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Encyclopedia > Transylvania University
Transylvania University
Transylvania University Logo
Motto In Lumine Illo Tradimus Lumen
Established 1780
Type Private Undergraduate Liberal Arts
President Charles L. Shearer
Staff 100
Students 1,120
Location Lexington, Kentucky, USA
Campus Urban
Athletics NCAA Division III
Mascot Pioneer
Affiliations Disciples of Christ
Website http://www.transy.edu/

Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students. Transylvania University Logo File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A motto is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Nickname: Athens of the West Horse Capital of the World Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: Country State Counties United States Kentucky Fayette Mayor Teresa Isaac (D) Area    - City 285. ... Official language(s) English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... An urban area is a term used to define an area where there is an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Mascots at the Mascot Olympics in Orlando, Florida. ... The insignia of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ... This page as shown in the AOL 9. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... The insignia of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ... Nickname: Athens of the West Horse Capital of the World Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: Country State Counties United States Kentucky Fayette Mayor Teresa Isaac (D) Area    - City 285. ... Official language(s) English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ...

Contents

History

Transylvania University has a long, notable and complicated history that touches a number of former and subsequent institutions of higher learning.


The Early Years: Transylvania University and Kentucky University

The school is named Transylvania (Latin for "across the woods") after the heavily forested region of western Virginia that became Kentucky in 1792. Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Official language(s) English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Transylvania University opened at Danville, Kentucky, in 1780, and did not move to Lexington until 1789. In its early years, the University included a medical school, a law school, a divinity school, and a college of arts and sciences. During this early period many important figures in American history attended the school: Notable statesman Henry Clay, himself a graduate, taught at the school's college of law from 1805-07 before returning to politics and founding Whig Party. Stephen F. Austin, the "Father of Texas", graduated in 1810. In the early 1820s, Jefferson Davis the future first and only President of the Confederate States attended as a student. The first Supreme Court justice to have earned a modern law degree, John Marshall Harlan, earned it from Transylvania's law school in 1853. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Freeman Miller earned a degree from the medical school, practiced medicine in Barbourville, Kentucky, and then became a lawyer before being appointed to the Court by Abraham Lincoln in 1862. Danville is a city located in Boyle County, Kentucky. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Faculty of Medical Sciences of the State University of Campinas, in Campinas, Brazil A medical school, or faculty of medicine, is a tertiary educational institution, or part of such an institution, which is involved in the education of future medical practitioners (medical doctors) as well as their accreditation to legally... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... A divinity school is an institute of higher education devoted to the study of divinity, religion and theology. ... Henry Clay Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was a leading American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... . ... Stephen F. Austin Stephen Fuller Austin (November 3, 1793 – December 27, 1836), known as the Father of Texas, led the Anglo-American colonization of the region. ... Official language(s) See: Languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 268,581 sq mi (695,622 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808–December 6, 1889) was an American statesman and advocate for American slavery and, until he became President of the Confederate States of America, for States Rights. ... The President of the Confederate States was the Head of State of the short-lived republic of the Confederate States of America, which seceded from the United States. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the judicial branch of the United States federal government. ... A Law degree is the degree conferred on someone who successfully completes studies in law. ... John Marshall Harlan (1833-1911) John Marshall Harlan (June 1, 1833 – October 14, 1911) was an American Supreme Court associate justice. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Samuel Freeman Miller (April 5, 1816 - October 13, 1890), was an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court, 1862-1890. ...


Meanwhile, Kentucky University, the other major institution that would play role in the creation of the modern Transylvania University, was founded in 1836 in Georgetown, Kentucky as a spinoff of Georgetown College, a Baptist supported institution. This new school was launched by former Georgetown faculty members who were aligned with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). Originally known as Bacon College (named after Sir Francis Bacon), the college was recharted as Kentucky University in 1858 upon a move to donated land in Harrodsburg, Kentucky. Charles Darwin 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Georgetown is a city located in Scott County, Kentucky. ... Note: Georgetown University is a separate and unaffiliated institution located in Washington, DC. Georgetown College is a small, private liberal arts college located in Georgetown, Kentucky. ... A Baptist is a member of a Baptist church. ... The insignia of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ... Sir Francis Bacon Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Albans, KC (22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626) was an English astrologer, philosopher, statesman, spy, freemason and essayist. ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Harrodsburg is a city located in Mercer County, Kentucky. ...


After the Civil War: Kentucky University

The American Civil War wreaked havoc on the South, and the state of Kentucky was no exception. Kentucky University was devastated by fire and both it and Transylvania University were in dire financial straits. As a result, in 1865, both institutions secured permission to merge: The new institution utilized Transylvania's campus in Lexington while perpetuating the name Kentucky University. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert Edward Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


The University was reorganized around several new colleges. Among them was the Agricultural and Mechanical College (A&M) of Kentucky, publicly chartered as a department of Kentucky University as a land-grant institution under the Morrill Act. However, due to questions regarding the appropriateness of a federally funded land-grant college controlled by a religious body, the A&M college was spun off in 1878 as an independent, state-run institution. A&M soon developed into the state's flagship public university, the University of Kentucky. Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... The Morrill Land-Grant Acts are pieces of US legislation which allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges, which would be funded by the grant of federally-controlled land to each of the states which had stayed with the United States during the American Civil War. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Kentucky (also as UK or simply Kentucky) is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ...


Kentucky University's College of the Bible, which traced its roots to Bacon College's Department of Hebrew Literature, also received its own charter in 1878. The Seminary became a separate institution, although it remained housed on the Kentucky University campus until 1950, later changing its name to the Lexington Theological Seminary. In 1903, Hamilton College, a Lexington-based women's college founded in 1869, merged into Kentucky University. 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Lexington Theological Seminary Lexington Theological Seminary is an accredited graduate theological institution located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Photos of Hamilton College, 1904 Hamilton College was a private womens college in Lexington, Kentucky that closed in 1932. ... In higher education, particularly in the United States, a womens college is a college (that is, a primarily undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institution) whose students are exclusively women. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


20th Century and beyond: Transylvania University

Due to confusion between Kentucky University and its daughter institution the University of Kentucky, the institution adopted the eldest name in its lineage "Transylvania University" in 1908. 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The school remains affiliated with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). The insignia of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ...


Censorship Controversy

In the fall of 2006, students returned to Transylvania's campus to discover that the student newspaper, The Rambler, had been suspended indefinitely by the administration without explanation. As students began questioning the motivation of this action, the Student Government Association was asked to investigate. The administration's official statement proposed that the The Rambler had dropped below an acceptable level of journalistic quality, while students believe the cancellation was specifically in response to the use of the word "fuck" in the publication. Regardless of the reasoning, students' concerns were based on the following section of the Student Rights and Responsibilities:

"Student-directed publications that are published under the auspices of the University and/or are funded by the University shall be free of censorship. The University shall honor this freedom by publicly recognizing and protecting the student editors’ and managers’ right to establish editorial policies within the bounds of prevailing legal and journalistic standards. Specifically, student editors and managers may not be suspended or removed in response to pressure by individuals or groups disagreeing with editorial policies, positions, or opinions."

Campus

Commonly referred to as "Transy," the school is located on a 35 acre (142,000 m²) campus about 4 blocks north of downtown Lexington. Nickname: Athens of the West Horse Capital of the World Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: Country State Counties United States Kentucky Fayette Mayor Teresa Isaac (D) Area    - City 285. ...


Academic buildings

  • Haupt Humanities - The most used classroom building, it houses the various humanities programs.
  • Cowgill Center - Finished in 1999, houses the Business, Economics & Education programs.
  • L.A. Brown Science Center - Natural Sciences building. Includes largest classroom on campus, Strickland auditorium, a greenhouse, numerous labs, a 16 node supercomputer cluster, and a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer.
  • J. Douglas Gay Jr. / Frances Carrick Thomas Library - The library complex includes the original Frances Carrick Thomas Library, dedicated by President Eisenhower in 1954, and the J. Douglas Gay Jr. addition, dedicated by Vice President George Bush in 1986.
  • Mitchell Fine Arts Center - Houses facilities for all of the fine arts programs. Contains a large concert hall, small theater, recital hall, art gallery and practice rooms, among other things.
  • Charles L. Shearer Studio Art Building - This building is home to most of the visual art facilities, including a dark room, ceramics, painting, and other studios, and a student art gallery.

Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys high magnetic field (800 MHz, 18. ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American soldier and politician. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States of America serving from 1989 to 1993. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Residential buildings

  • Forrer Hall - Mainly the women's dorm, Forrer's front and back lobbies contain offices for Residence Life, Department of Public Safety, and others.
  • Henry Clay Hall - Men's dorm primarily for first-years.
  • Jefferson Davis Hall - Men's dorm for upperclassmen. Each floor belongs to one of the four fraternities.
  • Rosenthal Residence Complex - Apartment complex for upperclassmen.
  • Poole Residence Center - Suite style residential building.
  • Hazelrigg Hall - A multipurpose building. Contains a classroom, a computer lab, social science faculty offices, and two floors of dormitories.

While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for...

Other buildings

  • Old Morrison - The administrative building, this building was built in the 1830s and has burnt twice, most recently in 1969, when the interior was completely gutted. This building is featured on the city seal of Lexington.
  • Lucille C. Little Theater - Black box style theater allowing for very flexible stage and seating arrangements.
  • Clive M. Beck Athletic Center - Contains athletics offices, classrooms, fitness center, competition and recreational facilities. Completed in 2002.
  • Glenn Building - Completed in the fall of 2005, this building houses the new university bookstore as well as a coffee shop.

1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... Nickname: Athens of the West Horse Capital of the World Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: Country State Counties United States Kentucky Fayette Mayor Teresa Isaac (D) Area    - City 285. ...

Greek Life

Transylvania has a thriving Greek life on campus, with four fraternities and four sororities on campus. Each chapter is represented on the Interfraternity Council or the Panhellenic Association. The Greek community does provide a social outlet, but the “Animal House” image of the past is misleading.


Fraternitites

Sororities Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college Fraternity. ... The Kappa Alpha Order (KA) is a collegiate fraternity, though its modern members staunchly refer to it as an Order of Christian Knights. ... ΦΚΤ (Phi Kappa Tau) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... Delta Sigma Phi (ΔΣΦ, also known as DSP, Delta Sig or in Michigan, Delt Sig) is a fraternity established at the City College of New York in 1899 and is a charter member of the North-American Interfraternity Conference. ...

Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference [1] as well as over 170 active collegiate chapters. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Phi Mu (ΦΜ) is the second oldest secret organization for women in the United States. ... Delta Zeta (ΔΖ) is a college sorority founded on October 24, 1902, at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Sigma Kappa (ΣΚ) is a sorority founded in 1874 at Colby College in Waterville, Maine, founded by five women: Mary Caffrey Low Carver, Elizabeth Gorham Hoag, Ida Mabel Fuller Pierce, Frances Elliott Mann Hall and Louise Helen Coburn. ... Alpha Omicron Pi (ΑΟΠ, AOII) is an international fraternity that was founded on January 2, 1897 at Barnard College on the campus of Columbia University in New York. ...

Notable alumni

James Lane Allen (December 21, 1849 – February 18, 1925) is the author of many novels and short stories, including A Kentucky Cardinal. ... David Rice Atchison David Rice Atchison (August 11, 1807 – January 26, 1886) was a mid-19th century Democratic United States Senator from Missouri. ... Stephen F. Austin Stephen Fuller Austin (November 3, 1793 – December 27, 1836), known as the Father of Texas, led the Anglo-American colonization of the region. ... Official language(s) See: Languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 268,581 sq mi (695,622 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... William Taylor Barry (February 5, 1784–August 30, 1835) was an American statesman and jurist. ... Francis Preston Blair (April 12, 1791 – October 18, 1876), American journalist and politician, was born at Abingdon, Virginia. ... Francis Preston Blair, Jr. ... Levi Day Boone (born: December 6, 1808 in Kentucky; died: January 24, 1882; buried in Rosehill Cemetary) served as mayor of Chicago, Illinois (1855-1856) on the Know-Nothing Party. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans February 4, 1861–May 1... Benjamin Gratz Brown (May 28, 1826 - December 13, 1885) was a Liberal Republican Senator, Governor of Missouri, and the Vice presidential candidate in the election of 1872. ... William Orlando Butler (April 19, 1791 - August 6, 1880) was a U.S. political figure from Kentucky. ... Alexander Campbell (1779 - November 5, 1857) was a National Republican politician from Ohio. ... Albert Chandler Albert Benjamin Happy Chandler (July 14, 1898–June 15, 1991) was a governor of Kentucky, a U.S. Senator and Baseball Commissioner. ... Thomas James Churchill (10 March 1824 - 10 March 1905) was a Confederate Major General during the American Civil War and a Governor of the state of Arkansas. ... Cassius Marcellus Clay, nicknamed The Lion of Whitehall (October 19, 1810–July 22, 1903) was an emancipationist from Madison County, Kentucky, a much younger first cousin, once removed, of famous politician Henry Clay. ... Henry Clay Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was a leading American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808–December 6, 1889) was an American statesman and advocate for American slavery and, until he became President of the Confederate States of America, for States Rights. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (April 3–April 10, 1865) Largest city New Orleans... William McKendree Gwin (October 9, 1805–September 3, 1885) was an American medical doctor and politician. ... John Marshall Harlan (1833-1911) John Marshall Harlan (June 1, 1833 – October 14, 1911) was an American Supreme Court associate justice. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... Wilson Shannon (February 24, 1802 - August 30, 1877) was a Democratic politician from Ohio and Kansas. ... James Speed (March 11, 1812–June 25, 1887) was a American lawyer, politician and professor. ... DVD cover showing horror characters as depicted by Universal Studios. ... Jon Bon Jovi (born John Francis Bongiovi on March 2, 1962) is an American musician and actor who is the lead singer of the highly successful rock band Bon Jovi. ...

Notable faculty

  • Constantine Samuel Rafinesque-Schmaltz, an unrecognized genius of botany and zoology from Europe, became the professor of botany at Transylvania University in 1819, teaching French and Italian as well. In the spring of 1826 he was dismissed from the university, either for having an affair with the university president's wife or for attending even fewer classes than his students. His tomb is on campus.

C. S. Rafinesque Constantine Samuel Rafinesque-Schmaltz (October 22, 1783-September 18, 1840) was a nineteenth-century polymath who led a chaotic life. ... Pinguicula grandiflora Botany is the scientific study of plantlife. ... Zoology is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Trivia

A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative in prose. ... All the Kings Men is a novel by Robert Penn Warren, published in 1946 and made into a film in 1949 and again in 2006. ... Robert Penn Warren Robert Penn Warren (April 24, 1905 - September 15, 1989) was an American poet and novelist. ...

External link

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Transylvania University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1503 words)
Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students.
Due to confusion between Kentucky University and its daughter institution the University of Kentucky, the institution adopted the eldest name in its lineage "Transylvania University" in 1908.
In the spring of 1826 he was dismissed from the university, either for having an affair with the university president's wife or for attending even fewer classes than his students.
Definition of Transylvania University (676 words)
Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college located in Lexington, Kentucky with approximately 1,100 students.
When Transylvania University was founded in 1780 it became the 16th college in the U.S. and the first west of the Allegheny Mountains.
In the spring of 1826 he was dismissed from the university, for either having an apparent affair with the university president’s wife or for attending even less classes than his students.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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