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Encyclopedia > Tricuspid valve
Tricuspid valve
Anterior (frontal) view of the opened heart. White arrows indicate normal blood flow. (Tricuspid valve labeled at bottom left.)
Base of ventricles exposed by removal of the atria. (Tricuspid valve visible at bottom right.)
Latin valva atrioventricularis dextra, valvula tricuspidalis
Gray's subject #138 531
MeSH Tricuspid+Valve
Dorlands/Elsevier v_02/12843894

The tricuspid valve is on the right side of the heart, between the right atrium and the right ventricle. The normal tricuspid valve usually has three leaflets and three papillary muscles. Tricuspid valves may also occur with two or four leaflets, and the number may change during life (Van Pragh, 1998). Image File history File links Diagram_of_the_human_heart_(cropped). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... Elseviers logo. ... This page is about the muscular organ, the Heart. ... The right ventricle is one of four chambers (two atria and two ventricles) in the human heart. ... Papillary muscles: attached to chordae tendineae, their function is to open and close both the bicuspid and the tricuspid valves, which are located between the atrias and their respective ventricles. ...

Contents

Valves

  • The largest cusp is interposed between the atrioventricular orifice and the conus arteriosus and is termed the anterior or infundibular cusp.
  • A second, the posterior or marginal cusp, is in relation to the right margin of the ventricle.
  • A third, the medial or septal cusp, to the ventricular septum.
  • The tricuspid valve prevents the blood from returning to the right atrium when the right ventricle contracts

jono white (1991) Atrioventricular opening can refer to: Right atrioventricular opening Left atrioventricular opening Category: ... The upper and left angle of the right ventricle forms a conical pouch, the conus arteriosus, from which the pulmonary artery arises. ... In the heart, a ventricle is a heart chamber which collects blood from an atrium (another heart chamber that is smaller than a ventricle) and pumps it out of the heart. ... Interventricular septum: The stout wall separating the lower chambers (the ventricles) of the heart from one another. ...


Pathology

A small amount of leakage or regurgitation is not uncommon in the tricuspid valve. It is a common valve to be infected (endocarditis) in IV drug users.[1][2] Although it is not a common site of endocarditis, patients with a small VSD usually develop endocarditis of the tricuspid valve.[citation needed] Regurgitation is blood flow in the opposite direction from normal, as the backward flowing of blood into the heart or between heart chambers. ... Endocarditis is an inflammation of the inner layer of the heart, the endocardium. ... An intravenous drug (IV drug) is a drug administered intravenously, either by an intravenous drip or a syringe. ...


The tricuspid valve can be affected by rheumatic fever which can cause tricuspid stenosis or tricuspid insufficiency (also called tricuspid regurgitation). Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory disease which may develop after a Group A streptococcal infection (such as strep throat or scarlet fever) and can involve the heart, joints, skin, and brain. ... Tricuspid valve stenosis is a narrowing of the orifice of the tricuspid valve of the heart. ... Tricuspid insufficiency, also termed Tricuspid regurgitation, refers to the failure of the hearts tricuspid valve to close properly during systole. ...


Some patients are born with congenital abnormalities of the tricuspid valve. Congenital apical displacement of the tricuspid valve is called Ebstein's anomaly and typically causes significant tricuspid regurgitation. A congenital disorder is a medical condition or defect that is present at or before birth (for example, congenital heart disease). ... Ebsteins anomaly is a congenital heart defect in which the opening of the tricuspid valve is displaced towards the apex of the right ventricle of the heart. ... Regurgitation is blood flow in the opposite direction from normal, as the backward flowing of blood into the heart or between heart chambers. ...


The first endovascular tricuspid valve implant was performed by physicians at the Cleveland Clinic. [3] Cleveland Clinic is a multispecialty academic medical center located in Cleveland, Ohio. ...


References

  1. ^ Demin AA, Drobysheva VP, Vel'ter OIu (2000). "[Infectious endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers]" (in Russian). Klinicheskaia meditsina 78 (8): 47-51. PMID 11019526. 
  2. ^ Butany J, Dev V, Leong SW, Soor GS, Thangaroopan M, Borger MA (2006). "Infective endocarditis of the tricuspid valve". Journal of cardiac surgery 21 (6): 603-4. PMID 17073968. 
  3. ^ http://www.universitycircle.org/content/healthcare.asp

Additional reading

  • Richard Van Pragh: Cardiac anatomy in A. C. Chang et al.: Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care, Philadelphia 1998.

See also

Grays Fig. ... Anterior (frontal) view of the opened heart. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Tricuspid valve - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (221 words)
The tricuspid valve is on the right side of the heart, between the right atrium and the right ventricle.
The largest cusp is interposed between the atrioventricular orifice and the conus arteriosus and is termed the anterior or infundibular cusp.
Congenital apical displacement of the tricuspid valve is called Ebstein's anomaly and typically causes significant tricuspid regurgitation.
Heart valve - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (626 words)
In anatomy, the heart valves are valves in the heart that maintain the unidirectional flow of blood by opening and closing depending on the difference in pressure on each side.
These are large, multicusped valves that prevent backflow from the ventricles into the atria during systole.
A common complication of rheumatic fever is thickening and stenosis of the mitral valve.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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