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Encyclopedia > Triangular trade
An historic example of three way trade in the North Atlantic

Triangular trade is a historical term indicating trade between three ports or regions. The trade evolved where a region had an export commodity that was not required in the region from which its major imports came. Triangular trade thus provided a mechanism for rectifying trade imbalances. Image File history File links Triangle_trade. ... Image File history File links Triangle_trade. ...


The most famous triangular trade in human history was the 18th century trade between West Africa, the West Indies, and Europe [1] (alternatively: West Africa, the West Indies, and northern colonies in British North America). Of these, the sea lane west from Africa was the notorious Middle Passage; its cargo, abducted or recently purchased African slaves.[2] (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... British North America consisted of the loyalist colonies and territories (i. ... A sea lane is regularly used route for ocean-going vessels. ... The Middle Passage refers to the forced transportation of African people from Africa to the New World as part of the Atlantic slave trade[1] and was the middle portion of the triangular trade voyage. ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... Slave redirects here. ...


The triangular slave trade

The trade represented a profitable enterprise for merchants. The business was risky, competitive, and severe, but enslaved Africans fetched a high price at auctions, making the trade in human cargo a lucrative business. A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...


The first leg of the triangle was from a European port, where supplies such as copper, cloth, trinkets, slave beads, guns and ammunition would be shipped to a port in Africa.[3] When the slave ship arrived, its cargo would be sold in exchange for slaves, who were often tightly-packed like any other cargo to maximize profits. The ship would then make the journey along the Middle Passage to the New World. Once the slave ship reached the New World, the surviving slaves would be sold for a good profit. The ships were then sunk[citation needed] to get them thoroughly cleaned,[citation needed] drained[citation needed] and loaded for a return voyage to their home port. From the West Indies the main cargo was sugar, rum, and molasses; from Virginia, it was tobacco and hemp. The ship then returned to Europe to complete the triangle. Trinket Island (86 sq km) is part of the Nicobar Islands chain, located in the northeast Indian Ocean between the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. ... Slave beads (often called Trade beads) were otherwise decorative glass beads used between the 16th and 20th century as a currency to exchange for goods, services and slaves (hence the name). ... The Middle Passage refers to the forced transportation of African people from Africa to the New World as part of the Atlantic slave trade[1] and was the middle portion of the triangular trade voyage. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... Slave ships were cargo boats specially converted for the purpose of transporting slaves, especially newly captured African slaves. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... U.S. Marihuana production permit. ...


Alternatively, New England also benefited from the trade, as many merchants were from New England, especially Rhode Island, replacing the role of Europe in the triangle. New England also made rum from the Caribbean sugar and molasses, which it shipped to Africa as well as within the New World. This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the beverage. ... West Indies redirects here. ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely traded commodity. ... Molasses or treacle is a thick syrup by-product from the processing of the sugarcane or sugar beet into sugar. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ...


Other triangular trades

The term "Triangular Trade" is also used to refer to a trade pattern which evolved before the American Revolutionary War between Great Britain, the colonies of British North America, and British colonies in the Caribbean. This typically involved exporting raw resources such as fish (especially salt cod) or agricultural produce from British North American colonies to feed slaves and planters in the West Indies (also lumber); sugar and molasses from the Caribbean; and various manufactured commodities from Great Britain.[4] This article is about military actions only. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill Lumber or Timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use—from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use—as structural material for construction...


Other triangular trades included the shipment of Newfoundland salt cod and corn from Boston, Massachusetts in British vessels to southern Europe.[5] Newfoundland —   IPA: [nuw fÉ™n lænd] (French: , Irish: ) is a large island off the east coast of North America, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... The word grain has several meanings, most being descriptive of a small piece or particle. ... Boston redirects here. ...


References

  1. ^ About.com: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. Accessed 6 November 2007.
  2. ^ National Maritime Museum - Triangular Trade. Accessed 28 March 2007.
  3. ^ Scotland and the Abolition of the Slave Trade. Accessed 28 March 2007.
  4. ^ Kurlansky, Mark. Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World. New York: Walker, 1997. ISBN 0-8027-1326-2.
  5. ^ Morgan, Kenneth. Bristol and the Atlantic Trade in the Eighteenth Century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993. ISBN 0521330173. Pages 64–77.

  Results from FactBites:
 
triangular trade (226 words)
The Triangular Trade is a route to recieve slaves.
It was called the triangular trade because of the triangular shape that the three legs of the journey made.
The EU is failing to honor its obligation under the Lome Convention the trade and aid treaty between the EU and the African, Caribbean and Pacific countries-- to increase the quota in line with rising consumption.
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