FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Transfiguration" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Transfiguration
Liturgical year
Western
Eastern
Major events in Jesus' life in the Gospels

The word Transfiguration means a changing of appearance or form. In Christianity The Transfiguration is a miraculous event in the Synoptic Gospel accounts of Jesus (Matthew 17:1–6, Mark 9:1–8, Luke 9:28–36): Jesus led three of his apostles, Peter, John, and James, to pray at the top of a mountain, where he became transfigured, with his face shining like the sun, and with brilliant white clothes; Elijah and Moses appeared with Jesus, and talked with him, and then a bright cloud appeared overhead, and a voice from cloud proclaimed, "This is my Son, the Beloved. Listen to him." According to Luke, Moses and Elijah also appeared in "glorious splendor", and Jesus spoke with them concerning his upcoming death. hello The liturgical year, also known as the Christian year, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in some Christian churches which determines when Feasts, Memorials, Commemorations, and Solemnities are to be observed and which portions of Scripture are to be read. ... Advent (from the Latin Adventus, sc. ... The Christmas season (also known as the holiday season) is a term that covers the time when two interconnected periods of celebration are held. ... John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ as Angels look on in wonder in an Eastern Orthodox icon of the Theophany This article is about the Christian feast. ... Septuagesima (in full, Septuagesima Sunday) is the name given to the third from the last Sunday before Lent in the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches. ... Look up Lent in Wiktionary, the free dictionary In Western Christianity, Lent is the period before the Christian holy day of Easter. ... Eastertide, or the Easter Season, begins on Easter Sunday and continues until Pentecost in the Christian liturgical calendar, thus spanning a total of seven weeks. ... Icon of the Ascension. ... The name of the Jewish holiday Shavuot is commonly translated as Pentecost. Pentecost is the Christian festival that commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles, fifty days after the Resurrection of Jesus at Easter, and ten days after the Ascension. ... Ordinary Time is a term used in the Christian (especially the Roman Catholic) liturgical calendar to refer, collectively, to two different seasons of the liturgical year. ... In the Christian liturgical calendar, there are several different feasts known as Feasts of the Cross, all of which commemorate the cross used in the crucifixion of Jesus. ... The Nativity Fast, practiced by the Eastern Orthodox Church, is believed to enable participants to draw closer to God by denying the body of worldly pleasure in preparation for celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ, which is held on December 25th (Julian Calendar). ... Nativity is the general time and place of a persons birth and early years. ... John the Baptist baptizes Jesus in The Baptism of Christ by Leonardo da Vinci. ... Great Lent is the greatest fasting period in the church year in Eastern Christianity, which prepares Christians for the greatest feast of the church year, Easter (or Holy Pasch). Although it is in many ways similar to Lent in Western Christianity, there are important differences in the timing of Lent... Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed in March, April, or May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus, which Christians believe occurred after his death by crucifixion in AD 30-33 (see Good Friday). ... The name of the Jewish holiday Shavuot is commonly translated as Pentecost. Pentecost is the Christian festival that commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles, fifty days after the Resurrection of Jesus at Easter, and ten days after the Ascension. ... The Dormition of the Theotokos is the Eastern Orthodox as well as the Eastern Catholic commemoration of the falling asleep or death of Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... The Intercession of Our Most Holy Lady Theotokos and Ever-Virgin Mary (Russian Pokrov, Покров) is one of the most important Russian Orthodoxy feasts (maybe the most important after the Twelve Great Feasts). ... The chronology of Jesus depicts the traditional chronology established for the events of the life of Jesus by the four canonical gospels (which allude to various dates for several events). ... Jesus, also known as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus the Nazarene, is the central figure of Christianity, in which context he is known as Jesus Christ (from Greek Ιησούς Χριστός) with Christ being a title meaning Anointed One. He is also considered a very important prophet in Islam and a manifestation of... This article presents a description of Jesus life, as based on the four gospels. ... For the genre of Christian-themed music, see gospel music. ... Nativity is the general time and place of a persons birth and early years. ... Jacopo Bellinis Madonna and Child Blessing depicts the infant Jesus in the act of blessing the viewer The Child Jesus is a religious archetypal symbol based on the activities of Jesus as an infant up to the age of twelve that recurs throughout history starting from around the 3rd... The Baptism of Christ, by Piero della Francesca, 1449 The Baptism of Jesus is the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist. ... In Christianity, the temptation of Christ refers to the temptation of Jesus by Satan as detailed in the New Testament, specifically: Matthew 4:1-11 Mark 1:12-13 Luke 4:1-13 According to these Gospels, Jesus has fasted for forty days and nights in the desert or wilderness... The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch. ... This article relates to the events described in the New Testament of the Bible, see The Last Supper (disambiguation) for other uses, including a list of famous works of art with this name. ... The Passion is the technical term for the suffering and Agony of Jesus that led directly to the Crucifixion, a central Christian event. ... Crucifixion is an ancient method of execution, where the victim was tied or nailed to a large wooden cross (Latin: crux) and left to hang there until dead. ... The Harrowing of Hell, as depicted in the Petites Heures de Jean de Berry, a fourteenth-century illuminated manuscript. ... According to the New Testament, especially the Gospels, Jesus, also called Christ, had the power to lay his life down and to take it up again, being both human and God as well as the Promised Messiah. ... Icon of the Ascension. ... The history of Christianity is difficult to extricate from that of the European West (and several other culture-regions) in general. ... According to many religions, a miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by God in the universe by which the operations of the ordinary course of Nature are overruled, suspended, or modified. ... The Synoptic Gospels are the Gospels of Mark, Matthew, and Luke. ... Jesus, also known as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus the Nazarene, is the central figure of Christianity, in which context he is known as Jesus Christ (from Greek Ιησούς Χριστός) with Christ being a title meaning Anointed One. He is also considered a very important prophet in Islam and a manifestation of... The Gospel of Matthew (literally: according to Matthew, Greek: Κατα Μαθθαιον ) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ... The Gospel of Mark is traditionally the second of the New Testament Gospels. ... The Gospel of Luke is the third of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament, which tell the story of Jesus life, death, and resurrection. ... Saint Peter, also known as Peter, Simon ben Jonah/BarJonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Kepha—original name Simon or Simeon (Acts 15:14)—was one of the twelve original disciples or apostles of Jesus. ... John the Apostle (יוחנן The LORD is merciful, Standard Hebrew Yoḥanan, Tiberian Hebrew Yôḥānān) was one of the twelve apostles of Jesus. ... For people and places called Saint James, see the diambiguation page. ... Elijah (אֱלִיָּהוּ Whose/my God is the Lord, Standard Hebrew Eliyyáhu, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĔliyyāhû), also Elias (NT Greek Ἠλίας), is a prophet of the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament. ... Moses or Moshe (מֹשֶׁה, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew , Syriac ܡܘܫܐ , Arabic موسى , Ethiopic ሙሴ Musse, Latin ), son of Amram (Imran in Arabic) and his wife, Jochebed, a Levite. ...


Moses and Elijah have been interpreted to represent the Law and the Prophets, respectively, recognizing and adoring Jesus, and speaking of how his upcoming death and resurrection would fulfill the Law and the Prophets. Torah (תורה) is a Hebrew word meaning teaching, instruction, or law. ... A prophet is a person who is believed to communicate with God, or with a deity. ...


Peter and John briefly allude to the event in their writings (II Peter 1:16–18, John 1:14).


According to tradition, the event took place on Mount Tabor. Mount Tabor may refer to a number of places: Mount Tabor is a hill in the Holy Land near Nazareth. ...


Christian commemorations of the Transfiguration

Orthodox icon of the Transfiguration
Orthodox icon of the Transfiguration

In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Feast of the Transfiguration commemorates this event. It is one of the twelve Great Feasts in the liturgical year of the Eastern Orthodox Church and is observed by it on August 6. Traditionally, fruit is brought to church to be blessed on this day. The Transfiguration falls during the Dormition Lent, but fish, wine and oil are allowed to be consumed on this day in recognition of the feast. ImageMetadata File history File links Icon_03021_Preobrazhenie_Gospodne. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Icon_03021_Preobrazhenie_Gospodne. ... The Vladimir Icon, one of the most venerated of Orthodox Christian icons of Mary. ... // Great Feasts of the Orthodox Church Easter/Pascha The feast of the Resurrection of Jesus, called Easter or Pascha, is the greatest of the feasts of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... The liturgical year, also known as the Christian year, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in some Christian churches which determines when Feasts, Memorials, Commemorations, and Solemnities are to be observed and which portions of Scripture are to be read. ... August 6 is the 218th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (219th in leap years), with 147 days remaining. ... The Dormition of the Theotokos is the Eastern Orthodox as well as the Eastern Catholic commemoration of the falling asleep or death of Mary, the mother of Jesus. ...


(Information needed on Roman Catholic and Oriental Orthodox observance of the Transfiguration)


In Roman Catholic devotion, the Transfiguration is one of the Luminous Mysteries of the Rosary. Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary Beads The Rosary (from Latin rosarium, crown of roses), an important and traditional devotion of the Catholic Church consisting of a set of prayer beads and a system of set prayers. ...


Protestant churches observe Transfiguration Sunday on the last Sunday after the Epiphany (January 6), which places it somewhere in February or March.


Raphael's Transfiguration (see Transfiguration (Raphael))

The upper part of The Transfiguration (1520) by Raphael, depicting Christ miraculously discoursing with Moses and Elijah
Enlarge
The upper part of The Transfiguration (1520) by Raphael, depicting Christ miraculously discoursing with Moses and Elijah

The Transfiguration (1517–1520) is a painting depicting the event, by Raphael, completed posthumously by Giulio Romano. It is considered to be one of Raphael's greatest works. The painting unusually combines a portrayal of the Transfiguration itself in the upper part with a scene depicting the Apostles trying unsuccessfully to expel a demon from a possessed child. This juxtaposition has been interpreted as a symbolic representation of the concept of divine grace. The philosopher Nietzsche interpreted the painting in his book The Birth of Tragedy as an image of the conflict between Apollonian and Dionysian principles. The Transfiguration is considered the last painting completed by the Italian High Renaissance master Raphael. ... A detail from The Transfiguration by Raphael. ... A detail from The Transfiguration by Raphael. ... This page is about the artist. ... Giulio Romano (ca 1499? – November 1, 1546) was an Italian painter, architect, painter and decorator, the favorite pupil of Raphael, whose legacy Giulio Romano extended, and at the same time one of the inventors of 16th century Mannerism. ... For the twelve apostles chosen by Jesus, see Apostles See also London Arch (formerly London Bridge) Loch Ard Gorge The Gibson Steps The Grotto Categories: Australia geography stubs | Cliffs | Geography of Australia ... St. ... Grace may stand for: // Meaning the ability to move, act, or present oneself in a pleasant manner, especially under difficult or unpleasant conditions. ... Friedrich Nietzsche, 1882 Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 - August 25, 1900) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... The Birth of Tragedy (Die Geburt der Tragödie aus dem Geiste der Musik, 1872) is a 19th Century work of philosophy by Friedrich Nietzsche. ... The Birth of Tragedy (Die Geburt der Tragödie aus dem Geiste der Musik, 1872) is a 19th Century work of philosophy by Friedrich Nietzsche. ... The Birth of Tragedy (Die Geburt der Tragödie aus dem Geiste der Musik, 1872) is a 19th Century work of philosophy by Friedrich Nietzsche. ...


External Links

  • Icons and Mosaics of the Transfiguration
Commons
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Transfiguration

  Results from FactBites:
 
Transfiguration (574 words)
The Transfiguration of Christ is the culminating point of His public life, as His Baptism is its starting point, and His Ascension its end.
Moreover the summits of Hermon are covered with snow as late as June, and even the lesser peaks of 4000 or 5000 feet are likewise snow-covered in February and March, the period of the Transfiguration.
Finally, the ancients judged of the height of mountains by their appearance, and Thabor especially was considered a "high mountain", if not by David and Jeremias, at least by Origen and St. Jerome and the pilgrims who made the ascent.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m