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Encyclopedia > Treaty of Chicago

The Treaty of Chicago may refer to either of two treaties between the United States and the the Ottawa, Ojibwe (Chippewa), and Potawatomi Native American peoples. A treaty is a binding agreement under international law concluded by subjects of international law, namely states and international organizations. ... The Ottawa (also Odawa or Odaawa) are a Native American people. ... For other uses of Chippewa, see Chippewa (disambiguation). ... The Potawatomi (also spelled Pottawatomie or Pottawatomi) are an Aboriginal American people of the upper Mississippi River region. ... Native Americans (also Indians, Aboriginal Peoples, American Indians, First Nations, Alaskan Natives, Amerindians, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are the indigenous inhabitants of The Americas prior to the European colonization, and their modern descendants. ...


1821 Treaty of Chicago

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The 1821 treaty ceded the L-shaped grey area in southwest Michigan

The first treaty of Chicago was signed by Michigan Territorial Governor Lewis Cass and Solomon Sibley for the United States and representatives of the Ottawa, Ojibwe, and Potawatomi on August 29, 1821, and proclaimed on March 25, 1822. The treaty ceded to the United States all lands in Michigan Territory south of the Grand River, with the exception of several small reservations. Download high resolution version (1495x1740, 510 KB)This 19th century map, produced by the Smithsonian Institution, depicts the major Native American land cessions that resulted in what is now Michigan. ... Download high resolution version (1495x1740, 510 KB)This 19th century map, produced by the Smithsonian Institution, depicts the major Native American land cessions that resulted in what is now Michigan. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782–June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... Solomon Sibley (October 7, 1769–April 4, 1846) was a United States politician and jurist in the Michigan Territory. ... The Ottawa (also Odawa or Odaawa) are a Native American people. ... For other uses of Chippewa, see Chippewa (disambiguation). ... The Potawatomi (also spelled Pottawatomie or Pottawatomi) are an Aboriginal American people of the upper Mississippi River region. ... August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ... Events February 23 - The Philadelphia College of Apothecaries founds the first pharmacy college. ... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... Events March 30 - Florida becomes a United States territory. ... From 1805-1818, the western border was a line through Lake Michigan. ... Pedestrian bridge over the Grand River in downtown Lansing The Grand River is the longest river in the U.S. state of Michigan. ...


1833 Treaty of Chicago

The second treaty of Chicago was signed by Michigan Territorial Governor George B. Porter, Thomas J. V. Owen, and William Weatherford for the United States and representatives of the "United Nation of Ojibwe, Ottawa and Potawatomi" on September 26, 1833 and proclaimed on February 21, 1835. The treaty ceded all of the tribal lands to the United States west of Lake Michigan, approximately 5,000,000 acrea, in exchange for a reservation of equal size further to the west on the Missouri River. George Bryan Porter (February 9, 1791 - July 6, 1834), was a U.S. statesman in Pennsylvania and Michigan Territory. ... For other uses of Chippewa, see Chippewa (disambiguation). ... The Ottawa (also Odawa or Odaawa) are a Native American people. ... The Potawatomi (also spelled Pottawatomie or Pottawatomi) are an Aboriginal American people of the upper Mississippi River region. ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 96 days remaining. ... Events January 3, Britain seizes control of the Falkland Islands in the South Atlantic. ... February 21 is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Sunset on Lake Michigan A different sunset on the lake. ... The Missouri River and its tributaries N.P. Dodge Park, Omaha, Nebraska Fort Randall Dam on the Missouri River in South Dakota The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ...


In articles supplementary to the treaty, the tribes ceded some of the specific reservations granted to them under previous treaties to lands in the Michigan Territory on the east side of Lake Michigan and south of the Grand River. From 1805-1818, the western border was a line through Lake Michigan. ...


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  Results from FactBites:
 
Science Fair Projects - Treaty of Chicago (389 words)
The first treaty of Chicago was signed by Michigan Territorial Governor Lewis Cass and Solomon Sibley for the United States and representatives of the Ottawa, Ojibwe, and Potawatomi on August 29, 1821, and proclaimed on March 25, 1822.
The second treaty of Chicago was signed by Michigan Territorial Governor George B. Porter, Thomas J. Owen, and William Weatherford for the United States and representatives of the "United Nation of Ojibwe, Ottawa and Potawatomi" on September 26, 1833 and proclaimed on February 21, 1835.
The treaty ceded all of the tribal lands to the United States west of Lake Michigan, approximately 5,000,000 acrea, in exchange for a reservation of equal size further to the west on the Missouri River.
Treaties (395 words)
The Chicago area was directly affected by five of the approximately 370 ratified treaties between the federal government and American Indian nations signed from 1778 to 1871.
The Treaty of Greenville, Ohio (1795), ceded to the federal government the southern two-thirds of present-day Ohio, ending the allied Indians' long battle to maintain the Ohio River as the boundary between areas for white and Indian settlement, a boundary set by the Treaty of Fort Stanwix in 1768.
The famous Treaty of Chicago (1833) brought an estimated three thousand Indians, traders, government officials, army troops, land speculators, and adventurers to the small village to witness the dramatic proceedings whereby the Potawatomi ceded the last of their Illinois and Wisconsin lands and their last reservations in Michigan.
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