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Encyclopedia > Tourism in Scotland

Scotland is a well-developed tourist destination, with tourism generally being responsible for sustaining 200,000 jobs mainly in the service sector, with tourist spending averaging at £4bn per year [1]. Tourists from the United Kingdom make up the bulk of visitors to Scotland. In 2002 , for example, UK visitors made 18.5 million visits to Scotland, staying 64.5 million nights and spending £3.7bn. In contrast, overseas residents made 1.58 million visits to Scotland, staying 15 million nights and spending £806m. In terms of overseas visitors, those from the United States made up 24% of visits to Scotland, with the United States being the largest source of overseas visitors, and Germany (9%), France (8%), Canada (7%) and Australia (6%), following behind. [2] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 592 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tourism in Scotland User:Globaltraveller Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 592 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tourism in Scotland User:Globaltraveller Metadata... Melrose Abbey, June 2004 Melrose Abbey, located in Melrose, Scotland, was founded in 1136 by Cistercian monks, on the request of King David I of Scotland. ... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... Tourist redirects here. ...


Scotland is generally seen as clean, unspoilt destination with beautiful scenery which has a long and complex history, combined with thousands of historic sites and attractions. These include prehistoric stone circles, standing stones and burial chambers, and various Bronze Age, Iron Age and Stone Age remains. There are also many historic castles, houses, and battlegrounds, ruins and museums. Many people are drawn by the culture of Scotland. Stirling Castle has stood for centuries atop a volcanic crag defending the lowest ford of the River Forth. ... Swinside stone circle, in the Lake District, England. ... Standing stones, orthostats, liths or more commonly, megaliths because of their large and cumbersome size, are solitary stones set vertically in the ground. ... A chamber tomb is a tomb for burial used in many different cultures. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... Stone Age fishing hook. ... Addressing the haggis during Burns supper: Fair fa your honest, sonsie face, Great chieftain o the puddin-race! The culture of Scotland is the national culture of Scotland. ...


The cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow are increasingly being seen as a cosmopolitan alternative to Scotland's countryside, with visitors year round, but the main tourist season is generally from April to October inclusive. In addition to these factors, the national tourist agency, VisitScotland, have deployed a strategy of niche marketing, aimed at exploiting, amongst other things, Scotland's strengths in golf, fishing and food and drink tourism. Another significant, and increasingly popular reason for tourism to Scotland - especially by those from North America - is genealogy, with many visitors coming to Scotland to explore their family and ancestral roots. For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... VisitScotland is Scotlands national tourism agency. ... Niche marketing is the process of finding small but potentially profitable market segments and designing custom-made products for them. ... This article is about the game. ... For the computer security term, see Phishing. ... Scottish cuisine shares much with that of other parts of the British Isles but has distinctive attributes and recipes of its own, thanks to foreign and local influences both ancient and modern. ... North American redirects here. ... Genealogy (from Greek: γενεα, genea, family; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ...

Contents

Infrastructure

Main article: Transport in Scotland

Scotland is connected to the rest of the United Kingdom by a road, rail and air network. The airports at Glasgow International, Glasgow Prestwick, Edinburgh and Aberdeen serve as the main international gateways to Scotland, with an expanding route network. In terms of international air links with Europe, the country is generally well connected, with daily flights from a variety of European cities, such as Paris, Berlin, Rome, Barcelona, Dublin and Stockholm. There are also direct flights operated from the main Scottish airports to destinations in North America such as New York, Atlanta, Boston, Philadelphia, Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary. The expanding budget airline network from Scotland's airports is making a significant contribution to bringing more visitors to the country. The transport system in Scotland is generally well-developed. ... For other uses, see Road (disambiguation). ... railroads redirects here. ... Prestwick Airport from the air Glasgow Prestwick International Airport (IATA: PIK, ICAO: EGPK) is situated north of the town of Prestwick in South Ayrshire, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Canadian city. ...


The country is also connected to mainland Europe by a car ferry service operating daily from Rosyth in Fife to the Belgian port of Zeebrugge. Ferry services also connect Scotland with Northern Ireland, operating between Stranraer and Belfast and Cairnryan and Larne. Continental Europe refers to the continent of Europe, explicitly excluding European islands and peninsulae. ... Rosyth (pronounced Ross-sythe) (Scottish Gaelic: Ros Saoithe) is located on the Firth of Forth on Scotlands east coast, a mile (1. ... The church of Zeebrugge Zeebrugge (French: Zeebruges) is a harbour-town at the coast of Belgium, a subdivision of Bruges, for which it is the modern port. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Stranraer (An t-Sròn Reamhar in Gaelic) is a town in the south of Scotland in the west of the region of Dumfries and Galloway and in the county of Wigtownshire. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... Cairnryan is a small Scottish village overlooking Loch Ryan and is notable today for its large modern ferry port, operated by P&O, which links Scotland with Larne in Northern Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ...


The ferry to Gothenburg, Sweden, from "Newcastle" (actually North Shields) in northern England (currently run by the Danish company DFDS Seaways), ceased at the end of October 2006[1]. This service was a key route for Scottish tourist traffic from Sweden and Norway. The company cited high fuel prices and new competition from low-cost air services, especially Ryanair (which now flies to Glasgow Prestwick and London Stansted from Gothenburg City Airport), as being the cause. DFDS Seaways' sister company, DFDS Tor Line, will continue to run scheduled freight ships between Gothenburg and several English ports, including Newcastle, and these have limited capacity for passengers, but not private vehicles. It is unclear if the Newcastle-Kristiansand, Norway, route will continue. For other uses, see Gothenburg (disambiguation). ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... , North Shields (or locally just Shields) is a town on the north bank of the River Tyne, in the metropolitan borough of North Tyneside, in North East England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... DFDS Headquarters in Copenhagen, Denmark. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Competition is the act of striving against others for the purpose of achieving gain, such as income, pride, amusement, or dominance. ... Boeing 737-700 of UK low cost carrier easyJet waiting for take off at Bristol A low-cost carrier or low cost airline (also known as a no-frills or discount carrier / airline) is an airline that offers generally low fares in exchange for eliminating many traditional passenger services. ... Ryanair (ISEQ: RYA, LSE: RYA, NASDAQ: RYAAY) is an Irish airline headquartered in Dublin, with its biggest operational base at London Stansted Airport in the UK. It is Europes largest low-cost carrier and is one of the worlds largest and most successful airlines (whether in terms of... Prestwick Airport from the air Glasgow Prestwick International Airport (IATA: PIK, ICAO: EGPK) is situated north of the town of Prestwick in South Ayrshire, Scotland. ... Terminal building, designed by Sir Norman Foster Stansted Airport is a medium-sized passenger airport with a single runway, located in the English county of Essex about thirty miles north of London. ... Gothenburg City Airport or Göteborg City Airport (IATA: GSE, ICAO: ESGP), formerly (and still informally) known as Säve Flygplats, is Gothenburgs second international airport located 14 kilometres north-west from the centre of Gothenburg (Swedish:  ) on the island of Hisingen, Bohuslän, Sweden. ... Freight is a term used to classify the transportation of cargo and is typically a commercial process. ... County District Sørlandet Municipality NO-1001 Administrative centre Kristiansand Mayor (2004) Per Sigurd Sørensen(H) Official language form BokmÃ¥l Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 287 277 km² 259 km² 0. ...

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 591 KB) Summary Description: Arthurs Seat and the Old Town of Edinburgh, viewed from the Castle Source: Own Record Date: Sept 04 Author: Globaltraveller Permission: photographed by myself Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Tourism... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 591 KB) Summary Description: Arthurs Seat and the Old Town of Edinburgh, viewed from the Castle Source: Own Record Date: Sept 04 Author: Globaltraveller Permission: photographed by myself Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Tourism... Arthurs Seat on a summer evening Arthurs Seat is the main peak of the group of hills which form most of Holyrood Park, a remarkably wild piece of highland landscape in the centre of the city of Edinburgh, about a mile to the east of Edinburgh Castle. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The castle dominates the Edinburgh skyline as seen here from Princes Street Gardens Edinburgh Castle is an ancient fortress which, from its position atop Castle Rock, dominates the sky-line of the city of Edinburgh, and is Scotlands second most visited tourist attraction, after the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and...

Tourist Destinations in Scotland

Other areas which are popular for tourists include the Highlands and the Hebrides, such as the Isle of Skye. Perthshire, the Scottish Borders and Orkney and Shetland are also popular tourism destinations. For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... The Old Town of Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. ... The Edinburgh New Town is a neo-classical masterpiece. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The castle dominates the Edinburgh skyline as seen here from Princes Street Gardens Edinburgh Castle is an ancient fortress which, from its position atop Castle Rock, dominates the sky-line of the city of Edinburgh, and is Scotlands second most visited tourist attraction, after the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and... Edinburgh Zoo, formally the Scottish National Zoological Park, is situated in the Corstorphine area of Edinburgh, not far from Murrayfield Stadium. ... Holyrood Palace The Palace of Holyroodhouse, more commonly known as Holyrood Palace, originally founded as a monastery by David I of Scotland in 1128, has served as the principal residence of the Kings and Queens of Scotland since the 15th century. ... Our Dynamic Earth is a Scottish science centre and prominent conference venue and visitor attraction located in Holyrood, Edinburgh, beside the Scottish Parliament Building. ... Much of the Royal Mile is cobbled, as seen in this view looking east down the High Street past the old Tron Kirk. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... The buildings that house the Burrell Collection The Burrell Collection is an art collection in the city of Glasgow, in Scotland. ... Glasgow Cathedral Glasgow Cathedral is a Church of Scotland cathedral in Glasgow. ... The Glasgow Science Centre and the Glasgow Tower The Glasgow Science Centre is a major science and technology museum located in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is Glasgows premier museum and art gallery and has one of Europes great civic art collections. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... Lowland-Highland divide The Scottish Lowlands (a Ghalldachd, meaning roughly the non-Gaelic region, in Gaelic), although not officially a geographical area of the country, in normal usage is generally meant to include those parts of Scotland not referred to as the Highlands (or Gàidhealtachd), that is, everywhere due... Stirling Castle southwest aspect from the Kings Knot Parterre below the castle crags. ... The monument The monument seen from the University of Stirling The Wallace National Monument (generally known as the Wallace Monument) is a tower standing on the summit of Abbey Craig, a hilltop near Stirling in Scotland. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ... Location Geography Area Ranked 16th  - Total 990 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Kirkwall ISO 3166-2 GB-ORK ONS code 00RA Demographics Population Ranked 32nd  - Total (2006) 19,800  - Density 20 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Orkney Islands Council http://www. ... For other uses, see Shetland (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see St Andrews (disambiguation). ... This article is about the area in Scotland. ... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... This article is about the game. ... For other uses, see St Andrews (disambiguation). ... St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... Greek ἀνταρκτικός, opposite the arctic) is a continent surrounding the Earths South Pole. ... The RRS Discovery was the last wooden three-masted ship to be built in the British Isles, and was launched on 21 March 1901, designed for Antarctic research. ... The European Route of Industrial Heritage (ERIH) is a network of the most important industrial heritage sites in Europe. ... Perth (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a royal burgh in central Scotland. ... The Tay is a river starting in the Highlands and flowing down into the centre of Scotland through Perth and Dundee. ... Scone is a large village, a mile north of Perth, Scotland. ... The list of monarchs of Scotland (Scottish Gælic: Rìghrean agus Bàn-rìghrean na h-Alba) concerns the Kingdom of Scotland (Alba) which was first unified as a state by Kenneth I of Scotland in 843. ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... For other uses, see Loch Ness (disambiguation). ... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... This article is about the Hebrides islands in Scotland. ... Map of the Hebrides. ... Perthshire (Siorrachd Pheairt in Gaelic) was a county in central Scotland, which extended from Strathmore in the east, to the Pass of Drumochter in the north, Rannoch Moor and Ben Lui in the west, and Aberfoyle in the south. ... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 16th  - Total 990 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Kirkwall ISO 3166-2 GB-ORK ONS code 00RA Demographics Population Ranked 32nd  - Total (2006) 19,800  - Density 20 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Orkney Islands Council http://www. ... For other uses, see Shetland (disambiguation). ...


Ben Nevis is the highest mountain in the United Kingdom, but there are many other significant mountains in Scotland, though by international standards all the mountains are relatively small. The Cuillin on the Isle of Skye offer some challenging climbs, such as the Inaccessible Pinnacle. Ben Nevis (Gaelic: Beinn Nibheis) is the highest mountain in Great Britain. ... The Cuillin from the north The Cuillin are a range of rocky mountains located on the Isle of Skye in Scotland. ... The Inaccessible Pinnacle is the 986 m summit of Sgurr Dearg (Gaelic for Red Mountain) in the Cuillin on the Isle of Skye, Scotland. ...


Scotland also has many lochs, including Loch Lomond, and Loch Ness, which is considered by some to be the home of the Loch Ness monster. There are also many rivers, which are good for salmon and fly fishing. These include the Tay, Tweed, Don, and Dee. View across Loch Lomond, towards Ben Lomond. ... For other uses, see Loch Lomond (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Loch Ness (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Loch Ness Monster (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Salmon (disambiguation). ... Fly rod and reel with a wild brown trout from a chalk stream. ... The Tay is a river starting in the Highlands and flowing down into the centre of Scotland through Perth and Dundee. ... There are other rivers with this name: see Tweed River The River Tweed at Abbotsford, near Melrose The River Tweed at Coldstream The River Tweed (156 kilometres or 97 miles long) flows primarily through the Borders region of Scotland. ... The article is about the Don River in Scotland. ... River Dee near Braemar The Linn of Dee, small gorge near Braemar The River Dee is a 90 mile (140 km) long river, that rises in the Cairngorms, Aberdeenshire, Scotland and flows into the North Sea at Aberdeen. ...



Scotland's best known export is Scotch Whisky and over a million visitors a year[2]. enjoy a tour around its Whisky distilleries Scotch whisky is whisky made in Scotland. ...


Scotland has some good hunting, especially deer stalking and grouse shooting. This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Deer hunting. ...


Scotland is also the home of golf, with many historic and famous courses including, St Andrews, Gleneagles, Royal Troon, Carnoustie, and Muirfield. There are hundreds of other courses in the country. This article is about the game. ... For other uses, see St Andrews (disambiguation). ... Gleneagles (Scottish Gaelic: Gleann na h-Eaglais/Gleann Eagas) is a glen in the Ochil Hills of Perthshire in Scotland. ... Royal Troon Golf Club is a golf course located in Ayrshire, Scotland. ... , Carnoustie (Gaelic: Càrn Fheusda) is a town and former police burgh in the council area of Angus, Scotland. ... Muirfield is a golf course in Scotland which is one of the rotation of courses used for The Open Championship. ...


References

  1. ^ "DFDS scraps Newcastle-Gothenburg line", The Local, 7 September 2006: "Danish shipping company DFDS Seaways is to scrap the only passenger ferry route between Sweden and Britain, with the axing of the Gothenburg-Newcastle route at the end of October."
  2. ^ "Whisky Tourism - Project history and facts", Scotlandwhisky.com - Scotland's Whisky tourism site"

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

See also

Scotland Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... Museums in Scotland is a link page for any museum in Scotland. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Scotland This is a list of articles relating to Scotland. ... The Common Travel Area includes the UK, the Isle of Man, Jersey, Guernsey, and the Republic of Ireland The Common Travel Area (or, informally, the passport free zone) refers to the fact that citizens of the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom and the Crown Dependencies (the Isle of Man... Tourism > Tourism in England Tourism plays a significant part in the economic life of England. ... Wales is an emerging tourist destination, with 8,078,900 visitors to National Trust and Welsh Tourist Board destinations in 2002. ...

External links

  • VisitScotland- The Official Site of Scotland's National Tourist Board
  • VisitBritain website - Scotland homepage
  • www.pagemost.com, Interactive Google maps showing local places and attractions, complete with Flickr photographs. Search by UK place name or postcode. Shows many Scottish land features.
  • Come to Scotland, - The Official Site for travellers coming to Scotland from the United States and Canada
  • ScotlandWhisky - A guide to Scotland's Scotch Whisky distilleries which are open to the public.
  • Visit Tweeddale, - Guide to Tweeddale and the Peebles area of the Scottish Borders
  • Live It VisitScotland VisitScotland's culture Website, featuring range of events and festivals in Scotland, and articles on cultural destinations, shopping and food and drink.
  • Mountain Bikes Apart's guide to South West Scotland mountain biking activities. Other areas are also covered on the site.
The list of unrecognized countries enumerates those geo-political entities which lack general diplomatic recognition, but wish to be recognized as sovereign states. ...  Southwest Asia in most contexts. ... The borders of the continents are the limits of the several continents of the Earth, as defined by various geographical, cultural, and political criteria. ...  The North American plate, shown in brown The North American Plate is a tectonic plate covering most of North America, extending eastward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and westward to the Cherskiy Range in East Siberia. ...  The African plate, shown in pinkish-orange The African Plate is a tectonic plate covering the continent of Africa and extending westward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
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Tourism businesses operating in rural areas across Scotland have the potential to collectively boost the economy through developing and exploiting the fast growing mountain biking market, that is the message which will be delivered to delegates attending an Adventure Sports Tourism event held later this month in Peebles.
Businesses operating in the tourism and forest industries are expected to attend the event which has been designed to build on the fact that more and more companies are recognising that significant sustainable business development opportunities exist in Scotland's natural assets.
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Tourism is a cultural phenomenon that depicts the act of travelling for pleasure and sightseeing in a different area to the one in which we usually live.
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But the promotion of Scotland as a destination for short breaks appears to be an opportunity for the STB and the tourist industry to effect some change in the holiday habits of the Scottish people.
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