FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Tony Martin (farmer)

Anthony Edward Martin (born 1944) is a Norfolk farmer and cause célèbre as a result of his action in shooting two burglars who were robbing his home; he was convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison, but his conviction was reduced to manslaughter on appeal. 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ... Norfolk (pronounced IPA: ) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... Farmer spreading grasshopper bait in his alfalfa field. ... A cause célèbre (of which the plural is causes célèbres) is an issue or incident arousing widespread controversy, outside campaigning and/or heated public debate. ... Burglary – also called breaking and entering or house breaking – is a crime related to theft. ...


Martin lived in a run-down, isolated farmhouse in Emneth Hungate, Norfolk, nick-named "Bleak House". He had been burgled several times and in May 1999 had apparently lost £6,000 worth of furniture. He complained about police inaction on the burglaries. His shotgun license was revoked in 1994. Norfolk (pronounced IPA: ) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... Burglary – also called breaking and entering or house breaking – is a crime related to theft. ... A Shaker chair. ...

Contents


Attempted burglary and manslaughter

On the night of August 20, 1999 two burglars, Brendon Fearon, 29, and Fred Barras, 16, entered Bleak House. In the darkness of the night Martin fired his shotgun, wounding both of the intruders; Fearon in the leg, Barras in the back. Barras died in the grounds, though Fearon was able to leave and got medical assistance. Martin subsequently left the farm and spent the night at a friend's house. August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Brendon Fearon of Newark, Nottinghamshire, was convicted for conspiring to burgle the home of farmer Tony Martin in a notorious raid on 20 August 1999. ...


Burglary trial

On 10 January 2000 Fearon and Darren Bark, 33, both from Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire, admitted to conspiring to burgle Martin's farmhouse. Fearon was sentenced to three years, Bark to 30 months (with an additional 12 months from previous offences). Fearon was released on 10 August 2001. January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Newark (also Newark-on-Trent) is a town in Nottinghamshire, located on the River Trent. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ...


Murder trial

On 10 April 2000 Martin was charged with murder (of Barras), attempted murder (of Fearon), wounding with intent to cause injury (of Fearon) and possessing a firearm with intent to endanger life. April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Murder is both a legal and a moral term, that are not always coincident. ...


At his trial, Martin claimed that on the night of August 20, 1999, he was awakened by sounds in his home. He took his shotgun and came downstairs, he claimed, to be confronted by a torch being shone in his face. A 29 year old man, Brendon Fearon, and an accomplice of 16, Fred Barras, were stealing from the house. Martin fired three shots in the dark and in doing so killed the youth, and injured the older man. Martin was later arrested and charged with the murder of Barras and the wounding of Fearon with intent to cause grievous bodily harm. Martin was bailed; it was claimed by police that there was information of an underworld contract on his head for £60,000. August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... A pump-action and two semi-automatic action shotguns, 20 boxes of shotgun shells, a clay trap, and three boxes of clay pigeons. ... Brendon Fearon of Newark, Nottinghamshire, was convicted for conspiring to burgle the home of farmer Tony Martin in a notorious raid on 20 August 1999. ... The word bail as a legal term means: Security, usually a sum of money, exchanged for the release of an arrested person as a guarantee of that persons appearance for trial. ...


The jury at the trial found Martin guilty of murder by a 10 to 2 majority. They had been told that they had the option of returning a verdict of manslaughter if they thought that Tony Martin "did not intend to kill or cause serious bodily harm". A jury is a sworn body of persons convened to render a rational, impartial verdict and a finding of fact on a legal question officially submitted to them, or to set a penalty or judgment in a jury trial of a court of law. ... In legal parlance, a trial is an event in which parties to a dispute present information (in the form of evidence) in a formal setting, usually a court, before a judge, jury, or other designated finder of fact, in order to achieve a resolution to their dispute. ...


Martin was sentenced to life in prison, the mandatory sentence for murder. The case had attracted considerable media interest and the life sentence shocked many.


Appeal

An appeal was lodged and, in due course, Martin's appeal went before three senior judges headed by Lord Lane. An appeal is the act or fact of challenging a judicially cognizable and binding judgment to a higher judicial authority. ... Geoffrey Dawson Lane, Baron Lane AFC QC PC (born July 17, 1918) is a British Judge who served as Lord Chief Justice of England during the 1980s and early 1990s. ...


Martin's case was highlighted by William Hague, then leader of the Tories. Hague's actions arguably contributed to his growing image as the opportunist 'Billy Bandwagon' as it was thought Martin's case had little appeal beyond the Tory 'core vote'. This article is about the British politician William Hague; there is also a fictional character in sci-fi series Babylon 5 known as General William Hague. ... The Conservative Party is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting MPs, and the largest by of public membership. ...


Submissions by the defence that Martin had fired in self defence were rejected by the appeal court. But on this occasion the defence submitted evidence that Martin suffered paranoid personality disorder specifically directed at anyone intruding into his home; this submission was accepted by the Court of Appeal, and on the grounds of diminished responsibility, Martin's murder conviction vacated and replaced with manslaughter carrying a five year sentence, and his 10-year sentence for wounding the Fearon cut to three years, to run concurrently. For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ...


Parole applications and release

Martin was imprisoned in Highpoint prison, Suffolk. When he became eligible for parole and early release the Parole Board rejected his application; probation officers on Martin's cases said there was an "unacceptable risk" that Martin might again react with excessive force if other would-be burglars intruded on his Norfolk farm. Parole can have different meanings depending on the context. ... A Parole Board is a panel of people who decide whether a criminal should be allowed to be released from prison following him or her serving the minimum term of their sentence. ...


Martin stated that he would do the same thing again if he encountered the same circumstances[citation needed]


The Sun newspaper ran a continuous campaign supporting Tony Martin, with one front-page headline (2nd April 2000) stating that 55,000 readers had telephoned their support for him. On the 8th July 2003 they ran another full-page article (p.9) with the headline Sun readers have risen in defence of decency, with a personal letter of thanks from Martin, and picture. The Sun, a tabloid daily newspaper published in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland, has the highest circulation of any daily English-language newspaper in the world, standing at 3,154,881 copies daily in early 2006 [1], (compared to USA Today, the best-selling US newspaper at...


On July 28, 2003 Martin was released after serving over three years of his five year sentence, the maximum he could be held for given good behaviour, three days after Fearon was released from a drugs conviction, on the earliest date possible[citation needed]. The contrast led to another public outcry[citation needed]. July 28 is the 209th day (210th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 156 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Aftermath

The family of Fearon applied for, and received, an estimated £5,000 of legal aid to sue Martin for loss of earnings due to the injury he sustained, but later dropped the case after it became clear that Fearon had never actually received any legitimate earnings. Most liberal democracies consider that it is necessary to provide some level of legal aid to persons otherwise unable to afford legal representation. ...


Martin sold his version of the story to the Daily Mirror for £100,000. Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ...


Since his release Martin has appeared on the platform of the United Kingdom Independence Party and has also endorsed the British National Party, both parties have advocated changes in the law to stop prosecutions of people attacking intruders as well as less restrictive firearm controls. The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced you-kip) is a Eurosceptic political party that aims at British withdrawal from the European Union. ... The British National Party (BNP) is the most prominent far-right, and extremely racist political party in the United Kingdom. ...


Martin is the nephew of the late far right politician Andrew Fountaine. Andrew Fountaine (1918-1997) was a veteran of the far right scene in British politics. ...


The November 2003 "Traditional Britain Dinner" at Simpsons-in-the-Strand had Martin as their Guest-of-Honour. A number of figures on the traditional British right were in attendance, including Derek Turner, editor of the magazine Right Now!; Mike Smith, United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) candidate for Portsmouth North in the 2005 General Election and Chairman of the Conservative Democratic Alliance; Andrew Moffat, who stood for UKIP at the last two general elections; Adrian Davies, the barrister who is Chairman of the fledgling Freedom Party; and John Gouriet, a founder with Norris McWhirter of the Freedom Association. Gregory Lauder-Frost was in the Chair. A notice of the dinner appeared in the 'Court & Social' columns of The Daily Telegraph on 8 November 2003. SIMPSONS-IN-THE-STRAND is one of the most reknowned restaurants, and banquetting suites, in London. ... Derek Turner (born 1964 in Dublin, Ireland) is the editor of the right wing British conservative magazine Right Now!, and a freelance journalist. ... Right Now! is a bimonthly British political magazine. ... Michael Keith Smith (born 1953), commonly known as Mike Smith, is the chairman of the Conservative Democratic Alliance (CDA), and an activist in the United Kingdom Independence Party. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced you-kip) is a Eurosceptic political party that aims at British withdrawal from the European Union. ... Portsmouth North is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. ... The Conservative Democratic Alliance is a strongly right-wing United Kingdom pressure group which considers the Conservative Party to have swung overtly to the left and to no longer represent Toryism. ... Adrian Davies is chairman of the British Freedom Party, and the barrister who represented the World War II historian David Irving at his libel case appeal where Irving was accused of being a Holocaust revisionist. ... The Freedom Party is a small right wing British political party. ... Norris Dewar McWhirter, CBE (August 12, 1925 - April 19, 2004) was a writer, right wing political activist and television presenter. ... The Freedom Association is a right-wing British pressure group. ... This article is being considered for deletion for the 2nd time in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In a March 2004 interview with The Daily Telegraph, Martin said: "There is going to be a dictator in this country, but there are such things as benign dictators. Too much liberalism is worse than too little. The politicians as we know them are already anachronisms." 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


He continued: "There are things that want doing today, right now. A dictator is the way to go. For instance, we must keep out of Europe. We are a unique island people."


In a development which provoked fury [citation needed] Fearon was paid a reported £4,500 to contribute to a BBC documentary in 2005, Martin had also been interviewed for the documentary but had not been offered any fee.[citation needed] Founded in 1922 as the British Broadcasting Company Ltd (a privately owned company), subsequently Incorporated and nationalised in 1927 as The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC, also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Tony Martin's case was one that polarised the media in the UK to a greater degree than would usually be seen. To the left-leaning papers, he was a trigger-happy and unstable xenophobe, who wilfully killed a fleeing boy; and to the right-wing papers, he is a wronged man and a prime example of how the British legal system punishes victims and rewards criminals.


The law

For a general discussion on the theory behind the law, see the theory of self-defence. For a more specific coverage of the issues, see self-defence in English law and defence of property. This article and defense of property deal with the legal concept of excused (sometimes termed justified) acts that might otherwise be illegal. ... In English criminal law, the defence of self-defence provides for the right of people to act in a manner that would be otherwise unlawful in order to preserve the physical integrity of themselves or others or to prevent any crime. ... The defense of property is a possible justification used by defendants who argue that they should not be held liable for the loss and injury they have caused because they were acting to protect their property. ...


External links

  • Vote BNP and give Britain a dictator, says Tony Martin
  • An Englishman's home is his castle- Supportive page from sterlingtimes.com
  • BBC timeline for the case
  • Court of Appeal - Law Report
  • Guardian account of parole board decision
  • Failed attempt to quash parole board decision by Judicial Review - Law Report
  • Guardian catalogue of articles
  • Guardian profile of Martin

  Results from FactBites:
 
Special report: the Tony Martin case | Special reports | Guardian Unlimited (916 words)
September 22: Tony Martin is today expected to call an end to a legal dispute with a burglar he shot during a raid on his remote Norfolk farmhouse.
October 31: Tony Martin, the farmer jailed for life for shooting dead a teenage burglar, could be free within a year after his conviction was reduced from murder to manslaughter yesterday.
April 25 2000: Tony Martin, the Norfolk farmer who shot a teenage boy in the back as he tried to burgle his isolated farmhouse, was yesterday found guilty of murder and sent to prison for life at the end of a case that touched a raw nerve across rural Britain.
Tony Martin (farmer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1087 words)
On 10 April 2000 Martin was charged with murder (of Barras), attempted murder (of Fearon), wounding with intent to cause injury (of Fearon) and possessing a firearm with intent to endanger life.
Martin fired three shots in the dark and in doing so killed the youth, and injured the older man. Martin was later arrested and charged with the murder of Barras and the wounding of Fearon with intent to cause grievous bodily harm.
Tony Martin's case was one that polarised the media in the UK to a greater degree than would usually be seen.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m