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Encyclopedia > Trento
Comune di Trento
Coat of arms of Comune di Trento
Municipal coat of arms
Country Flag of Italy Italy
Region Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol
Province Trento (TN)
Mayor Alberto Pacher
Elevation 190 m
Area 157 km²
Population
 - Total (as of December 31, 2005) 110,142
 - Density 702/km²
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 46°04′N, 11°07′E
Gentilic Trentini or Tridentini
Dialing code 0461
Postal code 38100
Frazioni see list
Patron St. Vigilius
 - Day June 26
Website: www.comune.trento.it

Trento (Italian: Trento; German: Trient; Latin: Tridentum; Note that many of the region's Italian languages/dialects use Trent or Trènt) is an Italian city located in the Adige River valley in Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol. It is the capital of the region and of the Autonomous Province of Trento. Image File history File links Trento-Stemma. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol[1] (Italian: Trentino-Alto Adige; German: Trentino-Südtirol; Ladin: Trentin-Adesc Aut, also Trentin-Sudtirol [2][3]) is an autonomous region in Northern Italy. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... Trento (Italian: Provincia autonoma di Trento, German: Autonome Provinz Trient) is an autonomous province in the autonomous Trentino-South Tyrol region of Italy. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ... Trento (Italian: Trento; German: Trient; Latin: Tridentum; Note that many of the regions Italian languages/dialects use Trent or Trènt) is an Italian city located in the Adige River valley in Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Adige (Italian: ; German: ; Ladin: Adiç or Adesc; Latin: Athesis; Trentino: Ades; Veneto: Adexe; Slovenian: Adiža) is a river with its source in the Alpine region of Trentino-Tiroler Etschland near the Italian border with Austria and Switzerland. ... Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol[1] (Italian: Trentino-Alto Adige; German: Trentino-Südtirol; Ladin: Trentin-Adesc Aut, also Trentin-Sudtirol [2][3]) is an autonomous region in Northern Italy. ... Trento (Italian: Provincia autonoma di Trento, German: Autonome Provinz Trient) is an autonomous province in the autonomous Trentino-South Tyrol region of Italy. ...

Panorama of Trento.

The township of Trento is geographically very large and encompasses the town center as well as many suburbs of extremely varied geographical and population conditions (from the industrial suburb of Gardolo, just north of the city, to tiny mountain hamlets on the Monte Bondone). Various distinctive suburbs still maintain their traditional identity of rural or mountain villages. The town proper only has 55,197 inhabitants (October 2004). The 2004 population of the entire township is 110,142. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x557, 114 KB) Panoramic view of Trento. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x557, 114 KB) Panoramic view of Trento. ...

Contents

Geography

Trento lies in a wide glacial valley called the Adige valley just south of the Alps foothill range Dolomite Mountains, where the Fersina and Avisio rivers join the Adige River (the second longest river in Italy). The valley is surrounded by mountains, including the Vigolana (2,150 m), the Monte Bondone (2,181 m), the Paganella (2,124 m), the Marzola (1,747 m) and the Monte Calisio (1,096 m). Nearby lakes include the Lago di Caldonazzo, Lago di Levico, Lago di Garda and Lago di Toblino. A glaciated valley is one formed by the process of glaciation. ... The Adige (Italian: ; German: ; Ladin: Adiç or Adesc; Latin: Athesis; Trentino: Ades; Veneto: Adexe; Slovenian: Adiža) is a river with its source in the Alpine region of Trentino-Tiroler Etschland near the Italian border with Austria and Switzerland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Dolomites (Italian: Dolomiti; German: Dolomiten) are a section of the Alps. ... The Avisio is a river in Northern Italy which joins the Adige River in the town of Trento. ... The Adige (Italian: ; German: ; Ladin: Adiç or Adesc; Latin: Athesis; Trentino: Ades; Veneto: Adexe; Slovenian: Adiža) is a river with its source in the Alpine region of Trentino-Tiroler Etschland near the Italian border with Austria and Switzerland. ... Lake Garda (Italian Lago di Garda or Benaco) is the largest lake in Italy. ...

History

The origins of the city are controversial. Some scholars maintain it was a Rhaetian settlement: the Adige area was however influenced by neighbouring populations, including the (Adriatic) Veneti, the Etruscans, the Cimbri, and the Gauls (a Celtic people). According to other theories, therefore, the latter did instead found the city during the 4th century BC. Raetia as province of the Roman Empire, ca. ... The Veneti (Enetoi in Greek) were an ancient people who inhabited todays northeastern Italy, in a area comprised in the modern-day region Veneto. ... The Etruscan civilization existed in Etruria and the Po valley in the northern part of what is now Italy, prior to the formation of the Roman Republic. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Cimbrian War. ... Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given,in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... This article is about the European people. ... The 4th century BC started the first day of 400 BC and ended the last day of 301 BC. It is considered part of the Classical era, epoch, or historical period. ...


Trento was conquered by the Romans in the late 1st century BC, after several clashes with the Rhaetian tribes. The Romans gave their settlement the name Tridentum, because of the three hills that surround the city: the Doss Trent, Sant'Agata and San Rocco. The Latin name is the source of the adjective Tridentine. On the old townhall a Latin inscription is still visible: Montes argentum mihi dant nomenque Tridentum ("Mountains give me silver and the name of Trento"), attributed to Fra' Bartolomeo da Trento (died in 1251). Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 1st century BC started on January 1, 100 BC and ended on December 31, 1 BC. An alternative name for this century is the last century BC. The AD/BC notation does not use a year zero. ... The adjective Tridentine refers to any thing or person pertaining to the city of Trent, Italy (Latin: Tridentum). ...


After the fall of the Roman Empire, Trento was ruled by the Goths, Lombards and Franks, finally becoming part of the Holy Roman Empire. In 1027, Emperor Conrad II created the Prince-Bishops of Trento, who wielded both temporal and religious powers; but in the following centuries the sovereignty was divided between the Bishopric of Trent and the County of Tyrol (from 1363 part of the Habsburg monarchy). Around 1200, Trento became a minerary production center of some significance (silver was mined from the Monte Calisio - Khalisperg), and Prince-Bishop Federico Wanga issued the first mining code of the alpine region. A dark episode in the history of Trento involved the alleged disappearance of a three year old boy known as Simon of Trent (S.Simonino) in 1475, which was blamed on the local Jewish community and resulted in a series of executions. Invasion of the Goths: a late 19th century painting by O. Fritsche, is a highly romanticized portrait of the Goths as cavalrymen. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... The extent of the Holy Roman Empire around 1630, superimposed over modern European state borders Capital None Language(s) Latin, German, many others Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy Emperor  - 962–967 Otto I  - 973–983 Otto II  - 996–1002 Otto III  - 1014– 1024 Henry II  - 1027–1039 Conrad II  - 1046... Conrad II (circa 990 - June 4, 1039) was the son of count Henry of Speyer. ... The Bishopric of Trent is a former independent state of Northern Italy which was created in 1027 and existed until 1802, when it was absorbed into Habsburg territory in the Holy Roman Empire. ... The Bishopric of Trent is a former independent state of Northern Italy which was created in 1027 and existed until 1802, when it was absorbed into Habsburg territory in the Holy Roman Empire. ... Coat of arms of Tyrol The Tyrol is a historical region in Western Central Europe, which includes the Austrian state of Tyrol (consisting of North Tyrol and East Tyrol) and the Italian regions known as the South Tyrol and Trentino. ... Federico Vanga (or Wanga; German: Frederick von Wangen; died 1218) was Prince-Bishop of Trento from August 9, 1207 until his death. ... Simon of Trent (? - approx. ...

18th century map of Trento showing walled old city and original course of the Adige river.

In the 16th century Trento became famous for the Council of Trent (1545-1563) which gave rise to the Counter-Reformation. The adjective Tridentine (as in "Tridentine Mass") literally means pertaining to Trento, but, because of the Tridentine Council, can also refer to this specific event. Among the famous prince bishops of this time were Bernardo Clesio (who ruled the city 1514-1539, and managed to steer the Council to Trento) and Cristoforo Madruzzo (who ruled 1539-1567, during the Council), both able European politicians and Renaissance humanists, who greatly expanded and embellished the city. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1134x777, 297 KB)Dal volume Itinerario dItalia di Lorenzo Scotto, Stampa in roma nellanno 1761, a spese di Fausto Amidel, mercante di Libri al Corso. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1134x777, 297 KB)Dal volume Itinerario dItalia di Lorenzo Scotto, Stampa in roma nellanno 1761, a spese di Fausto Amidel, mercante di Libri al Corso. ... The Council of Trent is the Nineteenth Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Counter-Reformation or the Catholic Reformation was a strong reaffirmation of the doctrine and structure of the Catholic Church, climaxing at the Council of Trent, partly in reaction to the growth of Protestantism. ... Bernardo Cles (1484 – 1539, Cles, Trentino-South Tyrol) was an Italian cardinal, prince, diplomat, humanist and botanist who was born to the noble Cles family (lat. ... Cristoforo Madruzzo (1512-1578), politician, cardinal, studied at the University of Padova and University of Bologna. ... See also the specific life stance known as Humanism For the Renaissance liberal arts movement, see Renaissance humanism Humanism[1][2] is a broad category of ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appeal to universal...


During this period, and as an expression of this Humanism, Trento was also known as the site of a Jewish printing press. In 1558 Cardinal Madruzzo granted the privilege of printing Hebrew books to Joseph Ottolengo, a German rabbi. The actual printer was Jacob Marcaria, a local physician; after his death in 1562 the activity of the press of Riva di Trento ceased. Altogether thirty-four works were published in the period 1558 to 1562, most of them bearing the coat of arms of Madruzzo. [1] The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Events January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... Rabbinic literature, in the broadest sense, can mean the entire spectrum of Judaisms rabbinic writing/s throughout history. ... Rabbi, in Judaism, means a religious ‘teacher’, or more literally, ‘great one’. The word Rabbi is derived from the Hebrew root word , rav, which in biblical Hebrew means ‘great’ or ‘distinguished (in knowledge)’. Sephardic and Yemenite Jews pronounce this word ribbÄ«; the modern Israeli pronunciation rabbÄ« is derived from a... Jacob Marcaria (d. ... Year 1562 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...


Prince-bishops ruled Trento until the Napoleonic era, when it bounced around among various states. Under the reorganization of the Holy Roman Empire in 1802, the Bishopric was secularized and annexed to the Habsburg territories. The Treaty of Pressburg in 1805 ceded Trent to Bavaria, and the Treaty of Schönbrunn four years later gave it to Napoleon's Kingdom of Italy. With Napoleon's defeat in 1814, Trento was finally annexed by the Habsburg Empire, becoming part of the province of Tyrol. The Reichsdeputationshauptschluss conclusion was a resolution of the last meeting of the Immerwaehrenden realm tags on 25 February 1803 in Regensburg. ... --69. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... The Treaty of Pressburg was signed on December 26, 1805 between France and Austria as a consequence of the Austrian defeats by France at Ulm (September 25 - October 20) and Austerlitz (December 2). ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... The Treaty of Schönbrunn was signed between France and Austria in 1809, ending the war of the Fifth Coalition during the Napoleonic Wars, at the beautiful castle Schloss Schönbrunn, which can be visited today as a tourist site. ... The flag of the Kingdom of Italy was a rectangular version of the flag of the Italian Republic, with Napoleons emblem on the green field. ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... Coat of arms of Tyrol: *[1] The Tyrol is a historical region in Western Central Europe, which includes the Austrian state of Tyrol (consisting of North Tyrol and East Tyrol) and the Italian regions known as the South Tyrol and Trentino. ...


In the next decades Trento experienced a modernization of administration and economy with the first railroad in the Adige valley opening in 1859. During the late 19th Century, Trento and Trieste, cities with ethnic Italian majorities still belonging to the Austrians, became icons of the Italian irredentist movement. Benito Mussolini briefly joined the staff of a local newspaper in 1908. The nationalist cause led Italy into World War I. Damiano Chiesa and Cesare Battisti were two well-known local irredentists who had joined the Italian army to fight against Austria-Hungary with the aim of bringing the territory of Trento into the new Kingdom of Italy. The two men were taken prisoners at the nearby southern front. They were put on trial for high treason and executed in the courtyard of Castello del Buonconsiglio (Cesare Battisti had served in the Austrian army). Their death caused an emotional outcry and was later used by the Italian government to celebrate the "liberation of Trento." The region was greatly affected during the war, and some of its fiercest battles were fought on the surrounding mountains. Trieste (Italian: Trieste; Slovenian, Croatian and Serbian: Trst; German: Triest) is a city and port in northeastern Italy right on the border with Slovenia. ... Irredentism is claiming a right to territories belonging to another state on the grounds of common ethnicity and/or prior historical possession, actual or alleged. ... Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini (July 29, 1883 – April 28, 1945) was the prime minister of Italy from 1922 until 1943, when he was overthrown. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Cesare Battisti (February 4, 1875 – July 12, 1916), Italian-Austrian politician, revolutionary and irredentist. ...


After World War I, Trento and its Italian-speaking province, along with Bolzano and the part of Tyrol that stretched south of the Alpine watershed (which was German speaking), were annexed by Italy. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Bolzano (Italian Bolzano; German: Bozen, archaic Botzen; Ladin: Bulsan; Latin: Bauzanum; many of the regions Italian languages/dialects use Bolzan or Bulsan) is a city in the Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol region of Italy. ...


In 1943, Mussolini was deposed and Italy surrendered to the Allies, who had invaded southern Italy via Sicily. German troops promptly invaded northern Italy and the provinces of Trento, Belluno and Bolzano became part of the Operation Zone of the Alpine Foothills, annexed to Greater Germany. Many German-speaking South Tyroleans wanted revenge upon Italians living in the area but were mostly prevented by the occupying Nazis, who still considered Mussolini head of the Italian Social Republic and wanted to preserve good relations with the Fascists. From November, 1944 to April, 1945 Trento was bombed as part of the so-called "Battle of the Brenner." War supplies from Germany to support the Gothic Line were for the most part routed through the rail line through the Brenner pass. Over 6,849 sorties were flown over targets from Verona to the Brenner Pass with 10,267 tons of bombs dropped. Parts of the city were hit by the Allied bombings, including the church of S. Maria Maggiore, the Church of the Annunciation and several bridges over the Adige river. In spite of the bombings, most of the medieval and renaissance town center was spared. Belluno (It. ... The Autonomous Province of Bolzano-Bozen[1][2] (Italian: Provincia autonoma di Bolzano; German: Autonome Provinz Bozen; Ladin: Provinzia autonòma de Balsan), also called Alto Adige/Südtirol (Italian: Alto Adige; German: Südtirol; Ladin: Adesc Aut[3][4] or Sudtirol; English: Alto Adige or South Tyrol), is an... The Operation Zone of the Alpine Foothills (German: ; Italian: ) was a Nazi German puppet district in the Alpine foothills created in territory seized from Italy during World War II. It was administered as part of the Reichsgau of Tyrol-Vorarlberg. ... Anthem Giovinezza (The Youth)¹ Capital Salò Language(s) Italian Religion Roman Catholicism Government Republic Head of State Benito Mussolini Historical era World War II  - Established September 23, 1943  - Disestablished April 25, 1945 ¹ External link The Italian Social Republic (Repubblica Sociale Italiana or RSI) was a Nazi puppet state led by... German defensive positions in Northern Italy 1944 370th Infantry Regiment walking toward the mountains at north of Prato - April 1945 The Gothic Line, also known as Linea Gotica, formed Field Marshal Albert Kesselrings last major line of defence in the final stages of World War II along the summits... Verona is a city and provincial capital in Veneto, Northern Italy. ... The Brenner Pass (Italian Passo del Brennero) is a mountain pass that creates a link through the Tyrolean Alps along the current border between the nations of Austria and Italy, one of the principal passes of the Alps. ... The Adige (Italian: ; German: ; Ladin: Adiç or Adesc; Latin: Athesis; Trentino: Ades; Veneto: Adexe; Slovenian: Adiža) is a river with its source in the Alpine region of Trentino-Tiroler Etschland near the Italian border with Austria and Switzerland. ...


Starting from the 1950s the region has enjoyed prosperous growth, thanks in part to its special autonomy from the central Italian government.


See also

Society and economy

Eight centuries of Prince-Bishop rulers, relative independence from the rest of Europe, the Austrian domination and a strong sense of communal fate left a distinctive mark on the city's culture, which is dominated by a fairly progressive Social-Catholic political orientation (in fact, Trento is one of the few cities in Italy where left-leaning Catholics form the majority party). The city is considered to be well-administered and enjoys the benefits of special autonomy from the central Italian government. Trento ranks high in Italian quality-of-life statistics. The Bishopric of Trento is a former independent state of Northern Italy which was created in 1027 and existed until 1802, when it was absorbed into the Habsburgs Holy Roman Empire. ...


The city owes much of its unique history to its position along the main communication route between Italy and Northern Europe and to the Adige river which prior to its diversion in the 19th century ran through the center of the city. The Adige river was formerly a navigable river and one of the main commercial routes in the Alps. The original course of the river is now covered by the Via Torre Vanga, Via Torre Verde and the Via Alessandro Manzoni.


Today Trento thrives on commerce, services, tourism, high-quality agriculture and food industry (including wine, fruit), as a research and conference center thanks to a small but renowned university and research centers such as ITC/IRST, and ECT*, and as logistics and transportation thoroughfare. The manufacturing industry installed in the post-war period has been mostly dismantled. The University of Trento is a university located in Trento, Italy. ...


Valued pink and white porphyry is still excavated from some surrounding areas (Pila). This stone can be seen in many of Trento's buildings, both new and old. Porphyry is a very hard igneous rock consisting of large-grained crystals, such as feldspar or quartz, dispersed in a fine-grained feldspathic matrix or groundmass. ...

Politics

The administrative elections of May 8, 2005 were won by a Center-Left coalition. Results are the following (only parties with more than 5% are listed): is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Current mayor is Alberto Pacher, of the Democrats of the Left. Daisy-Democracy is Freedom (full name in Italian: Democrazia è Libertà – La Margherita: Democracy is Freedom – The Daisy) is a centrist political Party in Italy. ... For the Italian political alliance see Olive Tree, and the color, olive (color). ... The Democrats of the Left (Democratici di Sinistra, DS) is the main Italian left-wing political party, part of the Olive Tree electoral coalition. ... Forza Italia (Forward Italy) is an Italian party. ... The Communist Refoundation Party (Partito della Rifondazione Comunista, PRC) is an Italian reformed communist party. ... The Northern League (Italian: Lega Nord) is an Italian political party founded in 1991 as a federation of several regional parties in Northern Italy, most of which had arisen, and all of which had expanded their share of the electorate, in the 1980s. ... The Democrats of the Left (Democratici di Sinistra, DS) is the main Italian left-wing political party, part of the Olive Tree electoral coalition. ...

Main sights

Piazza Duomo, the Cathedral (12th-13th Century) and the fountain of the Neptune.
Piazza Duomo, the Cathedral (12th-13th Century) and the fountain of the Neptune.
Piazza Duomo, Case Rella frescoes.
The Torre Civica (13th Century).
The Torre Civica (13th Century).
Castello del Buonconsiglio.
Trento's Train Station (1934–36) by architect Angiolo Mazzoni.
De Gasperi's memorial monument in Trento.

Although off the beaten path of mass tourism, Trento offers rather interesting monuments. Its architecture has a unique feel, with both Italian Renaissance and Germanic influences. The city center is small, and most Late-Medieval and Renaissance buildings have been restored to their original pastel colours and wooden balconies. Part of the medieval city walls is still visible in Piazza Fiera, along with a circular tower. Once, these walls encircled the whole town and were connected to the Castello del Buonconsiglio. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (981x768, 97 KB) Duomo (Cathedral of Saint Vigilio) and Neptuns Fountain, Trento (Italy) Photographer: Markus Bernet Date: 09/28/2004 License: File links The following pages link to this file: Trento ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (981x768, 97 KB) Duomo (Cathedral of Saint Vigilio) and Neptuns Fountain, Trento (Italy) Photographer: Markus Bernet Date: 09/28/2004 License: File links The following pages link to this file: Trento ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x673, 163 KB) Picture taken by Giovanni Iachello. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x673, 163 KB) Picture taken by Giovanni Iachello. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 118 KB) Campanile, Trento (Italy) Photographer: Markus Bernet Date: 09/28/2004 License: File links The following pages link to this file: Trento ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 118 KB) Campanile, Trento (Italy) Photographer: Markus Bernet Date: 09/28/2004 License: File links The following pages link to this file: Trento ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x685, 123 KB)Picture taken by Giovanni Iachello. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x685, 123 KB)Picture taken by Giovanni Iachello. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1570x714, 239 KB) Trento (Italy) Train Station. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1570x714, 239 KB) Trento (Italy) Train Station. ... Angiolo Mazzoni (1894-1979), Italian modernist architect, designed many public buildings during the 1920s and 1930s, among which post offices and train stations. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2134x2541, 755 KB) This picture was taken by Giovanni Iachello. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2134x2541, 755 KB) This picture was taken by Giovanni Iachello. ...


The main monuments of the city include:

  • the Duomo (Cathedral of Saint Vigilio), a Romanesque-Gothic cathedral of the twelfth-thirteenth century, built on top of a late-Roman basilica (viewable in an underground crypt).
  • Piazza Duomo, on the side of the Cathedral, with frescoed Renaissance buildings and a neoclassicist Fountain of the Neptune built in 1767-1768.
  • The Church of Santa Maria Maggiore (1520), site of the preparatory congregations of the Third Council of Trent (April 1562 – December 1563). It was built for Bishop Bernardo Clesio by Antonio Medaglia in Renaissance-Gothic style. The façade has a notable 16th century portal, while the interior has works by Cignaroli and Moroni.
  • The Castello del Buonconsiglio, which includes a museum and the famous Torre dell'Aquila, with a cycle of fine Gothic frescoes depicting the months, commissioned by the prince-bishop Georg von Lichtenstein.
  • Church of San Pietro (12th century) It has a neo-Gothic façade added in 1848-1850.
  • Church of Sant'Apollinare, erected in the 13th century at the feet of the Doss Trento hill.
  • Church of San Lorenzo (12th century). It has a notable Romanesque apse.
  • Torre Verde, along the former transit path of the Adige river, is said to be where persons executed in the name of the Prince-Bishop were deposited in the river.
  • The Palazzo delle Albere, a Renaissance villa next to the Adige river built around 1550 by the Madruzzo family, now hosting a modern art museum.
  • The Palazzo Pretorio, next to the Duomo, of the 12th century, with a bell tower (Torre Civica) of the thirteenth century (it now hosts a collection of baroque paintings of religious themes). It was the main Bishops' residence until the mid-13th century.
  • Palazzo Salvadori (1515).
  • Palazzo Geremia (late 15th century). It has a Renaissance exterior and Gothic interiors.
  • Palazzo Lodron, built during the Council of Trent. The interior has a large fresco cycle.
  • Various underground remains of the streets and villas of the Roman city (in Via Prepositura and Piazza Cesare Battisti).

Trento also sports noteworthy modernist architecture, including the train station and the central post office, both by rationalist architect Angiolo Mazzoni. In particular, the train station (1934–36) is considered a landmark building of Italian railways architecture and combines many varieties of local stone with the most advanced building materials of the time: glass, reinforced concrete, metal. The post office was once decorated with colored windows by Fortunato Depero, but these were destroyed during bombings in World War II. Other buildings of that time include the Grand Hotel (by G. Lorenzi) with some guest rooms furnished with futurist furniture by Depero, and the "R. Sanzio" Primary School built by Adalberto Libera in 1931–34. Trento Cathedral with the Fountain of Neptune. ... Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture. ... Bernardo Cles (1484 – 1539, Cles, Trentino-South Tyrol) was an Italian cardinal, prince, diplomat, humanist and botanist who was born to the noble Cles family (lat. ... Giovanni Battista Moroni (c. ... Castello del Buonconsiglio. ... The Adige (Italian: ; German: ; Ladin: Adiç or Adesc; Latin: Athesis; Trentino: Ades; Veneto: Adexe; Slovenian: Adiža) is a river with its source in the Alpine region of Trentino-Tiroler Etschland near the Italian border with Austria and Switzerland. ... Palazzo Salvadori in Trento One of the first examples of Renaissance civil architecture in Trento, this palazzo was built by the Lombard master Lucio Tosani, in Clesio´s times, starting in 1515. ... This article focuses on the cultural movement labeled modernism or the modern movement. See also: Modernism (Roman Catholicism) or Modernist Christianity; Modernismo for specific art movement(s) in Spain and Catalonia. ... Angiolo Mazzoni (1894-1979), Italian modernist architect, designed many public buildings during the 1920s and 1930s, among which post offices and train stations. ... Fortunato Depero (March 30, 1892 - November 29, 1960) was an Italian futurist painter, writer, sculptor and graphic designer. ... Rome, post office in via Marmorata (1932). ...


An important museum of modern art (Museo d'Arte di Trento e Rovereto) is located in the nearby town of Rovereto. Rovereto - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...


A famous aeronautical museum (Museo dell'Aeronautica Gianni Caproni) is located in Trento - Mattarello's Airport.


Trento's surroundings are known for the beautiful mountain landscapes, and are the destination of both summer and winter tourism. The Alpine Botanical Garden, located on Monte Bondone in Le Viotte was founded in 1938 and is therefore probably the first such garden in Italy.


Trento is also the venue of a popular Mountain Film Festival

Famous natives of Trento

In addition to the aforementioned Bernardo Clesio and Cristoforo Madruzzo, Giacomo Aconzio was born in Trento. Kurt von Schuschnigg was born in Riva del Garda, in the Trentino region. Other famous natives of Trento include: Bernardo Cles (1484 – 1539, Cles, Trentino-South Tyrol) was an Italian cardinal, prince, diplomat, humanist and botanist who was born to the noble Cles family (lat. ... Cristoforo Madruzzo (1512-1578), politician, cardinal, studied at the University of Padova and University of Bologna. ... Giacomo Aconzio (1492-1565?) (sometimes James Aconzio). ... Kurt von Schuschnigg (14 December 1897 - 18 November 1977) was an Austrian politician who in 1934 succeeded the assassinated Engelbert Dollfuss as dictator of Austria, as leader of the regime often called Austrofascism. ...

Communications

Highway A22-E45 to Verona and to Bolzano, Innsbruck and Munich. Railway (main connection between Italy and Germany; direct train to Venice). Bus or train service to the main surrounding valleys: Fassa, Fiemme, Gudicarie, Non, Primiero, Rendena, Sole, Tesino, Valsugana. Beniamino Andreatta (Trento, August 11, 1928 - Bologna, March 26, 2007) was an Italian economist and politician. ... Lorenzo Bernardi spiking in 1994 Lorenzo Bernardi (Trento, Italy, August 11, 1968) is an Italian volleyball player who was two times World champion with his national team in 1990 and 1994 and was elected Volleyball Player of the century in 2001. ... Volleyball is an Olympic sport in which two teams separated by a high net use their hands, arms or (rarely) other parts of their bodies to hit a ball back and forth over the net. ... Francesco Antonio Bonporti (1672 - 1748) - Italian priest and amateur composer. ... Caproni was Italian aircraft manufacturer, started in 1908 by Gianni Caproni. ... Bronze by Suzanne Silvercruys. ... Fortunato Depero (March 30, 1892 - November 29, 1960) was an Italian futurist painter, writer, sculptor and graphic designer. ... Rovereto - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Alcide De Gasperi (3 April 1881 – 19 August 1954) was an Italian statesman and politician. ... Felice Fontana (15 April 1730, Pomarolo - 10 March 1805, Florence) was an italian physicist who discovered the water gas shift reaction in 1780. ... Gregorio Fontana (December 7, 1735 Villa di Nogaredo - August 24, 1803 Milan) was an Italian mathematician. ... Ernst von Koerber (November 6, 1850 - March 5, 1919) was an Austrian politician. ... Chiara Lubich Chiara Lubich was born in 1920 in Trent, Italy. ... Founded 1943 in Trento, northern Italy by Chiara Lubich as a religious movement, the Focolare Movement, though primarily Roman Catholic, now has strong links to the major Christian denominations and other religions and even those with no religion. ... Giovanni Francesco Giuseppe aka Gian Francesco or Gianfrancesco (1731-9 October 1807) was an Italian mathematician. ... Martino Martini (Trento, 20 September 1614 - Hangzhou, 6 June 1661) was a distinguished Italian Jesuit missionary, cartographer and historian, mainly working on imperial China. ... Alois Negrelli, Ritter von Moldelbe (January 23, 1799 - October 1, 1858), was an engineer and railroad pioneer in Austria, Italy and Switzerland. ... Paolo Oss Mazzurana (1833, Trento, Italy-1895) was an Italian stetesman, and most importantly Trentos most famous mayor. ... Francesco Moser (Born June 19, 1951) was an Italian professional road racing cyclist. ... Andrea Pozzos painted ceiling in the Church of St. ... Giovanni Prati (1815-1884) was an Italian poet born at Dasindo and educated in law at Padua. ... The Venerable Antonio Rosmini-Serbati (March 25, 1797 - July 1, 1855) was an Italian philosopher. ... Rovereto - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Giovanni Antonio Scopoli (June 3, 1723 - May 8, 1788) was an Italian-Austrian physician and naturalist. ... Cavalese is a commune of 3,665 inhabitants in the autonomous province of Trento. ... Giovanni Segantini (January 15, 1858 - September 28, 1899), Italian painter, was born at Arco in the Trentino. ... Vitebsk Railway Station one of the finest examples of Art Nouveau architecture. ... Alessandro Vittoria (Trento 1525–Venice 1608) was a Venetian Mannerist sculptor, who was trained in the atelier of the architect-sculptor Jacopo Sansovino and a contemporary of Titian who was influenced by the painter in his compositions. ... Riccardo Zandonai (30 May 1883 – 5 June 1944) was an Italian opera composer. ... Francesca Neri (born February 10, 1964, Trento, Trentino-South Tyrol) is an Italian actress. ... This page is about the city in Italy; for other uses, see Verona (disambiguation). ... Bolzano (Italian Bolzano; German: Bozen, archaic Botzen; Ladin: Bulsan; Latin: Bauzanum; many of the regions Italian languages/dialects use Bolzan or Bulsan) is a city in the Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol region of Italy. ... Innsbruck is a city in western Austria, and the capital of the federal state of Tyrol. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venezsia, Latin: Venetia) is a city in northern Italy, the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,251 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ... The Valsugana valley is one of the most important valleys in both the region and autonomous province of Trento (also called Trentino region) of Northern Italy. ...

Twin cities

Frazioni

Povo, Villazzano, Gardolo, Roncafort, Mattarello, Martignano, Cognola, Ravina, Romagnano, Montevaccino, Vela, Meano, Sopramonte, Vigo Meano, Gazzadina, Candriai, Vaneze, Cadine, Vigolo Baselga Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Location Image:Donostia (San Sebastian), Euskadi location. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Kempten can refer to: A town in Bavaria, Germany, Kempten im Allgäu. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Czech_Republic. ... Nickname: Motto: Praga Caput Rei publicae Location within the Czech Republic Coordinates: , Country Czech Republic Region Capital City of Prague Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Pavel Bém Area  - City 496 km²  (191. ... A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ...

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Trento

External links

  • Official homepage of Trento
  • Azienda per il Turismo Trento e Monte Bondone
  • Flak Guns In The Brenner Pass
  • Maps and aerial photos for 46°04′08″N 11°07′20″E / 46.0688, 11.1221
    • Mapping from Multimap or GlobalGuide or Google Maps
    • Aerial image from TerraServer
    • Wiki Satellite image from WikiMapia

  Results from FactBites:
 
Trento - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2162 words)
It is the capital of the region and of the autonomous province of Trento.
In 1814, Trento was assigned to the Habsburg Empire.
Fortunato Depero, futurist artist and one of the founders of the futurist movement in Italy, was born in Fondo in 1892, close to Trento.
Trento class cruiser - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (656 words)
Trento class was an Italian heavy cruiser design of the Regia Marina from the late 1920s.
In February 1932 Trento was sent to Tianjin, China, to join the San Marco Battalion as a show of force during the Sino-Japanese War, returning on 30 June.
On 14 June 1942 Trento sank after being hit by two torpedoes, the first air-dropped, the second by the Royal Navy submarine Umbra as she limped home, hitting a magazine and sinking her rapidly.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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