FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Trenton, New Jersey
City of Trenton, New Jersey

Flag
Nickname: T-Town
Location of Trenton inside of Mercer County
Coordinates: 40°13′18″N 74°45′22″W / 40.22167, -74.75611
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Mercer
Incorporated November 13, 1792
Government
 - Mayor Douglas H. Palmer
Area
 - City  8.1 sq mi (21.1 km²)
 - Land  7.6 sq mi (19.8 km²)
 - Water  0.5 sq mi (1.3 km²)
Elevation [2]  52 ft (16 m)
Population (2006)[1]
 - City 83,923
 - Density 11,153.6/sq mi (4,304.7/km²)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08608, 08609, 08610, 08611, 08618, 08619, 08620, 08625, 08628, 08629, 08638, 08641, 08648, 08650
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 34-74000GR2
GNIS feature ID 0884540GR3
Website: www.ci.trenton.nj.us

Trenton is the capital of the U.S. state of New Jersey and the county seat of Mercer County. As of 2005, the City of Trenton had a population of 84,639.[1] Image File history File links Flag of the city of Trenton, NJ. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ... taken from State of New Jersey website - adapted by H. Cheney - licensed under GFDL and cc-by-sa File links The following pages link to this file: Trenton, New Jersey Image:Map of Mercer County highlighting Trenton City. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... “NJ” redirects here. ... List of New Jersey counties: New Jersey counties Atlantic County: formed in 1837 from part of Gloucester County. ... {{Infobox U.S. CoiirjhtfnEGEYWnfv state = New Jersey | seal = Mc-m f seal. ... A Municipal Corporation is a legal defintion for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, and towns. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Douglas Palmer was the first African-American mayor of Trenton, New Jersey. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Area code 609 once covered the entire South Jersey region and reached up into the north. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... “NJ” redirects here. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... {{Infobox U.S. CoiirjhtfnEGEYWnfv state = New Jersey | seal = Mc-m f seal. ... Modern forms of municipal government Walsh Act/Commission 1923 Municipal Manager Faulkner Act forms of municipal government Mayor-Council Council-Manager Small Municipality Mayor-Council-Administrator A City in the context of New Jersey local government refers to one of five types and one of eleven forms of municipal government. ...


Trenton dates back to June 3, 1719, when mention was made of a constable being appointed for Trenton, while the area was still part of Hunterdon County. Boundaries were recorded for Trenton Township as of June 3, 1719. Trenton became New Jersey's capital as of November 25, 1790, and the City of Trenton was formed within Trenton Township on November 13, 1792. Trenton Township was incorporated as one of New Jersey's initial group of 104 townships by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township were taken on February 22, 1834, to form Ewing Township. A series of annexations took place over a fifty-year period, with the city absorbing South Trenton borough (April 14, 1851), portions of Nottingham Township (April 14, 1856), Chambersburg and Millham Township (both on March 30, 1888) and Wilbur borough (February 28, 1898).[3] is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 23 - The Principality of Liechtenstein is created within the Holy Roman Empire April 25 - Daniel Defoe publishes Robinson Crusoe June 10 - Battle of Glen Shiel Prussia conducts Europes first systematic census Miners in Falun, Sweden find an apparently petrified body of Fet-Mats Israelsson in an unused... Hunterdon County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The New Jersey Legislature convene at the State House building in Trenton. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Ewing Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... South Trenton or Southside Trenton is a neighborhood in Trenton, New Jersey that is home to a diverse array of immigrants from places such as Latin America, Italy, and Ireland and their ancestors. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Nottingham Township is a now-defunct Township that existed in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, from 1688 until it was dissolved in 1856. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Chambersburg was a municipality that existed in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, from 1872 to 1888. ... Millham was a township that existed in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, from 1882 to 1888. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Wilbur was a borough that existed in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, from 1891 to 1898. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Trenton is the home of the Trenton Thunder Eastern League AA minor league baseball team, which is affiliated with the New York Yankees and plays in Mercer County Waterfront Park, and the Trenton Devils (an ECHL minor league hockey affiliate of the New Jersey Devils) which plays in the Sovereign Bank Arena. The New Jersey State Prison, which has two maximum security units and houses the state's most dangerous criminals, is also located in Trenton. Class-Level Double-A (1995-Present) Minor League affiliations Eastern League (1995-Present) Northern Major League affiliations New York Yankees (2003-present) Boston Red Sox (1995-2003) Detroit Tigers (1993-1995) Name Trenton Thunder (1994-present) London Tigers (1989-1993) Ballpark Mercer County Waterfront Park (1994-Present) Labatt Memorial Park... The Eastern League is a minor league baseball league which operates primarily in the northeastern United States, although it now has a team in Ohio. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Mercer County Waterfront Park is a baseball stadium in Trenton, New Jersey. ... The Trenton Devils are an ECHL team in Trenton, New Jersey. ... The ECHL (formerly the East Coast Hockey League) is a professional ice hockey league based in Princeton, New Jersey, with teams scattered across the United States and Canada, generally regarded as a tier below the American Hockey League. ... This is a list of ice hockey leagues from around the world. ... The New Jersey Devils are a professional ice hockey team based in Newark, New Jersey. ... The Sovereign Bank Arena is an 8,500 seat capacity arena in Trenton, New Jersey, that is home to the Trenton Titans and host numerous events every year. ... The New Jersey State Prison (NJSP) is a state prison located in Trenton, New Jersey. ...


In the year 2000 Trenton was designated as an anchor city for the New York Metropolitan Area. The rapid growth of suburban New York into Northern and Central New Jersey has brought Trenton under New York City's sphere of influence. During the Constitutional Convention in 1787, James Madison referred to the war-raged Trenton (and New Jersey at large) as "a dismembered torso bleeding into Philadelphia and New York" thus sealing its fate as an important port city in the eastern United States. Trenton and its immediate suburbs are often lumped together and referred to as "Greater Trenton" by locals. The New York metropolitan area is the most populous in the United States and the fourth most populous in the world (after Tokyo, Seoul, and Mexico City). ...

Contents

History

The first settlement which would become Trenton was established by Quakers in 1679, in the region then called the Falls of the Delaware, led by Mahlon Stacy from Handsworth, Sheffield, UK. Quakers were being persecuted in England at this time and North America provided the perfect opportunity to exercise their religious freedom. File links The following pages link to this file: New Jersey Categories: National Atlas images | New Jersey maps ... File links The following pages link to this file: New Jersey Categories: National Atlas images | New Jersey maps ... “Quaker” redirects here. ... Handsworth is a suburb of south eastern Sheffield, in South Yorkshire, England. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


By 1719, the town adopted the name "Trent-towne", after William Trent, one of its leading landholders who purchased much of the surrounding land from Stacy's family. This name later was shortened to "Trenton". William Trent (1653?-December 25, 1724) was a prominent merchant in Pennsylvania and New Jersey around the turn of the 18th century. ...


During the American Revolutionary War, the city was the site of George Washington's first military victory. On December 26, 1776, Washington and his army, after crossing the icy Delaware River to Trenton, defeated the Hessian troops garrisoned there (see Battle of Trenton). After the war, Trenton was briefly the national capital of the United States in November and December of 1784. The city was considered as a permanent capital for the new country, but the southern states favored a location south of the Mason-Dixon Line. This article is about military actions only. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The term Hessian refers to the inhabitants of the German state of Hesse. ... Combatants Continental Army a Hessian Brigade Commanders George Washington Johann Rall† Strength 2,400 1,400 Casualties 2 dead,On the march 4 wounded 23 dead, 92 wounded, 913 captured This article is about the Battle of Trenton which took place on December 26, 1776 For the Battle of Trenton... For the fictional character, see Mason Dixon (Rocky Balboa character). ...

The Lower Free Bridge displaying Trenton's slogan, "Trenton Makes, The World Takes". The bridge is commonly referred to as the "Trenton Makes Bridge".
The Lower Free Bridge displaying Trenton's slogan, "Trenton Makes, The World Takes". The bridge is commonly referred to as the "Trenton Makes Bridge".

Trenton became the state capital in 1790, but prior to that year the Legislature often met here. The town was incorporated in 1792. Image File history File links Trenton Makes The Country Takes Photographer --- Bob Jagendorf Website --- [1]www. ... Image File history File links Trenton Makes The Country Takes Photographer --- Bob Jagendorf Website --- [1]www. ... The south side of the bridge The Lower Trenton Toll Supported Bridge, commonly called the Lower Free Bridge, Warren Street Bridge or Trenton Makes Bridge, is a two-lane through truss bridge over the Delaware River between Trenton, New Jersey and Morrisville, Pennsylvania, owned by the Delaware River Joint Toll...


In 1896, the first professional basketball game was played in Trenton between the Trenton Basketball Team and the Brooklyn YMCA. Professional basketball refers to a number of leagues in which athletes play in sports arenas, on organized teams, for profit. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Not to be confused with YWCA. This article is about the association. ...


Trenton was a major manufacturing center in the late 1800s and early 1900s; one relic of that era is the slogan "Trenton Makes, The World Takes" displayed on the Lower Free Bridge (the "Trenton Makes Bridge"), just north of the Trenton-Morrisville Toll Bridge. The city adopted the slogan in the 1920s to represent Trenton's then-leading role as a major manufacturing center for steel, rubber, wire, rope, linoleum and ceramics. The south side of the bridge The Lower Trenton Toll Supported Bridge, commonly called the Lower Free Bridge, Warren Street Bridge or Trenton Makes Bridge, is a two-lane through truss bridge over the Delaware River between Trenton, New Jersey and Morrisville, Pennsylvania, owned by the Delaware River Joint Toll... The Trenton-Morrisville Toll Bridge is one of three bridges connecting Trenton, New Jersey with Morrisville, Pennsylvania. ...


Geography

The Trenton skyline during the Delaware River flood, April 2005
The Trenton skyline during the Delaware River flood, April 2005

Trenton is located at 40°13′18″N, 74°45′22″W (40.221741, -74.756138)GR1. Skyline of the City of Trenton, New Jersey during the Delaware River flood of April, 2005. ... Skyline of the City of Trenton, New Jersey during the Delaware River flood of April, 2005. ... For the Delaware River in Kansas, see Delaware River (Kansas) The Delaware River is a river on the Atlantic coast of the United States. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 8.1 square miles (21.1 km²)—7.7 square miles (19.8 km²) of it is land and 0.5 square miles (1.3 km²) of it is water. The total area is 6.01% water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ...


Trenton borders Ewing Township, Lawrence Township, Hamilton Township, and the Delaware River. Several bridges across the Delaware River - the Trenton-Morrisville Toll Bridge, Lower Trenton Bridge and Calhoun Street Bridge - connect Trenton to Morrisville, Pennsylvania. Ewing Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... Lawrence Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... Hamilton Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... For the Delaware River in Kansas, see Delaware River (Kansas) The Delaware River is a river on the Atlantic coast of the United States. ... The Trenton-Morrisville Toll Bridge is one of three bridges connecting Trenton, New Jersey with Morrisville, Pennsylvania. ... The Lower Trenton Toll Supported Bridge, commonly called the Lower Free Bridge, Warren Street Bridge or Trenton Makes Bridge, is a two-lane through truss bridge over the Delaware River between Trenton, New Jersey and Morrisville, Pennsylvania, owned by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission. ... Calhoun Street Bridge is a toll supported bridge connecting Calhoun St in Trenton, NJ to West Trenton Ave in Morrisville, PA. It was once part of the Lincoln Highway, and was later connected to Brunswick Circle by the Calhoun Street Extension. ... Morrisville is a borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ...

Trenton is located in almost the exact center of the state (the official geographic center is 13 miles (21 km) southeast of Trenton at 74° 33.5'W, 40° 4.2'N). Due to this, it is sometimes included as part of North Jersey and as the southernmost city of the New York metropolitan area, while others consider it a part of the South Jersey and as the northernmost city of the Delaware Valley. Locals consider it to be a part of Central Jersey, and thus part of neither region. Interstate 95 and Route 1 connect Trenton to New York City and Philadelphia. The part of I-95 that connects New York to Trenton is also the New Jersey Turnpike. The Trenton train station serves as the terminus for both SEPTA's R7 Trenton line (train service to and from Philadelphia) and New Jersey Transit's Northeast Corridor Line (train service to and from Newark Penn Station and New York Penn Station). In terms of local television news coverage, both 6ABC (based in Philadelphia) and News 12 New Jersey (based in Edison, NJ) maintain a news bureau in Trenton. These news bureaus are located in Trenton because it is the capital of New Jersey. However, in terms of sports, as noted above, both of Trenton's minor league teams (Trenton Thunder and Trenton Devils) are affiliates of major-league professional teams based in the New York metropolitan area (New York Yankees and New Jersey Devils respectively). Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1275x899, 258 KB) Delaware River near Worthington State Park Taken by User:Mwanner, June 23, 2004; uploaded on 1 July 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1275x899, 258 KB) Delaware River near Worthington State Park Taken by User:Mwanner, June 23, 2004; uploaded on 1 July 2005. ... For the Delaware River in Kansas, see Delaware River (Kansas) The Delaware River is a river on the Atlantic coast of the United States. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... Metropolitan statistical areas and divisions of New Jersey; counties shaded in blue hues are in the New York City metro; counties shaded in green hues are in the Philadelphia metro. ... The New York metropolitan area is the most populous in the United States and the fourth most populous in the world (after Tokyo, Seoul, and Mexico City). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Delaware Valley is the name of the metropolitan area centered on the city of Philadelphia in the United States. ... Metropolitan statistical areas and divisions of New Jersey; counties shaded in blue hues are in the New York City metro; counties shaded in green hues are in the Philadelphia metro. ... This article is about the modern freeway. ... New Jersey Transit: SEPTA: Other service Greyhound Lines Other information Passengers (2006) 436,058[1] 52% Code TRE Owned by New Jersey Transit Trenton Rail Station is the main passenger train station in Trenton, New Jersey. ... For the abbreviation SEPTA, see SEPTA. A septum, in general, is a wall separating two cavities or two spaces containing a less dense material. ... The SEPTA R7 is a route of the SEPTA Regional Rail (commuter rail) system. ... The New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) is a statewide public transportation system serving the state of New Jersey, and Orange and Rockland counties in New York. ... For the agglomeration of metropolitan areas, see article on BosWash megalopolis The Northeast Corridor (NEC) is an electrified railway line with overhead wires running from Washington, DC to Boston, Massachusetts, passing through Baltimore, Maryland, Wilmington, Delaware, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, New York, New York, New Haven, Connecticut and Providence, Rhode Island. ... Categories: Rail stubs | Train stations | Transportation in New Jersey | Newark, New Jersey | Pennsylvania Railroad ... For the Pennsylvania Station in Newark, New Jersey or Baltimore, Maryland, see Pennsylvania Station (Newark) or Pennsylvania Station (Baltimore). ... WPVI-TV 6ABC is the owned-and-operated ABC television station in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, owned by ABCs parent The Walt Disney Company with its transmitter in the Roxborough neighborhood (shared with KYW-TV). ... News 12 New Jersey is a 24-hour regional news channel reaching more than 1,800,000 television homes within the New York City metropolitan area. ... Edison Township is a township located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... Class-Level Double-A (1995-Present) Minor League affiliations Eastern League (1995-Present) Northern Major League affiliations New York Yankees (2003-present) Boston Red Sox (1995-2003) Detroit Tigers (1993-1995) Name Trenton Thunder (1994-present) London Tigers (1989-1993) Ballpark Mercer County Waterfront Park (1994-Present) Labatt Memorial Park... The Trenton Devils are an ECHL team in Trenton, New Jersey. ... The New York metropolitan area is the most populous in the United States and the fourth most populous in the world (after Tokyo, Seoul, and Mexico City). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The New Jersey Devils are a professional ice hockey team based in Newark, New Jersey. ...


Trenton is one of the only two state capitals which borders another state. The other such capital is Carson City, Nevada, which borders California. Motto: Proud of its Past. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


Climate

Trenton enjoys a humid continental temperate climate with some marine influence due to the nearby Atlantic Ocean. The four seasons are of approximately equal length, with precipitation fairly evenly distributed through the year. The temperature is rarely below zero or above 100 °F. The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... An oceanic climate (also called marine west coast climate and maritime climate) is the climate typically found along the west coasts at the middle latitudes of all the worlds continents, and in southeastern Australia; similar climates are also found at high elevations within the tropics. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ...


During the winter months, temperatures routinely fall below freezing, but rarely fall below 0 °F. The coldest temperature ever recorded in Trenton was -14 °F (-25.6 °C) on February 9, 1934. The average January low is 24 °F (-4.4 °C) and the average January high is 38 °F (3.3 °C). The summers are usually very warm, with temperatures often reaching into the 90 °F's, but rarely reaching into the 100 °F's. The average July low is 67 °F (19.4 °C) and the average July high is 85 °F (29.4 °C). The temperature reaches or exceeds 90 °F on 18 days each year, on average. The hottest temperature ever recorded in Trenton was 106 °F (41.1 °C) on July 9, 1936. Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The average precipitation is 45.77 inches (1,163.1 mm) per year, which is fairly evenly distributed through the year. The driest month on average is February, with only 2.87 inches (72.9 mm) of rainfall on average, while the wettest month is July, with 4.82 inches (122.4 mm) of rainfall on average. Rainfall extremes can occur, however. The all-time single-day rainfall record is 7.25 inches (184.1 mm) on September 16, 1999, during the passage of Hurricane Floyd. The all-time monthly rainfall record is 14.55 inches (369.6 mm) in August 1955, due to the passage of Hurricane Connie and Hurricane Diane. The wettest year on record was 1996, when 67.90 inches (1,720 mm) of rain fell. On the flip side, the driest month on record was October 1963, when only 0.05 inches (1.27 mm) of rain was recorded. The driest year on record was 1957, when only 28.79 inches (731.27 mm) of rain was recorded. An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Lowest pressure 921 mbar (hPa; 27. ... Hurricane Connie was the first in a series of hurricanes to strike North Carolina during the 1955 Atlantic hurricane season. ... Hurricane Diane was one of three hurricanes to hit to North Carolina during 1955. ...


Snowfall can vary even more year-to-year. The average snowfall is 24.9 inches (632.5 mm), but has ranged from as low as 2 inches (50.8 mm) (in the winter of 1918-19) to as high as 76.5 inches (1,943.1 mm) (in 1995-96). The heaviest snowstorm on record was the Blizzard of 1996 on January 7-8, 1996, when 24.2 inches (614.7 mm) buried the city. Snowstorms with accumulations of 12 inches (305 mm) or greater occur on average about once every 5 years. Blizzard of 1996 snowdrifts, Yonkers, New York. ...

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Avg high °F 38
41
51
61
71
80
85
83
75
64
54
43
Avg low °F 24
26
33
42
52
61
67
65
57
45
37
28
Average Rainfall in. 3.7
2.9
3.8
3.7
4.2
4.0
4.8
4.1
4.4
3.4
3.3
3.6
45.8
Source: NCDC
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Record high °F 73
76
87
93
99
100
106
105
101
94
83
76
Record low °F -13
-14
1
11
33
41
48
41
31
22
12
-7
Record Daily Rain in. 2.60
2.49
2.60
4.56
4.20
7.00
5.75
5.18
7.25
5.42
2.85
2.59
Source: NCDC

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1810 3,002
1820 3,942 31.3%
1830 3,925 -0.4%
1840 4,035 2.8%
1850 6,461 60.1%
1860 17,228 166.6%
1870 22,874 32.8%
1880 29,910 30.8%
1890 57,458 92.1%
1900 73,307 27.6%
1910 96,815 32.1%
1920 119,289 23.2%
1930 123,356 3.4%
1940 124,697 1.1%
1950 128,009 2.7%
1960 114,167 -10.8%
1970 104,786 -8.2%
1980 92,124 -12.1%
1990 88,675 -3.7%
2000 85,403 -3.7%
Est. 2006 83,923 [1] -1.7%
historical data sources:[4][5][6]

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 85,403 people, 29,437 households, and 18,692 families residing in the city. The population density was 11,153.6 people per square mile (4,304.7/km² ). There were 33,843 housing units at an average density of 4,419.9 per square mile (1,705.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 52.06% African American, 32.55% White, 0.35% Native American, 0.84% Asian, 0.23% Pacific Islander, 10.76% from other races, and 3.20% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 21.53% of the population. The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twetieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,542,199, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 29,437 households out of which 32.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 29.0% were married couples living together, 27.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.5% were non-families. 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.38. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 27.7% under the age of 18, 10.1% from 18 to 24, 31.9% from 25 to 44, 18.9% from 45 to 64, and 11.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 97.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.0 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $31,074, and the median income for a family was $36,681. Males had a median income of $29,721 versus $26,943 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,621. About 17.6% of families and 21.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.8% of those under age 18 and 19.5% of those age 65 or over. The median household income is commonly used to provide data about geographic areas and divides households into two equal segments with the first half of households earning less than the median household income and the other half earning more. ... The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Top 10 ethnicities reported during the 2000 Census by percentage 1. African American (52.1) 2. Puerto Rican (10.5) 3. Italian (7.3) 4. Irish (4.5) 5. Polish (3.8) 6. Guatemala (3.1) 7. English (2.0) 8. Jamaican (1.3) 9. Hungarian (1.1) 10. Mexican (1.1) An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ...


Riots of 1968

The Trenton Riots of 1968 were a major civil disturbance that took place during the week following the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King in Memphis on April 4. Race riots broke out nationwide following the murder of the civil rights activist. “Martin Luther King” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A race riot or racial riot is an outbreak of violent civil unrest in which race is a key factor. ...


More than 200 downtown Trenton businesses were ransacked and burned. More than 300 people, most of them young black men, were arrested on charges ranging from assault and arson to looting and violating the mayor's emergency curfew. Most of the assaults were on policemen, including one officer who was nearly killed when he was run over by a truck.[7]


In addition to 16 other injured policemen, 15 firefighters were treated at city hospitals for smoke inhalation, burns, sprains and cuts suffered while fighting raging blazes or for injuries inflicted by rioters. The losses incurred by downtown businesses were estimated at $7 million.[7]


Trenton's Battle Monument neighborhood had been struggling with the urban decay that was fueled by the riots. New homes have been built recently and more development is in the works as Trenton is seeing a revival in housing development.[8] Combatants Continental Army a Hessian Brigade Commanders George Washington Johann Rall† Strength 2,400 1,400 Casualties 2 dead,On the march 4 wounded 23 dead, 92 wounded, 913 captured This article is about the Battle of Trenton which took place on December 26, 1776 For the Battle of Trenton... Urban decay and renewal in Cincinnati Urban decay is the popular term for both the physical and social degeneration of cities and large towns. ...


Neighborhoods

The City of Trenton is home to numerous neighborhoods and sub-neighborhoods. The main neighborhoods are taken from the four cardinal directions (North, South, East, and West) and are often the main identifying points for city residents. A neighbourhood or neighborhood (see spelling differences) is a geographically localised community located within a larger city or suburb. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


North Ward is an African American community that houses numerous important sites in this predominantly African American city and its history. North Trenton also has a large Polish-American neighborhood that borders Lawrence Township. North Trenton is home to numerous important landmarks in the city of Trenton. The aforementioned Marcus Garvey School is an independent high school instructing students grades 9-12 that was founded in 2003 and exhibits African-themed curriculum, practices and terminology in the school setting. It is also the only high school besides Trenton Central High School within city limits providing an alternative to the larger, public high school most of Trenton's residents attend. North Trenton is also home to the historic Shiloh Baptist Church--the largest church in the city of Trenton and the oldest African American church in the city founded in 1888. Also located just at the southern tip of North Trenton is the city's Battle Monument, also known as "Five Points". It is a 150 ft. structure that marks the spot where George Washington's Continental Army launched the Battle of Trenton during the American Revolutionary War. It faces downtown Trenton and is a symbol of the city's historic past. An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... For the group sometimes known as Landmark, see Landmark Education Originally, a landmark literally meant a geographic feature, used by explorers and others to find their way back through an area on a return trip. ... Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr. ... Students in Rome, Italy. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... Curriculum has many different conceptions. ... Terminology is the study of terms and their use — of words and compound words that are used in specific contexts. ... Trenton Central High School is a four-year comprehensive public high school that serves students in ninth through twelfth grades from Trenton, in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, as part of the Trenton Public Schools. ... A public high school is a secondary school that is financed by tax revenues and other government-collected revenues, and administered exclusively by, and at the discretion of, state and local officials. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Five Points may refer to any of several small census-recognized communities in the U.S.: Five Points, Alabama Five Points, Florida Five Points, North Carolina Five Points, Ohio Five Points, Pennsylvania Five Points may also refer to various U.S. neighborhoods: Five Points (Athens), in Athens, Georgia Five Points... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... Combatants Continental Army a Hessian Brigade Commanders George Washington Johann Rall† Strength 2,400 1,400 Casualties 2 dead,On the march 4 wounded 23 dead, 92 wounded, 913 captured This article is about the Battle of Trenton which took place on December 26, 1776 For the Battle of Trenton... This article is about military actions only. ...


South Ward is the most diverse neighborhood in Trenton and is home to many residents with Latin American, Italian-American, and Irish-American ancestry as well as a sizable African American community. The Chambersburg neighborhood is contained within South Ward, and was once noted in the region as a destination for its many Italian restaurants. South Trenton or Southside Trenton is a neighborhood in Trenton, New Jersey that is home to a diverse array of immigrants from places such as Latin America, Italy, and Ireland and their ancestors. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ...


East Ward is the smallest neighborhood in Trenton and is home to Trenton's train station as well as Trenton Central High School. Recently, two campuses have been added, Trenton Central High School West and Trenton Central High School North, respectively, in those areas of the city. East Trenton is a neighborhood in Trenton, New Jersey. ... New Jersey Transit: SEPTA: Other service Greyhound Lines Other information Passengers (2006) 436,058[1] 52% Code TRE Owned by New Jersey Transit Trenton Rail Station is the main passenger train station in Trenton, New Jersey. ... Trenton Central High School is a four-year comprehensive public high school that serves students in ninth through twelfth grades from Trenton, in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, as part of the Trenton Public Schools. ...


West Ward is the home of Trenton's more affluent neighborhoods, including Hiltonia, Glen Afton, Berkeley Square, and the area surrounding Cadwalader Park. Trenton is also known for its family favorite dairy farm, Halo Farms, located on the border of Ewing Township and Trenton. West Trenton, New Jersey is a suburb of Trenton, New Jersey, and it is not a section of the capital itself. ...


In addition to these neighborhoods, other notable sections include the "The Island" (a small neighborhood between Route 29 and the Delaware River that is prone to flooding - and did so in 2005 and again in 2006) and historic Mill Hill located next door to downtown Trenton). Kingsbury Towers (a high rise apartment complex technically in South Ward) is also semi-autonomous or neutral. the Fisher-Richey-Perdicaris neighborhood comprises a little-known district sandwiched between West State Street and Route 29 with large several-story residences dating from ca. 1915. Route 29 is a state highway in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... For the Delaware River in Kansas, see Delaware River (Kansas) The Delaware River is a river on the Atlantic coast of the United States. ... Mill Hill is a neighborhood in New Jerseys capital city of Trenton, New Jersey. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ion Perdicaris (1840 - 1925) was a U.S.-Greek playboy who was the centre of the infamous Perdicaris incident, a kidnapping that aroused international conflict in 1904. ...


Government

Local government

The Old Barracks in Trenton, NJ
The Old Barracks in Trenton, NJ

The City of Trenton is governed under the Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council) system of municipal government. Image File history File linksMetadata TrentonBarracks. ... Image File history File linksMetadata TrentonBarracks. ... Modern forms of municipal government Walsh Act/Commission 1923 Municipal Manager Faulkner Act forms of municipal government Mayor-Council Council-Manager Small Municipality Mayor-Council-Administrator The Faulkner Act, or Optional Municipal Charter Law, provides for New Jersey municipalities to adopt a Mayor-Council government. ...


Trenton's current Mayor, Douglas Palmer, has been in office since July 1, 1990.[9] A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Douglas Palmer was the first African-American mayor of Trenton, New Jersey. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ...


Members of the City Council are:[10]

  • Paul M. Pintella - Council President and Councilman At Large
  • Annette H. Lartigue - Council Vice President and West Ward Councilwoman
  • Milford Bethea - North Ward Councilman
  • James H. Coston - South Ward Councilman
  • Gino A. Melone - East Ward Councilman
  • Manuel Segura - Councilman At Large
  • Cordelia M. Staton - Councilwoman At Large

Federal, state and county representation

The New Jersey State House in Trenton is the seat of the New Jersey Legislature.
The New Jersey State House in Trenton is the seat of the New Jersey Legislature.

Trenton is spread across two congressional districts, the Fourth Congressional District and the Twelfth Congressional District, and is part of New Jersey's 15th Legislative District.[11] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 557 pixelsFull resolution (2221 × 1545 pixel, file size: 656 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Courtesy of User:68. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 557 pixelsFull resolution (2221 × 1545 pixel, file size: 656 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Courtesy of User:68. ... The New Jersey State House is located in Trenton, New Jersey and is the seat of government for the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... The New Jersey Legislature convene at the State House building in Trenton. ...


New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District, covering portions of Burlington County, Mercer County, Monmouth County and Ocean County, is represented by Christopher Smith (R). New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District, covering all of Hunterdon County and portions of Middlesex County, Monmouth County, Morris County, and Somerset County, is represented by Rush D. Holt Jr. (D). New Jersey is represented in the Senate by Frank Lautenberg (D, Cliffside Park) and Bob Menendez (D, Hoboken). New Jerseys Fourth Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Chris Smith. ... Location in the state of New Jersey Formed 1694 Seat Mount Holly Area  - Total  - Water 2,122 km² (819 mi²) 38 km² (15 mi²) 1. ... {{Infobox U.S. CoiirjhtfnEGEYWnfv state = New Jersey | seal = Mc-m f seal. ... Monmouth County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey, within the New York metropolitan area. ... Ocean County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Christopher Henry Smith (born March 4, 1953, in Rahway, New Jersey) is an American Republican Party politician, who is a member of the United States House of Representatives for the 4th District of New Jersey (map). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... New Jerseys Twelfth Congressional District is currently represented by Democrat Rush Holt. ... Hunterdon County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Middlesex County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Monmouth County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey, within the New York metropolitan area. ... Morris County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey, about 25 mi (40 km) west of New York City. ... Somerset County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Rush Dew Holt, Jr. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Frank Raleigh Lautenberg (born January 23, 1924) is a businessman and Democratic Party politician. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Map highlighting Cliffside Parks location within Bergen County. ... Robert Bob Menendez (born January 1, 1954) is a Democratic Senator from New Jersey. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Map of New Jersey highlighting Hoboken Image of Hoboken taken by NASA (red line shows where Hoboken is). ...


The 15th legislative district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Shirley Turner (D, Ewing) and in the Assembly by Reed Gusciora (D, Trenton) and Bonnie Watson Coleman (D, Trenton). The Governor of New Jersey is Jon Corzine (D, Hoboken). The New Jersey Legislature convene at the State House building in Trenton. ... The New Jersey Legislature convene at the State House building in Trenton. ... The New Jersey Senate is the upper house of the New Jersey Legislature. ... Sen. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Ewing Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... The New Jersey General Assembly is the lower house of the New Jersey Legislature. ... Assemblyman Reed Gusciora Reed Gusciora (born March 27, 1960 in Passaic, New Jersey) is an American Democratic Party politician, who has served in the New Jersey General Assembly since 1996, where he represents the 15th legislative district. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Assemblywoman Bonnie Watson Coleman Bonnie Watson Coleman (February 6, 1945) is an American Democratic Party politician, who has served in the New Jersey General Assembly since 1998, where she represents the 15th legislative district. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Jon Corzine 54th Governor of New Jersey; Incumbent Christine Christie Todd Whitman, the first female governor of New Jersey The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Jon Stevens Corzine (born January 1, 1947) is the Governor of New Jersey. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Map of New Jersey highlighting Hoboken Image of Hoboken taken by NASA (red line shows where Hoboken is). ...


Mercer County's County Executive is Brian M. Hughes. The executive, along with the Board of Chosen Freeholders administer all county business. As of 2007, Mercer County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chair Pasquale "Pat" Colavita, Jr. (term ends December 31, 2009; Lawrenceville), Freeholder Vice Chair Lucylle R. S. Walter (2008; Ewing Township), Ann M. Cannon (2009; East Windsor Township), Anthony P. Carabelli (2007; Trenton), Keith V. Hamilton (2007; Hamilton Township), Tony Mack (2008; Trenton) and Elizabeth Maher Muoio (2006; Pennington Borough).[32] {{Infobox U.S. CoiirjhtfnEGEYWnfv state = New Jersey | seal = Mc-m f seal. ... Brian M. Hughes is the County Executive for Mercer County, New Jersey. ... The Board of Chosen Freeholders is the legislative body in each of the 21 counties in New Jersey. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map of Lawrenceville CDP in Mercer County Lawrenceville is a census-designated place and unincorporated area located within Lawrence Township in Mercer County, New Jersey. ... Ewing Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... East Windsor Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... Hamilton Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... Pennington is a Borough in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. ...


Education

The Trenton Public Schools serve students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. The Superintendent runs the district and the school board is appointed by the Mayor. The School District has undergone a "construction" renaissance throughout the district. Trenton Central High School is Trenton's only traditional public high school in the city. Trenton also has a host of charter and private schools. The Trenton Public Schools are a comprehensive community public school district, serving students in kindergarten through twelfth grade from Trenton, in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. ... Trenton Central High School is a four-year comprehensive public high school that serves students in ninth through twelfth grades from Trenton, in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, as part of the Trenton Public Schools. ...


Trenton is the home of two post-secondary institutions, Thomas Edison State College and Mercer County Community College. The College of New Jersey, formerly named Trenton State College, is located in nearby Ewing Township. Thomas Edison State College provides flexible, high-quality, collegiate learning opportunities for self-directed adults. ... Mercer County Community College is an accredited, co-educational, two-year, public, community college located in Mercer County, New Jersey. ... The College of New Jersey (TCNJ), is a four-year public institution located in Ewing Township, New Jersey, a northern suburb of Trenton. ... Ewing Township highlighted in Mercer County. ...


Crime

In 2005, there were 31 homicides in Trenton, the largest number in a single year in the city's history, with 22 of the homicides believed to be gang related.[12] The city was named the 4th "Most Dangerous" in 2005 out of 129 cities with a population of 75,000 to 99,999 ranked nationwide.[13] In the 2006 survey, Trenton was ranked as the 14th most dangerous "city" overall out of 371 cities included nationwide in the 13th annual Morgan Quitno survey, and was again named as the fourth most dangerous "city" of 126 cities in the 75,000-99,999 population range.[14] Morgan Quitno Press is an independent research and publishing company based out of Lawrence, Kansas. ...


Trenton's mayor, Douglas Palmer, is a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition,[15] a bi-partisan group with a stated goal of "making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets." The Coalition is co-chaired by Boston Mayor Thomas Menino and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Douglas Palmer was the first African-American mayor of Trenton, New Jersey. ... The Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition is a coalition of mayors from 225 different United States cities, with a stated goal of making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets. ... In a two-party system (such as in the United States), bipartisan refers to any bill, act, resolution, or any other action of a political body in which both of the major political parties are in agreement. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Thomas Michael Menino (born December 27, 1942) is the current mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, United States and the citys first Italian-American mayor. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ...


Transportation

City highways include the Trenton Freeway, which is part of U.S. Route 1, and the John Fitch Parkway, which is part of Route 29. Canal Boulevard, more commonly known as Route 129, connects US Route 1 and NJ Route 29 in South Trenton. U.S. Route 206, Route 31, and Route 33 also pass through the city via regular city streets (Broad Street / Brunswick Avenue / Princeton Avenue, Pennington Avenue, and Greenwood Avenue, respectively). As a 5. ... U.S. Route 1 in New Jersey is a portion of the United States highway which parallels the East Coast of the United States, running 2,390 miles (3,846 km) from Key West, Florida in the south, to Fort Kent, Maine at the Canadian border in the north, 66. ... Route 29 is a state highway in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Route 129 is a state highway in New Jersey, United States. ... U.S. Route 206 is a north-south United States highway in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, United States. ... Route 31 is a 48. ... Route 33 is a state highway in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ...


Interstate 95 and Interstate 295 pass through the surrounding suburbs of Ewing Township and Hamilton Township, respectively, and connect in Lawrence Township, thus forming a beltway around the capitol region. Beginning in the mid 1960's, federal and state highway planners envisioned a highway branching off today's Interstate 95 just east of Route 31 and running through the Hopewell Valley and Somerset County to a spot on I-287 in Franklin Township, only a short ride from the New Jersey Turnpike. This plan, which was known as the Somerset Freeway, intended to allow motorists and truckers to completely avoid the New York Metropolitan Area when traveling north on either I-95 or the New Jersey Turnpike to New England or Upstate New York from Philadelphia and points south. [3] However, as the expressway plan gained momentum in the late 1970's, community opposition grew. Residents of Hopewell, Princeton, Piscataway and Montgomery Townships banded together, organized and lobbied local politicians to scrap the I-95, I-287 link. Their cause was aided when Tom Kean won the gubernatorial election of 1981. Upon taking office, Kean successfully convinced President Reagan and New Jersey’s two Senators to "de-designate" the funding for the Somerset Freeway. Interstate 95 is a major Interstate Highway that traverses the full extent of the East Coast of the United States, from Maine to Florida. ... Interstate 295 (abbreviated I-295) in New Jersey and Delaware is a bypass route from a junction with Interstate 95 south of Wilmington, Delaware to another junction with I-95 north of Trenton, New Jersey. ... Ewing Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... Hamilton Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... Lawrence Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... For the American political term, see Inside the Beltway and Beltway bandits. ... Interstate 95 is a major Interstate Highway that traverses the full extent of the East Coast of the United States, from Maine to Florida. ... Hopewell Valley is a town in New Jersey. ... Somerset County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 287 New Jersey state line along Interstate 287 south I-287 at I-95 in Rye, NY Interstate 287 (abbreviated I-287) is a major interstate highway in New Jersey and New York. ... Map of Franklin Township in Somerset County Blackwells Mills Canal House in the Somerset section of Franklin Township Franklin Township is a Township in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. ... This article is about the modern freeway. ... The Somerset Freeway is the planning name for an unbuilt section of Interstate 95 in central New Jersey. ... The New York metropolitan area is the most populous in the United States and the fourth most populous in the world (after Tokyo, Seoul, and Mexico City). ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The areas highlighted in YELLOW and GREEN are those which are considered to be a bona fide part of Upstate New York from the perspective of New York City. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Hopewell Township is a Township in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. ... See also: the Borough of Princeton, New Jersey Princeton Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... “Piscataway” redirects here. ... Montgomery Township is a township located in Somerset County, New Jersey. ... Thomas Kean Thomas Howard Kean (born April 21, 1935 in New York City) was the Republican Governor of New Jersey from 1982 to 1990. ... Order: 40th President Term of Office: January 20, 1981–January 20, 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: February 6, 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: June 5, 2004 Place of death: Los Angeles, California First Lady: Nancy Reagan... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ...


Interstate 195 connects the city to the New Jersey Turnpike via NJ Routes 29 and 129. The Pennsylvania Turnpike also passes close to the city. Interstate 195 (abbreviated I-195) begins at Route 34 in Wall Township and ends at I-295 just south of Trenton, New Jersey. ... This article is about the modern freeway. ... This Pennsylvania state route article needs to be cleaned up to conform to both a higher standard of article quality and accepted design standards outlined in the WikiProject Pennsylvania State Highways. ...


Public transportation within and beyond the city is mostly provided by New Jersey Transit, in the form of local bus routes between nearby suburbs and the city, as well as commuter train service northward from the Trenton Rail Station along the Northeast Corridor to Newark and New York. The new River Line diesel light rail line extends from Trenton southward to Camden, with Trenton stations at Cass Street, Hamilton Avenue and at the Trenton Rail Station. SEPTA provides commuter train service southward from the Trenton Station along the Northeast Corridor to Philadelphia. The New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) is a statewide public transportation system serving the state of New Jersey, and Orange and Rockland counties in New York. ... New Jersey Transit: SEPTA: Other service Greyhound Lines Other information Passengers (2006) 436,058[1] 52% Code TRE Owned by New Jersey Transit Trenton Rail Station is the main passenger train station in Trenton, New Jersey. ... Most of the NEC (those sections shown in red, except Boston to the Rhode Island state line) is owned by Amtrak. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County County Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - City 67. ... This article is about the state. ... River Line system map The River Line (styled River LINE by NJ Transit) is a light rail system in New Jersey, United States that connects the cities of Camden and Trenton, New Jerseys capital. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... The City of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey in the United States. ... Cass Street is a station on the River LINE light rail system, located on Cass Street in Trenton, New Jersey. ... Hamilton Avenue is a station on the River LINE light rail system, located on Hamilton Avenue in Trenton, New Jersey. ... SEPTA redirects here. ... Most of the NEC (those sections shown in red, except Boston to the Rhode Island state line) is owned by Amtrak. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


Long-distance transportation is provided by Amtrak train service along the Northeast Corridor. Limited commercial airline transportation is provided at nearby Trenton-Mercer Airport in Ewing; much more extensive airline service is available at the more distant international airports in Newark (reachable by direct New Jersey Transit or Amtrak rail link) and Philadelphia. The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... Most of the NEC (those sections shown in red, except Boston to the Rhode Island state line) is owned by Amtrak. ... An Airbus A380 of Emirates Airline An airline provides air transport services for passengers or freight. ... Trenton-Mercer Airport (IATA: TTN, ICAO: KTTN), located in Ewing, New Jersey adjacent to Interstate 95, is an airport handling general and corporate aviation, and limited commercial service. ... Ewing Township highlighted in Mercer County. ... For the massive interchange outside of Newark Liberty International Airport, see Newark Airport Interchange. ... “PHL” redirects here. ...


Points of interest

  • Friends Burying Ground

Friends Burying Ground is a cemetery in Trenton in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ...

Trivia

Trenton is one of only two capital cities in the United States that borders another state; the other is Carson City, Nevada. The Trenton city limits borders Morrisville, Bucks County, PA, Lower Makefield Township, PA (Yardley, PA), and Falls Township, Bucks County, PA. Motto: Proud of its Past. ... Morrisville is a borough located in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. ... Lower Makefield Township is a township located in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. ... Falls Township is a township located in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. ...


In 1992, then Vice President of the United States Dan Quayle infamously misspelled the word 'potato' at a spelling bee at the Luis Munoz-Rivera Elementary School in Trenton. After student William Figueroa correctly spelled 'potato' on the blackboard, Quayle (who was relying on a card on which the word 'potato' had been misspelled by the teacher) prompted Figueroa to an 'e' to 'potato', thus spelling 'potato' as 'potatoe.' The incident made national headlines. Figueroa was quoted as saying "He (Quayle) may be the vice president, but he's an idiot." Figueroa, riding his 15 minutes of fame, would go on to appear on Late Night with David Letterman and lead the Pledge of Allegiance that began the 1992 Democratic National Convention. Quayle, who was characterized as a buffoon by the media before the incident, was lambasted by the press and late night comedians. In his autobiography, Quayle devoted an entire chapter to the incident, saying "it was a defining moment of the worst kind imaginable." "Politicians live and die by the symbolic sound bite.’’[16] The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS)[1] is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... James Danforth Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the forty-fourth Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989–1993). ... For other uses, see Potato (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Spelling bee (disambiguation). ... William Figueora (born 1980 in Trenton, NJ) received his 15 minutes of fame on Monday, June 15, 1992, when he caused a huge embarrassment to Vice President Dan Quayle during a routine campaign stops. ... Potatoe is an archaic spelling of the word potato as a variant form, with the most recent usage cited from 1880: She found the parson in his garden. ... 15 minutes of fame (or famous for 15 minutes) is an expression coined by the American artist Andy Warhol. ... Late Night with David Letterman was a nightly hour-long comedy talk show on NBC hosted by David Letterman. ... The Pledge of Allegiance is a promise or oath of allegiance to the United States as represented by its national flag. ... The 1992 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party nominated Governor Bill Clinton of Arkansas for President and Senator Al Gore of Tennessee for Vice President; Clinton announced Gore as his running-mate on July 9, 1992. ... The term Buffoon is used to define someone who provides amusement through inappropriate appearance and/or behavior. ...


Janet Evanovich set all her Stephanie Plum novels in Trenton.


Noted residents

Some well-known Americans who were born and/or have lived in Trenton include:

Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ... Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States. ... George Antheil (June 8, 1900 – February 12, 1959) was an American composer and pianist of German and Lutheran descent, born in Trenton, New Jersey. ... New Atlantic is an Alternative Rock band from New Jersey currently signed to Eyeball Records. ... Bo Belinsky (b. ... This article is about the sport. ... John Taylor Bird (August 16, 1829, Bloomsbury, New Jersey – May 6, 1911, Trenton, New Jersey) was an American Democratic Party politician and businessman who represented New Jerseys 3rd congressional district from 1869 to 1873. ... New Jerseys Third Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Jim Saxton. ... James Bishop (May 11, 1816 in New Brunswick, New Jersey – May 10, 1895 in Morristown, New Jersey) was an American Opposition Party politician, who represented New Jerseys 3rd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1855-1857. ... New Jerseys Third Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Jim Saxton. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Tal Brody (born August 30, 1943 in Trenton, New Jersey, USA) is a former basketball player. ... Betty Bronson on the cover of a 1920s magazine Betty Bronson born Elizabeth Ada Bronson (November 17, 1906 Trenton, New Jersey - October 19, 1971 Pasadena, California) was an actress in silent and sound films. ... John Hart Brewer (March 29, 1844 - December 21, 1900) was an American Republican Party politician who represented New Jerseys 2nd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1881 to 1885. ... New Jerseys Second Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Frank LoBiondo. ... James Buchanan (June 17, 1839 - October 30, 1900) was an American Republican Party politician who represented New Jerseys 2nd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1885 to 1893. ... New Jerseys Second Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Frank LoBiondo. ... Shawn Corey Carter (born December 4, 1969 in Brooklyn, New York) better known by his stage name Jay-Z, is an American rapper and current president and CEO of Def Jam and Roc-A-Fella Records. ... Shawn Corey Carter (born December 4, 1969), better known as Jay-Z, is an American rapper and current president and CEO of Def Jam and Roc-A-Fella Records. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... David Norman Dinkins (born July 10, 1927 in Trenton, New Jersey) was the Mayor of New York City from 1989 through 1993, the first (and, to date, only) African American to hold that office. ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... Al Downing (born June 28, 1941 in Trenton, New Jersey) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who played for 17 seasons from 1961-1977. ... This article is about the sport. ... Samuel Gibbs French was a graduate of the West Point Military Academy, who rose to the rank of Major General in the Confederate States Army. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government. ... Dave Thomas Gallagher (born September 20, 1960 in Trenton, New Jersey), is a former professional baseball player who played outfield in the Major Leagues from 1987-1995. ... This article is about the sport. ... Tom Guiry (Born October 12, 1981) is an American actor from Trenton, New Jersey, USA. His most notable appearances were in The Sandlot, Mystic River, The Mudge Boy, and The Four Diamonds. ... Charles Robert Howell (April 23, 1904, Trenton, New Jersey - July 5, 1973, Trenton, New Jersey) was an American Democratic Party politician who represented New Jerseys 4th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1949 to 1955. ... New Jerseys Fourth Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Chris Smith. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Elijah Cubberley Hutchinson (August 7, 1855, Windsor, New Jersey – June 25, 1932, Trenton, New Jersey) was an American Republican Party politician who represented New Jerseys 4th congressional district from 1915–1923. ... New Jerseys Fourth Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Chris Smith. ... Dahntay Lavall Jones (born December 27, 1980 in Trenton, New Jersey) is a professional basketball player in the NBA. Originally a student at Rutgers University, Dahntay transferred to Duke University to play with his boyhood Jersey friend Jay Williams who encouraged him to join him in North Carolina. ... This article is about the sport. ... Patrick Kerney (born December 30, 1976 in Trenton, New Jersey) is an American football defensive end who currently plays for the Atlanta Falcons of the NFL. He played college football at the University of Virginia, although he was initially recruited to play lacrosse. ... The ball used in American football has a pointed oval shape, and usually has a large set of stitches along one side. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Judith Light (born Judith Ellen Licht on February 9, 1949) is an Emmy Award-winning American actress. ... Nia Long (born Nitara Carlynn Long on October 30, 1970) is an American actress and occasional music video director. ... Craig Mack was born in 3 September 1971 in North Trenton, New Jersey, USA. Craig Mack is an African-American rapper/hip hop musician, notable for being the first artist to debut on Puff Daddys Bad Boy Entertainment record label. ... It has been suggested that Pigou Club be merged into this article or section. ... Macroeconomics is the study of the entire economy in terms of the total amount of goods and services produced, total income earned, the level of employment of productive resources, and the general behavior of prices. ... Stephanie Plum is a fictional character and the protagonist in a series of novels written by Janet Evanovich. ... Janet Evanovich (born April 22, 1943, in South River, New Jersey) is an American writer. ... David Lane Powers (July 29, 1896 - March 28, 1968) was an American Republican Party politician who represented New Jerseys 4th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1933 to 1945. ... New Jerseys Fourth Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Chris Smith. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... The Poor Righteous Teachers are a trio of African American hip hop musicians from Trenton, New Jersey, founded in 1989 (see 1989 in music). ... For other uses, see Hip hop (disambiguation). ... Dennis Keith Rodman (born May 13, 1961, in Trenton, New Jersey) is an American professional basketball player best known for his fierce defensive and rebounding ability, leading the National Basketball Association in rebounds per game for a record seven consecutive years and earning NBA All-Defensive First Team honors seven... For the Washington, DC meteorologist, see Bob Ryan (meteorologist). ... Sportswriting is a form of journalism who writes and reports on sports topics and events. ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... Not to be confused with Round the Horne, a British radio comedy. ... Daniel Bailey Ryall (January 30, 1798 - December 17, 1864) was an American Democratic Party politician who represented New Jersey on a general ticket in the United States House of Representatives from 1839-1841. ... General H Norman Schwarzkopf KCB, also known as Stormin Norman (born August 22, 1934) is a retired United States Army General who, while he served as Commander-in-Chief (now known as Combatant Commander) of U.S. Central Command, was commander of the Coalition Forces in the Gulf War of... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... Emblem of the United States Central Command. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Antonin Gregory Scalia (born March 11, 1936[1]) is an American jurist and the second most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Charles Skelton (April 19, 1806 - May 20, 1879) was an American Democratic Party politician who represented New Jerseys 2nd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1851 to 1855. ... New Jerseys Second Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Frank LoBiondo. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Sommore (born Lori Ann Rambough in 1971) is an actor and comedian from Trenton, New Jersey. ... Not to be confused with John Stewart ,Jon Alan Stewart or John Stuart. ... A comedian, or comic, is an entertainer who amuses an audience by making them laugh. ... Gary Stills (born July 11, 1974 in Trenton, NJ) is an American football Linebacker for the Baltimore Ravens of the NFL. He was drafted in 1999 in the 3rd round by the Kansas City Chiefs. ... The ball used in American football has a pointed oval shape, and usually has a large set of stitches along one side. ... Michael Joseph (Silent Mike) Tiernan was an early baseball player. ... Troy Darnell Vincent (born June 8, 1971 in Trenton, New Jersey) is an American football player who is currently a free agent. ... The term footballer is ambiguous, as there are several games known as football. ... The National Football League Players Association, or NFLPA, is the labor union of players in footballs National Football League. ... Allan Bartholomew Walsh (August 29, 1874, Trenton, New Jersey - August 5, 1953, Trenton) was an American Democratic Party politician from New Jersey who represented the 4th congressional district from 1913 to 1915. ... New Jerseys Fourth Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Chris Smith. ... Charles Joseph (Charlie) Weis (born March 30, 1956 in Trenton, New Jersey) is the current head coach of the University of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... Ira Wells Wood (June 19, 1856, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania - October 5, 1931, Trenton, New Jersey) was an American Republican Party politician who represented New Jerseys 4th congressional district from 1904 to 1913. ... New Jerseys Fourth Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Chris Smith. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Census data for Princeton township, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 1, 2007.
  2. ^ USGS GNIS: City of Trenton, Geographic Names Information System, accessed June 4, 2007.
  3. ^ "The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968", John P. Snyder, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 164.
  4. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990. Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  5. ^ Campbell Gibson (June 1998). Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in The United States: 1790 TO 1990. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-03-06.
  6. ^ Wm. C. Hunt, Chief Statistician for Population. Fourteenth Census of The United States: 1920; Population: New Jersey; Number of inhabitants, by counties and minor civil divisions (ZIP). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  7. ^ a b http://www.capitalcentury.com/1968.html, accessed February 27, 2007
  8. ^ http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9A07E7DF163BF93AA25752C0A961958260, accessed February 27, 2007
  9. ^ Biography of Mayor Douglas Palmer, City of Trenton. Accessed June 10, 2007.
  10. ^ Meet the City Council, City of Trenton. Accessed June 10, 2007.
  11. ^ 2006 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, New Jersey League of Women Voters, p. 65. Accessed August 30, 2006.
  12. ^ Trenton murders hit all-time high, Signal, January 25, 2006.
  13. ^ 12th Annual Safest/Most Dangerous Cities Survey: Top and Bottom 25 Cities Overall, accessed June 23, 2006
  14. ^ 13th Annual Safest (and Most Dangerous) Cities: Top and Bottom 25 Cities Overall, Morgan Quitno. Accessed October 30, 2006.
  15. ^ Mayors Against Illegal Guns: Coalition Members.
  16. ^ [1][2]
  17. ^ John Taylor Bird, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 17, 2007.
  18. ^ James Bishop, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 1, 2007.
  19. ^ John Hart Brewer, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 17, 2007.
  20. ^ James Buchanan, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 27, 2007.
  21. ^ Bohlen, Celestine. " THE NATION: David N. Dinkins; An Even Temper In the Tempest of Mayoral Politics", The New York Times, September 17, 1989. Accessed August 18, 2007. "From his childhood, which he spent divided between New York City and Trenton, David Dinkins has kept steady control of his emotions, friends and family members say. When he was 6 years old, his mother left his father in Trenton and moved to New York, taking her two children with her. Mr. Dinkins later returned to Trenton, where he attended elementary and high school."
  22. ^ Armstrong, Samuel S. "Trenton in the Mexican, Civil, and Spanish-American Wars", accessed May 9, 2007. "Samuel Gibbs French was a native of Trenton and graduated from West Point in 1843 with the brevet rank of Second Lieutenant and assigned to the Third U.S. Artillery, July 1, 1843."
  23. ^ Charles Robert Howell, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 10, 2007.
  24. ^ Elijah Cubberley Hutchinson, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 7, 2007.
  25. ^ David Lane Powers, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 9, 2007.
  26. ^ Daniel Bailey Ryall, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 3, 2007.
  27. ^ Charles Skelton, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 25, 2007.
  28. ^ [1969] (1979) in Reichler, Joseph L.: The Baseball Encyclopedia, 4th edition, New York: Macmillan Publishing. ISBN 0-02-578970-8. 
  29. ^ Allan Bartholomew Walsh, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 6, 2007.
  30. ^ Charlie Weis, New England Patriots. Accessed August 18, 2007.
  31. ^ Ira Wells Wood, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 6, 2007.
  32. ^ Meet the Freeholders, Mercer County. Accessed July 4, 2007.

The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The League of Women Voters is a United States non-partisan political organization founded in 1920 by Carrie Chapman Catt during a meeting of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Morgan Quitno Press is an independent research and publishing company based out of Lawrence, Kansas. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick (de facto) Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Trenton, New Jersey
  • City of Trenton website
  • Trenton local community news
  • Trenton Public Schools
  • Trenton Public Schools's 2005-06 School Report Card from the New Jersey Department of Education
  • National Center for Education Statistics data for the Trenton Public Schools
  • Trenton Downtown Association
  • Trenton Historical Society
  • Get to Know Trenton as a Place to Live
  • Obsolete Bank Notes and Old Scrip of Trenton
  • Trenton Municipal Court
  • USGS GNIS: Trenton, New Jersey
  • US Census Data for Trenton, NJ

Coordinates: 40.221741° N 74.756138° W Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The New Jersey School Report Card is an annual report produced each year by the New Jersey Department of Education for all public schools in New Jersey, as required under a 1995 state law. ... The New Jersey Department of Education administers state and federal aid programs affecting more than 1. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Trenton, New Jersey (NJ) intellectual property Attorneys, Lawyers and Law Firms - Martindale.com (377 words)
Trenton, New Jersey (NJ) intellectual property Attorneys, Lawyers and Law Firms - Martindale.com
With nearly 500 attorneys, in offices in New York, Washington, DC...
Firm Profile: Founded in 1926, Gibbons is one of New Jersey's largest law firms and is ranked among the nation's top 250 firms by The National Law Journal.
Trenton, New Jersey - definition of Trenton, New Jersey in Encyclopedia (1494 words)
Trenton is the capital of New Jersey, a state of the United States of America.
Trenton is the home of the Trenton Thunder minor league baseball team, which is affiliated with the New York Yankees, and the Trenton Titans, an affiliate of the Philadelphia Flyers and the New York Islanders.
Trenton borders Ewing Township, Lawrence Township, Hamilton Township, and the Delaware River.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m