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Encyclopedia > Train robbery

Train robbery was a crime that occurred mainly in the middle-to-late 19th century. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In a train robbery, the first goal was to steal any money being delivered as cargo. Trains carrying payroll shipments were, for this reason, a major target. These shipments would be guarded by an expressman whose duty it was to protect the cargo of the "express car". Expressmen, conductors, and other personnel took enormous pride in their duty and had no problem with risking their lives for a shipment. Bandits would rely on the expressman to open the safe and provide the goods. Without the combination, it was almost impossible to break into safes. The invention of dynamite made it much easier to break into safes and rob trains, however. In rail transport, a train consists of a single or several connected rail vehicles that are capable of being moved together along a guideway to transport freight or passengers from one place to another along a planned route. ... Cargo is a term used to denotes goods or produce being transported generally for commercial gain, usually on a ship, plane, train or lorry. ... An expressman refers to anyone who has the duty of packing, managing, and ensuring the delivery of any cargo. ... Butch Cassidy, a famous outlaw An outlaw, a person living the lifestyle of outlawry, is most familiar to contemporary readers as a stock character in Western movies. ... A safe is a secure lockable box used for securing valuable objects against theft or damage. ... Dynamite is an explosive based on the explosive potential of nitroglycerin using diatomaceous earth (Kieselguhr) as an absorbent. ...


If the outlaw was unsatisfied with the goods, passengers of the train's carriages (generally unarmed) would be held at gunpoint and made to hand over any valuables they were carrying (usually jewelry or currency). In rail transport, a train consists of a single or several connected rail vehicles that are capable of being moved together along a guideway to transport freight or passengers from one place to another along a planned route. ... Tourists in a vis-a-vis, Prague The classic definition of a carriage is a four-wheeled horse-drawn private passenger vehicle with leaf springs or leather strapping for suspension, whether light, smart and fast or large and comfortable. ... This article is about firearms and similar devices. ... Jewellery (spelled jewelry in American English) consists of ornamental devices worn by persons, typically made with gems and precious metals. ...


Contrary to the method romanticized by Hollywood, outlaws never jumped from horseback onto a moving train. Usually, they would either board the train and wait for a good time to initiate the heist, or they would stop / derail the train and then begin the holdup. Robbery is the crime of seizing property through violence or intimidation. ...


Famous train robbers include Bill Miner, Jesse James and Butch Cassidy. (more needed) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... This article is about Jesse James, the outlaw. ... Butch Cassidy (April 13, 1866 - 1908?), American outlaw, was born Robert Leroy Parker in Beaver, Utah, the oldest of thirteen children born to Mormon pioneers from England. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Train robbery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (254 words)
Train robbery was a type of robbery, where the first goal was to steal any money being delivered as cargo on trains.
Trains carrying payroll shipments were for this reason a major target.
If the outlaw was unsatisfied with the goods, passengers of the train's carriages who would be generally unarmed would be held at gunpoint and made to hand over any valuables they were carrying, usually in the form of jewelry or currency.
Great Train Robbery (1963) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (906 words)
The Great Train Robbery was the name given to a £2.3 million train robbery committed on 8 August 1963 at Bridego Railway Bridge, Ledburn near Mentmore in Buckinghamshire, England.
Although no guns were used in the robbery, the train driver, Jack Mills, was hit on the head with an iron bar, causing a fl eye and facial bruising.
The robbery was investigated by Detective Chief Superintendent Jack Slipper of the Metropolitan Police (widely known in the press as "Slipper of the Yard"), who became so involved with its aftermath that he continued to hunt down many of the escaped robbers in retirement.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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