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Encyclopedia > Transatlantic

The term transatlantic refers to something occurring all the way across the Atlantic Ocean. Most often, this refers to the exchange of passengers, cargo, information, or communication between North America and Europe. Look up Transatlantic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Transatlantic crossings

Transatlantic crossings are passages of passengers and cargo between North America and Europe. Prior to the 19th century, transatlantic crossings were undertaken in sailing ships, which was a time of consuming and often perilous journey. Transatlantic crossings became faster, safer, and more reliable with the advent of steamships. Grand ocean liners began making regularly scheduled crossings, and soon it became a symbol of national and company status to build the largest, fastest, and most luxurious ocean liner for transatlantic crossings. Examples of some famous transatlantic liners are the RMS Titanic, SS United States, RMS Queen Mary, SS Normandie, RMS Queen Elizabeth 2, and the RMS Queen Mary 2. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Traditional wooden cutter under sail. ... Paddle steamers - Lucerne-Switzerland Left: original paddlewheel from a paddle steamer on the lake of Lucerne. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Titanic (disambiguation). ... The SS United States (also known as The Big U) is an ocean liner built in 1952 for the United States Lines. ... types/51 sh/sh liner/36 qma/qma. ... The Normandie was a French ocean liner built in Saint-Nazaire France for Compagnie Générale Transatlantique. ... RMS Queen Elizabeth 2 (QE2) is a Cunard Line ocean liner named after the earlier Cunard liner RMS Queen Elizabeth. ... The RMS Queen Mary 2 (QM2) is a Cunard Line ocean liner named after the earlier Cunard liner Queen Mary, which was in turn named after Mary of Teck, the Queen Consort of George V. At the time of her construction in 2003, the QM2 was the longest, widest and...


Transatlantic flights

Main article: Transatlantic flight

Transatlantic flight would eventually surpass ocean liners as the predominant mode of crossing the Atlantic by the late 20th century. In 1919, the American NC-4 became the first airplane to cross the Atlantic (but in multiple stages). Later that year, a British Vickers Vimy piloted by Alcock and Brown made the first non-stop transatlantic flight from Newfoundland to Ireland. In 1921, the British were the first to cross the Atlantic in an airship. In 1927, Charles Lindbergh made the first solo non-stop transatlantic flight in an airplane (between New York City and Paris). The second solo piloting, and the first to carry a passenger, was Clarence Duncan Chamberlin on June 6, 1927. Edward R. Armstrong proposed a string of anchored "seadromes" to refuel planes in a crossing. Transatlantic flight is any flight of an aircraft, whether fixed-wing aircraft, balloon or other device, which involves crossing the Atlantic Ocean -- with a starting point in North America or South America and ending in Europe or Africa, or vice versa. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The NC-4 was the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic Ocean. ... Airplane and Aeroplane redirect here. ... The Vickers Vimy was a British heavy bomber aircraft of the World War I era. ... Statue of Alcock and Brown at London Heathrow Airport. ... Newfoundland —   IPA: [nuw fÉ™n lænd] (French: , Irish: ) is a large island off the east coast of North America, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... USS Akron (ZRS-4) in flight, November 2, 1931 An airship or dirigible is a buoyant lighter-than-air aircraft that can be steered and propelled through the air. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Augustus Lindbergh (4 February 1902 – 26 August 1974), known as Lucky Lindy and The Lone Eagle, was an American pilot famous for the first solo, non-stop flight across the Atlantic, from Roosevelt Field, Long Island to Paris in 1927 in the Spirit of St. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Clarence Duncan Chamberlin (1893-1976) Clarence Duncan Chamberlin (1893-1976) Clarence Duncan Chamberlin (November 11, 1893 – October 30, 1976) was the second man to solo pilot across the Atlantic Ocean, and he was the first to carry a passenger. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Edward Robert Armstrong (1876-1955) and a scale model of his seadrome Edward Robert Armstrong (1876-1955) was a Canadian born engineer and inventor who in 1927 proposed a series of seadromes for airplanes to land on and refuel, for transatlantic flights. ...


The first serious attempt to take a share of the transatlantic passenger market away from the ocean liners was undertaken by Germany. In the 1930s, Germany crossed the Atlantic with Zeppelins that could carry about 60 passengers in relatively the same luxurious style as the ocean liners. However, the Hindenburg disaster in 1937 put an end to transatlantic Zeppelin flights. Beginning in the 1950s, the glory and predominance of ocean liners began to wane when larger and larger passenger airplanes began whisking passengers across the ocean in less and less time. The speed of crossing the ocean became more popular than the style of crossing it. By the 1970s, supersonic Concorde airplanes could cross the Atlantic in under four hours and only one ocean liner remained on the transatlantic route for those who favored the slower style of travel. The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... This is an article about Zeppelin airships. ... LZ 129 Hindenburg was a German zeppelin that was destroyed by fire while landing at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in New Jersey on May 6, 1937. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... For other uses, see Concorde (disambiguation). ...


Transatlantic cables

Transatlantic cables are cables that have been laid along the ocean floor to connect North America and Europe. Before the advent of radio, the only means of communication across the Atlantic Ocean was to physically connect the continents with a transatlantic telegraph cable, which was installed from Valentia, Ireland to Heart's Content, Newfoundland in 1858. The exchange rate between the United States dollar and British pound is still colloquially known as "cable" by financial marketeers on account of the fact the rate of exchange was one of the early uses of the transatlantic cable. [citation needed] Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... The first transatlantic telegraph cable crossed the Atlantic Ocean from Foilhommerum, Valentia Island, in western Ireland to Hearts Content, in eastern Newfoundland. ... Valentia Island (Dairbhre in Irish), is one of Europes westernmost inhabited locations, lying off the Iveragh Peninsula in the southwest of County Kerry in the Republic of Ireland. ... Hearts Content ( NST) an incorporated town in Trinity Bay on the Bay de Verde Peninsula of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ... Newfoundland —   IPA: [nuw fÉ™n lænd] (French: , Irish: ) is a large island off the east coast of North America, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... “USD” redirects here. ... “GBP” redirects here. ...


Transatlantic radio

Transatlantic radio communication was first accomplished on December 12, 1901 by Guglielmo Marconi who, using a temporary receiving station at Signal Hill, Newfoundland, received a Morse code signal representing the letter "S" sent from Poldhu, in Cornwall, United Kingdom. Marconi began the first commercial transatlantic radio service in 1907. Guglielmo Marconi [gue:lmo marko:ni] (25 April 1874 - 20 July 1937) was an Italian inventor of mixed Italian and Irish ethnicity, best known for his development of a radiotelegraph system, which served as the foundation for the establishment of numerous affiliated companies worldwide. ... Signal Hill is a hill which overlooks the city of Saint Johns, Newfoundland and Labrador. ... 1922 Chart of the Morse Code Letters and Numerals Morse code is a method for transmitting telegraphic information, using standardized sequences of short and long elements to represent the letters, numerals, punctuation and special characters of a message. ... Poldhu is a small area in south Cornwall, UK, situated on the Lizard Peninsula it comprises Poldhu Point and Poldhu Cove. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ...


High frequency (HF) transatlantic radio communication was initiated 1927 and the first transatlantic telephone cable TAT-1 was installed in 1955. Satellite technology vastly increased the speed and quality of transatlantic communication, but transatlantic fiber optic cables now carry the vast majority of transatlantic communications traffic. Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A transatlantic telephone cable is a submarine communications cable that carries telephone traffic under the Atlantic Ocean. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Satellite (disambiguation). ... Fiber Optic strands An optical fiber in American English or fibre in British English is a transparent thin fiber for transmitting light. ...


Transatlantic tunnel

Main article: Transatlantic tunnel

The Transatlantic Tunnel is a structure proposed by one of the engineers involved in the construction of the Channel Tunnel beneath the English Channel. It would be a tunnel that spans the Atlantic Ocean between New York City and England. There have been plans to construct such a tunnel, but no major actions toward the production of it. The Transatlantic Tunnel is a structure which would span the Atlantic Ocean between the east coast of the USA and U.K.. Plans for such a tunnel have not progressed beyond the outline concept stage and no companies or governments are actively pursuing such a project. ... Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... The British terminal at Cheriton in west Folkestone, from the Pilgrims Way. ... Satellite view of the English Channel The English Channel (French: , the sleeve) is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that separates the island of Great Britain from northern France and joins the North Sea to the Atlantic. ... A disused railway tunnel now converted to pedestrian and bicycle use, near Houyet, Belgium A tunnel is an underground passage. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


Transatlantic rowing race

Main article: Atlantic Rowing Race

The first East-West Atlantic Rowing Race took place in 1997 from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean. It now runs once every two years or so. The Atlantic Rowing Race is a challenging rowing race from La Gomera in the Canary Islands to Antigua in the West Indies, a distance of approximately 2,550 nm (2,930 statute miles or 4,700 km). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Anthem: Arrorró Capital Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and Santa Cruz de Tenerife Official language(s) Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 13th  7,447 km²  1. ... “West Indian” redirects here. ...


The first West-East 'North' Atlantic Rowing Race took place in 2006 from New York to Falmouth UK. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the state. ... Falmouth (Cornish: Aberfal) is a seaport on the River Fal on the south coast of Cornwall, England, UK. It is both a town and a civil parish. ...


Trivia

Today, some Britons and Americans use the term "crossing the pond" humorously in reference to transatlantic travel.


Transatlantic relations

Through history and culture Europe and North America are deeply connected with each other and this relationship is often referred to as transatlantic. Atlantic derives from Ancient Greek mythology: Altas as one of the Titans at the Rockefeller Center in New York City Transatlantic relations refers to the historic, cultural, political, economic and social relations between countries on both side of the Atlantic Ocean, specifically between the United States, Canada and the countries...


See also

Look up Transatlantic in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Transatlantic flight is any flight of an aircraft, whether fixed-wing aircraft, balloon or other device, which involves crossing the Atlantic Ocean -- with a starting point in North America or South America and ending in Europe or Africa, or vice versa. ... Atlantic derives from Ancient Greek mythology: Altas as one of the Titans at the Rockefeller Center in New York City Transatlantic relations refers to the historic, cultural, political, economic and social relations between countries on both side of the Atlantic Ocean, specifically between the United States, Canada and the countries... This is a list of islands in the Atlantic Ocean. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
North Atlantic Treaty Organisation
  • 2007 Transatlantic Student Essay Contest

  Results from FactBites:
 
transatlantic - definition of transatlantic in Encyclopedia (722 words)
Prior to the 19th century, transatlantic crossings were undertaken in sailing ships, which was a time consuming and often perilous journey.
Transatlantic flights would eventually surpass ocean liners as the predominant mode of crossing the Atlantic by the late 20th century.
Transatlantic radio communication was first accomplished on December 12, 1901 by Guglielmo Marconi who, using a temporary receiving station at Signal Hill, Newfoundland (then a British colony)-- received a Morse code signal representing the letter "S" sent from Poldhu, in Cornwall, England.
Transatlantic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (723 words)
Transatlantic radio communication was first accomplished on December 12, 1901 by Guglielmo Marconi who, using a temporary receiving station at Signal Hill, Newfoundland, received a Morse code signal representing the letter "S" sent from Poldhu, in Cornwall, England.
Transatlantic radio-based communication replaced the transatlantic telegraph in 1927 and the first transatlantic telephone cable was installed in 1955.
Satellite technology vastly increased the speed and quality of transatlantic communication, but transatlantic cables are still in use today, with the more recent being fiber optic cables.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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