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Encyclopedia > Triangles of the neck
Triangles of the neck
The triangles of the neck. (Anterior triangles to the left; posterior triangles to the right.)
Side of neck, showing chief surface markings. (Nerves are yellow, arteries are red.)
Latin '
Gray's subject #145 563
System
Precursor {{{Precursor}}}
MeSH [1]
Dorlands/Elsevier {{{DorlandsPre}}}/{{{DorlandsSuf}}}

Anatomists use the term triangles of the neck to describe the divisions created by the major muscles in the region. Image File history File links Gray512. ... It has been suggested that History of the Latin language be merged into this article or section. ... Embryology is the branch of developmental biology that studies embryos and their development. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... Elseviers logo Elsevier, the worlds largest publisher of medical and scientific literature, forms part of the Reed Elsevier group. ...


The side of the neck presents a somewhat quadrilateral outline, limited, above, by the lower border of the body of the mandible, and an imaginary line extending from the angle of the mandible to the mastoid process; below, by the upper border of the clavicle; in front, by the middle line of the neck; behind, by the anterior margin of the Trapezius. The neck is the part of the body on many limbed vertebrates that distinguishes the head from the torso or trunk. ... The mandible (inferior maxillary bone) (together with the maxilla) is the largest and strongest bone of the face. ... The mastoid process (or mastoid bone) is a conical bump of the posterior portion of the temporal bone that is situated behind the ear in humans and many other vertebrates and serves as a site of neck muscle attachment (the Sternocleidomastoid, Splenius capitis, and Longissimus capitis). ... Left clavicle - from above Left clavicle - from below Collarbone (a bone) redirects here. ... Trapezius In human anatomy, the trapezius is a large superficial muscle on a persons back. ...


This space is subdivided into two large triangles by the Sternocleidomastoideus, which passes obliquely across the neck, from the sternum and clavicle below, to the mastoid process and occipital bone above. In human anatomy, the sternocleidomastoid muscles are muscles in the neck that act to flex and rotate the head. ... Figure 1 : Anterior surface of sternum and costa cartilages. ... Left clavicle - from above Left clavicle - from below Collarbone (a bone) redirects here. ... The mastoid process (or mastoid bone) is a conical bump of the posterior portion of the temporal bone that is situated behind the ear in humans and many other vertebrates and serves as a site of neck muscle attachment (the Sternocleidomastoid, Splenius capitis, and Longissimus capitis). ... The occipital bone [Fig. ...


The triangular space in front of this muscle is called the Anterior triangle of the neck; and that behind it, the Posterior triangle of the neck.


External links

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. Not to be confused with the University of Georgetown in Georgetown, Guyana or Georgetown College in Georgetown, KY. Georgetown University is a private university in the United States. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
VI. The Arteries. 3a. 3. The Triangles of the Neck. Gray, Henry. 1918. Anatomy of the Human Body. (1700 words)
The Inferior Carotid, or Muscular Triangle, is bounded, in front, by the median line of the neck from the hyoid bone to the sternum; behind, by the anterior margin of the Sternocleidomastoideus; above, by the superior belly of the Omohyoideus.
The Suprahyoid Triangle is limited behind by the anterior belly of the Digastricus, in front by the middle line of the neck between the mandible and the hyoid bone; below, by the body of the hyoid bone; its floor is formed by the Mylohyoideus.
The size of the subclavian triangle varies with the extent of attachment of the clavicular portions of the Sternocleidomastoideus and Trapezius, and also with the height at which the Omohyoideus crosses the neck.
CHAPTER 50: THE NECK (9365 words)
The posterior triangle is bounded by the sternomastoid, the trapezius and by the clavicle.
In the posterior triangle, the brachial plexus is found in the angle between the posterior border of the sternomastoid and the clavicle, where it can be "blocked" by injection of a local anesthetic, thereby rendering insensitive all the deep structures of the upper limb and the skin distal to the middle of the arm.
On each side, the anterior triangle of the neck is bounded by the anterior border of the sternomastoid, the anterior median line of the neck, and the lower border of the mandible.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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