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Encyclopedia > Triboluminescence

Triboluminescence is an optical phenomenon in which light is generated via the breaking of asymmetrical bonds in a crystal when that material is scratched, crushed, or rubbed. This is a variant of luminescence; the term comes from the Greek tribein (to rub) and the Latin lumen (light). Image File history File links Merge-arrows. ... Fractoluminescence is the emission of light from the fracture of a crystal. ... An optical phenomenon is any observable event which results from the interaction of light and matter. ... For other uses, see Light (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Crystal (disambiguation). ... Luminescence is light not generated by high temperatures alone. ... Tribology is the science and technology of interacting surfaces in relative motion. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...


For example, a diamond may begin to glow while being rubbed. This occasionally happens to diamonds while a facet is being ground or the diamond is being sawn during the cutting process. Diamonds may fluoresce blue or red. Ordinary friction tape (the cloth type — not the shiny electrician's tape) displays a glowing line where the end of the tape is being pulled away from the roll. Many postal envelopes will produce a blue glow when opened in the dark or in low-light conditions. Also, when sugar crystals are crushed, tiny electrical fields are created, separating positive and negative charges that then create sparks while trying to reunite. WintOGreen Life Savers work especially well for creating such sparks, due to the fact that wintergreen oil (methyl salicylate) is fluorescent and converts ultraviolet light into blue light. Some Band Aid wrappers also glow bluish-green when unwrapped swiftly. This article is about the mineral. ... Man powered Diamond cutting mill in 18th century Diamond cutting is the art, skill and, increasingly, science of changing a diamond from a rough stone into a faceted gem. ... TVA electricians, Tennessee, 1942. ... An envelope is a packaging product, usually made of flat, planar material such as paper or cardboard, designed to contain a flat object such as a letter. ... This article is about the candy. ... Wintergreen is a term that can refer to various groups of plants: Wintergreen once commonly referred to plants that continue photosynthesis (remain green) throughout the winter. ... Methyl salicylate (chemical formula C6H4(HO)COOCH3; also known as salicylic acid methyl ester, oil of wintergreen, betula oil, methyl-2-hydroxybenzoate) is a natural product of many species of plants. ... Fluorescence induced by exposure to ultraviolet light in vials containing various sized cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots. ... Note: Ultraviolet is also the name of a 1998 UK television miniseries about vampires. ... The optical spectrum (light or visible spectrum) is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to the human eye. ...


The discovery of triboluminescence was actually an accident. In the late 1790's sugar production began to produce more refined pure sugar crystals. These crystals were formed into a large solid cone for transport and sale. This solid cone of sugar had to be broken into usable chunks using a device known as a sugar nip. People began to notice that as sugar was "nipped" in low light, tiny bursts of light were visible. The first recorded observation however, occurred even earlier and is attributed to English scholar Francis Bacon when he wrote in his 1620 "Novum Organum"[1] that "It is well known that all sugar, whether candied or plain, if it be hard, will sparkle when broken or scraped in the dark.". The scientist Robert Boyle also reported on some of his work on triboluminescence in 1663. This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely traded commodity. ... For other persons named Francis Bacon, see Francis Bacon (disambiguation). ... Robert Boyle (Irish: Robaird Ó Bhaoill) (25 January 1627 – 30 December 1691) was an Irish natural philosopher, chemist, physicist, inventor, and early gentleman scientist, noted for his work in physics and chemistry. ... Year 1663 (MDCLXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Contents

Mechanism of action

Materials scientists have not yet arrived at a full understanding of the effect, but the current theory of triboluminescence — based upon crystallographic, spectroscopic, and other experimental evidence — is that upon fracture of asymmetrical materials, charge is separated. When the charges recombine, the electric discharge ionizes the surrounding air, causing a flash of light. Research further suggests that crystals which display triboluminescence must lack symmetry (in order to permit charge separation) and be poor conductors. However, there are substances which break this rule, and which do not possess asymmetry, yet display triboluminescence anyway. It is thought that these materials contain impurities, which confer properties of asymmetry to the substance. Much of the work done on triboluminescence has been done by Dr. Linda M. Sweeting who is professor of chemistry at Towson University. The Materials Science Tetrahedron, which often also includes Characterization at the center Materials science or Materials Engineering is an interdisciplinary field involving the properties of matter and its applications to various areas of science and engineering. ... This box:      Electric charge is a fundamental conserved property of some subatomic particles, which determines their electromagnetic interaction. ... Towson University, often referred to as TU or simply Towson for short, is an American public university located in Towson in Baltimore County, Maryland, USA. It is part of the University System of Maryland. ...


Uncompahgre Ute Indians

The Uncompahgre Ute Indians from Central Colorado are one of the first documented groups of people in the world credited with the application of mechanoluminescence involving the use of quartz crystals to generate light. The Ute constructed special ceremonial rattles made from buffalo rawhide which they filled with clear quartz crystals collected from the mountains of Colorado and Utah. When the rattles were shaken at night during ceremonies, the friction and mechanical stress of the quartz crystals impacting together through the translucent buffalo hide produced flashes of light. The Utes (; yoots) are an ethnically related group of American Indians now living primarily in Utah and Colorado. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ...


See also

Fractoluminescence is the emission of light from the fracture of a crystal. ... Piezoelectricity is the ability of some materials (notably crystals and certain ceramics) to generate an electric potential[1] in response to applied mechanical stress. ... An earthquake light is an unusual luminous aerial phenomenon, similar in appearance to the aurora borealis, that appears in the sky at or near areas of tectonic stress, seismic activity or volcanic eruptions. ...

References

  • Martín Gil Jesús and Martín Gil Francisco J. "Triboluminescence of new uranyl salts", Journal of Chemical Education, 1978, 55(5):340.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Triboluminescence - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (437 words)
Triboluminescence is an optical phenomenon in which light is generated via the breaking of asymmetrical bonds in a crystal when that material is scratched, crushed, or rubbed.
This is a variant of luminescence; the term comes from the Greek tribein (to rub) and the Latin lumin (light).
The first recorded observation however, occurred even earlier and is attributed to English scholar Francis Bacon when he wrote in "The Advancement of Learning"[1] that he noticed a glow as he chopped blocks of cane sugar at night in 1605.
Sugar and Spice...and Light - Linda M. Sweeting (339 words)
She first viewed triboluminescence while working in a dark laboratory and has recently authored several papers on the spectra and structure of triboluminescent crystals.
The phenomenon is most commonly called triboluminescence, form the Greek verb meaning "to rub." It is very common in natural materials: minerals and rocks such as mica, quartz, and granite; plant extracts such as menthol and tartaric acid; and even bones.
To see the triboluminescence of sugar, strike the cubes against each other as if you were striking a match, or use a mortar and pestle to grind it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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