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Encyclopedia > Tony Kushner
Tony Kushner
Born July 16, 1956 (1956-07-16) (age 51)
New York City, New York

Tony Kushner (born July 16, 1956) is an award-winning American playwright most famous for his play Angels in America, for which he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. He is also co-author of, along with Eric Roth, the screenplay of the 2005 film Munich, which was directed by Steven Spielberg and earned Kushner (along with Roth) an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay. is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York redirects here. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes is an award winning play in two parts by American playwright Tony Kushner. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... Eric Roth (born 1945) is an American screenwriter. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Munich is a 2005 drama film starring Eric Bana. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...


He was born to a Jewish family in Manhattan. His parents, William Kushner and Sylvia (Deutscher) Kushner, both classically trained musicians, moved to Lake Charles, Louisiana, the seat of Calcasieu Parish, shortly after his birth. During high school Kushner had a reputation in policy debate, at one point going to a camp, and making it to the final rounds. Kushner moved to New York in 1974 to begin his undergraduate college education at Columbia University, where he completed a B.A. in Medieval Studies [1] in 1978. He studied directing at New York University's Graduate School, from which he was graduated in 1984. During graduate school, he spent the summers of 1978-1981 directing both early original works (Masque of Owls and Incidents and Occurrences During the Travels of the Tailor Max) and Shakespearean plays (A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Tempest) for the children attending the Governor's Program for Gifted Children (GPGC) in his home town of Lake Charles, Louisiana. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... This article is about the City of Lake Charles. ... Calcasieu Parish is a parish located in the state of Louisiana. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see A Midsummer Nights Dream (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The Tempest (disambiguation). ... This article is about the City of Lake Charles. ...


Angels in America is a play in two parts. The first part is entitled Millennium Approaches, and the second is entitled Perestroika. Kushner's other plays include Hydriotaphia, Slavs!: Thinking About the Longstanding Problems of Virtue and Happiness, A Bright Room Called Day, Homebody/Kabul, and the book for the musical Caroline, or Change. His new translation of Bertolt Brecht's Mother Courage and Her Children was performed at the Delacorte Theater in the summer of 2006 starring Meryl Streep and directed by George C. Wolfe. Kushner has also adapted S. Ansky's play The Dybbuk. Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes is an award winning play in two parts by American playwright Tony Kushner. ... A Bright Room Called Day is a play by American playwright Tony Kushner, author of the better-known Angels in America. ... Caroline, Or Change is a through-composed Broadway musical with book and lyrics by Tony Kushner and score by Jeanine Tesori, originally directed by George C. Wolfe. ... {{dy justified his choice of form, and from about 1929 on he began to interpret its penchant for contradictions, much as had Eisenstein, in terms of the dialectic. ... Mother Courage and Her Children (German: Mutter Courage und ihre Kinder) was a play written in 1939 by the German dramatist and poet Bertolt Brecht (1898 - 1956) with significant contributions from his mistress at the time, Margarete Steffin. ... Mary Louise Streep, mostly known as Meryl Streep (born June 22, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning American actress who has worked in theatre, television, and film. ... George C. Wolfe (September 23, 1954 - ) is an African-American playwright and director of theater and film. ... Shloyme Zanvl Rappoport (1863–1920), better known by the pseudonym S. Ansky, was a scholar who documented Jewish folklore and mystical beliefs. ... For information on the creature from Jewish folklore, see dybbuk. ...


In January 2006, a documentary feature about Kushner entitled Wrestling With Angels debuted at the Sundance Film Festival. The film was directed by Freida Lee Mock. The Sundance Film Festival is a film festival in the state of Utah in the United States. ... Freida Lee Mock is an Academy and Emmy Award-winning filmmaker, credited with producing films about a wide variety of historical and contemporary subjects. ...


In April 2003 Kushner and his long-time partner, Entertainment Weekly editor Mark Harris, had a wedding ceremony in New York. Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ...


Kushner's plays are published by T C G and Broadway Play Publishing Inc. New York publisher and licensor of stage rights of new American plays, founded in 1983. ...

Contents

Controversy over views on Israel and Zionism

In an interview with the Jewish Independent, Kushner insisted that "I want the state of Israel to continue to exist. I've always said that. I've never said anything else. My positions have been lied about and misrepresented in so many ways. People claim that I'm for a one-state solution, which is not true." However, he later stated that he hopes that "there might be a merging of the two countries because [they're] geographically kind of ridiculous looking on a map," although he acknowledged that political realities make this unlikely in the near future.[2]


Kushner's anti-Zionism has created some controversy in the Jewish community, including some opposition to his receiving an honorary doctorate at the 2006 commencement of Brandeis University. The Zionist Organization of America unsuccessfully lobbied for the university to rescind its invitation to Kushner. In the course of the controversy, quotes critical of Zionism and Israel made by Kushner were circulated. Kushner said at the time that his quotes were "grossly mischaracterized." Kushner told the Jewish Advocate in an interview "All that anybody seems to be reading is a couple of right-wing Web sites taking things deliberately out of context and excluding anything that would complicate the picture by making me seem like a reasonable person, which I basically think I am."[3][4][5]


Other statements

On the issue of Israel, Kushner has stated that:

"there's a very strong democratic tradition in Israel – a secular, pluralist, democratic tradition in Israel. I believe that there's a great deal of jurisprudence and legislative history and executive action in Israel that supports a vision of Israel as a progressive, democratic, secular, pluralist state. I don't know how you reconcile that with the notion of Israel as a Jewish state and that's always been a question that I've had about it, but I leave that to Israel to work out. I believe that there are a lot of people in Israel who absolutely want to see the country equally enfranchise its Jewish citizens and its non-Jewish citizens, its Arab citizens, and I would hope that would be an ongoing struggle that resolves itself in the direction of pluralist, constitutional democracy; a secular, pluralist, constitutional democracy. And there's good reason to hope for that and I think that needs to be supported."[2]

Works

Plays

  • The Age of Assassins, New York, Newfoundland Theatre, 1982.
  • La Fin de la Baleine: An Opera for the Apocalypse, New York, Ohio Theatre, 1983.
  • The Umbrella Oracle, Martha's Vineyard, The Yard, Inc..
  • Last Gasp at the Cataract, Martha's Vineyard, The Yard, Inc., 1984.
  • Yes, Yes, No, No: The Solace-of-Solstice, Apogee/Perigee, Bestial/Celestial Holiday Show, produced in St. Louis, Missouri, Imaginary Theatre Company, Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, 1985, published in Plays in Process, 1987.
  • Stella (adapted from the play by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe), produced in New York City, 1987.
  • A Bright Room Called Day, produced in New York, Theatre 22, 22 April 1985; San Francisco, Eureka Theatre, October 1987; London, Bush Theatre, 1988), Broadway Play Publishing, 1991.
  • The Heavenly Theatre, produced at New York University, Tisch School of the Arts, 1986.
  • In Great Eliza's Golden Time, produced in St. Louis, Missouri, Imaginary Theatre Company, Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, 1986.
  • Hydriotaphia, produced in New York City, 1987 (based on the life on Sir Thomas Browne)
  • The Illusion (adapted from Pierre Corneille's play L'Illusion comique; produced in New York City, 1988, revised version produced in Hartford, CT, 1990), Broadway Play Publishing, 1991.
  • In That Day (Lives of the Prophets), New York University, Tisch School of the Arts, 1989.
  • (With Ariel Dorfman) Widows (adapted from a book by Ariel Dorfman), produced in Los Angeles, CA, 1991.
  • Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes, Part One: Millennium Approaches (produced in San Francisco, 1991), Hern, 1992.
  • Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes, Part Two: Perestroika, produced in New York City, 1992.
  • Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes (includes both parts), Theatre Communications Group (New York, NY), 1995.
  • Slavs! Thinking About the Longstanding Problems of Virtue and Happiness, Theatre Communications Group, 1995.
  • Reverse Transcription: Six Playwrights Bury a Seventh, A Ten-Minute Play That's Nearly Twenty Minutes Long, Louisville, Humana Festival of New American Plays, Actors Theatre of Louisville, March 1996.
  • A Dybbuk, or Between Two Worlds (adapted from Joachim Neugroschel's transation of the original play by S. Ansky; produced in New York City at the Joseph Papp Public Theater, 1997), Theatre Communications Group, 1997.
  • The Good Person of Szechuan (adapted from the original play by Bertolt Brecht), Arcade, 1997.
  • (With Eric Bogosian and others) Love's Fire: Seven New Plays Inspired by Seven Shakespearean Sonnets, Morrow, 1998.
  • Terminating, or Lass Meine Schmerzen Nicht Verloren Sein, or Ambivalence, in Love's Fire, Minneapolis, Guthrie Theater Lab, 7 January 1998; New York: Joseph Papp Public Theater, 19 June 1998.
  • Henry Box Brown, or the Mirror of Slavery, performed at the Royal National Theatre, London, 1998.
  • Homebody/Kabul, first performed in New York City, 19 December 2001.
  • Caroline, or Change (musical), first performed in New York at the Joseph Papp Public Theater, 2002.
  • (Director)Ellen McLaughlin, Helen, produced at the Joseph Papp Public Theater, 2002.
  • Only We Who Guard The Mystery Shall Be Unhappy, 2003.
  • Translation with “liberties”—but purportedly “not an adaptation”—of Brecht’s Mother Courage and Her Children (2006)[6]

Goethe redirects here. ... A Bright Room Called Day is a play by American playwright Tony Kushner, author of the better-known Angels in America. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Bush Theatre, based in Shepherds Bush, London, is one of Britains leading new writing theatres. ... Sir Thomas Browne (October 19, 1605 – October 19, 1682) was an English author of varied works that disclose his wide learning in diverse fields including medicine, religion, science and the esoteric. ... Pierre Corneille. ... LIllusion Comique is a comedic play by Pierre Corneille, written in 1636. ... Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes is an award winning play in two parts by American playwright Tony Kushner. ... Dybbuk - in kabbalah and European Jewish folklore, is a malicious possessing spirit, believed to be the dislocated soul of a dead person, escaped from Gehenna, a Hebrew term very loosely translated as hell. The word dybbuk is derived from the Hebrew דיבוק, meaning attachment; the dybbuk attaches itself to the body... {{dy justified his choice of form, and from about 1929 on he began to interpret its penchant for contradictions, much as had Eisenstein, in terms of the dialectic. ... Eric Bogosian Eric Bogosian (born on April 24, 1953) is an American actor, playwright, monologist, and novelist. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Henry Box Brown was born into slavery in 1815 in Louisa County, Virginia. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Caroline, Or Change is a through-composed Broadway musical with book and lyrics by Tony Kushner and score by Jeanine Tesori, originally directed by George C. Wolfe. ... {{dy justified his choice of form, and from about 1929 on he began to interpret its penchant for contradictions, much as had Eisenstein, in terms of the dialectic. ... Mother Courage and Her Children (German: Mutter Courage und ihre Kinder) was a play written in 1939 by the German dramatist and poet Bertolt Brecht (1898 - 1956) with significant contributions from his mistress at the time, Margarete Steffin. ...

Books

  • A Meditation from Angels in America, HarperSan Francisco, 1994.
  • Thinking about the Longstanding Problems of Virtue and Happiness: Essays, a Play, Two Poems, and a Prayer, Theatre Communications Group (New York, NY), 1995.
  • Howard Cruse, Stuck Rubber Baby, introduction by Kushner (New York: Paradox Press, 1995).
  • David B. Feinberg, Queer and Loathing: Rants and Raves of a Raging AIDS Clone, introduction by Kushner (New York: Penguin, 1995).
  • David Wojnarowicz, The Waterfront Journals, edited by Amy Scholder, introduction by Kushner (New York: Grove, 1996).
  • "Three Screeds from Key West: For Larry Kramer," in We Must Love One Another or Die: The Life and Legacies of Larry Kramer, edited by Lawrence D. Mass (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1997), pp. 191-199.
  • Moises Kaufman, Gross Indecency, afterword by Kushner (New York: Vintage, 1997), pp. 135-143.
  • Plays by Tony Kushner (New York: Broadway Play Publishing, 1999). Includes:
    • A Bright Room called Day
    • The Illusion
    • Slavs! Thinking About the Longstanding Problems of Virtue and Happiness
  • Death & Taxes: Hydrotaphia, and Other Plays, Theatre Communications Group (New York, NY), 2000. Includes:
  • Brundibar, illustrated by Maurice Sendak, Hyperion Books for Children, 2003.
  • Peter's Pixie, by Donn Kushner, illustrated by Sylvie Daigneault, introduction by Tony Kushner, Tundra Books, 2003
  • The Art of Maurice Sendak: 1980 to the Present, 2003
  • Save Your Democratic Citizen Soul!: Rants, Screeds, and Other Public Utterances
  • Wrestling with Zion: Progressive Jewish-American Responses to the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, with Alisa Solomon, Grove, 2003.

Howard Cruse is a gay American cartoonist. ... Stuck Rubber Baby is a graphic novel written and illustrated by Howard Cruse, first published in 1995. ... A famous image of David Wojnarowicz David Wojnarowicz (September 14, 1954 - July 22, 1992) was a gay painter, photographer, writer, filmmaker, performance artist, and activist who was prominent in the New York City art world of the 1980s. ... Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial, or a Discourse of the Sepulchral Urns lately found in Norfolk, is a work by Sir Thomas Browne, published in 1658 as the first part of a two-part work that concludes with The Garden of Cyrus. ... G. David Schine at the Army-McCarthy hearings, 1954 Gerard David Schine, better known as G. David Schine (September 11, 1927 - June 19, 1996), received national attention in 1954 when he became a central figure in the Army-McCarthy Hearings of 1954. ... Akiba Also pronounced Akiva can refer to: The Aramaic form of the name Jacob. ... Howard Jarvis (September 22, 1903 - August 11, 1986) was born in Ogden, Utah and died in Los Angeles, California. ... Brundibar is the name of an opera by Jewish Czech composer Hans Krása. ... Maurice Bernard Sendak (born June 10, 1928) is an American writer and illustrator of childrens literature who is best known for his book Where the Wild Things Are, published in 1963. ... Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן, tziyyon; Tiberian vocalization: tsiyyôn; transliterated Zion or Sion) is a term that most often designates the Land of Israel and its capital Jerusalem. ...

Magazine contributions

  • "The Secrets of Angels," New York Times, 27 March 1994, p. H5.
  • "The State of the Theatre," Times Literary Supplement, 28 April 1995, p. 14.
  • "The Theater of Utopia," Theater, 26 (1995): 9-11.
  • "The Art of the Difficult," Civilization, 4 (August/September 1997): 62-67.
  • "Notes About Political Theater," Kenyon Review, 19 (Summer/Fall 1997): 19-34.
  • "Wings of Desire," Premiere, October 1997: 70.
  • "Fo's Last Laugh--I," Nation, 3 November 1997: 4-5.
  • "Matthew's Passion,"[1] Nation, 9 November 1998
  • "A Modest Proposal," American Theatre, January 1998: 20-22, 77-89.
  • "A Word to Graduates: Organize!," Nation, 1 July 2002.
  • "Only We Who Guard The Mystery Shall Be Unhappy," Nation, 24 March 2003.

is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Other works

  • La Fin de la Baleine: An Opera for the Apocalypse, (opera) 1983
  • St. Cecilia or The Power of Music, (opera libretto based on Heinrich von Kleist's eighteenth-century story Die heilige Cäcilie oder Die Gewalt der Musik, Eine Legende)
  • Brundibar, (an opera in collaboration with Maurice Sendak)
  • Munich, a film by Steven Spielberg (2005) - screenplay (co-written by)

Bernd Heinrich Wilhelm von Kleist (October 18, 1777 – November 21, 1811) was a German poet, dramatist and novelist. ... Munich is a 2005 drama film starring Eric Bana. ...

Interviews

  • Gerard Raymond, "Q & A With Tony Kushner," Theatre Week (20-26 December 1993): 14-20.
  • Mark Marvel, "A Conversation with Tony Kushner," Interview, 24 (February 1994): 84.
  • David Savran, "Tony Kushner," in Speaking on Stage: Interviews with Contemporary American Playwrights, edited by Philip C. Kolin and Colby H. Kullman (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1996), pp. 291-313.
  • Robert Vorlicky, ed., Tony Kushner in Conversation (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1998).
  • Victor Wishna, "Tony Kushner," in In Their Company: Portraits of American Playwrights, Photographs by Ken Collins, Interviews by Victor Wishna (New York: Umbrage Editions, 2006).

is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ...

Career

  • Governor's Program for Gifted Children, Lake Charles, LA, Drama Teacher, Director, Playwright, 1978-1981
  • United Nations Plaza Hotel, New York City, switchboard operator, 1979-85
  • St. Louis Repertory Theatre, assistant director, 1985-86
  • New York Theatre Workshop, artistic director, 1987-88
  • Theatre Communication Group, New York City, director of literary services, 1990-91
  • Juilliard School of Drama, New York City, playwright-in-residence, 1990-92
  • Guest artist at New York University Graduate Theatre Program, Yale University, and Princeton University, beginning in 1989.

The Juilliard School is a performing arts conservatory in New York City, informally but definitively identified as simply Juilliard, and most famous for its musically-trained alumni. ...

Awards and nominations

Academy Award

  • Nominated: Best Adapted Screenplay, Munich (2005)

Emmy Award Munich is a 2005 drama film starring Eric Bana. ...

  • Won: Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Dramatic Special, Angels in America (2004)

Golden Globe Award Angels in America is an award-winning 2003 HBO miniseries adapted from the play of the same name by Tony Kushner. ...

  • Nominated: Best Screenplay, Munich (2005)

Tony Award Munich is a 2005 drama film starring Eric Bana. ...

  • Won: Best Author of a Play, Angels in America: Millennium Approaches (1993)
  • Won: Best Author of a Play, Angels in America: Perestroika (1994)
  • Nominated: Best Book of a Musical, Caroline, or Change (2004)
  • Nominated: Best Score, Caroline, or Change (2004)

Other Awards Caroline, Or Change is a through-composed Broadway musical with book and lyrics by Tony Kushner and score by Jeanine Tesori, originally directed by George C. Wolfe. ... Caroline, Or Change is a through-composed Broadway musical with book and lyrics by Tony Kushner and score by Jeanine Tesori, originally directed by George C. Wolfe. ...

  • Pulitzer Prize for Drama
  • Evening Standard Award
  • Olivier Award Winner - Best New Musical - Caroline, or Change, 2007
  • OBIE
  • New York Drama Critics Circle Award
  • American Academy of Arts and Letters Award
  • Whiting Writers Fellowship
  • Lila Wallace/Reader's Digest Fellowship
  • National Foundation of Jewish Culture, Cultural Achievement award
  • Honorary Doctor of Letters from Pace University on May 25, 2004
  • Honorary Degree from Brandeis University on May 21, 2006

The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Doctor of Letters (Latin: Litterarum doctor; D.Litt. ... Pace redirects here. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Brandeis University is a private university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. ...

Further reading

  • Contemporary Literary Criticism, Gale (Detroit), Volume 81, 1994.
  • Bloom, Harold, ed., Tony Kushner, New York, Chelsea House, 2005.
  • Brask, Anne, ed., "Ride on the Moon", Chicago, Randomhouse, 1990.
  • Brask, Per K., ed., Essays on Kushner’s Angels, Winnipeg, Blizzard Publishing, 1995.
  • Dickinson, Peter, "Travels With Tony Kushner and David Beckham, 2002-2004", in Theatre Journal, 57.3, 2005, pp. 229-50
  • Fisher, James, The Theater of Tony Kushner, London, Routledge, 2002.
  • Fisher, James, ed., Tony Kushner. New Essays on the Art and Politics of His Plays, London, McFarland & Company, 2006.
  • Geis, Deborah R., and Steven F. Kruger, Approaching the Millennium: Essays on Angels in America, University of Michigan Press, 1997.
  • Klüßendorf, Ricarda, "The Great Work Begins". Tony Kushner's Theater for Change in America, Trier, WVT, 2007.
  • Lioi, Anthony, "The Great Work Begins: Theater as Theurgy in Angels in America", in CrossCurrents, Fall 2004, Vol. 54, No 3
  • Solty, Ingar, "Tony Kushners amerikanischer Engel der Geschichte", in Das Argument 265, 2/2006, pp. 209-24 [2]

External links

References

  1. ^ PBS
  2. ^ a b Cynthia Ramsey. "Tony Kushner as film subject", Jewish Independent, August 24, 2007. 
  3. ^ Shayndi Raice. Brandeis graduation honoree draws fire. The Jewish Advocate. May 4 2006.
  4. ^ Nicola Brodie. New controversy for Brandeis as school honors playwright Kushner. Jewish Telegraphic Agency. May 12, 2006.
  5. ^ Tony Kushner. Letter to President Jehuda Reinharz, Brandeis University. April 25, 2006. Reprinted in The Forward. Accessed March 13, 2008.
  6. ^ Kalb, Jonathan. "Still Fearsome, Mother Courage Gets a Makeover", The New York Times, 2006-08-06, p. 2.4. Retrieved on 2006-08-14. 
Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tony Kushner Collection (485 words)
Tony Kushner was born in Manhattan and raised in Lake Charles, Louisiana, the son of professional musicians.
Kushner is the recipient of grants from the New York Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts, a 1990 Whiting Foundation Writer's Award, and an Arts Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, among others.
Tony Kushner, the son of William and the late Sylvia Kushner was born in New York but graduated from Lake Charles High School.
Tony Kushner - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1306 words)
Tony Kushner (born July 16, 1956) is an award-winning American playwright most famous for his play Angels in America, for which he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize.
He was born to a Jewish family in Manhattan, but his parents, William Kushner and Sylvia (Deutscher) Kushner, both classically trained musicians, moved to Lake Charles, Louisiana, the seat of Calcasieu Parish, shortly after his birth.
Kushner moved to New York in 1974 to begin his undergraduate college education at Columbia University, where he completed a B.A. in English literature in 1978.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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