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Encyclopedia > Traitor

In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to one's nation. A person who betrays the nation of their citizenship and/or reneges on an oath of loyalty and in some way willfully cooperates with an enemy, is considered to be a traitor. Oran's Dictionary of the Law (1983) defines treason as: "...[a]...citizen's actions to help a foreign government overthrow, make war against, or seriously injure the [parent nation]." It is also generally considered treason to attempt or conspire to overthrow the government. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Law Law topics overview List of areas of law List of legal topics List of legal terms List of jurists List of legal abbreviations List of case law lists List of law firms Further reading Cheyenne Way: Conflict & Case Law in Primitive Jurisprudence, Karl... This page is about the philosophical and semantic background of loyalty. ... One of the most influential doctrines in history is that all humans are divided into groups called nations. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Citizenship is membership in a political community (originally a city but now usually a state), and carries with it rights to political participation; a person having such membership is a citizen. ... War is a state of widespread conflict between states, organisations, or relatively large groups of people, which is characterised by the use of lethal violence between combatants or upon civilians. ...


Traitor may also mean a person who betrays their own party, group, family, and friends.


One person's traitor is another's patriot. In a civil war or insurrection, the winners may deem the losers as traitors. Likewise the term "traitor" is used in heated political discussion — typically as a slur against political dissidents. In certain cases, as with the Nazi Dolchstosslegende, the accusation of treason towards a large group of people can be a unifying political message. A civil war is a war in which the competing parties are segments of the same country or empire. ... Insurrection could refer to: * in a general sense, it means Rebellion * it is also a title of a Star Trek film, see Star Trek: Insurrection ... Slur could mean: A Slur (music) is a symbol in Western musical notation indicating that the notes it embraces are to be played legato (smoothly). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Nazism. ... Magazine title from 1924, example of a propaganda illustration in support of the legend The Dolchstoßlegende or Dolchstosslegende, (German dagger-thrust legend, often translated in English as stab-in-the-back legend) refers to a social mythos and persecution-propaganda and belief among bitter post-World War I German...

Contents


United Kingdom

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with High treason in the United Kingdom. (Discuss)


The British law of treason is entirely statutory and has been so since the Treason Act 1351 (25 Edw. 3 St. 5) c. 2, which is unusual in English Criminal Law. The Act is written in Norman French, but is more commonly cited in its English translation. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Under English, and later British law, high treason is the crime of disloyalty to the Sovereign amounting to an intention to undermine their authority or the actual attempt to do so. ... A statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published. ... The Treason Act 1351 is an Act of the English Parliament which attempted to codify all existing forms of Treason. ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of law that punishes criminals for committing offences against the state. ... The Norman language is a Romance language, one of the Oïl languages. ...


The Treason Act 1351 has since been amended several times, and currently provides for four categories of treasonable offences, namely:

  • "when a man doth compass or imagine the death of our lord the King, or of our lady his Queen or of their eldest son and heir";
  • "if a man do violate the King’s companion, or the King’s eldest daughter unmarried, or the wife of the King’s eldest son and heir";
  • "if a man do levy war against our lord the King in his realm, or be adherent to the King’s enemies in his realm, giving to them aid and comfort in the realm, or elsewhere, and thereof be probably attainted of open deed by the people of their condition"; and
  • "if a man slea the chancellor, treasurer, or the King’s justices of the one bench or the other, justices in eyre, or justices of assise, and all other justices assigned to hear and determine, being in their places, doing their offices".

In addition to the crime of treason, the Treason Felony Act 1848 created various offences known as treason felony. Under the traditional categorisation of offences into treason, felonies and misdemeanours, treason felony was merely another form of felony. While the common law offences of misprision and compounding were abolished in respect of felonies (including treason felony) by the Criminal Law Act 1967, which abolished the distinction between misdemeanour and felony, misprision of treason and compounding of treason are still offences under the common law. A felony, in many common law legal systems, is the term for a very serious crime; misdemeanors are considered to be less serious. ... Misdemeanors are lesser criminal acts which are generally punished less severely than felonies; but more so than infractions. ... Misprision (from O. Fr. ... Misprision of treason is an offence found in many common law jurisdictions, committed by someone who knows a treason is being or is about to be committed but does not report it to a proper authority. ...


During the Second World War, the crime of treachery was created under the Treachery Act 1940, with the death penalty being the mandatory sentence, [1]. Anyone who spied for Germany, committed sabotage or otherwise aided the enemy was liable to be prosecuted for treachery, which was easier to prove than high treason because allegiance to the Crown did not have to be proven. 17 people were hanged for treachery during the war. The Treachery Act 1940 was repealed in England and Wales by the Criminal Law Act 1967. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to ones nation. ... Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the judicially ordered execution of a prisoner as a punishment for a serious crime, often called a capital offense or a capital crime. ... A mandatory sentence is a judicial decision setting the punishment to be inflicted on a person convicted of a crime where judicial discretion is limited by law. ... Spy and secret agent redirect here; for alternate use, see Spy (disambiguation) and Secret agent (disambiguation). ... Sabotage is a deliberate action aimed at weakening an enemy through subversion, obstruction, disruption, and/or destruction. ...


By virtue of the Treason Act 1708, the law of treason in Scotland is the same as the law in England, save that in Scotland counterfeiting the Great Seal of Scotland (the Forgery Act 1830 does not apply to Scotland) and the slaying of the Lords of Session and Lords of Justiciary are adjudged treason. Transport in Scotland Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in Scotland Abbeys and priories in Scotland... The Senators of the College of Justice, also known as the Lords of Council and Session and as the Lords Commissioners of Justiciary, are the judges of the Court of Session and of the High Court of Justiciary in Scotland. ... The Senators of the College of Justice, also known as the Lords of Council and Session and as the Lords Commissioners of Justiciary, are the judges of the Court of Session and of the High Court of Justiciary in Scotland. ...


The penalty for treason was changed to a maximum of imprisonment for life in 1998 under the Crime And Disorder Act. Before 1998, the death penalty was mandatory, subject to the Royal Prerogative of Mercy. William Joyce was the last person to be put to death for treason in 1946. William Joyce (April 24, 1906 – January 3, 1946), known as Lord Haw-Haw was a fascist politician and Nazi propaganda broadcaster to the United Kingdom during World War II. A condemned war-time traitor, he was controversially executed for treason. ...


As to who can commit treason, it depends on the ancient notion of allegiance. As such, British citizens (and British subjects who were Citizens of the United Kingdom and Colonies) wherever they may be owe allegiance to The Queen as do aliens present in the United Kingdom at the time of the treasonable act (except diplomats and foreign invading forces), those who hold a British passport however obtained, and by aliens who - having lived in Britain and gone abroad again - have left behind family and belongings.


History

The Treason Act 1351 formerly distinguished two varieties of treason: high treason and petty treason. High treason was punishable by death; if executed, the traitor's property would escheat to the Crown. Individuals convicted of petty treason surrendered property to their immediate Lord. The murder of one's lawful superior, i.e. a servant killing his master, a wife her husband or anyone his or her prelate, amounted to petty treason. High treason covered acts that constituted a serious threat to the stability or continuity of the state. Under English, and later British law, high treason is the crime of disloyalty to the Sovereign. ... Petty treason is, in English common law, any betrayal of a superior by a subordinate. ... Escheat is an obstruction of the course of descent and the consequent reversion of property to the original grantor. ... Crown names several entities associated with monarchy: A crown (headgear), the headgear worn by a monarch, other high dignitaries, divinities etcetera. ... A lord is a male who has power and authority. ... Servant has a number of meaning: A servant is another word for domestic worker, a person who is hired to provide regular household or other duties, and receives compensation. ... Master is a term that indicates a person from stanton). ... Marriage is a relationship that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ... Husband may refer to: the male spouse in a marriage a husband pillow. ... A prelate is a member of the clergy who either has ordinary jurisdiction over a group of people or ranks in precedence with ordinaries. ... A state is an organized political community occupying a definite territory, having an organized government, and possessing internal and external sovereignty. ...


The fifth category of treasonable offences, namely counterfeiting, was abolished by the Forgery Act 1830. The 1351 Act originally also provided that if new treasonable acts not listed in the Act arose they could be referred to the King and Parliament, who would determine whether the act constituted treason or merely some other felony. 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... An aerial view of Parliament of India at New Delhi. ... A felony, in many common law legal systems, is the term for a very serious crime; misdemeanors are considered to be less serious. ...


The punishment for treason was in former times typically an extended and especially cruel death. This remained unreformed until the 19th century. Previously, any method (in theory) could be legally used to carry out the death penalty —most popular in the middle-ages were hanging, drawing and quartering. The requirement that the body be hung, drawn and quartered was repealed by the Criminal Justice Act 1947 (1947 c.80). Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hanging is a form of execution or a method for suicide. ... Drawing and quartering was part of the penalty anciently ordained in England for treason. ...


A notable treason trial occurred at the Old Bailey in 1916 when Sir Roger Casement was accused of siding with Germany in World War I for his role in the Easter Uprising in Ireland. The charge against him said he tried to encourage Irish soldiers in the British Army to desert and fight for Germany as means of securing Irish freedom. Casement tried to argue that as an Irishman, he was a foreigner and could not be tried in an English court. This argument failed because he had been in the employment of the British Government as a diplomat for almost all of his adult life and had accepted a Knighthood and a pension from the British Government on his retirement in 1911. He was hanged in Pentonville Prison on 3 August 1916 and is regarded as a martyr by the Irish Republican movement to this day. His case is often cited as a classic example of the politically divisive aspect of the crime of treason. 1916 (MCMXVI) is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January-February January 1 -The first successful blood transfusion using blood that had been stored and cooled. ... Sir Roger David Casement (September 1, 1864 - August 3, 1916) was a British diplomat by profession and a poet, Irish revolutionary and nationalist by inclination. ... World War I was primarily a European conflict with many facets: immense human sacrifice, stalemate trench warfare, and the use of new, devastating weapons - tanks, aircraft, machine guns, and poison gas. ... The Easter Rising (Irish: Éirí Amach na Casca) was a militarily unsuccessful rebellion staged in Ireland against British rule on Easter Monday in April 1916. ... The United Kingdom is a unitary state and a democratic constitutional monarchy. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ... A pension is a steady income paid to a person (usually after retirement). ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Pentonville Prison is a prison built in 1842 in North London. ... August 3 is the 215th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (216th in leap years), with 150 days remaining. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January-February January 1 -The first successful blood transfusion using blood that had been stored and cooled. ... Fianna Fáil - The Republican Party (Pronounced fee-na fall.) (English: Soldiers of Destiny) is the largest political party in the Republic of Ireland. ...


The last execution for treason in the United Kingdom was held in 1946. William Joyce (a.k.a. Lord Haw Haw) stood accused of levying war against King George VI by travelling to Germany in the early months of World War II and taking up employment as a broadcaster of pro-Nazi propaganda to British radio audiences. He was awarded a personal commendation by Hitler in 1944 for his contribution to the German war effort. On his capture at the end of the war, Parliament rushed through the Treason Act 1945 (1945 c.44) to facilitate a trial that would have same procedure as a trial for murder. Before the Act, a trial for treason short of regicide involved an elaborate and lengthy medieval procedure. Although Joyce was born in the United States to Irish parents, he had moved to Britain in his teens and applied for a British passport in 1933 which was still valid when he defected to Germany and so under the law he owed allegiance to Britain. He appealed against conviction to the House of Lords on the grounds he had lied about his country of birth on the passport application and did not owe allegiance to any country at the beginning of the war. The appeal was not upheld and he was executed at Wandsworth Prison on 3 January 1946. 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... William Joyce (April 24, 1906 – January 3, 1946), known as Lord Haw-Haw was a fascist politician and Nazi propaganda broadcaster to the United Kingdom during World War II. A condemned war-time traitor, he was controversially executed for treason. ... Lord Haw-Haw was a propaganda radio program broadcast by Nazi German radio to audiences in Britain and Ireland on the mediumwave station Radio Hamburg and by shortwave to the United States. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George) (December 14, 1895 - February 6, 1952) was the third British monarch of the House of Windsor, reigning from December 11, 1936 to February 6, 1952. ... Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Commanders {{{commander1}}} {{{commander2}}} Strength {{{strength1}}} {{{strength2}}} Casualties 37 million Civilians 25 million military World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th century conflict that engulfed much of the globe and is accepted as the largest and deadliest war in... Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945, standard German pronunciation in the IPA) was the Führer (leader) of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party) and of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The broad definition of Regicide is the deliberate killing of a king, or the person responsible for it. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... Wandsworth Prison is a prison in Wandsworth in south London, England. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


It is thought the strength of public feeling against Joyce as a perceived traitor was the driving force behind his prosecution. The only evidence offered at his trial that he began broadcasting from Germany while his British passport was valid was the testimony of a London police inspector who had questioned him before the war while he was an active member of the British Union of Fascists and claimed to have recognised his voice on a propaganda broadcast in the early weeks of the war. The burden of proof on the prosecution in any British trial is usually much higher. The flag of the British Union of Fascists showing the Flash and Circle symbolic of action within unity The British Union of Fascists (BUF) was a political party of the 1930s in the United Kingdom. ...


Later convictions for treason in the UK include Marcus Sarjeant, who fired blank shots at the Queen during the Trooping the Colour ceremony in 1981 and was jailed for five years after he pleaded guilty to a charge under the Treason Act 1842; and Michael Bettaney, who was convicted of treason in 1984 after spying for the Russians and jailed for 23 years. [2] Marcus Sarjeant (born 1964, from Capel le Ferne, near Folkestone, Kent) fired six blank shots at Queen Elizabeth II as she rode down The Mall to the Trooping the Colour ceremony in 1981, when he was aged 17. ... There are a number of uses for the word blank: A blank (archeology) is a thick, shaped stone biface of suitable size and configuration for refining into a stone tool. ... Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born 21 April 1926, is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and... Elizabeth II in uniform as Colonel-in-Chief of the Coldstream Guards at the Trooping of the Colour ceremony. ... Michael Bettany was an officer of MI5 who was convicted at the Old Bailey in 1984 of treason, after spying for the Soviet Union. ... Spy and secret agent redirect here; for alternate use, see Spy (disambiguation) and Secret agent (disambiguation). ...


Treason, along with piracy with violence and arson in royal dockyards, remained one of the last offences in the United Kingdom that attracted the death penalty after it was abolished for murder in 1965. The death penalty for treason and the other remaining offences was finally abolished by Section 36 of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998[3] (1998 c.37). Copyright infringement is the unauthorized use of copyrighted material in a manner that violates one of the copyright owners exclusive rights, such as the right to reproduce or perform the copyrighted work, or to make derivative works that build upon it. ... Arson in royal dockyards was among the last offences that was punishable by execution in the United Kingdom. ... Capital punishment in the United Kingdom, now entirely abolished in all circumstances, has a long history, dating from before the modern United Kingdom actually existed. ... Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted felon as a punishment for a crime (often called a capital offence or a capital crime). ...


On 8 August 2005, it was reported that the UK Government is considering bringing prosecutions for treason against a number of British Islamic clerics who have publicly spoken positively about acts of terrorism against civilians in Britain, or attacks on British soldiers abroad, including the 7 July London bombings and numerous attacks on troops serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. [4] August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... On Thursday, 7 July 2005, a series of four bomb explosions struck Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ...


United States

To avoid the abuses of the English law (including executions by Henry VIII of those who criticized his repeated marriages), treason was specifically defined in the United States Constitution, the only crime so defined. Article Three defines treason as only levying war against the United States or "in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort," and requires the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act or a confession in open court for conviction. This safeguard may not be foolproof since Congress could pass a statute creating treason-like offences with different names (such as sedition, bearing arms against the state, etc.) which do not require the testimony of two witnesses, and have a much wider definition than Article Three treason. For example, some well-known spies have been convicted of espionage rather than treason. In the United States Code the penalty ranges from "shall suffer death" to "shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States." Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Article Three of the United States Constitution establishes the judicial branch of the federal (national) government. ... A congress is a gathering of people, especially a gathering for a political purpose. ... Sedition refers to a legal designation of non-overt conduct that is deemed by a legal authority as being acts of treason, and hence deserving of legal punishment. ... Espionage is the practice of obtaining secrets (spying) from rivals or enemies for military, political, or economic advantage. ... The United States Code (U.S.C.) is a compilation and codification of the general and permanent federal Law of the United States. ...


In the history of the United States there have been fewer than forty federal prosecutions for treason and even fewer convictions. Several men were convicted of treason in connection with the 1794 Whiskey Rebellion but were pardoned by President George Washington. The most famous treason trial, that of Aaron Burr in 1807, resulted in acquittal. Politically motivated attempts to convict opponents of the Jeffersonian Embargo Acts and the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 all failed. Significantly, after the American Civil War, no person involved with the Confederate States of America was charged with treason, and only one major Confederate official — the commandant of the Andersonville prison, who was charged with war crimes — was charged with anything at all. The decision not to prosecute Confederates was mostly due to the words and actions of President Abraham Lincoln, who considered peace and unity more important than vengeance. During the war, Lincoln issued a proclamation of amnesty for Confederates, and in his second inaugural address (1865) pleaded for a reconciliation "with malice toward none, with charity for all." 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Whiskey Rebellion was uprising that had its origins in 1791 and culminated in an insurrection in 1794 in the Monongahela Valley in western Pennsylvania by Appalachian settlers who fought against a federal tax on liquor and distilled drinks. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the successful Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and later became the first President of the United States, an office to which he was elected twice. ... Vice President Aaron Burr Alternate meaning: Rev. ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Fugitive Slave Law or Fugitive Slave Act was passed by the United States Congress on September 18, 1850 as part of the Compromise of 1850 between Southern slaveholding interests and Northern Free-Soilers and abolitionists. ... The American Civil War (1861–1865) was fought in North America within the United States of America, between twenty-four mostly northern states of the Union and the Confederate States of America, a coalition of eleven southern states that declared their independence and claimed the right of secession from the... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans February 4, 1861 until captured... Andersonville is a city located in Sumter County, Georgia. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ...


Several people generally thought of as traitors in the United States, such as the Walker Family and Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, were not prosecuted for treason, but rather for espionage. John Walker Lindh, the "American Taliban" fighter in Afghanistan, was also thought of as a traitor by many. However, instead of being tried for treason, he pleaded guilty to conspiracy to murder US nationals, aiding the Taliban and terrorist offences relating to Al Qaeda, even though he joined the Taliban before September 11, 2001, in the period when the United States was aiding the Taliban to help their destruction of the opium crop. John Anthony Walker Junior, born July 28, 1937, was a Chief Warrant Officer and communications specialist for the U.S. Navy, who sold his services as a spy to the Soviet Union from 1968 to 1985, the height of the Cold War era. ... The Rosenbergs Ethel Greenglass Rosenberg (1915-1953) and Julius Rosenberg (1918-1953) were American Communists who captured and maintained world attention after being tried, convicted, and executed for spying for the Soviet Union. ... Espionage is the practice of obtaining secrets (spying) from rivals or enemies for military, political, or economic advantage. ... John Walker Lindh John Phillip Walker Lindh (born February 9, 1981) is an American citizen who was captured in Afghanistan during the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan while fighting for the Taliban. ... Flag flown by the Taliban. ... Terrorism is the unconventional use of violence for political gain. ... al-Qaeda (Arabic: , al-Qā‘idah; the foundation or the base), a subset of the International Front for Jihad against the Jews and Crusaders, is the name given to an international Islamic fundamentalist campaign comprised of independent and collaborative cells that all profess the same cause of reducing outside influence... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ...


Treason has become largely a wartime phenomenon in the 20th century, and the treason cases of World Wars One and Two were of minor significance. Most states have provisions in their constitutions or statutes similar to those in the U.S. Constitution. There have been only two successful prosecutions for treason on the state level, that of Thomas Dorr in Rhode Island and that of John Brown in Virginia. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... World War I was primarily a European conflict with many facets: immense human sacrifice, stalemate trench warfare, and the use of new, devastating weapons - tanks, aircraft, machine guns, and poison gas. ... Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Commanders {{{commander1}}} {{{commander2}}} Strength {{{strength1}}} {{{strength2}}} Casualties 37 million Civilians 25 million military World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th century conflict that engulfed much of the globe and is accepted as the largest and deadliest war in... Thomas Wilson Dorr was born in 1805 and died in 1854. ... State nickname: The Ocean State, Little Rhody Official languages None Capital Providence Largest city Providence Governor Donald Carcieri (R) Senators Jack Reed (D) Lincoln Chafee (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 50th 4,005 km² 32. ... John Browns Oath Engraving from daguerreotype by Augustus Washington, ca. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Official languages English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 7. ...


In 1964, the anti-Communist activist John A. Stormer wrote a book called None Dare Call It Treason, which unexpectedly sold seven million copies with little or no advertising. The title phrase comes from a 17th-century epigram by John Harington: For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... Communism - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... John A. Stormer is an American Protestant anti-communist writer. ... Sir John Harington, 2nd Baron Harington of Exton Sir John Harington (1561 - November 20, 1612) was known as Queen Elizabeth Is saucy Godson. He was born in Kelston, Somerset, England. ...

"Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
For if it prosper, none dare call it treason."

This phrase refers to treason defined as attempting to overthrow the government. Since its popularization by Stormer, it has been reused and paraphrased many times and has become part of popular culture. Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in any given society. ...


List of convicted or accused traitors, by country

Main article: List of convicted or accused traitors

List of people convicted or accused of treason (This list is by nature highly subjective, even for those convicted of treason. ...

See also

This is a list of notable spies or alleged spies by the country for which they worked. ... Misprision of treason is an offence found in many common law jurisdictions, committed by someone who knows a treason is being or is about to be committed but does not report it to a proper authority. ... Capital punishment in the United Kingdom, now entirely abolished in all circumstances, has a long history, dating from before the modern United Kingdom actually existed. ... Capital punishment in the United States is officially sanctioned by 38 of the 50 states, as well as by the federal government. ...

External links

Look up treason in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
  • British Treason Law [5]

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary logo Wiktionary is a sister project to Wikipedia intended to be a free wiki dictionary (including thesaurus and lexicon) in every language. ...

Further reading

  • Elaine Shannon and Ann Blackman, The Spy Next Door : The Extraordinary Secret Life of Robert Philip Hanssen, The Most Damaging FBI Agent in US History, Little, Brown and Company, 2002, ISBN 0-316-71821-1
  • Ben-Yehuda, Nachman, "Betrayals and Treason. Violations of trust and Loyalty." Westview Press, 2001

  Results from FactBites:
 
Treason - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2078 words)
Likewise the term "traitor" is used in heated political discussion — typically as a slur against political dissidents.
Several people generally thought of as traitors in the United States, such as the Walker Family and Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, were not prosecuted for treason, but rather for espionage.
However, instead of being tried for treason, he pleaded guilty to conspiracy to murder US nationals, aiding the Taliban and terrorist offences relating to Al Qaeda, even though he joined the Taliban before September 11, 2001, in the period when the United States was aiding the Taliban to help their destruction of the opium crop.
Fenris Traitor (110 words)
Fenris Traitor is the sole surviving member of the military Dragon Knights.
Stingray chose to give Traitor a second chance, and it is Stingray's firm belief that the secret of defeating the Boomers lies somewhere within Traitor's clouded memory.
Traitor is a natural athlete and mech pilot, his body honed to near perfection, despite the absence of memory.
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