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Encyclopedia > Trail
A country trail in Slovenia.
A country trail in Slovenia.
A mountain trail.
A mountain trail.

A trail is a pedestrian path or road mainly used for walking, but often also for cycling, cross-country skiing or other activities. Some trails are off-limits to everyone other than hikers, and few trails allow motorized vehicles. Look up footpath in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links An image of a trail from Slovenia. ... Image File history File links An image of a trail from Slovenia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 5659 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Trail Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 5659 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Trail Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Look up path in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... An animated demonstration of a six-legged insect walking. ... Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a recreation, a sport and a means of transport across land. ... Cross-country skiing (also known as XC skiing) is a winter sport popular in many countries with large snowfields, primarily Northern Europe and Canada. ... Many beautiful natural scenes are only accessible if one is willing to hike to get to them. ... The Trikke is a Human Powered Vehicle (HPV) This article is about the means of transport. ...

Contents

Nomenclature

In the United States, the word footpath is also used to mean a trail; however in Australian English, New Zealand English, Indian English, and Irish English this word means "sidewalk" (American English) or "pavement" (British English). Australian English (AuE) is the form of the English language used in Australia. ... New Zealand English (NZE) is the English spoken in New Zealand. ... It has been suggested that Regional_differences_and_dialects_in_Indian_English be merged into this article or section. ... Hiberno-English is the form of the English language used in Ireland. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... British English (BrE) is a broad term used to distinguish the forms of the English language used in Britain from forms used elsewhere. ...


In Australia, the word track can be used interchangeably with trail, and can refer to anything from a dirt road to a pedestrian walkway (generally also unpaved). The term "trail" gained popularity during World War II, when many servicemen from the United States were stationed in Australia, which probably influenced its being adopted by elements of the Australian media at the time (see Kokoda Track). In New Zealand, the word track is used almost exclusively except in reference to cross-country skiing, where trail is used. Dirt road is a common term for an unpaved road. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... The monument at Owers Corner Location of the Kokoda Track within Papua New Guinea The Kokoda Track or Kokoda Trail is a single-file track which starts at Owers Corner 50 km east of Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea and runs 96 km overland (60 km as... Cross-country skiing (also known as XC skiing) is a winter sport popular in many countries with large snowfields, primarily Northern Europe and Canada. ...


In Norway they call it "Sti". "Sti" is also a normal name for a boy who looks like a bear.


Trail types and use

Walking trails

The Sendero de los quetzales in Panamá
The Sendero de los quetzales in Panamá

Trail use has become very popular for a wide variety of users. Some trails are designated as nature trails, and are used by people learning about the natural world. Many trails are designated day trails, meaning that they are generally used by people out for a short hike, less than a day. Some trails are designated backpacking trails, or long-distance trails, and are used by both day hikers and by backpackers. Some of the trails are over a thousand miles (1,500 km) long and may be hiked in sections by backpackers, or completed in one trip by dedicated hikers. Some trails are specifically used by other outdoor enthusiasts to gain access to another feature, such as good climbing sites. Many runners also favor running on trails rather than pavement, as giving a more vigorous work-out and better developing agility skills, as well as providing a more pleasant exercise environment. See trail running. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1136x852, 306 KB) The Sendero de los Quetzales, through Parque Nacional Volcán Barú, Panamá towards the western end. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1136x852, 306 KB) The Sendero de los Quetzales, through Parque Nacional Volcán Barú, Panamá towards the western end. ... Panama (Spanish: Panamá) is the southernmost country of Central America. ... Long-distance trails (or long-distance tracks, paths, footpaths or greenways) are trails or footpaths covering large distances, typically 50 kilometers (31 miles) or more, used for rambling (that is, hiking or backpacking). ... Two hikers in the Mount Hood National Forest Eagle Creek hiking Hiking is a form of walking, undertaken with the specific purpose of exploring and enjoying the scenery. ... Backpacking in the Grand Teton National Park, United States Backpacking (also tramping or trekking or bushwalking in some countries) combines hiking and camping in a single trip. ... Rock climbers on Valkyrie at The Roaches in Staffordshire, England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Backbone Trail, Santa Monica Mountains, Southern California. ...


Stairway Trails

Stairway is another way to ascend higher slopes. Stairway trails are usually for walking only. The stairs are constructed using cuts in dirt, rocks or concrete. Popular stair way trails include Stairway Trails in Bernal Heights East - San Francisco, Stairs at many hill top Hindu temple (Tirumala, Palani) used during Pilgrimage & Machu Picchu. Spiral (double helix) stairway in the Vatican Museum Stairs, staircase, stairway, stairwell, and flight of stairs are all names for a construction designed to bridge a large vertical distance by dividing it into smaller vertical distances, called steps. ... The Bernal Heights neighborhood, familiarly called Bernal, lies to the south of San Franciscos Mission District. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Bedugul Hindu temple in Bali, Indonesia A Hindu temple, is a house of worship for followers of Hinduism. ... Tirumala (తిరుమల), the abode of the Hindu God Lord Venkateswara, is situated on a very ancient ridge of mountains in a southern district of Andhra Pradesh. ... It is one of the most famous Murugan temples in India. ... For other uses, see Pilgrimage (disambiguation). ... Machu Picchu (Quechua: Machu Piqchu Old Peak; sometimes called the Lost City of the Incas) is a well-preserved pre-Columbian Inca ruin located at 2,430 m (7,970 ft)[1] on a mountain ridge. ...


Bicycle trails

Recent decades have seen an explosion of interest in cycling, both street-type and off-road type. Many graded, surfaced bike paths have been built, but especially popular is the off-road, or mountain biking. A common term for these facilities is simply "bike trail". These trails may be built to a different set of standards than foot trails, requiring more stable, harder surfaces, less strenuous grades, longer sight visibility, and less sharp changes in direction. On the other hand, the cross-slope of a bike trail may be significantly greater than a foot trail, and the actual treadway may be narrower in some cases. Cycling is a recreation, a transport across land. ... Offroad cycling is a sport where bicycles (and unicycles!) are ridden outside of standard grounds, for example on narrow mountain trails. ... This article or section should include material from Cycle path debate Segregated cycle facilities may consist of a separate road, track, path or lane that is designated for use by cyclists and from which motorised traffic is generally excluded. ... Mountain biker riding in the Arizona desert. ... A grade (or gradient) is the pitch of a slope, and is often expressed as a percent tangent, or rise over run. It is used to express the steepness of slope on a hill, roof, or road, where zero indicates level (with respect to gravity) and increasing numbers correlate to...


A particular offshoot of trail biking is downhilling, which can be environmentally destructive if not well-managed. Downhilling is particularly popular at ski resorts such as Mammoth Mountain in California or Whistler in British Columbia, where ski lifts are used to get bikes and riders to the top of the mountain. Downhill cycling (DH) is a gravity-assisted time trial mountain biking event. ...


Because of the greater need for more gradual grades, changing elevations may involve sidehill trails with multiple switchbacks, while these may not be necessary for hikers. In cases where hikers use these bike trails, attention must be paid to the potential of cutting across switchbacks.


Where bike trails intersect with pedestrian or equestrian trails, signage at the intersections is important, and high visibility onto the intersecting trails must be a priority in order to prevent collisions between fast-moving cyclists and slower moving hikers and horses. Bicycles and horses should be allowed on the same trails where the trail is wide enough with good visibility.


A well designed bike trail will have an average grade of less than 10%, and will generally follow a countour line, rather than straight downhill. The trail should slope out or across the trail 3-5% downhill to encourage water to run off the side, rather than down the trail bed. In addition, frequesnt grade reversals also prevent water from running down the trail, make the trail more fun and interesting to ride, and generally help keep bike speeds down, providing a more safe trail experience for all users.


The International Mountain Bicycling Association is an excellent resource on trail system design, trail building and maintenance. The International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA) is a non-profit educational association whose mission is to create, enhance and preserve trail opportunities for mountain bikers worldwide. ...


Equestrian trails

Horseback riding has continued to be a popular activity for many trail users. Again, horse trails must be built to different standards than other trails. Sight distance is an important issue with horse trails, as is overhead and side clearance. While trail surface types are a relatively insignificant issue with hikers, they may be an important issue with horses. Horses can negotiate much steeper terrain on a dirt trail, for instance, than on a gravel trail. Horses can usually negotiate much the same grades as hikers, but not always, although they can more easily clear obstacles in the path such as logs. A hard trail surface and drainage is a critically important issue on horse trails because of the relatively greater bearing impact of the horse's hoof on the trail than a hiker's foot. horse, see Horse (disambiguation). ...


Cross-country skiing

In cross-country skiing, a trail (also called a 'track' or 'piste') refers to the parallel grooves cut into the snow, one for each ski. Cross-country skiing (also known as XC skiing) is a winter sport popular in many countries with large snowfields, primarily Northern Europe and Canada. ... Animation of snowcover changing with the seasons Snow is precipitation in the form of crystalline water ice, consisting of a multitude of snowflakes that fall from clouds. ... A shaped, twin-tip alpine ski. ...


Motorized trails

A country trail created by vehicle tiremarks in Butte County, South Dakota
A country trail created by vehicle tiremarks in Butte County, South Dakota

Motorized trail use also remains very popular with some people. Such terms as ORV, four-wheeling, all-terrain vehicle, and others actually have highly specific meanings. In the United States, this group of people have a very strong political lobby. The Recreational Trail Program defined as part of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA, pronounced "ice tea", IPA ɑɪs ti/, ) of 1991 mandates that states must use a minimum of 30 percent of these funds for motorized trail uses. Image File history File links Tiremarks heading towards Deers Ears in South Dakota. ... Image File history File links Tiremarks heading towards Deers Ears in South Dakota. ... Butte County is a county located in the state of South Dakota. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,163 sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) is an assistance program of the United States Department of Transportations Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). ... The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (Public Law 102-240) (ISTEA, pronounced Ice-Tea) posed a major change to transportation planning and policy, as the first US federal legislation on the subject in the post-Interstate Highway System era. ... Not to be confused with the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Urban and suburban trails

Though the term trail conjures up images of a well-beaten path in a woodland setting, more and more frequently, the term is coming to refer to any sort transportation route designed for non-automobile traffic. For example, a trend sweeping Northern America, especially in the rural Northeast, is the conversion of abandoned railways into rail trails. Examples include the Ashuwillticook Rail Trail in Berkshire County and the Northern RailTrail of New Hampshire. Though these wide, often paved pathways could have easily been used as roads, their focus on recreational use for pedestrians and cyclists is what sets them apart as trails. Limber Pine woodland, Toiyabe Range, central Nevada Biologically, a woodland is a treed area differentiated from a forest. ... Northern America is a name for the parts of North America besides Mexico when Mexico is considered as Latin America. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Rail trails are former railway lines that have been converted to paths designed for pedestrian, bicycle, skating, equestrian, and/or light motorized traffic. ... The Ashuwillticook Rail Trail is a former railroad corridor converted into a 10-foot wide paved universally accessible path. ... Berkshire County is a county located in the U.S. state of Massachusetts. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ...


In Northern America, where urban sprawl has begun to strike even the most rural communities, developers and local leaders are currently striving to make their communities more conducive to non-motorized transportation through the use of less traditional "trails." The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has established the Active Living by Design program to improve the livability of communities in part through the trails, both in a more traditional sense, as is being done by the Upper Valley Trails Alliance or in the broader, as is being done by Groundwork Somerville. Urban sprawl (also: suburban sprawl), a term with pejorative implication, refers to the unplanned, rapid and expansive growth of a greater metropolitan area, traditionally suburbs (or exurbs) over a large area. ... The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is one of the worlds largest philanthropic organizations. ... Active Living by Design (ALbD) is a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation [1] that was established in 1998. ... The well-being or quality of life of a population is an important concern in economics and political science. ... The Upper Valley Trails Alliance, or UVTA, is a non-profit trails organization, based in Norwich, Vermont and serving the towns of the Upper Connecticut River Valley. ...


Another type of trail that was quite popular in the 1970s and 1980s but is less popular today is the exercise trail (also known as trim trail), which combines running with exercise stations. Template:A year The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... The 1980s refers to the years of and between 1980 and 1989. ... Assault course (also called trim trail) is a special sort of trail that combines running and exercising. ...


The term trail has also been used by developers and urban planners for a variety of modern paved roads, highways, and boulevards. A particularly unusual use of the term is in the province of Alberta, Canada, which has multi-lane freeways called "trails." This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Highway in Pennsylvania, USA The Pan-American Highway, in the Peruvian town of Máncora, where it serves as the main street. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Motto: Fortis et liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English (see below) Flower   Wild rose Tree Lodgepole Pine Bird Great Horned Owl Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ed Stelmach (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of total... The word lane has two meanings: a portion of a paved roadway which is intended for a single line of vehicles and is marked by white or yellow lines. ... Interstate 80 (Eastshore Freeway) in Berkeley, a typical American freeway (MUTCD definition) A freeway is a type of highway that is designed for safer high-speed operation of motor vehicles through the elimination of at-grade intersections. ...


Trail administration

In 1968, the United States created its National Trails System, which includes National Scenic Trails, National Historic Trails and National Recreation Trails. Image File history File links Wiki_letter_w. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... The National Trails System was created by an act of Congress in 1968. ... National Scenic Trail is a designation for protected areas in the United States that consist of trails of particular natural beauty. ... National Historic Trail is a designation for a protected area in the United States containing historic trails and surrounding areas. ... -1...


The rules and requlations for a trail are written and enforced by the land management agency in charge of the trail. A trail may be completely contained within one administration (e.g. a State Park) or it may pass through multiple administrations, leading to a confusing array of regulations, allowing dogs or mountain bikes in one segment but not in another, or requiring Wilderness Permits for a portion of the trail, but not everywhere.


In the United States agencies administering trails include the National Park Service, the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, State Park systems, County Parks, cities, private organizations such as land trusts, businesses and individual property owners. The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... The USDA Forest Service, a United States government agency within the United States Department of Agriculture, is under the leadership of the United States Secretary of Agriculture. ... US BLM logo The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is an agency within the United States Department of the Interior which administers Americas public lands, totaling approximately 261 million surface acres (1,056,229. ...


New trail construction by an agency must often be assessed for its environmental impact and conformance with State or Federal laws. For example, in California new trails must undergo reviews specified by the California Environmental Quality Act CEQA[1]. The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) is a California law (California Public Resources Code section 21000 et seq. ...


In the British Isles many trails and footpaths are of ancient origin and are protected under law as rights of way. Location of the British Isles The British Isles are a group of islands off the north west coast of continental Europe comprising Great Britain, Ireland and a number of smaller islands. ... In the United Kingdom, rights of way are paths on which the public have a legally-protected right to travel. ...


Trail construction

A walking path.
A walking path.

While many trails have arisen through common usage, quality trail design and construction is a complex process requiring certain sets of skills. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 1126 KB) A trail in the hills above Berkeley, California. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 1126 KB) A trail in the hills above Berkeley, California. ...


When a trail passes across a flat area that is not wet, often all that is required is to clear brush, tree limbs and undergrowth to produce a clear, walkable trail. When crossing streams, bridges may or may not be desirable, depending on the size of the stream and the depth of its banks. In wet areas, it may be necessary to create an elevated trailway with fill or by building a boardwalk. One problem with boardwalks is that they require frequent maintenance and replacement - boards in poor condition are often slippery and hazardous. A log bridge in the French Alps near Vallorcine. ... Photograph of the boardwalk in Atlantic City, NJ, USA, taken August 2003. ...


Trails on slopes

A common mistake in establishing trails is to make them on slopes that are too steep for comfort and the environment. Such steep trails generally result in serious erosion, a wide swath of impacted area as walkers go to the sides to find better footing, and the inability of many hikers to walk the trail. An absolute limit for trail grades is a grade of one in six, and a more practical limit is a slope of one in eight. Trails that ascend steep slopes may use switchbacks (also called hairpins), but switchback design and construction is a specialized topic that takes great care. The best trail designs eliminate switchbacks. A grade (or gradient) is the pitch of a slope, and is often expressed as a percent tangent, or rise over run. It is used to express the steepness of slope on a hill, roof, or road, where zero indicates level (with respect to gravity) and increasing numbers correlate to... Road D2204 ascends to the Col de Brauss using hairpin bends in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur in the French Alps. ...


If a trail is being made to be accessible to off-road wheelchairs, the grade should be no more than one in ten. If a paved trail has to be accessible to all wheelchairs, the grade must be no more than one in twelve, with periodic level pull-offs. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A wheelchair is a wheeled mobility device in which the user sits. ...


The off-slope, or side-slope, of the trail also must be considered. This is the slope of the trail from side to side, and should never be more than one in twelve. Side-sloped trails are prone to gullying. Ideally, the treadway of the trail should be almost, but not quite, level in cross-section. Gully in El Paso County, Colorado, USA. A gully is a landform created by running water eroding sharply into a hillside. ...


Achieving the proper slope in hilly terrain usually requires the excavation of sidehill trail. This is trailway that is constructed by establishing a line of suitable slope across a hillside, then digging out by means of a mattock or similar tool to create the trail. This may be a full-bench trail, where the treadway is only on the firm ground surface after the overlying soil is removed and thrown to the side as waste, or a half-bench trail, where soil is removed and packed to the side so that the treadway is half on firm old ground and half on new packed fill. In problem areas, it may be necessary to establish the trail entirely on fill. In cases where filling is used, it's necessary to pack it firmly and to revisit the site periodically to add to the fill and repack it until fully stable. A mattock in use to dig out a burrowing pit. ...


Drainage

An important and often-overlooked factor in trail construction is that of drainage. Where a trail is near the top of a hill or ridge, this is usually a minor issue, but when it is farther down it can become a very major issue. Trails, by their nature, tend to become drainage channels and eventually gullies if the drainage is not properly controlled. Drainage is the natural or artificial removal of surface and sub-surface water from a given area. ...

A waterbar in New York's Catskill Mountains. The trail forks right; the drainage ditch to the left.
A waterbar in New York's Catskill Mountains. The trail forks right; the drainage ditch to the left.

In areas of heavy water flow along a trail, it may be necessary to create a ditch on the uphill side of the trail with drainage points across the trail. The cross-drainage may be accomplished by means of culverts, which must be cleared on a semi-annual basis, or by means of cross-channels, often created by placing logs or timbers across the trail in a downhill direction, called "thank-you-marms", "deadmen", or waterbars. Using timbers or rocks for this purpose also creates erosion barriers. Rock paving in the bottom of these channels and in the trailside ditches may help to maintain stability of these. Ideally, waterbars should be created, with or without ditching, at major points of water flow on or along the trail, and in conjunction, if possible, with existing drainage channels below the trail. Another important technique is to create coweeta dips, or drain dips, points on the trail where it falls briefly (for a metre or so) and then rises again. These provide positive drainage points that are almost never clogged by debris. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (881x1076, 320 KB) Summary Photographed by Daniel Case on the Escarpment Trail in the Catskills, 2005-08-03 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (881x1076, 320 KB) Summary Photographed by Daniel Case on the Escarpment Trail in the Catskills, 2005-08-03 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of... A waterbar in the Catskills. ... NY redirects here. ... Catskill Escarpment and Blackhead Range as seen from Overlook Mountain The Catskill Mountains (also known as simply the Catskills), a natural area in New York State northwest of New York City and southwest of Albany, are not, despite their popular name, true geological mountains, but rather a mature dissected plateau... A culvert is a flowing body of water which passes underneath a road, railway, or embankment, or the part thereof that does so. ... A waterbar in the Catskills. ... Severe soil erosion in a wheat field near Washington State University, USA. For erosion as understood by materials science, see Erosion (materials science) For erosion as an English analogy, see Erosion (figurative) For erosion as an operation of Mathematical morphology, see Erosion (morphology) Erosion is the displacement of solids (soil...


Multi-use trails

Trails intended for use by bicycles, wheelchairs and pedestrians will often be surfaced, especially in heavily-used or urban areas. This can be asphalt paving, or compressed stone dust. Such trails will also have well-built bridges with a supported deck and side rails. Base layer of asphalt concrete in a road under construction. ...


There has been a major effort to convert abandoned railroad grades to bike paths or multi-use paths. This has been termed "rails-to-trails". This article or section should include material from Cycle path debate Segregated cycle facilities may consist of a separate road, track, path or lane that is designated for use by cyclists and from which motorised traffic is generally excluded. ... Railbanking is the practice of preserving railroad rights-of-way by using them as multi-use trails. ...


Signage

The most common symbols used in trail blazing
The most common symbols used in trail blazing
Main article: Trail blazing

For long-distance trails, or trails where there is any possibility of anyone taking a wrong turn, blazing or signage should be provided. This may be accomplished by using either paint on natural surfaces or by placing pre-made medallions. Horseshoe-shaped blazes are good for bridle trails (but be sure to have the "u" of the horseshoe opening to the top, or you'll offend some riders!). The Appalachian Trail is blazed with white rectangles. Blue is often used for side trails. European walking paths are blazed with yellow points encircled with red. However, other walking paths in European countries are blazed in a variety of manners.  ©  This image is copyrighted. ...  ©  This image is copyrighted. ... Typical painted blaze in Mt. ... Typical painted blaze in Mt. ... The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, generally known as the Appalachian Trail or simply The A.T., is a 2,174-mile (3,500-km)[2] marked hiking trail in the eastern United States, extending between Springer Mountain in Georgia and Mount Katahdin in Maine. ... The European long-distance paths are a network of extremely long distance footpaths across Europe. ...


Maintenance

Natural surface, single track trails will require some ongoing maintenance. However, if the trail is properly designed and constructed, maintenance should be limited to clearing downed trees and trimming back brush. If the trail is properly designed, there should be no need for major rework such as grading or erosion control efforts.


See also

Long-distance trails (or long-distance tracks, paths, footpaths or greenways) are trails or footpaths covering large distances, typically 50 kilometers (31 miles) or more, used for rambling (that is, hiking or backpacking). ... Rail trails are former railway lines that have been converted to paths designed for pedestrian, bicycle, skating, equestrian, and/or light motorized traffic. ... Segregated cycle facilities may consist of a separate road, track, path or lane that is designated for use by cyclists and from which motorised traffic is generally excluded. ... In the United Kingdom, rights of way are paths on which the public have a legally-protected right to travel. ... Desire Lines (di. ... Kokoda Track Conflict World War II, Pacific War Date July 1942 – January 1943 Place New Guinea Result Australian victory The Kokoda Track or Kokoda Trail campaign was part of the Pacific War of World War II. The campaign consisted of a series of battles fought from July 1942 to... Major highways of the Inca Empire For the Frank Zappa song, see Inca Roads Among the many roads and trails constructed in pre-Columbian South America, the Inca road system (El Camino Inca) of Peru was the most extensive. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Trail

  Results from FactBites:
 
Appalachian Trail Home Page - Appalachian Trail (291 words)
Many trace the origins of the Trail to a 1921 article by Benton MacKaye entitled An Appalachian Trail: A Project in Regional Planning.
The A.T. State by State includes chart of state high points along the trail.
The Appalachian Trail Conservancy (formerly Conference) FAQ and Information about the Trust for Appalachian Trail Lands
Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge Trail Page (1028 words)
The trail entrance is adjacent to the Bluff Lake levee near the spillway and is marked with a large sign.
This trail is located at the north end of the Bluff Lake levee and across from the parking area near the sign for the Trail of Big Trees.
This trail is wheelchair accessible, and the visitor may see a variety of plants and animals including giant blue stem, bald eagles, Indian grass, white-tailed deer, and various species of waterfowl.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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