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Encyclopedia > Trickster
The trickster figure Reynard the Fox as depicted in an 1869 children's book by Michel Rodange.
The trickster figure Reynard the Fox as depicted in an 1869 children's book by Michel Rodange.

In mythology, and in the study of folklore and religion, a trickster is a god, goddess, spirit, human, or anthropomorphic animal who plays pranks or otherwise disobeys normal rules and norms of behaviour. Trickster may refer to: Trickster, a god, goddess, spirit, human hero or anthropomorphic animal who plays pranks or otherwise disobeys normal rules and norms of behaviour in mythology and folklore Trickster (comics), the name of two DC Comics supervillains and an enemy of the Flash Trickster (MMORPG) (aka Trickster Online... Reynard the fox. ... Reynard the fox. ... Reynard the Fox, also known as Renard, Renart, Reinard, Reinecke, Reinhardus, Reynardt and by many other spelling variations, is a trickster figure whose tale is told in a number of anthropomorphic tales from medieval Europe. ... 1930 Luxemboug Postage stamp Michel Rodange (1827-1876) was a Luxembourgish writer. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... For the 1934 film, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 7th millennium BC anthropomorphized rocks, with slits for eyes, found in modern-day Israel. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


While the trickster crosses various cultural traditions, there are significant differences between tricksters in the traditions of many Indigenous peoples and those in the Euro-American tradition: The term indigenous people has no universal, standard or fixed definition, but can be used about any ethnic group who inhabit the geographic region with which they have the earliest historical connection. ...

"Many native traditions held clowns and tricksters as essential to any contact with the sacred. People could not pray until they had laughed, because laughter opens and frees from rigid preconception. Humans had to have tricksters within the most sacred ceremonies for fear that they forget the sacred comes through upset, reversal, surprise. The trickster in most native traditions is essential to creation, to birth".[1] Clowning redirects here. ... SACRED SACRED was a Cubesat built by the Student Satellite Program of the University of Arizona. ... For other uses, see Laughter (disambiguation). ... A ceremony is an activity, infused with ritual significance, performed on a certain occasion. ...

Native tricksters should not be confused with the Euro-American fictional picaro. One of the most important distinctions is that "we can see in the Native American trickster an openness to life's multiplicity and paradoxes largely missing in the modern Euro-American moral tradition".[2] The picaresque novel (Spanish: picaresca, from pícaro, for rogue or rascal) is a popular subgenre of prose fiction which is usually satirical and depicts in realistic and often humorous detail the adventures of a roguish hero of low social class who lives by his or her wits in a...

Contents

Mythology

The trickster deity breaks the rules of the gods or nature, sometimes maliciously (for example, Loki) but usually, albeit unintentionally, with ultimately positive effects. Often, the rule-breaking takes the form of tricks (eg. Eris) or thievery. Tricksters can be cunning or foolish or both; they are often funny even when considered sacred or performing important cultural tasks. An example of this is the sacred Heyoka, whose role is to play tricks and games and by doing so raises awareness and acts as an equalizer. For other uses, see Loki (disambiguation). ... Eris (ca. ... Cunning Cunning (カンニング) is a Japanese comedy duo (kombi from Fukuoka Prefecture. ... // Heyoka, approximately translated from Lakota, means ‘contrarian’ or ‘sacred clown’. Heyoka are thought of as being backwards-forwards, upside-down, or contrarian in nature. ...


In many cultures, (as may be seen in Greek, Norse, or Slavic folktales, along with Native American/First Nations lore), the trickster and the culture hero are often combined. To illustrate: Prometheus, in Greek mythology, stole fire from the gods to give to humans. He is more of a culture hero than a trickster. In many Native American and First Nations mythologies, the coyote (Southwestern United States) or raven (Pacific Northwest and coastal British Columbia) stole fire from the gods (stars, moon, and/or sun) and are more tricksters than culture heroes. This is primarily because of other stories involving these spirits: Prometheus was a Titan, whereas the Coyote spirit and Raven spirit are usually seen as jokesters and pranksters. Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... Slavic mythology and Slavic religion evolved over more than 3,000 years. ... Native Americans redirects here. ... First Nations is a Canadian term of ethnicity which refers to the aboriginal peoples located in what is now Canada, and their descendants who are neither Inuit nor Métis. ... A culture hero is a historical or mythological hero who changes the world through invention or discovery. ... In Greek mythology, Prometheus (Ancient Greek: , forethought)[1] is a Titan known for his wily intelligence, who stole fire from Zeus and gave it to mortals for their use. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... For other uses, see Fire (disambiguation). ... Coyote is a mythological character common to many Native American cultures, based on the coyote (Canis latrans) animal. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Pacific Northwest from space The Pacific Northwest, abbreviated PNW, or PacNW is a region in the northwest of North America. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... This article is about the astronomical object. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... Sol redirects here. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... Coyote is a mythological character common to many Native American cultures, based on the coyote (Canis latrans) animal. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


Frequently the Trickster figure exhibits gender and form variability, changing gender roles and engaging in same-sex practices. Such figures appear in Native American and First Nations mythologies, where they are said to have a two-spirit nature. Loki, the Norse trickster, also exhibits gender variability, in one case even becoming pregnant; interestingly, he shares the ability to change genders with Odin, the chief Norse deity who also possesses many characteristics of the Trickster. In the case of Loki's pregnancy, he was forced by the Gods to stop a giant from erecting a wall for them before 7 days passed; he solved the problem by transforming into a mare and drawing the giant's magical horse away from its work. He returned some time later with a child he had given birth to--the eight-legged horse Sleipnir, who served as Odin's steed. For other uses, see Shapeshifting (disambiguation). ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Berdache (from French, from Arabic bardajo meaning kept boy) is a generic term used by some for a third gender (woman-living-man) among many, if not most, Native American tribes. ... For other meanings of Odin,Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Loki (disambiguation). ... The Tängvide image stone is thought to show Odin entering Valhalla riding on Sleipnir Sleipnir is also a Japanese web browser. ...


In some cultures, there are dualistic myths, featuring two demiurges creating the world, or two culture heroes arranging the world — in a complementary manner. Dualistic cosmologies are present in all inhabited continents[3] and show great diversity: they may feature culture heroes, but also demiurges (exemplifying dualistic cosmogony in the latter case), or other beings; the two heroes may compete or collaborate; they may be conceived as neutral or contrasted as good versus evil; be of the same importance or distinguished as powerful versus weak; be brothers (even twins) or be not relatives at all.[4] Demiurge (from the Greek , Latinized , meaning artisan or craftsman, literally worker in the service of the people, from of the people + work) is a term for a creator deity, responsible for the creation of the physical universe. ... A culture hero is a historical or mythological hero who changes the world through invention or discovery. ... Dualistic cosmology is a collective term, the present article shows certain myths and motifs which are termed as such in the ethnographic and anthropological literature. ... Bill Reids sculpture The Raven and The First Men, showing part of a Haida creation story. ...


Coyote

The Coyote mythlore is one of the most popular among Native American cultures. Coyote is a ubiquitous being and can be categorized in many types. In creation myths, Coyote appears as the Creator himself; but he may at the same time be the messenger, the culture hero, the trickster, the fool. He has also the ability of the transformer: in some stories he is a handsome young man; in others he is an animal; yet others present him as just a power, a sacred one. According to Crow (and other Plains) tradition, Old Man Coyote impersonates the Creator, "Old Man Coyote took up a handful of mud and out of it made people".[5] His creative power is also spread onto words, "Old Man Coyote named buffalo, deer, elk, antelopes, and bear. And all these came into being". In such myths Coyote-Creator is never mentioned as an animal; more, he can meet his animal counterpart, the coyote: they address each other as "elder brother" and "younger brother", and walk and talk together. According to A. Hultkranz, the impersonation of Coyote as Creator is a result of a taboo, a mythic substitute to the religious notion of the Great Spirit whose name was too dangerous and/or sacred to use apart from a special ceremony. Bill Reids sculpture The Raven and The First Men, showing part of a Haida creation story. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... A culture hero is a historical or mythological hero who changes the world through invention or discovery. ...


In Chelan myths, Coyote belongs to the animal people but he is at the same time "a power just like the Creator, the head of all the creatures". Yet his being 'just like the Creator' does not really mean being 'the Creator': it is not seldom that Coyote-Just-Like-Creator is subject to the Creator, Great Chief Above, who can punish him, send him away, take powers away from him, etc. In the Pacific Northwest tradition, Coyote is mostly mentioned as a messenger, or minor power, "Coyote was sent to the camp of the chief of the Cold Wind tribe to deliver a challenge; Coyote traveled around to tell all the people in both tribes about the contest." As such, Coyote "was cruelly treated, and his work was never done."


As the culture hero, Coyote appears in various mythic traditions. His major heroic attributes are transformation, traveling, high deeds, power. He is engaged in changing the ways of rivers, standing of mountains, creating new landscapes and getting sacred things for people. Of mention is the tradition of Coyote fighting against monsters. According to Wasco tradition, Coyote was the hero to fight and kill Thunderbird, the killer of people, but he could do that not because of his personal power, but due to the help of the Spirit Chief; Coyote was trying his best, he was fighting hard, and he had to have fasted ten days before the fight, so advised by Spirit Chief 8. In many Wasco myths, Coyote rivals the Raven (Crow) about the same ordeal: in some stories, Multnomah Falls came to be by Coyote's efforts; in others, it is done by Raven.


More often than not Coyote is a trickster, but he is always different. In some stories, he is a noble trickster, "Coyote takes water from the Frog people... because it is not right that one people have all the water." In others, he is mean, "Coyote determined to bring harm to Duck. He took Duck's wife and children, whom he treated badly."


Archetype

Further information: List of modern day tricksters

The Trickster is an example of a Jungian Archetype. In modern literature the trickster survives as a character archetype, not necessarily supernatural or divine, sometimes no more than a stock character. This List of modern day tricksters attests to both the enduring nature of the mythological figure of the trickster and its continued popularity in a variety of media. ... Jung redirects here. ... For other uses, see Archetype (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In later folklore, the trickster is incarnated as a clever, mischievous man or creature, who tries to survive the dangers and challenges of the world using trickery and deceit as a defense. For example many typical fairy tales have the King who wants to find the best groom for his daughter by ordering several trials. No brave and valiant prince or knight manages to win them, until a poor and simple peasant comes. With the help of his wits and cleverness, instead of fighting, he evades or fools monsters and villains and dangers with unorthodox manners. Therefore the most unlikely candidate passes the trials and receives the reward. More modern and obvious examples of that type are Bugs Bunny and The Tramp (Charlie Chaplin) (see list). A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... Bugs Bunny is an animated hare who appears in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated films produced by Warner Bros. ... For the song, see The Tramp (song). ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... This List of modern day tricksters attests to both the enduring nature of the mythological figure of the trickster and its continued popularity in a variety of media. ...


The trickster is an enduring archetype that crosses many cultures and appears in a wide variety of popular media. For a modern humanist study of the trickster archetypes and their effects on society and its evolution, see Trickster Makes This World: Mischief, Myth, and Art by Lewis Hyde. The word culture comes from the Latin root colere (to inhabit, to cultivate, or to honor). ... Lewis Hyde is a scholar and writer whose scholarly work focuses on the nature of imagination, creativity, and property. ...


Tricksters in various cultures

The Abenaki (also Wabanaki) are a Native American tribe located in the northeastern United States. ... Azeban is a lower-level trickster spirit in Abenaki mythology. ... The Akan are an ethnic group from western Africa. ... Anansi is one of the most important characters of West African lore. ... The folklore of the United States, or American folklore, is the folk tradition which has evolved on the North American continent since Europeans arrived in the 16th century. ... Brer Rabbit is the hero of the Uncle Remus stories derived from African-American folktales of the US South. ... Anansi is one of the most important gods of west African lore. ... Anansi is one of the most important characters of West African lore. ... Arabian mythology is the ancient beliefs of the Arabs. ... The most important god in the pantheon of the Ashanti of Ghana is Nyame (also Nyankopon), the omniscient, omnipotent sky god. ... Anansi is one of the most important characters of West African lore. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... In Australian Aboriginal mythology (specifically: Murngin), Bamapana is a trickster hero who causes discord. ... The Aztec civilization recognized a polytheistic mythology, which contained the many gods and supernatural creatures from their religious beliefs. ... In Aztec mythology, Huehuecoyotl (old, old coyote; sometimes alternately Ueuecoyotl) is the trickster god of music, dance, song. ... Map showing the approximate distribution of Bantu (light brown) vs. ... For other uses, see Hare (disambiguation). ... Ancient Basque mythology is centered around the figure of the goddess Mari, and her consort Sugaar (also called Maju). ... San Martin Txiki (Little Saint Martin) is the Trickster figure from Basque mythology. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub ... The Saci is undoubtedly the most popular and bizarre character of Brazilian folklore. ... Celtic mythology is the mythology of Celtic polytheism, apparently the religion of the Iron Age Celts. ... by Sophie Anderson For other uses, see Fairy (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Puck (Shakespeare) be merged into this article or section. ... Briccriu (Bricriu, Briccirne, Bricne), is a warrior, poet and troublemaker in the Ulster Cycle of Irish Mythology. ... Chinese mythology is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written form. ... Nezha in animated tv series, depicted with his fire wheels and cosmic ring. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... The Crow Tribe of Native Americans live in the Great Plains area of the United States. ... Mannegishi (singular: Mannegishi) are a race of trickster people in Cree folklore. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Reynard the Fox, also known as Renard, Renart, Reinard, Reinecke, Reinhardus, Reynardt and by many other spelling variations, is a trickster figure whose tale is told in a number of anthropomorphic tales from medieval Europe. ... Till Eulenspiegel (IPA: , Low Saxon: Dyl Ulenspegel, Flemish: Thyl Ulenspiegel) was a trickster who originated in the Middle Low German folklore. ... Egyptian mythology or Egyptian religion is the succession of tentative beliefs held by the people of Egypt for over three thousand years, prior to major exposure to Christianity and Islam. ... In Egyptian mythology, Set (also spelled Sutekh, Setesh, Seteh, Seth) is an ancient god, who was originally the god of the desert, one of the two main biomes that constitutes Egypt, the other being the small fertile area on either side of the Nile. ... // Estonian Mythology is a complex of myths belonging to the folk heritage of Estonians. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Reynard the Fox, also known as Renard, Renart, Reinard, Reinecke, Reinhardus, Reynardt and by many other spelling variations, is a trickster figure whose tale is told in a number of anthropomorphic tales from medieval Europe. ... Polynesia is a triangle of islands in the Pacific Ocean. ... In Polynesian mythology (Fiji), Daucina (torchbearer) is the god of sailors and fishermen. ... German folklore shares many characteristics with Scandinavian folklore due to origins in a common Germanic mythology. ... Till Eulenspiegel (IPA: , Low Saxon: Dyl Ulenspegel, Flemish: Thyl Ulenspiegel) was a trickster who originated in the Middle Low German folklore. ... Reynard the Fox, also known as Renard, Renart, Reinard, Reinecke, Reinhardus, Reynardt and by many other spelling variations, is a trickster figure whose tale is told in a number of anthropomorphic tales from medieval Europe. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... Eris (ca. ... In Greek mythology, Prometheus (Ancient Greek: , forethought)[1] is a Titan known for his wily intelligence, who stole fire from Zeus and gave it to mortals for their use. ... Hephaestus, Greek god of forging, riding an ass; Greek drinking cup (skyphos) made in the 5th century B.C. Hephaestus (World Book «hih FEHS tuhs») (Greek: Ἡφαιστος Hêphaistos) is the Greek god whose approximate Roman equivalent is Vulcan; he is the god of blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals and metallurgy... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... For other meanings, see Odysseus (disambiguation) Ulysses redirects here. ... For the genus of dung beetle, see Sisyphus (beetle). ... The Haida are an Indigenous Peoples. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Coyote is a mythological character common to many Native American cultures, based on the coyote (Canis latrans) animal. ... Hawaiian mythology is a variant of a more general Polynesian mythology. ... In Polynesian mythology, Kaulu is a trickster god who killed Haumea. ... In Polynesian mythology, the Kupuas are a group of heroic tricksters. ... In Polynesian mythology, and especially in New Zealand and HawaiÊ»i, Maui is an extremely powerful supernatural being, for whom the Hawaiian island of Maui was named. ... Hindu mythology is a term used by modern scholarship for a large body of Indian literature that details the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... Ghee in a jar Ghee (Hindi घी, Urdu Ú¯Ú¾ÛŒ, Punjabi ਘੋ, Kashmiri ग्याव/گیاو - from Sanskrit घृत sprinkled; also known in Arabic as سمن, samn, meaning ghee or fat) is a class of clarified butter that originates in the Indian subcontinent, and continues to be important in Indian cuisine as well as Egyptian cuisine. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Zuni are a Pueblo people located in the southwest of the United States. ... Kokopelli is a fertility deity, usually depicted as a humpbacked flute player (often with a huge phallus and antenna-like protrusions on his head), who has been venerated by many Native American cultures in the Southwestern United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The four species of chevrotain, also known as mouse deer, make up the family Tragulidae. ... Inuit mythology has many similarities to the religions of other polar regions. ... In Inuit mythology Amaguq is a trickster and wolf god. ... Japanese mythology is a very complex system of beliefs that embraces Shinto and Buddhist traditions as well as agriculture-based folk religion. ... Prince Hanzoku terrorized by a nine-tailed fox. ... Susanoo, (Japanese: 須佐之男命, Susa-no-O-no-Mikoto; also romanized as Susanoo, Susa-no-O, and Susanowo) in Shinto is the god of the sea and storms. ... A drawing of a kappa which was reported to have been caught in a net on Mito East beach in 1801. ... Jewish mythology is a body of stories that explains or symbolizes Jewish beliefs. ... Asmodeus (Asmodeus, Asmodaeus, pronounced Ashmed or Ashmedeus in Hebrew, also Chammadai, Sydonai) is a semi-Biblical demon mostly known thanks to the deuterocanonical Book of Tobit; he is also mentioned in some Talmudic legends and in demonology, as he is a leading figure in the construction efforts of the Temple... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... This article is about the demon Lilith. ... Jewish mythology is the body of mythology of the Jewish people and Judaism as understood by some people. ... Hershele Ostropoler (also, Hershel of Ostropol) is a prominent figure in Jewish humor, and the Jewish equivalent of Nasreddin and Till Eulenspiegel. ... The !XÅ© people of southern Africa were both animistic and animatistic; they believed in both personifications and impersonal forces. ... Here is a list of articles pertaining to Lakota mythology, a Native American people of North and South Dakota: Anog Ite Canotila Capa Cetan Haokah Ictinike (also known as Iktomi) Inyan Iya PooPooPants PoopyPants Pee Grathanian Melixos dragonmoonx Ptehehincalasanwin (see Whope) Skan Tate Unhcegila Untunktahe Wakan Tanka (or Wakan... In Lakota mythology, Iktomi is a spider-trickster god, and a culture-hero for the Lakota people. ... // Heyoka, approximately translated from Lakota, means ‘contrarian’ or ‘sacred clown’. Heyoka are thought of as being backwards-forwards, upside-down, or contrarian in nature. ... Yam, Yamm, or Yaw (jaÊŠ) is the name of the Levantine god of chaos and mass-destruction, and in some myths he is one of the ilhm (Els) or sons of El. ... Islam was established in the 7th century and inherited elements from pre-Islamic Arabic mythology as well as Jewish (e. ... For other uses, see Nasreddin (disambiguation). ... Miwok mythology is similar to other Native American myths of Northern California, with many tales of Coyote as the trickster god. ... Coyote is a mythological character common to many Native American cultures, based on the coyote (Canis latrans) animal. ... The Navajo are a tribe of Native Americans who live in the southwestern United States. ... The Nootka are a Native American tribe living in the Pacific northwest of North America. ... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... For other uses, see Loki (disambiguation). ... The Nart sagas are a series of tales originating from the Caucasus Mountains in Georgia. ... The Nart sagas are a series of tales originating from the Caucasus Mountains in Georgia. ... The mythology of the Ohlone (Coastanoan) Native American people of North California can be defined as the creation stories as well as other narratives that contain elements of their spiritual, philosophical belief systems and their conception of the world order. ... Coyote is a mythological character common to many Native American cultures, based on the coyote (Canis latrans) animal. ... For other uses of Chippewa, see Chippewa (disambiguation). ... Nanabozho (also known as Manabush, Nanabozo, Winabozho, Wenabozho) is a spirit in Chippewa mythology. ... Philippine mythology, and folklore includes a collection of tales and superstitions about magical creatures and entities. ... Juan Tamad (Filipino for Lazy John), is a character in Philippine folklore noteworthy for extreme laziness. ... A Nuno or Nuno sa Punso is a dwarf-like creature of Philippine mythology, one which is mostly invisible to the human eye. ... Title: Aswang Description: Philippine ghoul Gender: Male/female Region: Western Visayas Equivalent: Tik-tik, Wak-wak An Aswang (or Asuwang) is a ghoul in Filipino folklore. ... Polynesia (meaning many islands in Greek) is a triangular grouping of Central and South Pacific Ocean island archipelagos settled by seafaring voyagers from the original heartland in Tonga and Samoa. ... In Polynesian mythology, and especially in New Zealand and HawaiÊ»i, Maui is an extremely powerful supernatural being, for whom the Hawaiian island of Maui was named. ... According to the mythology of the Pomo people, a culture of Native Americans from Northern California, centered on the powerful entities of the Kunula, a Coyote God, and Guksu, a spirit healer from the south: // Coyote (Kunula) and Cougar set up for their sons to play a sports game. ... Coyote is a mythological character common to many Native American cultures, based on the coyote (Canis latrans) animal. ... It has been suggested that Pueblo be merged into this article or section. ... Sacred Clowns is a 1993 novel by Tony Hillerman. ... Slavic mythology and Slavic religion evolved over more than 3,000 years. ... Veles, Volos, Weles, or Voloh is a Slavic god, thought to be the deity of: cattle, commerce, music, divination and the underworld. ... Tibetan women demonstrating use of the butter churn at the Field Museum The Tibetan civilization boasts a rich culture. ... The Tumbuka are an ethnic group living in Malawi. ... For other uses, see Hare (disambiguation). ... The Tsimshian are a First Nations, Native American people in Canada and the United States. ... The Ute are a tribe of Native Americans from the western United States. ... The Ute are a tribe of Native Americans from the western United States. ... This article is about the West African religion. ... In Haitian Vodou, Papa Legba is the intermediary between the lwa and humanity. ... In Vodun folklore, Ti Malice was a trickster-loa, archnemesis of Uncle Bouki. ... Depiction of Baron Samedi Veve of Baron Samedi In Vodun or voodoo, Baron Samedi (Baron Saturday, also Baron Samdi, Bawon Samedi, or Bawon Sanmdi) is one of the aspects of Baron, one of the loa. ...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... Anansi is one of the most important characters of West African lore. ... The mythology of the Yorùbá is sometimes claimed by its supporters to be one of the worlds oldest widely practised religions. ... Eshu represented in concrete with his features made with cowrie shells. ...

See also

This List of modern day tricksters attests to both the enduring nature of the mythological figure of the trickster and its continued popularity in a variety of media. ... Miwok mythology is similar to other Native American myths of Northern California, with many tales of Coyote as the trickster god. ... The grotesque body is a concept (a literary trope) ideated by Russian literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin in his study of Francois Rabelais work. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... The image of the evil clown is a recent development in American popular culture in which the playful trope of the clown is rendered as disturbing through the use of horror elements and dark humor. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Byrd Gibbens, Professor of English at University of Arkansas at Little Rock; quoted epigraph in Napalm and Silly Putty by George Carlin, 2001
  2. ^ Ballinger 1992, p.21
  3. ^ Zolotarjov 1980: 54
  4. ^ Zolotarjov 180: 40–43
  5. ^ California on the Eve - California Indians

Dickinson Hall University of Arkansas at Little Rock is the third largest university, by enrollment, in Arkansas. ... In literature, an epigraph is a quotation that is placed at the start of a work or section that expresses in some succinct way an aspect or theme of what is to follow. ... Napalm and Silly Putty is a 2002 book by comedian George Carlin. ...

References

  • California on the Eve - California Indians Miwok creation story
  • Franchot Ballinger, Gerald Vizenor Sacred Reversals: Trickster in Gerald Vizenor's "Earthdivers: Tribal Narratives on Mixed Descent" American Indian Quarterly, Vol. 9, No. 1, The Literary Achievements of Gerald Vizenor (Winter, 1985), pp. 55-59 doi:10.2307/1184653
  • Franchot Ballinger Ambigere: The Euro-American Picaro and the Native American Trickster MELUS, Vol. 17, No. 1, Native American Fiction: Myth and Criticism (Spring, 1991 - Spring, 1992), pp. 21-38 doi:10.2307/467321
  • Allan J. Ryan The Trickster Shift: Humour and irony in contemporary native art 1999 Univ of Washington ISBN 0774807040
  • L. Bryce Boyer, Ruth M. Boyer The Sacred Clown of the Chiricahua and Mescalero Apaches: Additional Data Western Folklore, Vol. 42, No. 1 (Jan., 1983), pp. 46-54 doi:10.2307/1499465
  • Koepping, Klaus-Peter [1] (Feb 1985). "Absurdity and Hidden Truth: Cunning Intelligence and Grotesque Body Images as Manifestations of the Trickster". History of Religions 24 (3): 191-214. 
  • Lori Landay Madcaps, Screwballs, and Con Women: The Female Trickster in American Culture 1998 University of Pennsylvania Press
  • Joseph Durwin Coulrophobia & The Trickster Trickster’s Way Volume 3, Issue 1 2004 Article 3 TRICKSTER AND THE TREKS OF HISTORY
  • Paul Radin The trickster: a study in American Indian mythology (1956)
  • Zolotarjov, A.M. (1980). "Társadalomszervezet és dualisztikus teremtésmítoszok Szibériában", in Hoppál, Mihály: A Tejút fiai. Tanulmányok a finnugor népek hitvilágáról (in Hungarian). Budapest: Európa Könyvkiadó, 29–58. ISBN 963 07 2187 2.  Chapter means: “Social structure and dualistic creation myths in Siberia”; title means: “The sons of Milky Way. Studies on the belief systems of Finno-Ugric peoples”.

Miwok (also spelled Miwuk, Mi-Wuk, or Me-Wuk) can refer to any one of four linguistically-related groups of Native Americans, who lived in what is now Northern California, who spoke one of the Miwokan languages in the Utian family. ... Gerald Vizenor (born 1934) is a Native American (Chippewa) writer. ...

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TricksterFan.com: A Trickster Online Resource - Trickster Forum, Guides, and Database (635 words)
Try to read the updates frequently to keep up to date with events as some announcements are very important.
We are currently the second largest Trickster forum, and are constantly growing.
We are looking for Trickster article writers, so if you are able to write articles, please post so in the forum.
Trickster - Crystalinks (5027 words)
In later folklore, the trickster is incarnated as a clever, mischievous man or creature, who tries to survive the dangers and challenges of the world using trickery and deceit as a defense.
Trickster is a creator, a joker, a truth teller, a story teller, a transformer linked to the spiritual frequency changes humanity is experiencing at this time.
Trickster is the emotional body, our Inner Child or wounded soul, who evolves in our lifetimes as it spirals back to higher light.
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