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Encyclopedia > Toyman
Toyman


The Toyman versus Superman, from the cover of Action Comics #64. Art by Joe Shuster. Image File history File links Supesvstoyman. ... Joseph Joe Shuster (July 10, 1914 - July 30, 1992) was a Canadian-born comic book artist best known for co-creating the DC Comics character Superman, with writer Jerry Siegel, first published in Action Comics #1 (March 1938). ...

Publisher DC Comics
First appearance Action Comics #64, September 1943
Created by Jerry Siegel
Joe Shuster
Characteristics
Alter ego Winslow Schott
Team
affiliations
Superman Revenge Squad
Abilities Mechanical genius manifests in the form of many violent, destructive and dangerous toys.

The Toyman is a fictional comic book supervillain in the DC Comics universe and an enemy of Superman. He first appeared in Action Comics #64 (September 1943). His traditional identity is Winslow Schott, although several others have taken the name "Toyman" over the years. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jerome Jerry Siegel a. ... Joseph Joe Shuster (July 10, 1914 - July 30, 1992) was a Canadian-born comic book artist best known for co-creating the DC Comics character Superman, with writer Jerry Siegel, first published in Action Comics #1 (March 1938). ... The Superman Revenge Squad was an organization in DC Comics. ... A genius is a person of great intelligence. ... FicTioNaL is a Gaming Legend. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Toyman uses toy-based or toy-themed devices and gimmicks in his various crimes. The Toyman's weapons, while sometimes comical, are also very dangerous. The Toyman's creations include devices such as life-sized wind-up tanks, acid-spraying water pistols, and toy soldiers that carry real guns. The Toyman usually dresses in a flamboyant costume. Overall, despite the threat he poses, his modus operandi makes him a less terrifying villain compared to such foes as Lex Luthor. The Toyman made frequent appearances in the Golden Age comics, but has appeared infrequently in Superman stories since then. A squirt gun (or water pistol) is a type of toy designed to shoot water. ... 54mm Toy Soldiers by Imperial Productions of New Zealand A toy soldier is a miniature figurine that represents a soldier. ... This article is about the video game. ... Modus operandi (often used in the abbreviated form MO) is a Latin phrase, approximately translated as mode of operation. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and a prominent member of Supermans rogues gallery. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ...

Contents

Winslow Schott

As noted above, the Toyman first appeared in 1943 and appears in many Golden Age Superman comics. He appears less frequently in comics published after the early 1950s, but still remains a semi-regular foe during the 60s, 70s, and 80s. Superman, the catalyst of the Golden Age, from Superman #14, January-February 1942. ...


After 1985's miniseries Crisis on Infinite Earths and John Byrne's Man of Steel miniseries, the Toyman makes his revised, post-Crisis debut in Superman vol. 2 #13 (January 1988). In this version, Winslow Schott is an unemployed British toymaker who blames Lex Luthor and his company, LexCorp, for being fired from the toy company he is working for, and uses his toymaking talents to seek revenge, which eventually causes him to cross paths with the British hero Godiva, and subsequently, Superman himself. The Toyman continues to commit various crimes in Metropolis, including engaging in child abduction. This article is about the year. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... For other uses of John Byrne, see John Byrne (disambiguation). ... Man of Steel may refer to: The Man of Steel, a common nickname for Superman Joseph Stalins last name, roughly translated into English This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and a prominent member of Supermans rogues gallery. ... Lex Luthor is a DC Comics supervillain and archenemy of Superman. ... Godiva is the name of a DC Comics character. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Metropolis Skyline, as seen in Smallville. ... Child abduction is the abduction or kidnapping of a child (or baby) by an older person. ...


The Toyman later became a much more sinister figure, shaving his head and getting advice from "Mother" (probably just a voice in his head, but possibly something more). Apparently this is prompted by being told that a range of Superman action figures would not include him as he is not "edgy" enough. While this seems to begin as a pose of what he thought people expect of a villain, it rapidly became a genuine psychotic break. While in this state he murders the son of Daily Planet reporter Cat Grant ("You were a bad mommy. I'm glad I killed your son."). He also develops a hatred of children, blaming them for not appreciating his toys. Zarbon action figure from Dragon Ball Z made by Bandai An action figure is a posable plastic figurine of a character, often from a movie, comic book, video game, or television program. ... The Daily Planet is a fictional broadsheet newspaper that appears in Superman stories published by DC Comics. ... Cat Grant is a fictional character in Superman comics. ...


The Toyman later seemingly recovers, and Superman shows him that children did appreciate old-fashioned toys, arranging parole in an orphanage; it is later revealed, however, that this is all a hallucination, caused when Zatanna attempts to cure him, and he has, in fact, returned to child abduction. // An orphanage is an institution or asylum for the care of a child bereaved of both father and mother; sometimes, also, a child who has but one parent living. ... A hallucination is a perception in the absence of a stimulus that the person may or may not believe is real. ... Zatanna Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ...


In the 1997 Speed Force Special, the Max Mercury story "Child's Play", set in 19th century New York, features the Schott Toy Company run by Archimedes Schott, a crooked businessman who resembles Winslow. Any relationship between them is unknown. Winslow was last seen in the Infinite Crisis: Villains United special, preparing for the Blackgate Prison break by lacing the dinner stew with Venom and Velocity 9 to increase the prisoners' strength and speed. Unfortunatately, some guards also ate the stew and fought the super-heroes who showed up to stop the criminals. Max Mercury is the name of a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... This article is about the state. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Villains United is a six-issue comic book limited series, written by Gail Simone with art by Dale Eaglesham and Wade von Grawbadger, published by DC Comics in 2005. ... The Black Gate was added to Newcastle Castle between 1247 and 1250, forming an additional barbican. ... This is a list of fictional performance enhancers, serums, trigger chemicals, booster drugs, and mutagenic foods in the various comic book universes, that were used to give a specific hero or villain their powers. ... This is a list of fictional performance enhancers, serums, trigger chemicals, booster drugs, and mutagenic foods in the various comic book universes, that were used to give a specific hero or villain their powers. ...


Jack Nimball

In the 1970s, a man named Jack Nimball assumes the identity of the second Toyman during a period in which Schott retires from his criminal career. Nimball, who first appears in Action Comics #432 (February 1974), wore a jester costume and uses a similar modus operandi to the original Toyman. However, this version of the Toyman proves short-lived, with Schott killing Nimball and resuming his crime career in Superman vol. 1 #305. He is also the Toyman who appears in Challenge of the Superfriends. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... For other uses of Jester, see Jester (disambiguation). ...


Hiro Okamura

Hiro Okamura, (do not confuse with Hiro Nakamura) is a teenage mechanical genius from Japan first appears as Toyman in Superman #177 (February 2002). He targets Metallo, claiming the cyborg's body was based on a material stolen from his grandfather. Hiro Nakamura ) is a fictional character on the NBC drama Heroes who possesses the ability to teleport, stop time, and travel through time by manipulating the space-time continuum. ... Metallo is a fictional supervillain and cyborg who appears in Superman stories published by DC Comics. ...


He later becomes ally to Superman and Batman. In the Superman/Batman series, he aids the two in destroying a kryptonite meteor that threatens the Earth (Superman/Batman # 1-6). He strikes a deal with Batman to provide him with various technological implements (Superman/Batman # 7). Okamura uses more technologically advanced devices than the traditionally-constructed contrivances Schott uses and his work is largely whimsical in nature. Many of his inventions are inspired by anime and manga, including giant mecha (notably his giant Composite Batman-Superman robot). Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Superman/Batman is a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics that features the publishers two most popular characters: Superman and Batman. ... This article is about the fictional substance. ... “Animé” redirects here. ... This article is about the comics published in East Asian countries. ... This article is about the term used in science fiction, anime, and manga. ...


Okamura appears only a few times in the Superman/Batman comic book, and his activities are limited to Japan. Winslow Schott remains active as the Toyman in the United States. In the Sam Loeb-penned memorial issue Superman/Batman #26, Okamura fakes his own kidnapping at the hands of Schott, forcing Superboy and Robin to search through his complex to save his life. Realizing his loneliness, Superboy and Robin extend their friendship to the boy. Okamura joins Robin and the other Teen Titans at the Titans Tower for Superboy's funeral, clutching a Superboy Action Figure. Sam Loeb with his father Jeph Sam Loeb, born Joseph Loeb IV, (April 13, 1988 – June 17, 2005) was the son of comic book writer Jeph Loeb. ... Superboy, also known by his Kryptonian name Kon-El and his human alias Conner Kent, is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Timothy Tim Drake is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ...


Okamura is later seen at Green Arrow's bachelor party, in the Justice League of America Wedding Special. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ...


Android Toyman

A robot Toyman surfaces in Metropolis and allies with Lex Luthor. His appearance, inspired by the character's Superman: The Animated Series incarnation, is that of a child-sized doll. As part of his bargain with Luthor, he is given the information needed to find his creator Winslow Schlott in exchange for assistance in a plot against Superman. Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and a prominent member of Supermans rogues gallery. ... Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ...


In other media

  • The Toyman first appears in animated form in The New Adventures of Superman animated series from 1966. This particular Toyman is the original Winslow Schott version.
  • The Toyman is a recurring villain on the Challenge of the SuperFriends television cartoon, as one of the members of Lex Luthor's Legion of Doom. The Toyman is voiced by Frank Welker. This series used the Nimball version of the Toyman, with an extra-terrestrial origin[citation needed]. This version of the Toyman often dresses like a jester and wears a mask to cover his face.
  • An episode of Batman: The Animated Series features a villain called 'The Mad Bomber', who was possibly influenced by Toyman (although, he might also have been influenced by the Puppet Master, a villain fought by the Golden Age Batman and Robin in Detective Comics vol. 1/#212), who uses customized toys based on a line of Gray Ghost (voiced by Adam West, who portrayed Batman in the 1960s television show) merchandise to carry bombs and hold Gotham City's economic centers ransom. He becomes more Toyman-like as the episode progresses, stating his delusional belief that toys are a powerful all-purpose tool. The Bomber is voiced by (and also resembles) the series' designer/producer Bruce Timm.
  • The Superboy live-action television series features a villain named Nick Knack, a reference to the Toyman. The character, played by Gilbert Gottfried, wears childlike clothing. Gottfried appeared in two episodes and wrote a story featuring the character for the Superboy tie-in comics series.
  • A character named Winslow P. Schott appears in the Lois and Clark Christmas episode "Seasons Greedings". With a similar background to the post-Crisis Schott in the comics, he creates a toy that causes children to become selfish and adults to act like children. He is referred to only once as being "a toyman" in passing onscreen, and is played by Sherman Hemsley. A later episode features a childlike Toyman played by Grant Shaud, who abducts children.
  • A much more disturbing and creepy Toyman appears in the 1990s series Superman: The Animated Series (voiced by Bud Cort), an insane man wearing an eversmiling mask similar to a doll's head. His arsenal of weapons includes a giant superball that can smash concrete and an "inescapable" bubble-blower. In this version, Winslow Schott, Jr. is the son of a kindly toymaker, who spends all day in his father's shop watching him make toys. Gangsters take over the shop and use it as a front for a numbers racket. When the police uncover the scheme, the gangsters flee, leaving the elder Schott to be framed for running the operation and be arrested and falsely imprisoned for embezzlement. Winslow is left on his own, and he spends several years in abusive and neglectful foster homes. By the time he reaches adulthood, Winslow is mentally ill. Making use of his natural aptitude for mechanics, he decides to make up for his ruined childhood by terrorizing the world and stealing money to amass his own personal fortunes. He appears in two episodes: "Fun and Games" and "Obsession." His plans revolve around Darcy, a lifelike android created to be his companion, but he also seeks revenge against Bruno Mannheim, the criminal who wronged his father, and against Superman.
  • This Toyman also appears in Static Shock, again voiced by Bud Cort. In the episode "Toys in the Hood," Toyman (who was revealed to have survived the events of "Obsession" after his helicopter was destroyed) orders Darcy to capture Static's friend Daisy so she can be Darcy's new body. After Superman and Static confront Toyman, Darcy betrays Toyman and tries to escape, only to discover that Toyman had implanted a fail-safe device programmed to destroy her if she turned on him. Darcy's body melts, and Toyman is taken to jail.
  • In "Hereafter", an episode of Justice League, Toyman is a member of the Superman Revenge Squad, and during their attack on the city of Metropolis, he uses an experimental machine (which resembles a giant toy robot) that can fire blasts of energy from its "chest". Toyman first targets innocent bystanders before trying to blast Superman. Toyman then fires a blast at Batman and the injured Wonder Woman, hoping that Superman will take the blast to save them. To save them, Superman flies straight into the blast from Toyman's machine and is sent 30,000 years into the future. Everyone, including Toyman himself, believed that Superman had been vaporized. Out of anger, Wonder Woman destroyed Toyman's machine and prepared to kill him, but was stopped by Flash, who said "That's not what we do to our enemies." Later in the episode, when Superman awakes in a post-apocalyptic future, he is eventually told by the immortal Vandal Savage, the only surviving human, that Toyman was a simpleton who underestimated his own weapons, since Toyman assumed that Superman had been killed by his machine, not sent to the future. Corey Burton played Toyman here.
  • In Justice League Unlimited, Toyman is a member of Grodd's Legion of Doom. He is prominently featured in the episode "Alive!", in which he becomes the pilot of the Legion of Doom's spaceship. When a riot erupts and divides the villains into two factions, he holds his own and defeats Killer Frost with a decent headbutt and a few tricks with a heavily rigged yo-yo. In the following Justice League Unlimited episode "Destroyer", the series finale, Toyman is briefly shown firing what appear to resemble Nerf darts at Darkseid's henchmen. What makes these darts deadly is that they explode shortly after being fired. Bud Cort reprises him here.
  • The Toyman appears as part of the new Legion of Doom in Alex Ross's mini-series Justice. He is one of several super-villains who've been infected with micrscopic robots by the alien Brainiac, which give him supposedly prescient dreams in which the Earth is destroyed, and the super-heroes are unable to save the world's populace. Thus, the Toyman is driven to aid in a scheme to sidetrack the Justice League while also helping to build mobile cities which supposedly will serve as interstellar arks, one such ark being a massive amusement park for the children being "rescued". The Toyman operates mostly through a remote-controlled arsenal and robots which resemble the Jack Nimball Toyman as a life-sized (or gigantic) puppet. The Toyman is only fully seen in the last issue -- he is the Winslow Schott version, but now morbidly obese, having been kept immobile by cybernetic connections which give him control over his toys.
  • In the tv show Heroes there is a character called Hiro Nakamura, a Japanese man who has the capacity of change the past and the future. His name resembles the third Toyman's name, Hiro Okamura.
  • Toyman appears as a minor villain in the DTV movie, Superman: Doomsday, voiced by John DiMaggio. Like most of the characters in this film, his appearance differs from that of the DCAU Toyman, and he is portrayed in a more gothic form. In the movie, Toyman appears after Superman dies during a fight with Doomsday. Toyman (referred to in this movie as Winslow Schott) uses a giant spider-like robot (a homage to Kevin Smith's un-made Superman project in which Superman was meant to fight a giant spider in the third act of the movie[citations needed]) and takes a school bus full of children hostage. He is routed by the efforts of Lois Lane and a newly-cloned Superman. Later on in the film, Superman's clone discovers that Toyman killed a four-year-old girl while trying to escape. The clone, upon hearing the news, angrily tracks down and brutally executes Toyman by dropping him to his death from high above the city.

This same version of Toyman will appear in an episode of The Batman during Season 5.[citations needed] Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman was a live-action television series based on the Superman comic books. ... Challenge Of The Super Friends is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 1978 to 1979. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and a prominent member of Supermans rogues gallery. ... This article is about the supervillain group. ... Franklin W. Welker (born March 12, 1946) is an American voice actor. ... Beware the Gray Ghost is an episode from Batman: the Animated Series. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... The Gray Ghost is a character voiced by Adam West from Batman: The Animated Series. ... Adam West (born William West Anderson on September 19, 1928) is an American actor who is best known for playing the role of Batman/Bruce Wayne on the TV series Batman (which also had a film adaptation). ... This article is about the fictional place. ... Bruce Walter Timm (born on February 8, 1961) is an American character designer, animator and producer. ... Gilbert Gottfried (born February 28, 1955 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American stand-up comedian. ... Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman was a live-action television series based on the Superman comic books. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Sherman Hemsley (born February 1, 1938 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an Emmy Award nominated and Image Award winning African American character actor most famous for his roles as George Jefferson, on the television shows All in the Family and The Jeffersons and as Deacon Ernest Frye on Amen. ... Grant Shaud (born Edward Shaud III on February 27, 1961) is an American actor best known for playing the character of Miles Silverberg on the 1990s TV sitcom Murphy Brown. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ... Harold and Maude, 1971 Bud Cort (born Walter Edward Cox on March 29, 1948) is an American film and stage actor, writer, and director. ... The Numbers Game is a lottery game where the bettor attempts to pick three or four numbers from zero to nine that will be randomly drawn. ... Foster care is a system by which adults care for orphans or other children who are not living with their biological parents, for example due to child abuse. ... Intergang is a fictional organized crime organization in Superman comics. ... Static Shock is an American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ... Hereafter is an episode of season two of the animated series Justice League Unlimited. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... The Superman Revenge Squad was an organization in DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Apocalyptic science fiction is a sub-genre of science fiction that is concerned with the end of the world or civilization, through nuclear war, plague, or some other general disaster. ... Vandal Savage is a fictional character and supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Corey Burton (born August 3, 1955), is an animation voice actor. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... Gorilla Grodd is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics, primarily as an opponent of The Flash. ... This article is about the supervillain group. ... Killer Frost is the name of two DC Comics supervillains, mainly as foes of Firestorm. ... The yo-yo is a toy consisting of two equally-sized discs of plastic, wood, or metal, connected with an axle, around which a string is wound. ... For other uses, see Nerf (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Harold and Maude, 1971 Bud Cort (born Walter Edward Cox on March 29, 1948) is an American film and stage actor, writer, and director. ... Nelson Alexander Alex Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. ... Justice was a 12-issue American comic book limited series published bi-monthly by DC Comics from August 2005 through June 2007. ... Brainiac is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain and frequent opponent of Superman. ... Prescience is the ability to predict the future through vision. ... A generation ship is a hypothetical starship that travels across great distances between stars at a speed much slower than that of light (see interstellar travel). ... This article is about the type of character. ... John William DiMaggio (born September 4, 1968) is an American voice actor. ... Doomsday is the name of a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe, a supervillain best known for fighting and killing Superman in the Death of Superman storyline in 1992. ... For other persons named Kevin Smith, see Kevin Smith (disambiguation). ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... The Batman is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ...


See also

This is a list of fictional characters from DC Comics who are or have been enemies of Superman. ...

External links

  • Supermanica entry on the pre-Crisis Toyman

  Results from FactBites:
 
Toyman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1372 words)
The Toyman is a supervillain in the DC Comics universe and an enemy of Superman.
Rather than using his talents for criminal ends, the new Toyman is an ally to both Superman and Batman -- he aided the two in destroying a massive kryptonite meteor in danger of destroying Earth, and subsequently struck a deal with Batman to provide him with various technological implements.
The Toyman was a recurring villain on the Super Friends television cartoon, as one of the members of Lex Luthor's Legion of Doom.
Superman Super Site - Toyman (1174 words)
However, this version of the Toyman proved short-lived, with Schott resuming his crime career in Superman (volume 1) #305 (November 1976) and killing Nimball.
The Toyman has also appeared on the 1990s series Superman: The Animated Series (voiced by Bud Cort) as a man wearing a mask similar to a doll's head, and whose repertoire included such weapons as a bouncing ball and a bubble-blower.
In Justice League, he was a member of the Superman Revenge Squad, and during their attack on the city, Superman took the blow from his machine which was aimed at Wonder Woman and Batman and the machine sent Superman into the future.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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