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Encyclopedia > Transmission coefficient

This article is about the transmission coefficient in optics. See also, transmission coefficient (chemistry) and transmission coefficient (physics). Transmission Coefficient is a state of unity for monomolecular reactions. ... The transmission coefficient, , for a particle tunneling through a single barrier potential is found to be: Where are the 2 classical turning points for the potential barrier. ...


In optics, a transmission coefficient is a measure of how much of an electromagnetic wave (light) passes through a surface or an optical element. Transmission coefficients can be calculated for either the amplitude or the intensity of the wave. Either is calculated by taking the ratio of the value after the surface or element to the value before. Table of Opticks, 1728 Cyclopaedia Optics (appearance or look in ancient Greek) is a branch of physics that describes the behavior and properties of light and the interaction of light with matter. ... Electromagnetic radiation is a propagating wave in space with electric and magnetic components. ... Prism splitting light Light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength that is visible to the eye (visible light) or, in a technical or scientific context, electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength. ... Amplitude is a nonnegative scalar measure of a waves magnitude of oscillation, that is, magnitude of the maximum disturbance in the medium during one wave cycle. ... In physics, intensity is a measure of the time-averaged energy flux. ...


In telecommunications, the term is also used for characterizing transmission lines. In this case, the transmission coefficient is the ratio of the amplitude of the complex transmitted wave to that of the incident wave at a discontinuity in the line. BlackBerry 7100t Telecommunications is the communication of information over a distance. ... A transmission line is the material medium or structure that forms all or part of a path from one place to another for directing the transmission of energy, such as electromagnetic waves or acoustic waves, as well as electric power transmission. ...


The probability that a portion of a communications system, such as a line, circuit, channel or trunk, will meet specified performance criteria is also sometimes called the "transmission coefficient" of that portion of the system. The value of the transmission coefficient is inversely related to the quality of the line, circuit, channel or trunk. In telecommunication, a communications system is a collection of individual communications networks, transmission systems, relay stations, tributary stations, and data terminal equipment (DTE) usually capable of interconnection and interoperation to form an integrated whole. ... A telecommunication circuit is defined as follows: The complete path between two terminals over which one-way or two-way communications may be provided. ... Channel, in communications (sometimes called communications channel), refers to the medium through which information is transmitted from a sender (or transmitter) to a receiver. ... For computer networking, trunking describes using multiple network cables / ports in parallel to increase the link speed beyond the limits of any one single cable or port. ...


References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Transmission coefficient - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (206 words)
In optics, a transmission coefficient is a measure of how much of an electromagnetic wave (light) passes through a surface or an optical element.
Transmission coefficients can be calculated for either the amplitude or the intensity of the wave.
In this case, the transmission coefficient is the ratio of the amplitude of the complex transmitted wave to that of the incident wave at a discontinuity in the line.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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