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Encyclopedia > Touch of Evil
Touch of Evil

Original film poster
Directed by Orson Welles
Produced by Albert Zugsmith
Rick Schmidlin
(1998 restoration & director's cut)
Written by Whit Masterson
(novel, Badge of Evil)
Orson Welles
(screenplay)
Paul Monash (uncredited)
Franklin Coen (uncredited)
Starring Orson Welles
Charlton Heston
Janet Leigh
Marlene Dietrich
Music by Henry Mancini
Cinematography Russell Metty, ASC
Editing by Aaron Stell
Virgil Vogel
Walter Murch
Distributed by Universal Studios
Release date(s) May 21, 1958
Running time USA 95 Min.
Edited
111 Min.
Director's Cut
Country United States
Language English
Spanish
Budget $829,000 (estimated)
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

Touch of Evil (1958) is an American film considered one of the last examples of film noir in the genre's classic era (from the early 1940s until the late 1950s). It was directed by Orson Welles, who appears as a corrupt U.S. police captain. The black-and-white film also features Charlton Heston as a Mexican police officer, Janet Leigh as his bride, and Marlene Dietrich as a cigar-smoking Gypsy brothel owner. The screenplay, loosely based on the novel Badge of Evil by Whit Masterson (a pseudonym for Robert Wade and William Miller), was written by Welles. Additional scenes were written by Paul Monash, and Franklin Coen. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Touch of Evil This is a copyrighted poster. ... George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, actor and producer for film, stage, radio and television. ... Albert Zugsmith (1910 - 1993) was an American film producer and director who specialized in low-budget exploitation films through the 1950s and 1960s. ... Rick Schmidlin (b. ... Cover art by Glen Orbik Whit Masterson is a pen name for a partnership of two authors, Robert Allison “Bob” Wade (1920-present) and H. Bill Miller (1920-61). ... Badge of Evil is a novel written by Whit Masterson (actually the pseudonym of authors Robert Wade and Bill Miller) and published in 1956. ... Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... Janet Leigh (July 6, 1927 – October 3, 2004), born Jeanette Helen Morrison, was an American actress. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer and entertainer. ... Henry Mancini (April 16, 1924 – June 14, 1994), was an Academy Award winning American composer, conductor and arranger. ... Russell Metty (born 1906, died 1978) was an American cinematographer, who worked on many films during the forties, fifties and sixties. ... Walter Murch speaking 13 March 2005 Walter Scott Murch (born July 12, 1943) is an Academy Award–winning film editor/sound mixer. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... Editor has four major senses: a person who obtains or improves material for a publication; a film editor, a person responsible for the flow of a motion picture or television program from scene to scene a sound editor, a person responsible for the flow and choice of music, voice, and... A directors cut is a specially edited version of a film, and less often TV series, music video, commercials or video games, that is supposed to represent the directors own approved edit. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The year 1958 in film involved some significant events. ... Two silhouetted figures in The Big Combo (1955). ... George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, actor and producer for film, stage, radio and television. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... Janet Leigh (July 6, 1927 – October 3, 2004), born Jeanette Helen Morrison, was an American actress. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer and entertainer. ... Badge of Evil is a novel written by Whit Masterson (actually the pseudonym of authors Robert Wade and Bill Miller) and published in 1956. ... Cover art by Glen Orbik Whit Masterson is a pen name for a partnership of two authors, Robert Allison “Bob” Wade (1920-present) and H. Bill Miller (1920-61). ...

Contents

Cast

Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... Janet Leigh (July 6, 1927 – October 3, 2004), born Jeanette Helen Morrison, was an American actress. ... George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, actor and producer for film, stage, radio and television. ... Joseph Calleia (August 4, 1897 – October 31, 1975), was a singer, composer, and actor, both on Broadway and in film. ... Akim Tamiroff (October 29, 1899, Tiflis (now Tbilisi), Georgia - September 17, 1972, Palm Springs, California) was an actor of Armenian ethnicity, trained at the Moscow Art Theatre drama school. ... Movie, stage and radio actor Ray Collins (December 10, 1889 - July 11, 1965) made his screen debut as Boss Jim Gettys in Citizen Kane and was one of the voices in Orson Welles infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast. ... William Dennis Weaver (June 4, 1924 â€” February 24, 2006) was an Emmy Award-winning actor and was an American television actor, best known for his roles as sidekick Chester Goode from 1955 to 1964 on TVs first adult Western Gunsmoke, as Marshal Sam McCloud on the NBC police drama... Phil Harvey (1938) is an American entrepreneur, philanthropist and libertarian who over the past 30 years has set up large scale programs that deliver subsidized contraceptives in poor countries, has supported freedom of speech issues in the US--all with profits from an American commercial enterprise that sells sex-related... Joi Lansing was the screen name of Joyce Wassmansdoff, born in Salt Lake City, Utah on April 6, 1928. ... HARRY SHANNON Harry Shannon has been an actor, a singer, an Emmy-nominated songwriter, a recording artist in Europe, a music publisher, a VP of Carolco Pictures (“Terminator 2,” “Total Recall,” “Rambo”), and worked as a free-lance Music Supervisor on films such as “Basic Instinct” and “Universal Soldier. ... Wayne Taylor is a sports racer and winner of the 1996 and 2005 Daytona 24 hour Sports Endurance race and was born in Port Elizabeth, South Africa on 10 July 1956. ... Kenneth Kenny Miller (born December 23, 1979 in Edinburgh) is a Scottish professional footballer currently playing for Derby County and the Scottish national team. ... Zsa Zsa Gábor (born Sári Gábor on February 6, 1917)) is a Hungarian-American actress and socialite. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer and entertainer. ... Mercedes Agnes Carlotta McCambridge (March 16, 1916 – March 2, 2004), nicknamed Mercy, was an Academy Award-winning American film actress, also known for her acting in radio dramas. ... Wynn in Warning Shot (1967) Keenan Wynn (July 27, 1916 – October 14, 1986) was an American character actor and member of a well-known show-business family. ... Joseph Cheshire Cotten (May 15, 1905–February 6, 1994) was an American stage and screen actor. ...

Plot Summary

The movie opens with a famous, three minute continuous tracking shot that to this day is still hailed by critics as one of the best long shots in cinema. This shot shows a man placing a bomb in a car and then the journey of the car to the US/Mexican border crossing. The scene ends with Mike Vargas (Charlton Heston) and Susie Vargas (Janet Leigh), newlyweds, kissing. The scene then cuts to the car, containing a man and a woman, exploding. In motion picture terminology, a tracking shot is the same as a dolly shot or a trucking shot--the camera is mounted on a wheeled platform that is pushed on rails while the picture is being taken. ... Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... Janet Leigh (July 6, 1927 – October 3, 2004), born Jeanette Helen Morrison, was an American actress. ...


Mike Vargas, a police official within the Mexican government, realizes the implications of a Mexican bomb exploding on US soil and begins to investigate. The police chief Pete Gould (Harry Shannon) and district attorney Adair (Ray Collins) arrive shortly on the scene, as well as police Captain Hank Quinlan (Orson Welles) and Quinlan's friend and partner, Pete Menzies (Joseph Calleia). HARRY SHANNON Harry Shannon has been an actor, a singer, an Emmy-nominated songwriter, a recording artist in Europe, a music publisher, a VP of Carolco Pictures (“Terminator 2,” “Total Recall,” “Rambo”), and worked as a free-lance Music Supervisor on films such as “Basic Instinct” and “Universal Soldier. ... Collins in The Racket (1951) Ray Collins (December 10, 1889 – July 11, 1965) was an American actor in film, stage, radio, and television. ... George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, actor and producer for film, stage, radio and television. ... Joseph Calleia (August 4, 1897 – October 31, 1975), was a singer, composer, and actor, both on Broadway and in film. ...


Over the course of the movie, Vargas finds that Quinlan may have been planting evidence to help win convictions. Susie Vargas is kidnapped and framed for a murder to ruin her husband.


Vargas confronts Menzies about the suspicious fact that so many murders have been solved by Quinlan and Menzies where the defense claims the primary evidence was fabricated. In all those cases, Menzies discovered the evidence. Menzies dismisses Vargas's claim.


Vargas returns to the motel only to discover that Susie is no longer there. Vargas also realizes that whoever absconded with Susie also stole Vargas's gun.


Vargas travels to the jail to discover Susie barely conscious. Vargas seems to be in a hopeless situation, with no proof that his wife did not commit a murder. Menzies then reveals to Vargas Quinlan's cane, which Menzies had found at the crime scene. Menzies realizes that Quinlan has been in the wrong, and desires to confront Quinlan and set things right. Menzies wears a crude wire and Vargas must follow the moving Quinlan and Menzies with a radio that must be within a certain distance to record Quinlan and Menzie's conversation.


Quinlan admits to Menzies that he did frame people, but that everyone who was framed was "guilty, guilty". Quinlan and Menzies come to a bridge, and Vargas must sneak under the bridge to maintain the recording. Quinlan hears the echo, and according to Quinlan his game leg informs him of Menzies's wire. Quinlan orders Vargas to show himself, and when Vargas does, Quinlan shoots Menzies with Vargas's gun.


As Quinlan is readying to kill Vargas, Menzies shoots Quinlan to death instead. The movie ends with Vargas reuniting with Susie and leaving town.


History

There are two stories as to how Welles ended up directing Touch of Evil. Charlton Heston claimed that Welles was originally hired to act in the film. Universal was keen to secure Heston for the lead, but Heston wanted the studio to confirm the film's director before he signed on. As an admirer of Welles' films, Heston proposed Welles as the director, noting that he would be more interested in starring if Welles was directing. The other story is that Welles had recently worked with producer Albert Zugsmith, known as the "king of the B's", on a film called Pay the Devil and was interested in directing something for him. Zugsmith offered him a pile of scripts with no director attached, and to prove he could make a great film out of a bad script, he asked Zugsmith to give him the worst. This was Badge of Evil, as it was then called. Welles did a rewrite and took it into production. Eager to get back into directing (a Hollywood film), he agreed to take only an acting fee, taking on the role of Quinlan. Although Welles was overweight in later life, Quinlan's girth in the film is mostly padding.[1][2] Albert Zugsmith (1910 - 1993) was an American film producer and director who specialized in low-budget exploitation films through the 1950s and 1960s. ...


A number of notable actors popped up in minor roles. Dennis Weaver plays a mentally unbalanced night clerk at an isolated motel; Welles liked Weaver as Chester on TV's Gunsmoke and worked closely with him on his part, which was shot on a three-day hiatus from the TV show. Zsa Zsa Gabor, who appears briefly as the impresario of a strip club, was a friend of the producer. Welles's old friend Joseph Calleia portrays Quinlan's betrayed partner. Many of the actors worked for lower wages just to make a film with Welles. Marlene Dietrich's role was a surprise to the producers and they raised her fee so they could advertise her involvement. His friend and Mercury Theater colleague, Joseph Cotton appears uncredited as a police officer. William Dennis Weaver (June 4, 1924 â€” February 24, 2006) was an Emmy Award-winning actor and was an American television actor, best known for his roles as sidekick Chester Goode from 1955 to 1964 on TVs first adult Western Gunsmoke, as Marshal Sam McCloud on the NBC police drama... TV redirects here. ... This article is about the radio and television series. ... Zsa Zsa Gábor (born Sári Gábor on February 6, 1917)) is a Hungarian-American actress and socialite. ... Joseph Calleia (August 4, 1897 – October 31, 1975), was a singer, composer, and actor, both on Broadway and in film. ... Joseph Cheshire Cotten (May 15, 1905–February 6, 1994) was an American stage and screen actor. ...


Welles wrapped production on time, delivered a rough cut to Universal, and was convinced that his Hollywood career was back on the rails. However, the film was then re-edited (and in part re-shot) by Universal International pictures. The editing process was protracted and disputed, and the eventually released version was not the film Universal or Welles had hoped for. The movie was literally a B-movie, released as the lower half of a double feature. The A-movie was The Female Animal, starring Hedy Lamarr, produced by Albert Zugsmith and directed by Harry Keller whom the studio had hired to direct the re-shot material in Touch of Evil. The two films even had the same cameraman: Russell Metty. Welles's film was given little publicity despite the many stars in the cast. Nonetheless, even as originally released it was a film of power and impact: though it had little commercial success in the US, it was nonetheless quite well-received in Europe, particularly by critics like future film-maker François Truffaut. Universal Studios logo Universal Studios is a famous Hollywood movie studio located at 100 Universal City Plaza Drive in Universal City, California, which is in the San Fernando Valley. ... The term B-movie originally referred to a film designed to be distributed as the lower half of a double feature, often a genre film featuring cowboys, gangsters or vampires. ... Hedy Lamarr (November 9, 1913 – January 19, 2000) was an Austrian/Jewish-American actress and communications technology innovator. ... Russell Metty (born 1906, died 1978) was an American cinematographer, who worked on many films during the forties, fifties and sixties. ... François Roland Truffaut (French IPA: ) (February 6, 1932 – October 21, 1984) was one of the founders of the French New Wave in filmmaking, and remains an icon of the French film industry. ...


Differing versions

1998 re-release
1998 re-release

Three versions of the film have been released: Image File history File links Touch_of_Evil_restored. ... Image File history File links Touch_of_Evil_restored. ...

  1. The original 1958 release version
  2. A longer version, released in 1976
  3. A 1998 restored version that attempted to follow Welles's 1958 memo as closely as possible.

Welles's rough cut as submitted to the Universal no longer exists. This was worked on and trimmed down by Universal staff, and in late 1957 Universal decided to perform some reshoots. Welles claimed these were done without his knowledge, but Universal claimed that Welles ignored their requests to return and undertake further work. This was when Keller came aboard: some of his material was entirely new, some replaced Welles scenes. Welles viewed the new cut and wrote a 58-page memo to Universal's head of production, Edward Muhl, detailing what he thought needed to be done to make the film work. However, many of his suggestions went unheeded and Touch of Evil was eventually released in a version running 93 minutes.


In the mid-1970s, Universal discovered that it held a 108-minute print of Touch of Evil in its archives. Aware that there was a growing audience of cineastes with a strong interest in Welles' work, the studio released this version to cinemas in 1976 and later issued it on video, billing it as 'complete, uncut and restored'. In fact, this print was not a restoration at all, but a preview version which post-dated the Welles memo but pre-dated the release version. Whilst it did feature some vital Welles scenes which had been cut from the release version, it also featured more Keller material: the new footage had been cut into the film, but much of it ended up being cut out again, resulting in pointless expense for Universal. This 1976 version was not Welles' Touch of Evil either.


In 1998, the film was re-released in a re-edited form, which was based on the Welles memo and edited by Walter Murch, working from all available material. It should be noted that, as Welles' rough cut no longer exists, no true 'Welles cut' is possible, but Murch was able to assemble a version incorporating most of the existing material, omitting some of the Keller scenes (though some were retained, either because they had replaced Welles scenes which no longer existed and were necessary to the plot, or because Welles had approved of their inclusion). In addition, some of Welles's complaints were concerned with subtle sound and editing choices, and Murch was able to re-jig the material accordingly. The Murch version is the closest we will get to the film Welles wanted, carrying out as many of the memo's instructions as possible. Notable changes include the removal of the credits and music from the three-minute opening shot, crosscutting between the main story and Janet Leigh's subplot and the removal of Harry Keller's hotel lobby scene. The 1998 director's cut was produced by Rick Schmidlin, had a limited but successful theatrical release (again by Universal International) and was subsequently made available on DVD. The DVD includes a reproduction of the 58-page memo.[3] Walter Murch speaking 13 March 2005 Walter Scott Murch (born July 12, 1943) is an Academy Award–winning film editor/sound mixer. ... A directors cut is a specially edited version of a film, and less often TV series, music video, commercials or video games, that is supposed to represent the directors own approved edit. ... Rick Schmidlin (b. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


Originally scheduled to be premiered at the 1998 Cannes Film Festival with Janet Leigh, Walter Murch and Rick Schmidlin attending, the screening was cancelled in the eleventh-hour after threats of litigation from Welles' daughter Beatrice Welles,[4] who has in the past issued similar threats against some parties who try to show or alter her father's work (such as the Touch of Evil restoration or the completion of Welles' last film The Other Side of the Wind.) The reason given for the litigation was that Beatrice Welles was not consulted for the restoration, despite the restoration incorporating changes that Orson Welles had requested after he had the film taken out of his hands. The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in order to recover a right, obtain damages for an injury, obtain an injunction to prevent an injury, or obtain a declaratory judgment to prevent future legal disputes. ...


Legacy

In 1993, Touch of Evil was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". The film was placed #64 on American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Thrills. The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The film is also jokingly referred to (although not by name) in the Tim Burton film Ed Wood. In a scene near the end of the film, Ed Wood (Johnny Depp) is complaining to Orson Welles about how producers always want the wrong actors to play certain parts in their movies. Welles says, "Tell me about it. I'm just about to start work on a movie where they want Charlton Heston to play a Mexican!" Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... Ed Wood is a biopic directed by Tim Burton, starring Johnny Depp as the cross-dressing cult movie maker Edward D. Wood, Jr. ... John Christopher Depp II[1] (born June 9, 1963) is an American actor, best known for his frequent portrayals of offbeat and eccentric characters such as Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy and the titular character of Tim Burtons Edward Scissorhands. ... Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... Mexican may have several meanings. ...


A similar line is used in Get Shorty, where movie fan Chili Palmer invites another character to see a screening of Touch of Evil, saying, "We can see Charlton Heston play a Mexican." We later see Palmer watching the final scene of the movie, mouthing the words together with the characters on screen. European book cover Get Shorty is a novel by American novelist Elmore Leonard, first published in 1990, and a movie adaptation of the same name, released in 1995. ...


In James Robert Baker's novel, Boy Wonder, fictional movie producer Shark Trager makes it his goal to surpass Touch of Evil's three minute opening tracking shot when filming a movie of his own. Tana's line, "He was some kind of a man. What does it matter what you say about people?" was also quoted extensively in the book. James Robert Baker (1947-November 5, 1997) was an American author of sharply satirical, predominantly gay-themed transgressional fiction. ...


The opening shot is discussed briefly in the opening of Robert Altman's 1992 film, The Player, by two characters who work for a fictional Hollywood studio. The shot in which the discussion takes place is itself a similar type of extended, uninterrupted tracking shot that spans the first three minutes of Touch of Evil. The opening is also referenced by Rainn Wilson in the DVD commentary of The Office episode entitled "Performance Anxiety". For other persons named Robert Altman, see Robert Altman (disambiguation). ... The Player (1992) is a movie that tells the story of Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins), a Hollywood studio executive who believes he is being blackmailed by a screenwriter whose script he once rejected. ...


Singer-songwriter Tom Russell has a song titled "Touch Of Evil" on his 2001 album Borderland that references the movie extensively, including the long opening shot and the dialogue between Dietrich and Welles about his future. Thomas George Tom Russell (born 5 March 1950[1] in Los Angeles) is an American singer-songwriter. ...


In the 2008 film In Bruges, the opening shots of Touch of Evil can be seen playing in the background during the scene when Harry (Ralph Finnes) instructs Ken (Brendan Gleeson) to kill Ray (Collin Farrell). In Bruges is a film directed and written by Martin McDonagh. ...


About the film

  • "Touch of Evil, of course, was made by one of the great directors. If it is not Citizen Kane, it has been listed not far behind Kane in the list of Welles' films. It was a remarkable experience for me, a great learning experience, one of the most valuable I've had in my whole film career. I probably learned more about acting from Welles than any other film director I've worked for."—Charlton Heston

Citizen Kane is a 1941 classic American dramatic film, the first feature film directed by Orson Welles, who also co-authored the screenplay. ... Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ...

See also

According to the Auteur Theory, the prevalent framework of modern film criticism, a film director is most responsible for the creative aspects of a film. ...

References

  1. ^ Robson, Eddie, Film Noir, Virgin Books, 2005.
  2. ^ Leaming, Barbara, "Orson Welles: A biography." New York: Viking Penguin Inc., 1985.
  3. ^ The memo and changes are featured at http://wellesnet.com/touch_memo1.htm
  4. ^ One of our classics is missing. Guardian Unlimited. Retrieved on 2006-08-19.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

Nericcio, William Anthony. 'Hallucinations of Miscegenation and Murder: Dancing along the Mestiza/o Borders of Proto-Chicana/o Cinema with Orson Welles's Touch of Evil.'The first chapter of Tex(t)-Mex.


External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Touch of Evil
Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... . ... . ... . ... . ... . ... . ... . ... . ... . ... . ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Chicago Reader Movie Review (2359 words)
This version makes it even clearer that Touch of Evil is a flat-out all-cylinders-running, eye-popping masterpiece, one of a few monumental 1950s swan songs marking the end of the great epoch of traditional studio filmmaking.
But as masterful as Welles's filming is, what makes Touch of Evil a staggering masterpiece is the global quality of his style, which causes every image to echo almost every other in the film.
In particular, the original release print of Touch of Evil is a historical artifact, a record of what opposing forces--cinematically illiterate studio bosses and a brilliant filmmaker--produced together as well as a record of what millions of people saw.
Touch of Evil - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1248 words)
Touch of Evil (1958), is considered one of the last examples of film noir in the classic era (from the early 1940s until the late 1950s).
Quinlan is not on the take, but is bitter about the unsolved murder of his wife early in his career and has come to believe he can spot the guilty with his intuition, an aching in his bad leg, and he was willing to frame the guilty to make sure they get their just deserts.
The A-movie was The Female Animal, starring Hedy Lamarr, produced by Albert Zugsmith and directed by Harry Keller whom the studio had hired to direct the re-shot material in Touch of Evil.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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