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Encyclopedia > Trichophycus pedum

Trichophycus pedum (or Treptichnus pedum; formerly Phycodes pedum) was one of the earliest animals, and the first found in great abundance.[1] Trichophycus produced a fairly complicated and distinctive burrow pattern: along with a central, sometimes sinuous or looping burrow, it made successive probes upward through the sediment in search of nutrients, generating a trace pattern reminiscent of a fan or twisted rope.[2] It is considered more complex than earlier Ediacaran fauna; and its trace fossils, which occur worldwide, are usually found in strata above them. In fact, evidence of Trichophycus is used to demarcate the boundary between the Precambrian and Cambrian divisions of the geologic time scale in the stratigraphic reference section at Fortune Head, Newfoundland.[3] Phyla Subregnum Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subregnum Agnotozoa Placozoa (trichoplax) Orthonectida (orthonectids) Rhombozoa (rhombozoans) Subregnum Eumetazoa Radiata (unranked) (radial symmetry) Ctenophora (comb jellies) Cnidaria (coral, jellyfish, anemones) Bilateria (unranked) (bilateral symmetry) Acoelomorpha (basal) Orthonectida (parasitic to flatworms, echinoderms, etc. ... There is a suggestion that the words Bunny and Burrow have a common origin and meaning, French in origin appearing in Britain afetr the Norman conquest. ... Sediment is any particulate matter that can be transported by fluid flow and which eventually is deposited as a layer of solid particles on the bed or bottom of a body of water or other liquid. ... The Vendian biota (also known as Ediacaran Biota, Vendian forms, Vendian fauna(s), Vendobionta or Vendozoa) are a group of ancient lifeforms that are found in rocks of the Ediacaran Period, a bit older than the Cambrian faunas that represent the oldest (shelly) fossils of classical paleontology. ... A fossilized dinosaur footprint at Clayton Lake State Park, New Mexico. ... This article is about the geologic use of the term, for other uses see Stratum (disambiguation) Interstate road cut through limestone and shale strata in eastern Tennessee In geology and related fields, a stratum (plural: strata) is a layer of rock or soil with internally consistent characteristics that distinguishes it... The Precambrian is an informal name for the eons of the geologic timescale that came before the current Phanerozoic eon. ... The Cambrian is a major division of the geologic timescale that begins about 542 Ma (million years ago) at the end of the Proterozoic eon and ended about 488. ... // The geological time scale is used by geologists and other scientists to describe the timing and relationships between events that have occurred during the history of the Earth. ... Stratigraphy, a branch of geology, is basically the study of rock layers and layering (stratification). ... A Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point, abbreviated GSSP, is an internationally agreed upon stratigraphic section which serves as the reference section for a particular boundary on the geologic timescale. ... Fortune Head is a headland located about 1. ... Newfoundland (French: Terre-Neuve; Irish: Talamh an Éisc; Latin: Terra Nova) is a large island off the northeast coast of North America, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ...


Since it lacked any hard anatomical features, such as shells or bones, no fossilized remains of Trichophycus (besides its burrows) have been found. Its morphology and relationship to modern animals is therefore unknown, and some dispute even its inclusion into the animal kingdom.[4] Look up shell in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Grays illustration of a human femur, a typically recognized bone. ... A fossil Ammonite Fossils (from Latin fossus, literally having been dug up) are the mineralized or otherwise preserved remains or traces (such as footprints) of animals, plants, and other organisms. ... Comparative anatomy is the study of similarities and differences in the anatomy of organisms. ...


References

  1. Earth Science 3360: Introduction to Paleontology. URL accessed on 2006-03-09.
  2. McMenamin, Mark A.; Dianna L. McMenamin [1990-01-15]. The Emergence of Animals, Columbia University Press. ISBN 0231066473.
  3. Life in the Cambrian. URL accessed on 2006-03-09.
  4. Altermann, Wladyslaw [2002-07-01]. Precambrian Sedimentary Environments, Blackwell Publishing. ISBN 0632064153.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Trichophycus pedum - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (191 words)
Trichophycus pedum (or Treptichnus pedum; formerly Phycodes pedum) was one of the earliest animals, and the first found in great abundance.
Trichophycus produced a fairly complicated and distinctive burrow pattern: along with a central, sometimes sinuous or looping burrow, it made successive probes upward through the sediment in search of nutrients, generating a trace pattern reminiscent of a fan or twisted rope.
In fact, evidence of Trichophycus is used to demarcate the boundary between the Precambrian and Cambrian divisions of the geologic time scale in the stratigraphic reference section at Fortune Head, Newfoundland.
Fortune Head - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (444 words)
The boundary between the Precambrian and Cambrian is demarcated by the presence of trace fossils of Trichophycus pedum, one of the earliest animals.
Fortune Head records the beginning of a period of increasing biological diversity known as the "Cambrian explosion", and it exhibits a number of other Cambrian and Precambrian fossils, including early shell fossils, vendotaenid algae, soft-bodied megafossils, and microfossils.
Below Trichophycus, the stratotype at Fortune Head includes traces of the arthropod Monomorphichnus, vertical dwelling burrows from Skolithes and Arenicolites, cnidarian resting burrows from Conichnus and Bergauria, and more intricate feeding burrows from Gyrolithes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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