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Encyclopedia > Transistor radio
Regency TR-1.
Regency TR-1.

A transistor radio is a small transistor-based radio receiver. Historically, the term "transistor radio" refers to a radio that is monoaural and typically receives only the 540–1600 kilocycle[1] AM broadcast band. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 398 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1444 × 2176 pixel, file size: 609 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Transistor radio Regency TR-1 ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 398 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1444 × 2176 pixel, file size: 609 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Transistor radio Regency TR-1 ... For other uses, see Transistor (disambiguation). ... For the device which is a tuner (radio) and a amplifier and/or loudspeaker, see receiver (home stereo). ... Label for 1. ... AM radio is radio broadcasting using amplitude modulation. ...

Contents

History

In 1953 Intermetall unveiled what was probably the first transistorized portable radio on the Düsseldorf Radio fair. Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The first commercial transistor radio, the Regency TR-1, was announced on October 18, 1954 by the Regency Division of Industrial Development Engineering Associates of Indianapolis, Indiana and put on sale in November of 1954. It cost $49.95 (the equivalent of roughly $364 in year-2005 dollars) and sold about 150,000 units. Raytheon and Zenith Electronics transistor radios soon followed and were priced even higher. Even the first Japanese imports (in 1957) were priced at $30 and above. Transistor radios did not achieve mass popularity until the early 1960s when prices of some models fell below $20, then below $10 as markets became flooded with radios from Hong Kong by the mid to late 1960s. The Regency TR-4 shown here is similar in appearance to the original Regency TR-1 model, but the TR-1 has a gold tuning knob and lettering. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Indianapolis” redirects here. ... Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) is a major United States military contractor based in Waltham, Massachusetts. ... Zenith Electronics Corporation is an American manufacturer of televisions headquartered in Lincolnshire, Illinois. ...


Texas Instruments was behind the Regency transistor radio. In May 1954, they had designed and built a prototype and were looking for an established radio manufacturer to develop and market a radio using their transistors. None of the major radio makers were interested. RCA had demonstrated a prototype transistor radio as early as 1952 and it is likely that they and the other radio makers were planning transistor radios of their own. But Texas Instruments and Regency were the first to put forth a production model. Sony, at the time still a small company named Tokyo Tsushin Kogyo, Ltd., (aka "Totsuko"), followed soon after by releasing the Sony TR-55 in August 1955 as Japan's first commercially produced transistor radio. With its release, Sony also became the first company to manufacture a radio from the transistors on up, and to utilize all miniature components. Sony's first official import to the U.S.A. was the "pocketable" TR-63 released in March 1957, a model which proved highly successful in that market. In January 1958, the company changed its name to Sony, a name that had previously been the reserve of its radio brand. The Sony TR-610 was released some months later, marking another resounding success and taking its place as the first transistor radio to sell more than a half-million units. Texas Instruments (NYSE: TXN), better known in the electronics industry (and popularly) as TI, is an American company based in Dallas, Texas, USA, renowned for developing and commercializing semiconductor and computer technology. ... RCA, formerly an acronym for the Radio Corporation of America, is now a trademark owned by Thomson SA through RCA Trademark Management S.A., a company owned by Thomson. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... The TR-55 The TR-55, released in 1955, was Sonys first transistor radio, and the first to be made in Japan. ...

Sanyo 8S-P3.
Sanyo 8S-P3.

jh The use of transistors instead of vacuum tubes as the amplifier elements meant that the device was much smaller and required far less power to operate than a tubed radio. The typical portable radio of the fifties was about the size and weight of a lunchbox, and contained several heavy (and non-rechargeable) batteries: one or more so-called "A" batteries just to heat the tube filaments and a large 45- to 90-volt "B" battery to power the rest of the circuitry. By comparison, the "transistor" could fit in a pocket and weighed half a pound or less and was powered by standard flashlight batteries or a single compact 9-volt battery. (The now-familiar 9-volt battery was introduced specifically for powering transistor radios.) Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1500 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1500 pixel, file size: 1. ... Sanyo Electric Co. ... For other uses, see Transistor (disambiguation). ... Structure of a vacuum tube diode Structure of a vacuum tube triode In electronics, a vacuum tube, electron tube, or (outside North America) thermionic valve or just valve, is a device used to amplify, switch or modify a signal by controlling the movement of electrons in an evacuated space. ... Symbols representing a single Cell (top) and Battery (bottom), used in circuit diagrams. ...


Listeners sometimes held an entire transistor radio directly against the side of the head, with the speaker against the ear, to minimize the "tinny" sound. Most radios included earphone jacks and came with single earphones that provided middling-quality sound reproduction. To consumers familiar with the earphone-listening experience of the transistor radio, the first Sony Walkman cassette player, with a pair of high-fidelity stereo earphones, would provide a greatly contrasting display of audio fidelity. SONY Recorder Walkman (TCM-S68V) MD Walkman The Sony Walkman personal stereo was a transistorized miniature portable cassette tape player invented by Akio Morita, Masaru Ibuka and Kozo Ohsone, and manufactured by Sony Corporation. ...

A modern transistor radio (Sony Walkman SRF-S84 transistor radio, released 2001, without included earphones)

The transistor radio remains the single most popular communications device in existence. Some estimates suggest that there are at least seven billion of them in existence, almost all tunable to the common AM band, and an increasingly high percentage of those also tunable to the FM band. Some receive shortwave broadcasts as well. Most operate on battery power. They have become small and cheap due to improved electronics which pack millions of transistors on one integrated circuit or chip. The prefix "transistor" basically now means an old pocket radio; it can be used to refer to any small radio, but the term itself is today somewhat obsolescent, since virtually all commercial broadcast receivers, pocket-sized or not, are now transistor-based. Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 1384 KB)Sony Walkman SRFS84S/SRF-S84 Silver pocket radio/miniature radio. Taken 31 May 2005. ... Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 1384 KB)Sony Walkman SRFS84S/SRF-S84 Silver pocket radio/miniature radio. Taken 31 May 2005. ... Portable communications devices refer to hand-held or wearable devices. ... Mediumwave radio transmissions (sometimes called Medium frequency or MF) are those between the frequencies of 300 kHz and 3000 kHz. ... In most of the world, the FM broadcast band, used for broadcasting FM radio stations, goes from 87. ... A solid-state, analog shortwave receiver Shortwave radio operates between the frequencies of 3 MHz (3,000 kHz) and 30 MHz (30,000 kHz) [1] and came to be referred to as such in the early days of radio because the wavelengths associated with this frequency range were shorter than... Four double-A batteries In science and technology, a battery is a device that stores energy and makes it available in an electrical form. ... For other uses, see Transistor (disambiguation). ... Integrated circuit of Atmel Diopsis 740 System on Chip showing memory blocks, logic and input/output pads around the periphery Microchips with a transparent window, showing the integrated circuit inside. ...

Decline

Transistor radios have declined in popularity with the rise of portable digital audio players, which allow people to listen to the exact music of their choosing and may include a digital radio tuner. This is a popular choice with listeners who are dissatisfied with terrestrial music radio because of limited selection of music or other criticisms. However, transistor radios are still popular for news, weather, horse races and emergency alert applications. Apple iPod, the best-selling hard drive-based player An embedded hard drive-based player (Creative ZEN Vision:M) An MP3 CD player (Philips Expanium) The Eiger Labs MPMan F10, the first digital audio player A digital audio player (DAP) is a device that stores, organizes and plays audio files. ... Categories: Stub | Consumer electronics ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


See also

Radio Portal

Image File history File links Radio_icon. ... Broadcasting is the distribution of audio and/or video signals which transmit programs to an audience. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Kilocycles is an old term for what is today known as kilohertz. The hertz was adopted as the new unit of frequency in 1960 (replacing the cycle per second), and became common use in the 1970s.

MHZ redirects here. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...

External links

“PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... MSOE redirects here. ...

Reading

  • Michael F. Wolff: "The secret six-month project. Why Texas Instruments decided to put the first transistor radio on the market by Christmas 1954 and how it was accomplished." IEEE Spectrum, December 1985, pages 64-69
  • Transistor Radios: 1954-1968 (Schiffer Book for Collectors) by Norman R. Smith
  • Made in Japan: Transistor Radios of the 1950s and 1960s by Handy, Erbe, Blackham, Antonier (1993) (ISBN 0-8118-0271-X)
  • The Portable Radio in American Life by University of Arizona Professor Michael Brian Schiffer, Ph.D. (The University of Arizona Press, 1991).
  • Restoring Pocket Radios (DVD) by Ron Mansfield and Eric Wrobbel. (ChildhoodRadios.com, 2002).
  • The Regency TR-1 story, based on an interview with Regency co-founder, John Pies (partner with Joe Weaver) www.regencytr1.com/Regency_Early_Years.html

  Results from FactBites:
 
Transistor radio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (977 words)
RCA had demonstrated a prototype transistor radio as early as 1952 and it is likely that they and the other radio makers were planning transistor radios of their own.
It was the first transistor radio to utilize all miniature components and was the first Japanese radio to be imported into the U.S.A. The use of transistors instead of vacuum tubes as the amplifier elements meant that the device was much smaller and required far less power to operate than a tubed radio.
Transistor radios have declined in popularity with the rise of portable digital audio players, which allow people to listen to the exact music of their choosing.
Fifties - The Transistor Radio (575 words)
When the transistor was invented in the early 50’s, it was the beginning of a new era for radio.
The potential for using the radio as an early warning device for the public was realized and some early radios were marked with the letters CD on a certain section of the dial.
Transistor radios could be listened to with headphones and families began to turn away from the tradition of sitting around the radio as each family member listened to their own programs on personal radios.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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