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Encyclopedia > Trapezoid bone

In human anatomy, the trapezoid bone (lesser multangular bone; os multangulum minus) is a bone in the hands. It is the smallest bone in the distal row. It may be known by its wedge-shaped form, the broad end of the wedge constituting the dorsal, the narrow end the volar surface; and by its having four articular facets touching each other, and separated by sharp edges. The superior surface, quadrilateral, smooth, and slightly concave, articulates with the navicular. The inferior surface articulates with the proximal end of the second metacarpal bone; it is convex from side to side, concave from before backward and subdivided by an elevated ridge into two unequal facets. The dorsal and volar surfaces are rough for the attachment of ligaments, the former being the larger of the two. The lateral surface, convex and smooth, articulates with the greater multangular. The medial surface is concave and smooth in front, for articulation with the capitate; rough behind, for the attachment of an interosseous ligament. Human anatomy or anthropotomy is a special field within anatomy. ... Grays illustration of a human femur, a typically recognized bone. ... The hand (med. ... Technically a portable double inclined plane, a wedge is a simple machine used to separate two objects, or portions of objects, through the application of force, perpendicular to the inclined surfaces, developed by conversion of force applied to the blunt end. ... In mathematics, an object is convex if for any pair of points within the object, any point on the straight line segment that joins them is also within the object. ... In geometry, concavity is a property of certain geometric figures, and in calculus, a property of certain graphs of functions. ...

image:Gray226.png
The left lesser multangular bone.

From Grays Anatomy File links The following pages link to this file: Carpus Trapezoid bone Wikipedia:Grays Anatomy images with missing articles 5 Categories: Public domain images ...

Articulations

The lesser multangular articulates with four bones: the navicular proximally, second metacarpal distally, greater multangular laterally, and capitate medially. The trapezium is a bone in the human hand. ...


See also


This article is based on an entry from the 1918 edition of Gray's Anatomy, which is in the public domain. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. Grays illustration of a human femur, a typically recognized bone. ... In zootomy, several terms are used to describe the location of organs and other structures in the body of bilateral animals. ... A trapezoid (American English) or trapezium (British English) is a quadrilateral two of whose sides are parallel to each other. ... Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
trapezoid bone - definition of trapezoid bone in Encyclopedia (287 words)
In human anatomy, the trapezoid bone (lesser multangular bone; os multangulum minus) is a bone in the hands.
It is the smallest bone in the distal row.
The inferior surface articulates with the proximal end of the second metacarpal bone; it is convex from side to side, concave from before backward and subdivided by an elevated ridge into two unequal facets.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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