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Encyclopedia > Treaty of Accession 2003

The Treaty of Accession 2003 was the agreement between the European Union and ten countries (Czech Republic, Estonia, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Malta, Poland, Slovenia, Slovakia), concerning these countries' accession into the EU. At the same time it changed a number of points which were originally laid down in the Treaty of Nice. Accession (from Lat. ... The Treaty of Nice is a treaty adopted in Nice by the European Council to amend the two founding treaties of the European Union: the Treaty on European Union, or Maastricht Treaty, which introduced the Euro and the 3-pillar structure of the EU; the Treaty of Rome, which established...


The treaty was signed on April 16, 2003 in Athens and it entered into force on 1 May 2004, the day of the enlargement of the European Union. April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Acropolis in central Athens, one of the most important landmarks in world history. ... Coming into force refers to the date on which a legislation, or part of legislation, becomes a law. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Enlargement of the European Union is the growth in size of the European Union, from the six founding member states in 1952, to the 25 current member states. ...


The European Union comprises a large number of overlapping legal structures which is a result of it being defined by successive international treaties. The Treaty of Accession 2003 modifies:

as well as other acts which together form the current legal framework (acquis) of the EU. The Treaty of Rome signing ceremony Signatures in the Treaty The Treaty of Rome refers to the treaty which established the European Economic Community (EEC) and was signed by France, West Germany, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg on March 25, 1957. ... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... The European Atomic Energy Community, or EURATOM, is an international organisation composed of the members of the European Union. ... The Maastricht Treaty (formally, the Treaty on European Union) was signed on 7 February 1992 in Maastricht between the members of the European Community and entered into force on 1 November 1993, under the Delors Commission. ... The treaties of the European Union are effectively its constitutional law, making up the EUs primary legislation. ... The term acquis (or sometimes acquis communautaire), deriving from French, is used in European Union law to refer to the total body of EU law accumulated so far. ...


Changes include the way that the Qualified Majority Voting is handled in the Council of the European Union. Qualified Majority Voting (QMV) is a voting procedure employed in the Council of the European Union for some decisions. ... The Council of the European Union forms, along with the European Parliament, the legislative arm of the European Union (EU). ...


The Treaty's full name in English is: Treaty between the Kingdom of Belgium, the Kingdom of Denmark, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Hellenic Republic, the Kingdom of Spain, the French Republic, Ireland, the Italian Republic, the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, the Kingdom of the Netherlands, the Republic of Austria, the Portuguese Republic, the Republic of Finland, the Kingdom of Sweden, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Member States of the European Union) and the Czech Republic, the Republic of Estonia, the Republic of Cyprus, the Republic of Latvia, the Republic of Lithuania, the Republic of Hungary, the Republic of Malta, the Republic of Poland, the Republic of Slovenia, the Slovak Republic, concerning the accession of the Czech Republic, the Republic of Estonia, the Republic of Cyprus, the Republic of Latvia, the Republic of Lithuania, the Republic of Hungary, the Republic of Malta, the Republic of Poland, the Republic of Slovenia and the Slovak Republic to the European Union.


See also: European Union Law The European Union is unique among international organisations in having a complex and highly developed system of internal law which has direct effect within the legal systems of its member states. ...


External links

  • Treaty of accession 2003
  • Image:Link.gif Summary of the Treaty of Accession, including voting weights is now a dead link; use the wayback machine link here instead..
  • Official web site of the Greek presidence about the signing with press releases, speeches, a presentation and a video.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Treaty of Accession 2003 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (252 words)
The Treaty of Accession 2003 was the agreement between the European Union and ten countries (Czech Republic, Estonia, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Malta, Poland, Slovenia, Slovakia), concerning these countries' accession into the EU.
The treaty was signed on April 16, 2003 in Athens, Greece and it entered into force on May 1, 2004, the day of the enlargement of the European Union.
Treaty concerning the accession of 10 new countrie to the European Union European NAvigator
Eurotreaties Menu Bar (1705 words)
The Treaty of Rome, signed in 1957, known more often as the Treaty establishing the European Economic Community, was the second treaty of the three treaties establishing the European Communities.
The Treaty of Amsterdam introduced into the treaties the concept of the fundamental principles of the European Union (liberty, democracy, respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms and the rule of law).
The aim of the Treaty was to prepare the Union for enlargement and to develop the decision-making of the Community by developing the ‘Community Method’, where the institutions would form guidelines for the Member States, by strengthening the involvement of the European Parliament and introducing more qualified majority voting.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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