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Encyclopedia > Treaty of Rome
The Treaty of Rome signing ceremony
The Treaty of Rome signing ceremony
Signatures in the Treaty

The Treaty of Rome, signed by France, West Germany, Italy and Benelux (Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg) on March 25, 1957, established the European Economic Community (EEC). Download high resolution version (2693x1748, 1095 KB)TreatyRomesigning This material is offered free of charge for EU-related information and education purposes. ... Download high resolution version (2693x1748, 1095 KB)TreatyRomesigning This material is offered free of charge for EU-related information and education purposes. ... Download high resolution version (634x850, 96 KB)This material is offered free of charge for EU-related information and education purposes. ... Download high resolution version (634x850, 96 KB)This material is offered free of charge for EU-related information and education purposes. ... Location of Benelux in Europe Official languages Dutch and French Membership  Belgium  Netherlands  Luxembourg Website http://www. ... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ...


According to George C. McGhee, former US ambassador to West Germany, it was nurtured at Bilderberg meetings.[1] The treaty's original full name was the Treaty establishing the European Economic Community, later amended by the Treaty of Maastricht to the Treaty establishing the European Community (TEC). The "EC Treaty" then became a short form of the name. George C. McGhee (1912-2005-07-04) was a career diplomat in the United States foreign service. ... The Bilderberg Group is an informal, secretive and international association of influential people, meeting every year. ... The Maastricht treaty (formally, the Treaty on European Union) was signed on 7 February 1992 in Maastricht between the members of the European Community and entered into force on 1 November 1993. ...


In March 2007, the BBC's Today radio programme reported that delays in printing the treaty meant that the document signed by the European leaders as the Treaty of Rome consisted of blank pages between its frontispiece and page for the signatures.[2][3][4] The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Today, sometimes referred to as the Today programme to avoid ambiguity, is BBC Radio 4s long-running early morning news and current affairs programme, which is now broadcast from 6am to 9am from Monday to Friday and from 7am to 9am on Saturdays. ... In architecture, a frontispiece constitutes the elements that frame and decorate the main, or front, door to a building; especially when the main entrance is the chief face of the building, rather than being kept behind columns or a portico. ...

Contents

Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community

Another treaty was signed the same day establishing the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom), which came into effect on the same day as the Treaty of Rome, 1 January 1958. The European Atomic Energy Community, or EURATOM, is an international organization composed of the members of the European Union. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The treaties of Rome

Both treaties, in conjunction with the Treaty establishing the European Coal and Steel Community (the Treaty of Paris, which expired in 2001-2002), have become known as the Treaties of Rome. The Treaty of Paris, signed on April 18, 1951 between Belgium, France, West Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands established the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC), which subsequently became part of the European Union. ...


To date, the original Treaty of Rome has been amended by all subsequent treaties of the European Union. The Treaty of Nice consolidated all treaties into one document, but within this the EC Treaty (the amended form of the Treaty of Rome) remains a single section with its own article numbering. The treaties of the European Union are effectively its constitutional law, making up the EUs primary legislation. ... The Treaty of Nice is a treaty adopted in Nice by the European Council to amend the two founding treaties of the European Union: the Treaty on European Union, or Maastricht Treaty, which introduced the euro and the three-pillar structure of the EU; the Treaty of Rome, which established...


Despite subsequent treaties, especially the Treaty of Maastricht, the EC Treaty is still the legal basis for most decisions taken by the institutions of the European Union and it remains the main source of communitary legislation. This article or section should be merged with List of European Union-related topics The European Union has several institutions: The European Parliament The European Council The Council of the European Union (or Council of Ministers) The European Commission The European Court of Justice (incorporating the Court of First Instance...


Signatories

On behalf of Signed by
Flag of Belgium Belgium Paul-Henri Spaak · J. Ch. Snoy et d'Oppuers
Flag of West Germany West Germany Konrad Adenauer · Walter Hallstein
Flag of France France Christian Pineau · Maurice Faure
On behalf of Signed by
Flag of Italy Italy Antonio Segni · Gaetano Martino
Flag of Luxembourg Luxembourg Joseph Bech · Lambert Schaus
Flag of Netherlands Netherlands Joseph Luns · J. Linthorst Homan

Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Paul-Henri Charles Spaak   listen? (January 25, 1899 - July 31, 1972) was a Belgian Socialist politician and statesman. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... For other uses, see Konrad Adenauer (disambiguation). ... Walter Hallstein (17 November 1901 – 29 March 1982) was a German politician and professor. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_France. ... Christian Pineau, French resistance leader and statesman Christian Pineau (October 14, 1904 - April 5, 1995) was a noted French Resistance fighter. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Antonio Segni (February 2, 1891, Sassari - December 1, 1972) was twice Prime Minister of Italy (1955-1957, and again 1959-1960). ... Gaetano Martino (Messina, November 25, 1900 - Rome, July 21, 1967) was an Italian politician and university teacher. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Luxembourg. ... Joseph Bech (born February 17, 1887 in Diekirch, Luxembourg; died March 8, 1975 in Luxembourg (city)) was a Luxembourgish politician and statesman. ... Lambert Schaus (born 18 January 1908 in Luxembourg City, died 1976) was a Luxembourgish politician and European Commissioner. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Joseph Antoine Marie Hubert Luns ( August 28, 1911 - July 18, 2002) was a Dutch politician and former NATO secretary-general. ...

Timeline of the Treaties and EU Constitution

Preceded by
Treaty of Paris (1951)
EU treaties Succeeded by
Merger Treaty (1965)

The Treaty of Paris, signed on April 18, 1951 between Belgium, France, West Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands established the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC), which subsequently became part of the European Union. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... The treaties of the European Union are effectively its constitutional law, making up the EUs primary legislation. ... The Merger Treaty, signed in Brussels on 8 April 1965 and in force since 1 July 1967, first gathered together the organizational structures of the then three European Communities (European Coal and Steel Community, European Economic Community and Euratom). ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ...

See also

European Union Portal

Image File history File links European_flag. ... Berlin is symbolic in European history, the divided city reflecting the divided continent, both reunited after the fall of Communism. ... The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) is a system of European Union agricultural subsidies and programmes. ... In European Union law, the Four Freedoms (sometimes the Four Liberties) are the free movement of goods, services, capital, and labour within the internal market of the European Union. ... This is the history of the European Union. ...

References

  1. ^ Origins - articles which explain how and why the Bilderberg meetings began.
  2. ^ What really happened when the Treaty of Rome was signed 50 years ago
  3. ^ EU landmark document was 'blank pages'
  4. ^ How divided Europe came together

External links

  • Consolidated version of the Treaty (OJEC C325 of 24 December 2002)
  • History of the Rome Treaties European NAvigator
  • Treaty establishing the European Economic Community European NAvigator
  • Happy Birthday EU - Union wide design competition to mark the 50th anniversary of the Treaty

  Results from FactBites:
 
Eurotreaties Menu Bar (1705 words)
The Treaty of Rome, signed in 1957, known more often as the Treaty establishing the European Economic Community, was the second treaty of the three treaties establishing the European Communities.
The Treaty of Amsterdam introduced into the treaties the concept of the fundamental principles of the European Union (liberty, democracy, respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms and the rule of law).
The aim of the Treaty was to prepare the Union for enlargement and to develop the decision-making of the Community by developing the ‘Community Method’, where the institutions would form guidelines for the Member States, by strengthening the involvement of the European Parliament and introducing more qualified majority voting.
A Concise Encyclopedia of the European Union --T-- (4298 words)
The Treaty of Amsterdam, agreed in 1997 and ratified in 1998, was intended as a sequel to the Maastricht Treaty, with the emphasis on institutional reform to facilitate enlargement and address the EU's 'democratic deficit'.
Given the furore which the Maastricht Treaty caused in 1992 and the extent of the subsequent alterations and additions made at Amsterdam, it is convenient to refer to the original Treaty as Maastricht, leaving the name Treaty on European Union to denote the consolidated and amended version, incorporating the Treaty of Rome.
Europe's seminal Treaty, signed in 1957 and second of the three founding Treaties to be concluded (the first was the 1951 Treaty of Paris; the third, also signed in 1957, was the Euratom Treaty), the Treaty of Rome established the European Economic Community (later to become the European Community).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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