Innsbruck, September 21, 1415 – August 19, 1493 in Linz) was elected as German King as the successor of Albert II in 1440. ... Rogier van der Weyden painted Charles the Bold in about 1460, wearing the Order of the Golden Fleece. ... région of Bourgogne, see Bourgogne. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In the 17th century, the Archbishops and Prince-Electors of Trier relocated their residences to Philippsburg Castle in Ehrenbreitstein, near Koblenz. A session of the Reichstag was held in Trier in 1512 AD, during which the demarcation of the Imperial Circles was definitively established. (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop heading a diocese of particular importance due to either its size, history, or both, called an archdiocese. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Philippsburg is a small town in Germany, in the district of Karlsruhe in Baden-Württemberg. ... Festung Ehrenbreitstein Festung Ehrenbreitstein is a fortress on the same-named mountain on the right side of the Rhine opposite to the town of Koblenz. ... Map of the Koblenz region Koblenz (also Coblenz in pre-1926 German spellings; French Coblence) is a city situated on both banks of the Rhine at its confluence with the Moselle, where the Deutsches Eck (German Corner) and its monument ( Emperor William I on horseback) are situated. ... The Reichstag (German for Imperial Diet) was the parliament of the Holy Roman Empire, the North German Confederation, and of Germany until 1945. ... 1512 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A map of the Imperial Circles as at the beginning of the 16th century. ...

The Constantine Basilica in Trier
The Constantine Basilica in Trier

With the Thirty Years' War (1618 - 1648 AD), more than two centuries of warfare began for Trier. It was occupied several times by French troops. They besieged and occupied Trier in 1632, 1645, 1673 (the French Army stayed until 1675 and destroyed all churches, abbeys and settlements in front of the city walls for military reasons; the city itself was heavily fortified). Download high resolution version (1296x972, 336 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1296x972, 336 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Events March 8 - Johannes Kepler discovers the third law of planetary motion (he soon rejects the idea after some initial calculations were made but on May 15 confirms the discovery). ... 1648 (MDCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... See also: 1632 (novel) Events February 22 - Galileos Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems is published July 23 - 300 colonists for New France depart Dieppe November 8 - Wladyslaw IV Waza elected king of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth after Zygmunt III Waza death November 16 - Battle of Lützen... // Events January 10 - Archbishop Laud executed on Tower Hill, London. ... 1673 (MDCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... The French Army (French: Armée de Terre) is the land-based component of the French Armed Forces. ... Events January 5 - The Battle of Turckeim June 18 - Battle of Fehrbellin August 10 - King Charles II of England places the foundation stone of the Royal Greenwich Observatory in London - construction begins November 11 - Guru Gobind Singh becomes the Tenth Guru of the Sikhs. ...


In 1684 AD, with the War of the Reunions, an era of French expansion began. Trier was again captured in 1684; all walls and fortresses were destroyed this time. After Trier and its associated Electorate were yet again taken during the War of Palatinate Succession in 1688, many cities in the Electorate were systematically destroyed in 1689 by the French Army. Nearly all castles were blown up and the only bridge across the Moselle in Trier was burnt. King Louis XIV of France personally issued the order for these acts of destruction but also gave the command to spare the City of Trier. As the French Army retreated in 1698 AD, it left a starving city without walls and only 2,500 inhabitants. Events France under Louis XIV makes Truce of Ratisbon separately with the Empire and Spain. ... The War of the Reunions (1683-1684) was a small conflict between Louis XIVs France and Spain and her allies. ... Events France under Louis XIV makes Truce of Ratisbon separately with the Empire and Spain. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Nine Years War redirects here. ... // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... The Moselle (French Moselle, German Mosel, Luxembourgish Musel, Dutch Moezel, from Latin Mosella, little Meuse) is a river flowing through France, Luxembourg and Germany, joining the Rhine river at Koblenz. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ...


During the War of the Spanish Succession, Trier was occupied again by a French Army in 1702. In 1704-1705 an allied British-Dutch army commanded by the Duke of Marlborough passed Trier on its way to France. When the campaign failed, the French came back to Trier in 1705 and stayed until 1714. After a short period of peace, the War of the Polish Succession started in 1734; the following year Trier was again occupied by the French, who stayed until 1737. The last Prince-Elector, Clement Wenceslaus of Saxony relocated to Koblenz in 1786 AD. In August 1794, French Republican troops took Trier. This date marked the end of the era of the old Electorate. Churches, abbeys and clerical possessions were sold or the buildings put to practical use, such as stables. Charles II was the last Habsburg King of Spain. ... Events March 8 - William III died; Princess Anne Stuart becomes Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... Events Building of the Students Monument in Aiud, Romania. ... // Events Construction begins on Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England. ... The coat of arms of the Dukes of Marlborough The Dukedom of Marlborough (named after Marlborough, pronounced Maulbruh - in the IPA), is an hereditary title of British nobility in the Peerage of England. ... // Events Construction begins on Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England. ... Battle of Gangut, by Maurice Baquoi, 1724-27. ... The War of the Polish Succession (1733-1738) was a European war and a Polish civil war, with considerable interference from other countries, to determine the succession to Augustus II, King of Poland, as well as an attempt by the Bourbon powers to check the power of Austria in western... Events January 8 - Premiere of George Frideric Handels opera Ariodante at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. ... Events 12 February — The San Carlo, the oldest working opera house in Europe, is inaugurated. ... Map of the Koblenz region Koblenz (also Coblenz in pre-1926 German spellings; French Coblence) is a city situated on both banks of the Rhine at its confluence with the Moselle, where the Deutsches Eck (German Corner) and its monument ( Emperor William I on horseback) are situated. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ...

The Roman Bridge across the Moselle River
The Roman Bridge across the Moselle River

With the peace treaties of Basel and Campo Formio in 1797 AD, German hegemonial powers Prussia and Austria accepted to cede all German territories on the left banks of the Rhine river to France. Trier became de facto a French city. In 1798, it became capital of the newly-founded French Département de la Sarre. With the Treaty of Lunéville in 1801, Trier became also de jure a French city. In 1801 AD, Napoleon I signed a concordate with the Pope, thus stopping defamations of clerics and making Trier a diocese. Its territory now was identical with the Département de la Sarre, much smaller than the Archbishopric had been until 1794. In 1802, the Frenchman Charles Mannay became first bishop of the new founded diocese and, in 1803, the first Holy Mass since 1794 was celebrated in the Cathedral. Emperor Napoleon visited Trier in 1804. In this time, French Trier began to prosper. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (944x559, 123 KB) Summary Roman bridge in Trier, picture taken by Stefan Kühn in 2003. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (944x559, 123 KB) Summary Roman bridge in Trier, picture taken by Stefan Kühn in 2003. ... The Peace of Basel of 1795 consists of three peace treaties of France (represented by François de Barthélemy). ... The Treaty of Campo Formio was signed on October 17, 1797 (26 Vendémiaire, Year VI of the French Republic) by Napoleon Bonaparte and Count Ludwig von Cobenzl as representatives of France and Austria. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Flag of Prussia (1894 - 1918) The Kingdom of Prussia existed from 1701 until 1918, and from 1871 was the leading kingdom of the German Empire, comprising in its last form almost two-thirds of the area of the Empire. ... The River Rhine (Dutch: ; French: ; German: ; Italian: ; Romansh: ) is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe at 1,320 kilometres (820 miles), with an average discharge of more than 2,000 cubic meters per second. ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Sarre is the name of a département of the First French Empire in present Germany. ... The Treaty of Lunéville was signed on February 9, 1801 between the French Republic and the Holy Roman Empire by Joseph Bonaparte and Louis, Count Cobentzel, respectively. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Napoleon I Bonaparte, Emperor of the French, King of Italy, Mediator of the Swiss Confederation and Protector of the Confederation of the Rhine (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Pope Pius VII, O.S.B. (August 14, 1742 – August 20, 1823), born Barnaba Niccolò Maria Luigi Chiaramonti, was Pope from March 14, 1800 to August 20, 1823. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... The Archbishopric of Trier was one of the important ecclesiastical principalities of the Holy Roman Empire. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... --69. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Cathedral of Trier Cathedral at night The Cathedral of Trier is the main religious building in Trier, [[Germany History Categories: | ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1814 AD, the French era ended suddenly as Trier was taken by Prussian troops. After the defeat of Napoleon, the German-French borders of 1792 were restored in the 1814 and 1815 Paris peace treaties. The city was proclaimed part of the Kingdom of Prussia in 1815. In 1816 AD, the Prussians reorganized their new territory and set up the Rhine Province, with six administrative districts. Trier became seat of one these district administrations, the Regierungsbezirk Trier. Because of the new political situation and the new customs frontiers in the West, the economy of Trier began a steady decline that was to last until 1840. 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Napoleon I Bonaparte, Emperor of the French, King of Italy, Mediator of the Swiss Confederation and Protector of the Confederation of the Rhine (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The 1814 Treaty of Paris, signed on May 30, 1814, ended the war between France and the Sixth Coalition of the United Kingdom, Russia, Austria, Sweden and Prussia. ... The Treaty of Paris of 1815 was signed on November 20, 1815, following the defeat of Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. ... Flag of Prussia (1894 - 1918) The Kingdom of Prussia existed from 1701 until 1918, and from 1871 was the leading kingdom of the German Empire, comprising in its last form almost two-thirds of the area of the Empire. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Rhineland (Rheinland in German) is the general name for the land on both sides of the river Rhine in the west of Germany. ... A Regierungsbezirk is an government region of Germany, a subdivision of certain federal states (Bundesländer). ... A customs duty is a tariff or tax on the import or export of goods. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

The Constantine Basilika and the Electoral Palace.
The Constantine Basilika and the Electoral Palace.

From 1840 on, the situation began to improve as the neighbouring state of Luxemburg, an important market for Trier-made products, joined the German Customs Union in 1842. Trier, with a population of 15,500 at this time, produced mainly leather, cloth, wine and tobacco. Iron works were founded in Quint near Trier at this time. An important infrastructural improvement was the introduction of a shipping line operating with paddle-wheel steamers on the Moselle River, connecting Trier, Koblenz and Metz. The first railway line, linking Trier with Saarbrücken and Luxemburg was inaugurated in 1860, followed by the Trier-Cologne line across the Eifel in 1871 and the Moselle Railway to Koblenz in 1879. Minor lines to Bitburg via Irrel along the River Sauer, to Hermeskeil along the Ruwer River and the Moselbahn to Bullay (near Zell) were built later. A sign of increasing prosperity were the first trade fairs in modern Trier in 1840 and 1842. Image File history File links en:: Description: Trier, Konstantinsbasilica and the Palace of the Elector Author: Stefan Kühn, Foto taken himself, upload to German wikipedia 16. ... Image File history File links en:: Description: Trier, Konstantinsbasilica and the Palace of the Elector Author: Stefan Kühn, Foto taken himself, upload to German wikipedia 16. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Motto: Luxembourgish: Mir wëlle bleiwe wat mir sinn (English: We wish to remain what we are) Anthem: Ons Hémécht (Our Homeland) Royal anthem: De Wilhelmus 1 Capital (and largest city) Luxembourg Official languages French, German, Luxembourgish (de jure since 1984) Government Grand duchy  - Grand Duke Grand Duke... Zollverein (German for customs union) or German Customs Union was formed between the 39 states of the German Confederation in 1834 during the Industrial Revolution to remove internal custom barriers, although upholding a protectionist tariff system with foreign trade partners. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Modern leather-working tools Leather is a material created through the tanning of hides, pelts and skins of animals, primarily cows. ... It has been suggested that Textile be merged into this article or section. ... A glass of red wine This article is about the alcoholic beverage. ... Species Nicotiana acuminata Nicotiana alata Nicotiana attenuata Nicotiana benthamiana Nicotiana clevelandii Nicotiana excelsior Nicotiana forgetiana Nicotiana glauca Nicotiana glutinosa Nicotiana langsdorffii Nicotiana longiflora Nicotiana obtusifolia Nicotiana paniculata Nicotiana plumbagifolia Nicotiana quadrivalvis Nicotiana repanda Nicotiana rustica Nicotianasuaveolens Nicotiana sylvestris Nicotiana tabacum Nicotiana tomentosa Ref: ITIS 30562 as of August 26, 2005... Quint - Fictional character in the novel Jaws by Peter Benchley and the movie of the same title (1975) directed by Steven Spielberg. ... A paddle steamer, paddleboat, or paddlewheeler is a ship or boat propelled by one or more paddle wheels driven by a steam engine. ... The Moselle (French Moselle, German Mosel, Luxembourgish Musel, Dutch Moezel, from Latin Mosella, little Meuse) is a river flowing through France, Luxembourg and Germany, joining the Rhine river at Koblenz. ... For other uses of Metz, see Metz (disambiguation) City motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) City proper (commune) Région Lorraine Département Moselle (57) Mayor Jean-Marie Rausch Area 41. ... Saarbrücken [] is the capital of the Saarland Bundesland in Germany. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... For other uses, see Cologne (disambiguation). ... The Eifel is a hilly region in Germany. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Map of the Koblenz region Koblenz (also Coblenz in pre-1926 German spellings; French Coblence) is a city situated on both banks of the Rhine at its confluence with the Moselle, where the Deutsches Eck (German Corner) and its monument ( Emperor William I on horseback) are situated. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Bitburg (English - Bit Castle) is a city in Germany, capital of the district Bitburg-Prüm, in the state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... Irrel is a village and a municipality in the district Bitburg-Prüm, in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Sauer (German and Luxembourgish; in French: Sûre) is a river of Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany. ... Hermeskeil is a town in Rhineland-Palatinate in Germany with about 5900 inhabitants. ... Ruwer valley The Ruwer is a river in Germany with a length of 46 kilometres, an affluent of the Moselle River. ... Zell an der Mosel Zell an der Mosel is a quaint town in the district Cochem-Zell, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... The 2006 LinuxWorld trade show at the Boston Convention and Exposition Center. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


During the Revolutions of 1848 in the German states, Trier also saw protests and conflicts. The city council sent a letter to King Frederick William IV of Prussia, demanding more civic liberties. The lawyer Ludwig Simon was elected to represent Trier in the first German parliament in Frankfurt. After Prussian soldiers killed one citizen and wounded others in a melée, the situation escalated. The people of Trier hoisted black-red-gold flags as democratic symbols, rang the church bells, organized a militia and took away the signs of Prussian rule. A second melée between demonstrators and soldiers, which left two citizens dead, led to a collective outburst of fury. The people began to build barricades and wave the red flag. There were even reports that a statue of the Prussian King was smashed into pieces. Trier was on the eve of a civil war when the commander of the VIII Prussian army corps arrived and threatened to shell Trier. After being confronted with superior Prussian military power, the citizens gave up and removed the barricades. Some Trierers were jailed for their democratic attitude; Ludwig Simon emigrated like many others and died in Switzerland. // Germany at the time of the Revolutions of 1848 was a collection of 38 states including Austria loosely bound together in the German Confederation after the Congress of Vienna in 1815. ... Photograph of Frederick King Frederick William IV of Prussia (October 15, 1795 - January 2, 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. ... The Frankfurt Parliament is the name of the German National Assembly founded during the Revolutions of 1848 that tried to unite Germany in a democratic way. ... The flag of Germany was adopted in its present form in 1919. ... Democracy (literally rule by the people, from the Greek δημοκρατία-demokratia demos, people, and kratos, rule) is a form of government. ... Lexington Minuteman representing militia minuteman John Parker Militia is the activity of one or more citizens organized to provide defense or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... Historically, and most generally, the red flag is an international symbol for the blood of angry workers. ... A civil war is a war in which parties within the same culture, society or nationality fight against each other for the control of political power. ...

The Hochbunker in Trier.
The Hochbunker in Trier.

Download high resolution version (682x1000, 117 KB)For copyright see http://de. ... Download high resolution version (682x1000, 117 KB)For copyright see http://de. ...

Second World War

In September 1944, Trier was only a short distance from the frontline fighting and was subjected to almost daily bombardment by American artillery. Allied forces carried out three large-scale aerial attacks on the city later in the same year. On December 19 at 15:30, 30 British Lancaster bombers dropped 136 tonnes of high-explosive bombs over Trier. Two days later, on December 21 at 14:35, 94 Lancasters and 47 American fighter-bombers dropped 427 tonnes of ordnance (high-explosive, incendiary and napalm bombs). Another two days after that, 700 tonnes of bombs were released over the city. Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Historically, artillery (from French artillerie) refers to any engine used for the discharge of projectiles during war. ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Avro Lancaster was a four-engine World War II bomber aircraft made initially by Avro for the Royal Air Force (RAF). ... Preparing C-4 explosive This article is concerned solely with chemical explosives. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Incendiary bombs are bombs designed to start fires or destroy sensitive equipment using materials such as napalm, thermite, or white phosphorus. ... A simulated Napalm explosion during a 2003 air show. ...


According to research by the historian Adolf Welter, at least 420 people were killed in the December 1944 attacks on Trier. Numerous buildings were damaged. During the entire war, 1600 houses in the city were completely destroyed. On March 2, 1945, the city surrendered to the Allies with minimal resistance. March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ...


Postwar period

At the end of April 1969, the old Roman road at the Porta Nigra was uncovered. Shortly afterward, on May 12, 1969, the open-air wildlife enclosure in the Weisshaus forest was opened. The University of Trier was established in 1970, initially as part of the combined university of Trier-Kaiserslautern. The evolution of Trier as a university city took a further step forward with the opening on April 1, 1974 of the Martinskloster student residence halls. In 1975, the university once more became independent. Year 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... Year 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... University of Trier, Faculty building The modern University of Trier, in the German city of Trier was founded in the year 1970. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... This is the article about the city, for the district see Kaiserslautern (district)   is a city in southwest Germany, located in the Bundesland of Rheinland-Pfalz at the edge of the Palatine Forest (Pfälzer Wald). ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ...

Floodlit Trier Dom.
Floodlit Trier Dom.

Other significant events of the 1970s include the discontinuation of the 99-year-old "Trierische Landeszeitung" newspaper on March 31, 1974 and the reopening of the restored Trier Dom on May 1 of that same year. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2930x1846, 3416 KB) Illuminated Catholic Cathedral of Trier at night Beschreibung: Dom zu Trier, Deutschland Quelle: selbst fotografiert, 01/2004 Fotograf: Benutzer:Josef Thiel Kamera: Canon EOS 10D Objektiv: Peleng Fisheye 8mm Software: Verzerrung korrigiert mit Adobe Photoshop Lizenzstatus: GNU FDL... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2930x1846, 3416 KB) Illuminated Catholic Cathedral of Trier at night Beschreibung: Dom zu Trier, Deutschland Quelle: selbst fotografiert, 01/2004 Fotograf: Benutzer:Josef Thiel Kamera: Canon EOS 10D Objektiv: Peleng Fisheye 8mm Software: Verzerrung korrigiert mit Adobe Photoshop Lizenzstatus: GNU FDL... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ...


From the May 24 to 27 1984, Trier officially celebrated its 2000th anniversary. In 1986, Roman Trier (the amphitheatre, Barbara Baths, Imperial Baths, Constantine Basilica, Igel Monument, Porta Nigra, Roman bridge, Dom St. Peter and Liebfrauenkirche) and was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Another cultural heritage site is the church of St. Paulin, designed by Balthasar Neumann. During construction of an underground parking lot in October 1988, remnants of Roman fresco paintings were discovered beneath the Viehmarkt. On November 5, the Trier Observatory was officially inaugurated. In the course of excavation work on a further subterranean garage near the Roman bridge, a collection of 2558 Roman gold coins was discovered on September 9, 1993. The coins have an estimated value of 2.5 million Euro. May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Colosseum in Rome, Italy. ... Trier: The Porta Nigra, viewed from outside The Porta Nigra (black gate), a UNESCO world heritage site in Trier, Germany, is a large Roman gatehouse with two four-storied towers, projecting as near semi-circles on the outer side. ... UNESCO logo UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Johann Balthasar Neumann (January 27, 1687 _ August 19, 1753) was a German Baroque architect who designed the Vierzehnheiligen and several churches in Würzburg. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fresco by Dionisius representing Saint Nicholas. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... MolÄ—tai Astronomical Observatory An observatory is a location used for observing terrestrial and/or celestial events. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... ISO 4217 Code EUR User(s) European Union: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Republic of Ireland, Italy (except Campione dItalia), Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Slovenia and Spain. ...


From the April 22 to October 24, 2004, the State Garden Show was held on the Petrisberg heights and attracted 724,000 visitors. April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A new discovery of Roman remains was made in April 2006, when traces of building walls were unearthed during demolition works in the city centre. For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Incorporation of municipalities

Formerly autonomous municipalities and territories that have been incorporated into the City of Trier. Some localities had already formed part of the urban area between 1798 and 1851. In 1798, the city area covered a total of 8.9 square kilometres. 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Year Localities
1888 St. Paulin, Maar, Zurlauben, Löwenbrücken, St. Barbara
1888 Separation of Heiligkreuz and Olewig
1912 Pallien (southern part), Heiligkreuz, St. Matthias, St. Medard, Feyen (with Weismark)
1930 Euren, Biewer, Pallien (northern part), Kürenz, Olewig
June 7, 1969 Ehrang-Pfalzel (formed on March 1, 1968 through unification of the two previously autonomous municipalities)
June 7, 1969 Eitelsbach, Filsch, Irsch, Kernscheid, Ruwer, Tarforst, Zewen

June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... Tarforst is a suburban part of the city Trier with about 7. ...

Population development

At the beginning of the 4th century AD, Trier was the residence of the Roman Emperor and, with an estimated 80,000 inhabitants, the largest city North of the Alps. Through the Middle Ages and up until the start of the Modern Age, numerous wars, epidemics and famines caused the city's population to drop to only 2,677 in 1697. The population began to increase once more in the course of the 18th century, reaching 8,829 in 1801. The onset of industrialisation in the 19th century accelerated this growth. In the year 1900, the city was home to over 43,000 people. By 1939, this figure had doubled to over 88,000. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... The West face of the Petit Dru above the Chamonix valley near the Mer de Glace. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into modernity. ... Events September 11 - Battle of Zenta, Prince Eugene of Savoy crushed Ottoman army of Mustafa II September 20 - The Treaty of Ryswick December 2 – St Pauls Cathedral opened in London Peter the Great travels in Europe officially incognito as artilleryman Pjotr Mikhailov Use of palanquins increases in Europe Christopher... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... A factory in Ilmenau (Germany) around 1860 Industrialization or an Industrial Revolution is a process of social and economic change whereby a human society is transformed from a pre-industrial (an economy where the amount of capital accumulated per capita is low) to an industrial state (see Pre-industrial society). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The Second World War cost Trier roughly 35% of its population (30,551 people) and the number of inhabitants had dropped to 57,000 by 1945. Only through the incorporation of several surrounding localities into the city on June 7, 1969 did the population once more reach its prewar level. This reorganisation in fact pushed the number of inhabitants beyond the 100,000 mark, which accorded the city of Trier Großstadt status. On June 30, 2005, the population of Trier according to official records of the Rhineland-Palatinate state authorities was 99,685 (registered only by Hauptwohnsitz and after comparison with other regional authorities). Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000,000 Total dead: 50,000,000 Military dead: 8,000,000 Civilian dead: 4,000,000 Total dead 12,000,000 World War II (abbreviated WWII), or the Second World War, was a worldwide conflict... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 184 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Rhenish Palatinate (Rheinpfalz, sometimes Lower Palatinate or Niederpfalz) occupies rather more than a quarter of the German Bundesland (federal state) of Rhineland-Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz) and contains the towns of Ludwigshafen, Kaiserslautern, Neustadt an der Weinstrasse, Pirmasens, Landau and Speyer. ... The Hauptwohnsitz (English: Main domicile) is the residence to which one has a predominantly close relationship. ...


The following overview illustrates the city's different population levels, according to the current size of the city area. Up until 1801, these figures are mostly estimates; after this date they have been sourced from census results or official records of state authorities. From 1871 onwards, these statistics correspond to the "present population", from 1925 to the "resident population" and from 1987 to the "population resident at main domicile". Prior to 1871, the population was recorded using inconsistent survey methods. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The Hauptwohnsitz (English: Main domicile) is the residence to which one has a predominantly close relationship. ...

Year Population
100 20,000
300 80,000
400 50,000
1363 10,000
1542 8,500
1613 6,000
1697 2,677
1702 4,200
1801 8,829
December 1, 1831 ¹ 14,723
December 1, 1840 ¹ 15,717
December 3, 1855 ¹ 20,172
December 1, 1858 ¹ 20,060
December 1, 1871 ¹ 21,442
December 1, 1875 ¹ 22,100
December 1, 1880 ¹ 24,200
Year Population
December 1, 1885 ¹ 26,126
December 1, 1890 ¹ 36,166
December 2, 1895 ¹ 40,026
December 1, 1900 ¹ 43,506
December 1, 1905 ¹ 46,709
December 1, 1910 ¹ 49,112
December 1, 1916 ¹ 47,107
December 5, 1917 ¹ 45,709
October 8, 1919 ¹ 53,248
June 16, 1925 ¹ 57,341
June 16, 1933 ¹ 76,692
May 17, 1939 ¹ 88,150
December 31, 1945 57,599
Year Population
October 29, 1946 ¹ 63,420
September 13, 1950 ¹ 75,526
September 25, 1956 ¹ 84,869
June 6, 1961 ¹ 87,141
December 31, 1965 86,808
May 27, 1970 ¹ 103,724
December 31, 1975 100,338
December 31, 1980 95,536
December 31, 1985 93,472
May 25, 1987 ¹ 94,118
December 31, 1990 97,835
December 31, 1995 99,428
December 31, 2000 99,410
June 30, 2005 99,685
December 19, 2006 101,685

¹ Census figure-1... Events Romano-Celtic temple-mausoleum complex is constructed in Lullingstone, and also in Anderida (approximate date). ... Events First invasion of Italy by Alaric (probable date). ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1358 1359 1360 1361 1362 - 1363 - 1364 1365 1366 1367 1368 See also: 1363 state leaders Events Magnus II, King of Sweden, is deposed by Albert of Mecklenburg. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... Events January - Galileo observes Neptune, but mistakes it for a star and so is not credited with its discovery. ... Events September 11 - Battle of Zenta, Prince Eugene of Savoy crushed Ottoman army of Mustafa II September 20 - The Treaty of Ryswick December 2 – St Pauls Cathedral opened in London Peter the Great travels in Europe officially incognito as artilleryman Pjotr Mikhailov Use of palanquins increases in Europe Christopher... Events March 8 - William III died; Princess Anne Stuart becomes Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (282nd in leap years). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... June 16 is the 167th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (168th in leap years), with 198 days remaining. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... June 16 is the 167th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (168th in leap years), with 198 days remaining. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining // 1508 - Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, is defeated in Friulia by Venetian forces; he is forced to sign a three-year truce and cede several territories to Venice 1513... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 184 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Main sights

Roman Monuments, Cathedral of St. Peter and Church of Our Lady in Trier1
UNESCO World Heritage Site
State Party Flag of Germany Germany
Type Cultural
Criteria i, iii, iv, vi
Identification no. 367
Region2 Europe and North America
Inscription History
Formal Inscription: 1986
10th WH Committee Session
WH link: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/367

1 Name as officially inscribed on the WH List
2 As classified officially by UNESCO
Cathedral at night The Cathedral of Trier is the main religious building in Trier, Germany. ... UNESCO logo UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

Trier is well known for its well-preserved Roman and medieval buildings, which include:

  • the Porta Nigra, the best preserved Roman city gate north of the Alps;
  • ruins of three Roman baths, among them the largest Roman baths north of the Alps;
  • the huge Constantine Basilica, a basilica in the original Roman sense, being the 67 m long throne hall of Roman Emperor Constantine; it is today used as a Protestant church.
  • the Trier Cathedral (German: Trierer Dom or Dom St. Peter), which dates back to Roman times and is home to the Holy Tunic, a garment that presumably goes back to the robe Jesus was wearing when he died. It is only exhibited every few decades, at irregular intervals.
  • the Liebfrauenkirche (German for Church of Our Lady), which is one of the most important early Gothic cathedrals in Germany and follows into the architectural tradition of the French Gothic cathedrals;
  • the Roman amphitheatre;
  • the Roman bridge (German: Römerbrücke) across the Moselle River, which is the oldest bridge north of the Alps still crossed by traffic;
  • St. Matthew Abbey (German: Abtei St. Matthias), a still-in-use monastery in whose medieval church the only apostle north of the Alps is held to be buried

Other edifices of interest include: Trier: The Porta Nigra, viewed from outside The Porta Nigra (black gate), a UNESCO world heritage site in Trier, Germany, is a large Roman gatehouse with two four-storied towers, projecting as near semi-circles on the outer side. ... The Amsterdamse Poort, the only remaining city gate of Haarlem, the Netherlands, was built in 1355. ... The West face of the Petit Dru above the Chamonix valley near the Mer de Glace. ... The entrance to the Roman Baths The Roman Baths from the upper level of the site. ... St. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Constantine. ... Protestantism is one of three main groups within Christianity, whose beliefs are centered on Jesus. ... St. ... Cathedral of Trier Cathedral at night The Cathedral of Trier is the main religious building in Trier, [[Germany History Categories: | ... The Seamless Robe of Jesus or Holy Tunic is the robe said to have been worn by Jesus during his crucifixion. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... The Colosseum in Rome, Italy. ... The Römerbrücke (German for Roman Bridge) in Trier over the Mosel is the oldest standing bridge in Germany. ... The Twelve Apostles (, apostolos, Liddell & Scott, Strongs G652, someone sent forth/sent out) were men that according to the Synoptic Gospels and Christian tradition, were chosen from among the disciples (students) of Jesus for a mission. ...

  • the church of St. Paulin, which is one of the most important Baroque churches in Rhineland-Palatinate and may have been in parts designed by the famous architect Balthasar Neumann
  • the two old treadwheel cranes, the so called "Old Crane" (Ger. Der Alte Krahnen) or the "Trierian Moselle Crane" (German: der Trierer Moselkrahn), a Gothic time building from 1413, and the Baroque crane from 1774 called the (old) "Customs Crane" (German: der (alte) Zollkran), also called the "Younger Moselle Crane" (German: der Jüngere Moselkran).

Baroque architecture, starting in the early 17th century in Italy, took the humanist Roman vocabulary of Renaissance architecture and used it in a new rhetorical, theatrical, sculptural fashion, expressing the triumph of absolutist church and state. ... Johann Balthasar Neumann (January 27, 1687 _ August 19, 1753) was a German Baroque architect who designed the Vierzehnheiligen and several churches in Würzburg. ... What is a treadwheel? A treadwheel is a form of Animal engine powered by man. ... A tower crane with a pivoted main boom Cranes on the Sheksna River, Cherepovets, Russia A worker telecommanding a crane from the ground A crane is a machine equipped with hoists, wire ropes and sheaves that can be used both to lift and lower materials and to move them horizontally. ... German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ... Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... // Events March 20 - Henry V becomes King of England Project of Annals of Joseon Dynasty began. ... Baroque architecture, starting in the early 17th century in Italy, took the humanist Roman vocabulary of Renaissance architecture and used it in a new rhetorical, theatrical, sculptural fashion, expressing the triumph of absolutist church and state. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ...

Museums

  • Rheinisches Landesmuseum (one of the two most important German archaeological museums for the Roman period, along with the Römisch-Germanisches Museum in Cologne)
  • Städtisches Museum Simeonstift (history of Trier, displaying among other exhibits a model of the medieval city)
  • Toy Museum of Trier
  • Ethnological and open air museum Roscheider Hof , a museum in the neighboring town of Konz, right at the city limits of Trier, which shows the history of rural culture in the northwest Rhineland Palatinate and in the area where Germany, Luxembourg and Lorraine meet.
  • Fell Exhibition Slate Mine; site in the municipality of Fell, 20 kilometers from Trier, containing an underground mine, a mine museum, and a slate mining trail

For other uses, see Cologne (disambiguation). ... Hunsrück village The Roscheider Hof Open Air Museum is the open air museum and Folklore Museum of the Greater SaarLorLux Region. ... Slate mine Fell The Fell Exhibition Slate Mine is a former slate mine in Germany located about 20 km east from Trier (Germany) and about 60 km east from Luxembourg (city) (Luxembourg) next to the villages Fell and Thomm. ...

Miscellaneous

Trier is the oldest seat of a Christian bishop north of the Alps. In the Middle Ages, the Archbishop of Trier was an important ecclesiastical prince, controlling land from the French border to the Rhine. He was also one of the seven electors of the Holy Roman Empire. Two bishops assist at the Exhumation of Saint Hubert, who was a bishop too, at the église Saint-Pierre in Liège. ... The West face of the Petit Dru above the Chamonix valley near the Mer de Glace. ... The Archbishopric of Trier was one of the important ecclesiastical principalities of the Holy Roman Empire. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... The double-headed eagle A portrait of Charlemagne wearing the crown of the Holy Roman Empire (15th century painting by Albrecht Dürer) The Holy Roman Empire was a mainly Germanic conglomeration of lands in Central Europe during the Middle Ages and the early modern period. ...


Trier is also the birthplace of the influential philosopher and revolutionary Karl Marx. The Karl-Marx-Haus is the house where he was born. It was opened in 1947 and renovated in 1983. Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818, Trier, Germany – March 14, 1883, London) was a German philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... The Karl-Marx-Haus is the house in Trier, in what is now Germany but once was in Prussia, where Karl Heinrich Marx spent his early life. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


It is also the birthplace of Saint Ambrose, who later became the bishop of Milan and was named a Doctor of the Roman Catholic Church. Saint Ambrose, Latin Sanctus Ambrosius, Italian SantAmbrogio (circa 340 - April 4, 397), bishop of Milan, was one of the most eminent fathers of the Christian church in the 4th century. ...


Established in Trier is the University of Trier, founded 1483, closed 1796 and started again in 1970. University of Trier, Faculty building The modern University of Trier, in the German city of Trier was founded in the year 1970. ... Events The São Tomé settlement is founded. ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ...


Trier has been the base for the German round of the World Rally Championship since 2000, with the rally's presentation held next to the Porta Nigra. Stephane Sarrazin driving a Subaru Impreza WRC on the Monte Carlo Rally Carlos Sainz driving a Toyota Corolla WRC on the Monte Carlo Rally The World Rally Championship (WRC) is a rallying series organised by the FIA, culminating with a champion driver and manufacturer. ...


New Trier High School, in New Trier Township, Illinois, was originally settled by people from Trier. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... New Trier Township is a township located north of Chicago in Cook County, Illinois. ...


Infrastructure

Trier has direct railway connections to many cities. Nearest cities by train are Cologne, Saarbrücken and Luxemburg. Via the motorways A1, A48 and A64 Trier is linked with Koblenz, Saarbrücken and Luxemburg. Nearest international airports are in Luxemburg (0:40 h by car), Frankfurt-Hahn (1:00 h), Saarbrücken (1:00 h), Frankfurt (2:00 h) and Cologne/Bonn (2:00 h). The Moselle River is an important waterway and is also used for river cruises.


Twin towns

Image File history File links Flag_of_France. ... For other uses of Metz, see Metz (disambiguation) City motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) City proper (commune) Région Lorraine Département Moselle (57) Mayor Jean-Marie Rausch Area 41. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Ascoli Piceno is a town in the Marche region, Italy, capital of the province of the same name. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Shown within Gloucestershire Geography Status: City (1541) Region: South West England Admin. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... s-Hertogenbosch (literally The Dukes Forest in Dutch; translated in French as Bois-le-Duc), unofficially also called Den Bosch, is a municipality in the Netherlands, the capital of the province of North Brabant. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... Pula on the map of Croatia Pula (Croatian Pula, Italian Pola; the city has an official Croatian-Italian bilinguism [1] - in Istriot Pula, German Polei, Slovenian Pulj) is the largest city in Istria, Croatia, situated at the southern tip of the peninsula, with a population of 62,080 (2005). ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... Nickname: Cowtown, Panther City Motto: Where the West Begins Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Country United States State Texas Counties Tarrant and Denton  - Mayor Michael J. Moncrief Area    - City 774. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... The city hall Goethe and Schiller in front of the Deutsche Nationaltheater Weimar is a city in Germany. ... The Free State of Thuringia (German: Freistaat Thüringen) is located in central Germany and is considered one of the smaller of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), with an area of 16,200 km² and 2. ... 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan_(bordered). ... Nagaoka (長岡市; -shi) is a city located in Niigata, Japan. ...

References

  1. ^ Website of the Municipality of Trier
  2. ^ http://www.originofnations.org/germany/city_of_trier_and_the_assyrians.htm
  3. ^ http://www.originofnations.org/germany/city_of_trier_and_the_assyrians.htm

External links

  • city website
  • Trier City Panoramas - Panoramic Views and virtual Tours
  • Karl-Marx-Haus birth house and museum
  • Trier Daily Photo - A new photograph of Trier every day.
  • Trier Photographs
  • City Guide Trier - from the University of Trier website
  • Open Air Museum Roscheider Hof - the Open Air Museum of the Euregio SaarLorLux
  • Museum Mine Fell - A former slate mine
  • Treveris-Timetravel - Pictures of Trier
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:


Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Flag of Rhineland-Palatinate
Urban and rural districts in the
Federal State of Rhineland-Palatinate in Germany

Urban
districts
Image File history File links Flag_of_Rhineland-Palatinate. ... The Rhenish Palatinate (Rheinpfalz, sometimes Lower Palatinate or Niederpfalz) occupies rather more than a quarter of the German Bundesland (federal state) of Rhineland-Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz) and contains the towns of Ludwigshafen, Kaiserslautern, Neustadt an der Weinstrasse, Pirmasens, Landau and Speyer. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ...

Frankenthal | Kaiserslautern | Koblenz | Landau | Ludwigshafen | Mainz | Neustadt (Weinstraße)
Pirmasens | Speyer | Trier | Worms | Zweibrücken Political status Country: Germany Federal state: Rhineland-Palatinate Region: Rhine Neckar Area District: Independent municipality Facts Population: 47,564 (December 2003) Area: 43. ... This is the article about the city, for the district see Kaiserslautern (district)   is a city in southwest Germany, located in the Bundesland of Rheinland-Pfalz at the edge of the Palatine Forest (Pfälzer Wald). ... Map of the Koblenz region Koblenz (also Coblenz in pre-1926 German spellings; French Coblence) is a city situated on both banks of the Rhine at its confluence with the Moselle, where the Deutsches Eck (German Corner) and its monument ( Emperor William I on horseback) are situated. ... Landau or Landau in der Pfalz (pop. ... Map of Germany showing Ludwigshafen am Rhein Ludwigshafen am Rhein is a city in Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, with about 166,000 inhabitants. ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... Neustadt an der Weinstraße, otherwise known as Neustadt a. ... Pirmasens is a city in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, near the border with France. ... Speyer (English formerly Spires) is a city in Germany (Rhineland-Palatinate) with approx. ... // Worms (pronounced ) is a city in the southwest of Germany. ... Zweibrücken is a city of Germany in Rhineland-Palatinate, on the Schwarzbach river at the border of the Palatine Forest. ...

Rural
districts

Ahrweiler | Altenkirchen | Alzey-Worms | Bad Dürkheim | Bad Kreuznach | Bernkastel-Wittlich | Birkenfeld | Bitburg-Prüm
Cochem-Zell | Donnersbergkreis | Germersheim | Kaiserslautern | Kusel | Mainz-Bingen
Mayen-Koblenz | Neuwied | Rhein-Hunsrück-Kreis | Rhein-Lahn-Kreis | Rhein-Pfalz-Kreis
Südliche Weinstraße | Südwestpfalz | Trier-Saarburg | Vulkaneifel | Westerwaldkreis Categories: Districts of Rhineland-Palatinate ... Categories: Districts of Rhineland-Palatinate ... Categories: Districts of Rhineland-Palatinate ... Bad Dürkheim is a district in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Categories: Districts of Rhineland-Palatinate ... Bernkastel-Wittlich is a district in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Birkenfeld is a district in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Bitburg-Prüm is a district in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Categories: Districts of Rhineland-Palatinate ... The Donnersbergkreis is a district (Kreis) in the middle of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Germersheim is a district (Kreis) in the south-east of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Kaiserslautern is a district (Kreis) in the south of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Kusel is a district (Kreis) in the south of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Mainz-Bingen is a district (Kreis) in the east of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Mayen-Koblenz is a district (Kreis) in the north of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Neuwied is a district (Kreis) in the north of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Rhein-Hunsrück is a district (Kreis) in the middle of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Rhein-Lahn is a district (Kreis) in the east of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... The Rhein-Pfalz-Kreis is a district (Kreis) in the east of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Südliche Weinstraße is a district (Kreis) in the south of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Südwestpfalz is a district (Kreis) in the south of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Trier-Saarburg is a district in the west of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... Vulkaneifel is a district (Kreis) in the north-west of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... The Westerwaldkreis is a district (Kreis) in the east of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ...


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m