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Encyclopedia > Tony Blair
For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation)
The Rt Hon. Tony Blair MP


Incumbent
Assumed office 
May 2, 1997
Deputy John Prescott
Preceded by John Major
Succeeded by Incumbent

Born May 6, 1953 (age 53)[1]
Flag of Scotland Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom
Constituency Sedgefield
Political party Labour
Spouse Cherie Booth
Religion Anglican (Anglo-Catholic)
Signature

Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency of Sedgefield in the North East of England. As a member of the British Cabinet he is also a Privy Counsellor. His official residence is 10 Downing Street, London, SW1A 2AA.[2] Tony Blair is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Tony Blair may also refer to: Tony Blair (philosopher), a co-creater of informal logic at the University of Windsor Category: ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (708x874, 159 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Labour Party (UK) Talk:Tony Blair Tony Blair Prime Ministry of Tony Blair Metadata This file contains additional... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the the United Kingdom. ... The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Leslie Prescott MP (born 31 May 1938) is a British Labour Party politician, Deputy Prime Minister, First Secretary of State and Member of Parliament for the North East constituency of Hull East. ... Sir John Major, KG, CH (born 29 March 1943) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and leader of the British Conservative Party from 1990 to 1997. ... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... Edinburgh (pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity(English) Wha daur meddle wi me? (Scots)[1] Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots[2] Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I... Sedgefield is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... Cherie Blair Cherie Blair (born 23 September 1954 in Bury, England), known professionally as Cherie Booth QC, is a prominent barrister. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The terms Anglo-Catholic and Anglo-Catholicism describe people, groups, ideas, customs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise continuity with Catholic tradition. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the the United Kingdom. ... The First Lord of the Treasury is the head of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer in the United Kingdom, usually but not always the Prime Minister. ... The Minister of the Civil Service is the head of the British Civil Service. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Sedgefield is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... North-East England is one of the nine official regions of England and comprises the combined area of Northumberland, County Durham, Tyne and Wear and a small part of North Yorkshire. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... A cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... // An official residence is the residence at which heads of state, heads of government, gubernatorial or other senior figures officially reside. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Blair became leader of the British Labour Party in July 1994 following the sudden death of his predecessor, John Smith. Under Blair's leadership, the party won a landslide victory in the 1997 general election, ending 18 years of government by the Conservative Party. Blair is the Labour Party's longest-serving prime minister, the only person to have led the party to three consecutive general election victories, and the only Labour prime minister to serve more than one full consecutive term. The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... A leadership election was held in 1994 for the Labour Party in the United Kingdom, after the death of incumbent leader John Smith. ... John Smith QC (September 13, 1938 – May 12, 1994) was a British politician who served as leader of the Labour Party from July 1992 until his sudden and unexpected death from a heart attack on 12 May 1994. ... In politics, a landslide victory (or just a landslide) is the victory of a candidate or political party by an overwhelming majority in an election. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


On 7 September 2006 Blair publicly stated he would step down as party leader by the time of the TUC conference in September 2007, but has not yet given a date for his departure.[3] September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Image:TradeUnionsCongress20050108 CopyrightKaihsuTai. ...

Contents

Background and family life

Blair was born at the Queen Mary Maternity Home[4] in Edinburgh, Scotland, the second son of Leo and Hazel Blair (née Corscadden). Leo Blair was the son of two English actors, Charles Parsons and Mary Augusta Ridgway Bridson, whilst Hazel Corscadden's family were Protestants from County Donegal, Ireland. He has one elder brother, William Blair, who is a barrister and a Queen's Counsel (QC), and a younger sister, Sarah. Blair spent the first 19 months of his life at the family home in Paisley Terrace in the Willowbrae area of Edinburgh. During this period his father worked as a junior tax inspector whilst also studying for a law degree from the University of Edinburgh.[4] His family spent three and a half years in the 1950s living in Adelaide, Australia, where his father was a lecturer in law at the University of Adelaide.[5] The Blairs lived quite close to the university, in the leafy suburb of Dulwich. Edinburgh (pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity(English) Wha daur meddle wi me? (Scots)[1] Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots[2] Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I... Leo Charles Lynton Blair (1923 - 19??) is the father of Tony Blair, current Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... The English are an ethnic group and nation primarily associated with England and the English language. ... The Reformation, before which, in 1536, Henry VIII broke with Papal authority, fundamentally changed Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Lifford Code: DL Area: 4,841 km² Population (2006) 146,956 Website: www. ... William James Lynton Blair (born March 31, 1950) is a British QC and domestic and international banking and finance law specialist. ... English barrister A barrister is a lawyer found in many common law jurisdictions who employ a split profession (as opposed to a fused profession) in relation to legal representation. ... Cherie Booth QC wearing her ceremonial robes (including full-bottomed wig) as Queens Counsel at the Bar of England and Wales. ... The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Adelaide is the capital and most populous city of the Australian state of South Australia, and is the fifth largest city in Australia, with a population of over 1. ... The University of Adelaide (colloquially Adelaide University or Adelaide Uni) is a public university located in Adelaide. ... Dulwich is a suburb of Adelaide in the City of Burnside. ...


The family returned to Britain in the late 1950s, living for a time with Hazel Blair's parents at their home in Stepps, near Glasgow. He spent the remainder of his childhood in Durham, England, his father being by then a lecturer at Durham University. After attending Durham's Chorister School Blair boarded at Fettes College, a famous independent school in Edinburgh, where he met Charlie Falconer (a pupil at the rival Edinburgh Academy, whom he later appointed Lord Chancellor. He reportedly modelled himself on Mick Jagger, and is said to have enjoyed a reputation as a conspicuously "cool" young man among his fellow pupils. His teachers, however, were less impressed by his behaviour: his biographer John Rentoul reported that "All the teachers I spoke to... said he was a complete pain in the backside, and they were very glad to see the back of him." Blair was arrested at Fettes, having being mistaken for a burglar as he climbed into his dormitory using a ladder, after being out late.[6] Stepps is a town in North Lanarkshire, Scotland, on the north-eastern outskirts of Glasgow. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Statistics Population: 42,939 (2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: NZ274424 Administration District: City of Durham Shire county: Durham Region: North East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Durham Historic county: Durham Services Police force: County Durham Ambulance service: North East Post office and telephone... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Affiliations 1994 Group, European University Association, Association of MBAs, EQUIS, Universities UK, N8 Group, Association of Commonwealth Universities Website http://www. ... The Chorister School is a pre-preparatory and preparatory day and boarding school for ages 4-13 in Durham, England. ... Fettes College is an independent boarding and day school in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ... Charles Leslie Falconer, Baron Falconer of Thoroton, PC (born November 19, 1951), is a British lawyer and Labour Party politician. ... The Edinburgh Academy The Edinburgh Academy is an independent school. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born 26 July 1943) is an English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer, and businessman. ... Look up cool in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Tony Blair's wife, Cherie Booth QC
Tony Blair's wife, Cherie Booth QC

After Fettes, Blair spent a year in London, where he attempted to find fame as a rock music promoter, before going up to Oxford University to read jurisprudence at St John's College. As a student, he played guitar and sang for a rock band called Ugly Rumours. During this time, he dated future American Psycho director Mary Harron.[7] After graduating from Oxford with a second class degree, Blair became a member of Lincoln's Inn, enrolled as a pupil barrister and met his future wife, Cherie Booth (daughter of the actor Tony Booth) at the Chambers founded by Derry Irvine (who was to be Blair's first Lord Chancellor), 11 King's Bench Walk Chambers. His biographer Rentoul records that, according to his lawyer friends, Blair was much less concerned about which party he was affiliated with than about his aim of becoming Prime Minister. Image File history File links CherieBooth. ... Image File history File links CherieBooth. ... Cherie Blair QC (born in Bury, Greater Manchester on September 23, 1954), better known as the wife of British Prime Minister Tony Blair, is also a successful lawyer, in which capacity she uses her maiden name Cherie Booth. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Rock and roll. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Reading is the act of studying, particularly for an undergraduate degree at Oxford and Cambridge universities. ... College name St Johns College Collegium Divi Joannis Baptistae Named after Saint John the Baptist Established 1555 Sister College Sidney Sussex College President Sir Michael Scholar KCB JCR President Rhys Jones Undergraduates 381 Graduates 184 Homepage Boatclub St Johns College is one of the constituent colleges of the... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Parts of the guitar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Ugly Rumours was the name of a rock band founded in part by the current (as of September 12, 2006) UK prime minister Tony Blair, while studying law at St Johns College, Oxford during the early 1970s; he sang and played guitar. ... American Psycho is a 1991 novel by Bret Easton Ellis. ... Mary Harron (born 1956) is a Canadian film director, screenwriter and producer. ... The British undergraduate degree classification system is a grading scheme for undergraduate degrees (bachelors degrees and some masters degrees) in the United Kingdom. ... Part of Lincolns Inn drawn by Thomas Shepherd c. ... Cherie Blair Cherie Blair (born 23 September 1954 in Bury, England), known professionally as Cherie Booth QC, is a prominent barrister. ... Tony Booth Antony George Booth (born October 9, 1931 in Liverpool, better known as Tony Booth) is an English actor, best known for his role in the BBC series Til Death Us Do Part. ... A judges chambers - often just called Chambers - is the office of a judge. ... Alexander Andrew Mackay Irvine, Lord Irvine of Lairg, QC, PC (born June 23, 1940), known as Derry Irvine, is a British lawyer and political figure who served as Lord Chancellor under his former pupil Tony Blair. ... 11 Kings Bench Walk Chambers is a barristers Chambers founded by Alexander Irvine QC. The chambers specialises in employment law, public and administrative law and commercial law. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ...


Blair married Booth, a practising Roman Catholic and future Queen's Counsel, on 29 March 1980. They have four children (Euan, Nicky, Kathryn and Leo). Leo (born 20 May 2000) was the first legitimate child born to a serving Prime Minister in over 150 years, since Francis Russell was born to Lord John Russell on 11 July 1849. The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... Cherie Booth QC wearing her ceremonial robes (including full-bottomed wig) as Queens Counsel at the Bar of England and Wales. ... March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (89th in leap years). ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Euan Anthony Blair (born January 19, 1984, London), is the eldest son of British Prime Minister Tony Blair. ... Nicholas John Blair (born December 6, 1985) is the second son of British Prime Minister, Tony Blair and his wife Cherie Blair. ... Kathryn Hazel Blair ( March 2, 1988) is the only daughter of British Prime Minister Tony Blair and Cherie Booth, QC. She was born by caesarean section due to being in the breech position. ... Leo George Blair (born 20 May 2000) is the youngest son of Tony Blair, the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and his wife Cherie Blair. ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Russell, 1st Earl Russell, KG, GCMG, PC (18 August 1792–28 May 1878), known as Lord John Russell before 1861, was a British Whig and Liberal politician who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid-19th century. ... July 11 is the 192nd day (193rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 173 days remaining. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Although the Blairs stated that they had wished to shield their children from the media, Euan and Nicky's education was a cause of political controversy. They both attended the Catholic London Oratory School, criticised by left-wingers for its selection procedures instead of a poorly-performing Catholic school in Labour-controlled Islington, where they then lived, in Richmond Avenue. There was further criticism when it was revealed that Euan received private coaching from staff from Westminster School. London Oratory School Crest The London Oratory School is a Roman Catholic voluntary aided comprehensive secondary school in London educating boys in the age range of 7-16 and boys and girls in the sixth form. ... Catholic students of the Cathedral Church of St. ... Arms of Islington London Borough Council Islington Town Hall Islington is a borough of London to the north of the City of London, west of Hackney, east of Camden, and south of Haringey. ... The Royal College of St. ...


Early political career

Blair joined the Labour Party shortly after graduating from Oxford in 1975. During the early 1980s, he was involved in Labour politics in Hackney South and Shoreditch, where he aligned himself with the "soft left" of the party. He unsuccessfully attempted to secure selection as a candidate for Hackney Borough Council. Through his father-in-law, the actor Tony Booth, he contacted Labour MP Tom Pendry to ask for help in pursuing a Parliamentary career. Pendry gave him a tour of the House of Commons and advised him to stand for selection as a candidate in the forthcoming by-election in the safe Conservative seat of Beaconsfield, where Pendry knew a senior member of the local party. Blair was chosen as the candidate; at the Beaconsfield by-election he won only 10% of the vote and lost his deposit, but he impressed Labour Party leader Michael Foot and acquired a profile within the party. In contrast to his later centrism, Blair described himself in this period as a Socialist. A letter that he wrote to Foot in July 1982, eventually published in June 2006, gives an indication of his outlook at this time.[8] The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... Hackney South and Shoreditch is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The soft left was the name given to the more moderate left wing forces in the British Labour Party in the 1980s. ... Hackney Town Hall was built in the 1930s for the old Metropolitan Borough. ... Father-in-law A father-in-law is a spouses father. ... Tony Booth Antony George Booth (born October 9, 1931 in Liverpool, better known as Tony Booth) is an English actor, best known for his role in the BBC series Til Death Us Do Part. ... Thomas Pendry, Baron Pendry, PC, (born 10 June 1934) is a Labour member of the House of Lords. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Beaconsfield is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Beaconsfield by-election, 1982 was a parliamentary by-election held on 27th May 1982 for the British House of Commons constituency of Beaconsfield in Buckinghamshire. ... Michael Foot For other people named Michael Foot, see Michael Foot (disambiguation). ... Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to social control. ... June 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Extraordinary renditions. ...


In 1983 Blair found that the newly created constituency of Sedgefield, near where he had grown up in Durham, had no Labour candidate. Several sitting MPs displaced by boundary changes were interested in securing selection to fight the seat. He found a branch that had not made a nomination and arranged to visit them. With the crucial support of John Burton, he won their endorsement; at the last minute he was added to the shortlist and won the selection over displaced sitting MP Les Huckfield. Burton later became his agent and one of his most trusted and longest-standing allies. Sedgefield is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Statistics Population: 42,939 (2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: NZ274424 Administration District: City of Durham Shire county: Durham Region: North East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Durham Historic county: Durham Services Police force: County Durham Ambulance service: North East Post office and telephone... Leslie John Huckfield (7 Apr 1942 -) is a British Labour Party politician who served as Member of Parliament for Nuneaton from 1967 to 1983 and as an MEP from 1984-1989. ...


Blair's election literature in the 1983 UK general election endorsed left-wing policies that the Labour Party advocated in the early 1980s. He called for Britain to leave the EEC, though he had told his selection conference that he personally favoured continuing membership. He also supported unilateral nuclear disarmament, being a member of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. Sedgefield was a safe Labour seat and Blair was elected as its MP, despite the party's national landslide defeat. Blair was helped on the campaign trail by soap actress Pat Phoenix, his father-in-law's girlfriend. The UK general election, 1983 was held on June 9, 1983 and gave the Conservatives and Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of Labour in 1945. ... Motto: In varietate concordia 2 Anthem: Ode to Joy 3 Commission seat Brussels Official languages 23 Member states 27 Presidencies  - Commission José Manuel Barroso  - Parliament Hans-Gert Pöttering  - Council Frank-Walter Steinmeier  - European Council Germany Formation    - Treaty of Rome 25 March 1957   - Maastricht Treaty 7 February 1992  Area  - Total... Nuclear disarmament is the proposed undeployment and dismantling of nuclear weapons particularly those the United States and the Soviet Union (later Russia) targeted on each other. ... Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament logo In British politics, the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament has been at the forefront of the peace movement in the United Kingdom and claims to be Europes largest single-issue peace campaign. ... For Philippine soap opera, see Teleserye. ... Patricia Phoenix, as Elsie Tanner on Coronation Street, in a still from an episode first aired in the early 1970s. ...


Blair stated in his maiden speech in the House of Commons on 6 July 1983: "I am a socialist not through reading a textbook that has caught my intellectual fancy, nor through unthinking tradition, but because I believe that, at its best, socialism corresponds most closely to an existence that is both rational and moral. It stands for cooperation, not confrontation; for fellowship, not fear. It stands for equality".[9][10] The Labour Party is declared in its constitution to be a democratic socialist party,[11] rather than a social democratic party - Blair himself organized this declaration of Labour to be a socialist party when he dealt with the change to the party's Clause IV in their constitution. A maiden speech is the first speech given by a newly elected representative in such bodies as the House of Commons or the United States House of Representatives. ... July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... Socialist Party is the name of several different political parties around the world that are explicitly called Socialist though some are Social Democratic and some are not. ... Clause IV of the United Kingdom Labour Party constitution sets out the objects of the party, and has been the scene of political fights over its direction. ...


In opposition

Once elected, Blair's ascent was rapid, and he received his first shadow-cabinet appointment in 1984 as assistant Treasury spokesman. He demanded an inquiry into the Bank of England's decision to rescue the collapsed Johnson Matthey Bank in October 1985, and embarrassed the government by finding a European Economic Community report critical of British economic policy that had been countersigned by a member of the Conservative government. By this time Blair was aligned with the reforming tendencies in the party, headed by leader Neil Kinnock, and was promoted after the 1987 election to the shadow Trade and Industry team as spokesman on the City of London. In 1987, he stood for election to the Shadow Cabinet, with a good show of 77 votes. Headquarters London Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound Sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... Rt. ... Margaret Thatcher David Steel Election 1987 Titles The United Kingdom general election of 1987 was held on 11 June 1987 and was the third consecutive victory for the Conservative Party under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher. ... The City of London is a geographically-small city within Greater London, England. ... The Shadow Cabinet (also called the Shadow Front Bench) is a senior group of opposition spokespeople in the Westminster system of government who together under the leadership of the Leader of the Opposition (or the leader of other smaller opposition parties) form an alternative cabinet to the governments, whose...

As Shadow Employment Secretary, Blair announces that the Labour Party no longer supports the 'closed shop' (18 December 1989)
As Shadow Employment Secretary, Blair announces that the Labour Party no longer supports the 'closed shop' (18 December 1989)

After the stock market crash of October 1987, Blair raised his profile further when he castigated City traders as "incompetent" and "morally dubious," and criticised poor service for small investors at the London Stock Exchange. In 1988 Blair entered the Shadow Cabinet as Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and the following year he became Shadow Employment Secretary. In this post he realised that the Labour Party's support for the emerging European "Social Charter" policies on employment law meant dropping the party's traditional support for closed shop arrangements, whereby employers required all their employees to be members of a trade union. He announced this change in December 1989, outraging the left wing of the Labour Party. As a young and telegenic Shadow Cabinet member, Blair was given prominence by the party's Director of Communications, Peter Mandelson. He gave his first major platform speech at the 1990 Labour Party conference. Image File history File links This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Image File history File links This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... A closed shop is a business or industrial establishment whose employees are required to be union members or to agree to join the union within a specified time after being hired. ... In the Gregorian Calendar, December 18 is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years), at which point there will be 13 days remaining to the end of the year. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Black Monday (1987) on the Dow Jones Industrial Average A stock market crash is a sudden dramatic decline of stock prices across a significant cross-section of a stock market. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... The Shadow Cabinet (also called the Shadow Front Bench) is a senior group of opposition spokespeople in the Westminster system of government who together under the leadership of the Leader of the Opposition (or the leader of other smaller opposition parties) form an alternative cabinet to the governments, whose... The Secretary of State for Energy was a UK cabinet position from 1974 to 1992. ... Labour law (American English: labor) or employment law is the body of laws, administrative rulings, and precedents which addresses the legal rights of, and restrictions on, working people and their organizations. ... A closed shop is a business or industrial establishment whose employees are required to be union members or to agree to join the union within a specified time after being hired. ... A Trade Union (Labour union) ... is a continuous association of wage-earners for the purpose of maintaining or improving the conditions of their employment. ... Director of Communications is a senior executive position found in most corporations in the private, public, and non-profit sectors. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Labour Party Conference, or annual national conference of the Labour Party, is formally the supreme decision-making body of the Party. ...


In the run-up to the 1992 general election, Blair worked to modernise Labour's image. He had responsibility for developing the controversial minimum wage policy. The UK general election, 1992 was held on April 9, 1992, and was the fourth victory in a row for the Conservatives. ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ...


When Neil Kinnock resigned as party leader after his electoral defeat, Blair became Shadow Home Secretary under John Smith. The Labour Party at this time was widely perceived as weak on crime and Blair worked to change this: he accepted that the prison population might have to rise, and bemoaned the loss of a sense of community, which he was prepared to blame (at least partly) on "1960s liberalism". On the other hand, he spoke in support of equalising the age of consent for gay sex at 16, and opposed capital punishment. He defined his policy, in a phrase coined by Gordon Brown, as "Tough on crime, tough on the causes of crime". Home secretary The shadow home secretary is the MP within the shadow cabinet of the opposition who concerns themselves mainly with issues surrounding the home office and if the opposition is elected then the shadow home secretary then takes the secretariet of the home office job to become the Home... John Smith QC (September 13, 1938 – May 12, 1994) was a British politician who served as leader of the Labour Party from July 1992 until his sudden and unexpected death from a heart attack on 12 May 1994. ... Sense of community (or psychological sense of community) is a concept in social psychology (or more narrowly, in community psychology), which focuses on the experience of community rather than its structure, formation, setting, or other features. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Gay sex is a part of some males sexual needs, it is very popular in China and Greenland. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... Gordon Brown (born 20 February 1951) is the Chancellor of the Exchequer of the United Kingdom and a Labour Party politician. ... Get tough on crime (or simply tough on crime) is a slogan often used by supporters of law and order political platforms. ...


John Smith died suddenly in 1994 of a heart attack. Blair beat John Prescott and Margaret Beckett in the subsequent leadership election. After becoming Leader of the Opposition, Blair was, as is customary for the holder of that office, appointed a Privy Counsellor, which permitted him to be addressed with the style "The Right Honourable". Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ... John Leslie Prescott MP (born 31 May 1938) is a British Labour Party politician, Deputy Prime Minister, First Secretary of State and Member of Parliament for the North East constituency of Hull East. ... Margaret Mary Beckett (born 15 January 1943) is a British Labour Party politician who currently is Member of Parliament (MP) for Derby South and, since May 6, 2006, the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs; the first woman to hold this position in the British Cabinet and only... A leadership election was held in 1994 for the Labour Party in the United Kingdom, after the death of incumbent leader John Smith. ... The Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom is the politician who leads Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (the body in Parliament recognized as the Official Opposition). ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... The Right Honourable (abbreviated The Rt. ...


Leader of the Labour Party

The cover of Labour's 1997 general election manifesto
The cover of Labour's 1997 general election manifesto

Blair announced at the end of his speech at the 1994 Labour Party conference that he intended to replace Clause IV of the party's constitution with a new statement of aims and values. This involved the deletion of the party's stated commitment to 'the common ownership of the means of production and exchange', which was widely interpreted as referring to wholesale nationalisation. The clause was replaced by a statement that the party is one of democratic socialism. A special conference approved this highly symbolic change in April 1995. Image File history File links Labour_manifesto_97. ... Image File history File links Labour_manifesto_97. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... A manifesto is a public declaration of principles and intentions, often political in nature. ... Clause IV of the United Kingdom Labour Party constitution sets out the objects of the party, and has been the scene of political fights over its direction. ... Common ownership is a principle according to which the assets of an enterprise or other organisation are held indivisibly rather than in the names of the individual members. ... Means of production (abbreviated MoP; German: Produktionsmittel), also called means of labour are the materials, tools and other instruments used by workers to make products. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Blair also revised party policy in a manner that enhanced the image of Labour as competent and modern — he used the term "New Labour" to distinguish the party from its past. Although the transformation aroused much criticism (its alleged superficiality drawing fire both from political opponents and traditionalists within the "rank and file" of his own party), it was nevertheless successful in changing public perception. At the 1996 Labour Party conference, Blair stated that his three top priorities on coming to office were "education, education and education".


Aided by the unpopularity of John Major's Conservative government (itself deeply divided over the European Union), "New Labour" won a landslide victory in the 1997 general election with Blair the youngest person to attain the office of Prime Minister since Lord Liverpool in 1812.[12] Sir John Major, KG, CH (born 29 March 1943) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and leader of the British Conservative Party from 1990 to 1997. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... The son of George IIIs close adviser Charles Jenkinson, 1st Earl of Liverpool and his part-Indian first wife, Amelia Watts, Robert Jenkinson was educated at Charterhouse School and Christ Church, Oxford. ...


Blair as Prime Minister

Blair first became the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on 2 May 1997. While serving as Prime Minister, Blair concurrently serves as the First Lord of the Treasury, the Minister for the Civil Service, the Leader of the Labour Party, and a Member of Parliament for the constituency of Sedgefield in the North East of England. As a member of the British Cabinet he is also a Privy Counsellor. Blair is the Labour Party's longest-serving prime minister, the only person to have led the party to three consecutive general election victories, and the only Labour prime minister to serve more than one full consecutive term. Wikinews has news related to: Prime Ministry of Tony Blair The Prime Ministry of Tony Blair began on 2 May 1997 and continues with Blairs third term as Prime Minister. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the the United Kingdom. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The First Lord of the Treasury is the head of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer in the United Kingdom, usually but not always the Prime Minister. ... The Minister of the Civil Service is the head of the British Civil Service. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Sedgefield is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... North-East England is one of the nine official regions of England and comprises the combined area of Northumberland, County Durham, Tyne and Wear and a small part of North Yorkshire. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... A cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ...


Blair is both credited with and criticised for moving the Labour Party towards the centre of British politics, using the term "New Labour" to distinguish his pro-market policies from the more collectivist policies which the party had espoused in the past. In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... Collectivism is a term used to describe any moral, political, or social outlook, that stresses human interdependence and the importance of a collective, rather than the importance of separate individuals. ...


In domestic government policy, Blair has significantly increased public spending on health and education while also introducing controversial market-based reforms in these areas. Blair's tenure has also seen the introduction of a minimum wage, tuition fees for higher education, constitutional reform such as devolution in Scotland and Wales, and progress in the Northern Ireland peace process. The British economy has performed well, and Blair has kept to Conservative commitments not to increase income tax. The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... A constitutional amendment is a change to the constitution of a nation or a state. ... Devolution or home rule is the statutory granting of powers from the central government of a state to government at national, regional or local level. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity(English) Wha daur meddle wi me? (Scots)[1] Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots[2] Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I... This article is about the country. ... When discussing the history of Northern Ireland, the peace process is generally considered to cover the events leading up to the 1994 IRA ceasefire, the end of most of the violence of The Troubles, the Belfast (or Good Friday) Agreement, and subsequent political developments. ...


Since the start of the War on Terror in 2001, Blair has strongly supported US foreign policy, notably by participating in the invasions of Afghanistan in 2001 and Iraq in 2003. He has encountered fierce criticism as a result, over the policy itself and the circumstances in which it was decided upon. The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terror) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies to destroy groups deemed to be terrorist (primarily radical Islamist organizations such as al-Qaeda... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


On 7 September 2006 Blair publicly stated he would step down as party leader by the time of the TUC conference in September 2007, but has not yet given a date for his departure.[3] September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Image:TradeUnionsCongress20050108 CopyrightKaihsuTai. ...


Relationship with Parliament

British Prime Minister Tony Blair responding to a question in the House of Commons during Prime Minister's Questions. To the right is Chancellor Gordon Brown.
British Prime Minister Tony Blair responding to a question in the House of Commons during Prime Minister's Questions. To the right is Chancellor Gordon Brown.

Blair has changed Parliamentary procedures significantly. One of his first acts as Prime Minister was to replace the two weekly 15-minute sessions of Prime Minister's Questions, held on a Tuesday and Thursday, with a single 30-minute session on a Wednesday. This reform was said to have led to greater efficiency, but critics have noted that it is easier to prepare for one long set of questions than for two shorter sessions. In addition to PMQs, Blair has held monthly press conferences, at which he fields questions in a less confrontational manner than in the Commons.[13][14] Image File history File links Tony_Blair_at_PMQs. ... Image File history File links Tony_Blair_at_PMQs. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Prime Ministers Questions is a Parliamentary practice in the United Kingdom where every Wednesday when the House of Commons is sitting, the Prime Minister spends half an hour answering questions from MPs. ... Gordon Brown (born 20 February 1951) is the Chancellor of the Exchequer of the United Kingdom and a Labour Party politician. ... Prime Ministers Questions is a Parliamentary practice in the United Kingdom where every Wednesday when the House of Commons is sitting, the Prime Minister spends half an hour answering questions from MPs. ... A member of Liberal Democratic Party Taizo Sugimura in an apology news conference in Japan A news conference or press conference is a media event in which newsmakers invite journalists to hear them speak and, most often, ask questions. ...


Other procedural reforms include changing the official times for Parliamentary sessions in order to have Parliament operate in a more business-like manner.


Blair in the media

While evaluations of Blair's skills as a parliamentarian differ, he is acknowledged to be a highly skillful media performer in other contexts, appearing modern, charismatic, informal and articulate. Perhaps his best known television appearance was his tribute to Diana, Princess of Wales on the morning of her death in August 1997, in which he famously described her as "the people's princess". Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances Mountbatten-Windsor; née Spencer; 1 July 1961 – 31 August 1997) was the first wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, eldest son and heir apparent of Elizabeth II. Her two sons, Princes William and Harry, are second and third, respectively, in line to the...


After taking office in 1997, Blair gave particular prominence to his press secretary, who became known as the Prime Minister's Official Spokesman (the two roles have since been separated). Blair's first PMOS was Alastair Campbell, who served in that role from May 1997 to 8 June 2001, after which he served as the Prime Minister's Director of Communications and Strategy until his resignation on 29 August 2003 in the aftermath of the Hutton Inquiry. Campbell acquired a reputation as a sinister and Machiavellian figure, and both Blair and Campbell have frequently been criticised or satirised for their allegedly excessive use of "spin" and news management techniques (see below under Criticism). The Prime Ministers Official Spokesman is a role employed by the British Prime Minister Tony Blair whereby a spokesperson addresses the media each morning to deliver statements on current events by the Prime Minister. ... Alastair Campbell Alastair John Campbell (born May 25, 1957) was the Director of Communications and Strategy for 10 Downing Street. ... June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Hutton Inquiry was a British judicial inquiry chaired by Lord Hutton, appointed by the British government to investigate the death of a government weapons expert, Dr. David Kelly. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... Managing the news refers to acts which are intended to influence the presentation of information within the news media. ...


Blair and Gordon Brown

After the death of John Smith in 1994, both Blair and Gordon Brown were viewed as possible candidates for the leadership of the Labour Party. They had agreed that they would not stand against each other, and Brown had previously been considered to be the more senior of the two men — he understood this to mean that Blair would give way to him. It soon became apparent, however, that Blair had greater public support.[15] At the Granita restaurant in Islington on 31 May, Brown agreed with Blair that he would not contest the leadership election. He understood Blair to have agreed in return to step down as party leader after a specified period (after 8 years, according to some reports), but Blair has always denied striking any such deal with him. It may be that both men placed honestly differing interpretations on the same conversation. In September 2003, British TV Channel Channel 4 broadcast a one-off drama about the alleged agreement, called The Deal, which culminated in the conversation in question. The final words of it, as spoken by the actors playing Blair and Brown, were as follows: Granita was a restaurant in the Islington area of London. ... Islington is an inner-city district in north London. ... May 31 is the 151st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (152nd in leap years), with 214 days remaining. ... British television broadcasting has a range of different broadcasters, broadcasting multiple channels over a variety of distribution media. ... It has been suggested that Channel Four Television Corporation be merged into this article or section. ... The Deal is a 2003 made for television play directed by Stephen Frears starring Michael Sheen as Tony Blair and David Morrissey as Gordon Brown. ...


Brown: And the election after that? (i.e. the election following two terms of a Labour Government) Blair: Well... Obviously, I couldn't go on for ever.


It has also been alleged that while in office as Prime Minister, Blair gave Brown further indications (and even promises) that he would step down in Brown's favour at specified times. Whatever the truth of these reports, Blair's consistent refusal to leave office (so far) has led to relations between the two men becoming irretrievably embittered. At certain times, Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott has reportedly acted as their "marriage guidance counsellor".[16] A Deputy Prime Minister is a member of a nations cabinet who can take the position of acting Prime Minister when the real Prime Minister is temporarily absent. ... John Leslie Prescott MP (born 31 May 1938) is a British Labour Party politician, Deputy Prime Minister, First Secretary of State and Member of Parliament for the North East constituency of Hull East. ...


Another aspect of the political relationship between Blair and Brown is the exceptional freedom given by Blair from the start of his time in office to his Chancellor in the area of economic policy. Downing Street insiders have subsequently reported that Blair grew to regret granting Brown this freedom, since he has been excluded from important fiscal decisions as a result.


Blair is still seen as refusing to endorse Gordon Brown as his successor. Commentators speculate that this reflects hopes in Downing Street that, given sufficient time, other candidates for Prime Minister will emerge so as to force a full leadership contest.[17]


Blair's religious faith

Blair has rarely discussed his religious faith in public, but he is often identified as an Anglo-Catholic — that is, a member of the high church branch of the Church of England, sympathetic to the beliefs and practices of the Roman Catholic Church. His wife Cherie Booth is a practising Roman Catholic, and Blair has attended Catholic Masses at Westminster Cathedral, while on holiday in Italy, and with his family at his current home in Number 10 Downing Street. At one point, he was reprimanded by Basil Cardinal Hume for receiving Holy Communion at Mass despite not being a Roman Catholic, a contravention of Catholic doctrine. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... ... High Church relates to ecclesiology and liturgy in Christian theology and practice. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... Cherie Blair Cherie Blair (born 23 September 1954 in Bury, England), known professionally as Cherie Booth QC, is a prominent barrister. ... Westminster Cathedral from Victoria Street The interior of Westminster Cathedral Westminster Cathedral is the motherchurch of the Roman Catholic faithful of the Archdiocese of Westminster and the metropolitan church of the Westminster Province, located at 42 Francis Street SW1 in the City of Westminster in London, England. ... Basil Cardinal Hume, OSB OM (2 March 1923 - 17 June 1999) was the Archbishop of Westminster and Primate of England and Wales from 1976-1999. ... The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ...


In an interview with Michael Parkinson broadcast on ITV1 on 4 March 2006, Blair referred to the role of his Christian faith in his decision to go to war in Iraq, stating that he had prayed about the issue, and saying that God would judge him for his decision:[18] "I think if you have faith about these things, you realise that judgement is made by other people … and if you believe in God, it's made by God as well." Michael Parkinson CBE (born March 28, 1935) is a British journalist and television presenter. ... ITV1 is the name, in England, Wales and the Scottish borders, for a terrestrial, free-to-air television channel, broadcast in the United Kingdom by the ITV network. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... // Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Mary Magdalene in prayer. ...


A longer exploration of his faith can be found in an interview he did with Third Way Magazine. He says there that 'I was brought up as [a Christian], but I was not in any real sense a practising one until I went to Oxford. There was an Australian priest at the same college as me who got me interested again. In a sense, it was a rediscovery of religion as something living, that was about the world around me rather than some sort of special one-to-one relationship with a remote Being on high. Suddenly I began to see its social relevance. I began to make sense of the world.'[19] There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


These comments prompted a number of questions on Mr Blair's faith, questions that he was advised not to answer. At the time, the bar on the topic was so rigid that Alastair Campbell, Mr Blair's director of strategy and communications, intervened in an interview, preventing the Prime Minister from answering a question about his Christianity, explaining, "We don't do God".[20] Alastair Campbell Alastair John Campbell (born May 25, 1957) was the Director of Communications and Strategy for 10 Downing Street. ...


Political overview

Which part of the political spectrum Tony Blair occupies is disputed. Many Britons would place him in the centre ground. His party (Labour) is a socialist political party, and Conservatives consider him left of centre. Yet some of his Labour-party backbenchers and other Left-wing critics would place him to the right of centre. Blair rarely applies such labels to himself, though he promised, in advance of the 1997 election, that New Labour would govern "from the radical centre", and he is on record as describing himself as a "social democrat". A political spectrum is a way of visualizing different political positions. ... Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to social control. ... In politics, the term centre-left is commonly used to describe and denote political parties or organisations that stretch from the centre to the left or are moderately left-wing, as opposed to extreme left wing beliefs such as communism. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ...


An overview of Blair's policies gives an idea of the difficulty of defining him politically. He has raised taxes; implemented redistributive policies; introduced a minimum wage and some new employment rights (while keeping Margaret Thatcher's trade union legislation); introduced significant constitutional reforms (which remain incomplete and controversial); promoted new rights for homosexuals in the Civil Partnerships Act; and signed treaties integrating Britain more closely with the EU. He has also firmly supported President George W. Bush's foreign policy (while reportedly attempting to act as a restraining influence on him), leading to Blair's rule being characterised as an interventionist foreign policy; introduced substantial market-based reforms in the education and health sectors; introduced student tuition fees; sought to reduce certain categories of welfare payments; and introduced tough anti-terrorism and identity card legislation. Since its coinage, the word homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... It has been suggested that Free market be merged into this article or section. ... Counter-terrorism refers to the practices, tactics, and strategies that governments, militaries, and other groups adopt in order to fight terrorism. ... China ID card, front (top) back (bottom). ...


Criticism

The criticism of Tony Blair includes criticism about his alliance with U.S. President George W. Bush, and his policies in the Middle East, including the Iraq War, the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Tony Blair. ... Tony Blair. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Combatants Hezbollah Amal LCP  Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah (Secretary General of Hezbollah) Imad Mughniyeh (Commander of Hezbollahs armed wing)[5] Dan Halutz (CoS) Moshe Kaplinsky[12] Udi Adam (Regional) Strength 600-1,000 active fighters 3,000-10,000 reservists[6] 30,000 ground troops (plus IAF & ISC)[13... Israel, with the West Bank and Gaza Strip in diagonal stripes The Israeli-Palestinian conflict which is often claimed to be at the heart of the Arab-Israeli conflict, is an ongoing dispute between two peoples, Jewish Israelis and Arab Palestinians, that both claim the right to sovereignty over the...


Presidentialism

Blair is sometimes perceived as paying insufficient attention both to the views of his own Cabinet colleagues and to those of the House of Commons. His style is sometimes criticised as not that of a prime minister and head of government, which he is, but of a president and head of state, which he is not.[21] The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Head of Government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ... Queen Elizabeth II, is the Head of State of 16 countries including: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Jamaica, New Zealand and the Bahamas, as well as crown colonies and overseas territories of the United Kingdom. ...


Relationship with the United States

George W. Bush and Tony Blair shake hands after their press conference in the East Room of the White House on 12 November 2004.

Along with enjoying a close relationship with Bill Clinton during the latter's time in office, Blair has formed a strong political alliance with President George W. Bush of the United States of America, particularly in the area of foreign policy: at one point, Nelson Mandela described Blair as "the US foreign minister".[22] Blair has also often openly been referred to as "Bush's poodle."[23] Such claims received added credence in statements made by Kendall Myers, a senior analyst at the State Department, who reportedly said that he felt "a little ashamed" of Bush's treatment of the Prime Minister and that his attempts to influence US government policy were typically ignored - "It was a done deal from the beginning, it was a one-sided relationship that was entered into with open eyes... There was nothing, no payback, no sense of reciprocity.".[24] Image File history File linksMetadata Blair_Bush_Whitehouse_(2004-11-12). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Blair_Bush_Whitehouse_(2004-11-12). ... November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Mandela redirects here. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States Government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The government of the United States of America, established by the U.S. Constitution, is...


For his part, President Bush has lauded Blair and the UK. In his post-September 11 speech, for example, he stated that "America has no truer friend than Great Britain".[25] The alliance between Bush and Blair has seriously damaged Blair's standing in the eyes of many Britons.[26] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Look up Briton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Middle East policy and links with Israel

One of Blair's first actions in joining the Labour Party was to join Labour Friends of Israel. In 1994, a friend and former colleague of Blair at 11 King's Bench Walk Chambers, Eldred Tabachnik, Q.C. (one time president of the Board of Deputies of British Jews) introduced Blair to Michael Levy, later Lord Levy, a pop music mogul and major fundraiser for Jewish and Israeli causes, at a dinner party hosted by the Israeli diplomat Gideon Meir.[27] Blair and Levy soon became close friends and tennis partners. Levy ran the Labour Leader's Office Fund to finance Blair's campaign before the 1997 General Election and received substantial contributions from such figures as Alex Bernstein and Robert Gavron, both of whom were ennobled by Blair after he came to power. Levy was created a life peer by Blair in 1997, and in 2002, just prior to the Iraq War, Blair appointed Levy as his personal envoy to the Middle East. Levy has praised Blair for his "solid and committed support of the State of Israel"[28] and has been described himself as "a leading international Zionist".[29] In 2004, Blair was heavily criticised by 50 former diplomats, including ambassadors to Baghdad and Tel Aviv for his policy on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the Iraq War. They stated they had "watched with deepening concern" at Britain following the U.S. into war in Iraq in 2003 also stating, "We feel the time has come to make our anxieties public, in the hope that they will be addressed in parliament and will lead to a fundamental reassessment," and asked Blair to exert "real influence as a loyal ally". The ambassadors also accused the allies of having "no effective plan" for the aftermath of the invasion of Iraq and the apparent disregard for the lives of Iraqi civilians. The diplomats also criticised Blair for his support for the road map which included the retaining of settlements on the West Bank stating, "Our dismay at this backward step is heightened by the fact that you yourself seem to have endorsed it, abandoning the principles which for nearly four decades have guided international efforts to restore peace in the Holy Land".[30] Labour Friends of Israel is a UK Parliament based campaign group promoting support within the British Labour Party for a strong bilateral relationship between Britain and Israel. ... 11 Kings Bench Walk Chambers is a barristers Chambers founded by Alexander Irvine QC. The chambers specialises in employment law, public and administrative law and commercial law. ... Eldred Tabachnik, QC (born 5 November 1943) is a South African-born English barrister and recorder and a former president of the Board of Deputies of British Jews. ... Queens Counsel (postnominal QC), during the reign of a male Sovereign known as Kings Counsel (KC), are barristers or, in Scotland, advocates appointed by patent to be one of Her Majestys Counsel learned in the law. They do not constitute a separate order or degree of lawyers. ... The Board of Deputies of British Jews is the main representative body of British Jewry. ... Lord Levy greeting Tony Blair at a fundraising function (from BBC News) Michael Abraham Levy, Baron Levy (born 11 July 1944) is a Labour member of the British House of Lords and the major fundraiser for the UK Labour Party party and several Jewish and Israeli charities. ... For popular music (music produced commercially rather than art or folk music), see Popular music. ... Gideon Meir is the current Israeli ambassador to Italy (appointed July, 2006). ... A tennis net Tennis is a game played between either two players (singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). Players use a stringed racquet to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over a net into the opponents court. ... Alexander Bernstein, Baron Bernstein of Craigweil (b. ... Robert Gavron, Baron Gavron, of Highgate is a printing millionaire and a contributor to the Labour Leaders Office Fund run by Lord Levy to finance Tony Blairs private office before the 1997 General Election. ... In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... A bilingual poster in Romanian and Hungarian promoting a film about Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1930s. ... Baghdad (Arabic ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... Israel, with the West Bank and Gaza Strip in diagonal stripes The Israeli-Palestinian conflict which is often claimed to be at the heart of the Arab-Israeli conflict, is an ongoing dispute between two peoples, Jewish Israelis and Arab Palestinians, that both claim the right to sovereignty over the... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Map of Israeli settlements (magenta) in the West Bank. ...


In 2006, Blair was heavily criticised for his failure to call for a ceasefire in the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict, with members of his cabinet openly criticising Israel. Jack Straw, the Leader of the House of Commons and former Foreign Secretary stated that Israel's actions risked destabilising all of Lebanon. Kim Howell, a minister in the Foreign Office, stated that it was "very difficult to understand the kind of military tactics used by Israel", "These are not surgical strikes but have instead caused death and misery amongst innocent civilians.". The Observer newspaper claimed that at a cabinet meeting before Blair left for a summit with President George Bush on July 28, 2006, a significant number of ministers pressured Blair to publicly criticise Israel over the scale of deaths and destruction in Lebanon.[31] Combatants Hezbollah Amal LCP  Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah (Secretary General of Hezbollah) Imad Mughniyeh (Commander of Hezbollahs armed wing)[5] Dan Halutz (CoS) Moshe Kaplinsky[12] Udi Adam (Regional) Strength 600-1,000 active fighters 3,000-10,000 reservists[6] 30,000 ground troops (plus IAF & ISC)[13... A cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... John Whitaker Straw (born August 3, 1946) is a British Labour Party politician. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... The title of Foreign Secretary has been traditionally used to refer to the British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... July 28 is the 209th day (210th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 156 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Relationship with Labour party

Blair's apparent refusal to set a date for his departure has been criticised by the British press and members of parliament. It has been reported that a number of cabinet ministers believed that Blair's timely departure from office would be required to be able to win a fourth election.[32] Some ministers viewed Blair's announcement of policy initiatives in September 2006 as an attempt to draw attention away from these issues.[32] Upon his return from his holiday in the West Indies he announced that all the speculation about his leaving must stop. This stirred not only his traditional critics but also traditional party loyalists. West Indian redirects here. ...


While the Blair government has introduced social policies supported by the left of the Labour Party, such as the minimum wage and measures to reduce child poverty, Blair is seen on economic and management issues as being to the right of much of the party. A possible comparison may be made with American Democrats such as Joe Lieberman, who have been accused by their party's "base" of adopting their opponents' political stances. Some critics describe Blair as a reconstructed neoconservative or Thatcherite. He is occasionally described as "Son of Thatcher", though Lady Thatcher herself rejected this identification in an interview with ITV1 on the night of the 2005 election, saying that in her opinion the resemblances were superficial. Blair himself has often expressed admiration for Thatcher.[33] The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is an American politician from Connecticut. ... Neoconservatism describes several distinct political ideologies which are considered new forms of conservatism. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925), is the former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in office from 1979 to 1990. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925), is the former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in office from 1979 to 1990. ... ITV1 is the name, in England, Wales and the Scottish borders, for a terrestrial, free-to-air television channel, broadcast in the United Kingdom by the ITV network. ...


Approval rating

In May 2006, the Daily Telegraph reported that Blair's personal approval rating had dipped to 26 percent, lower than Harold Wilson's rating after devaluation of the pound and James Callaghan's during the Winter of Discontent, meaning that Blair had become the most unpopular post-war Labour Prime Minister. Of all British Prime Ministers, Margaret Thatcher and John Major have recorded lower approval (the former in the aftermath of the Poll Tax Riots). Previously Blair had achieved the highest approval ratings of any British Prime Minister of either party in the months following his election in 1997. This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ... The Winter of Discontent is a nickname given to the British winter of 1978–79, during which there were widespread strikes by Trade unions demanding larger pay rises for their members. ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom from when the first Prime Minister (in the modern sense), Robert Walpole, took office in 1721, until the present day. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925), is the former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in office from 1979 to 1990. ... Sir John Major, KG, CH (born 29 March 1943) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and leader of the British Conservative Party from 1990 to 1997. ... The Poll Tax Riots, as they became known, were major acts of civil disobedience carried out in London. ...


Portrayals

Michael Sheen (born February 5, 1969) is a Welsh actor, mainly known for his stage work. ... The Deal is a 2003 made for television play directed by Stephen Frears starring Michael Sheen as Tony Blair and David Morrissey as Gordon Brown. ... The Queen is an Academy Award-winning 2006 film directed by Stephen Frears. ... Martin Scorsese appears briefly in an uncredited role in this scene from his feature film Taxi Driver. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... The Regina Monologues is the fourth episode of The Simpsons fifteenth season. ... Robert Lindsay Stevenson (born 13 December 1949) is an English actor known as Robert Lindsay. ... The Trial of Tony Blair was a satirical fictional documentary, based around the notion that British Prime Minister, Tony Blair is to face charges of war crimes by an international tribunal, following his departure from 10 Downing Street. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Andrew Norman Wilson (born 1950) is an English writer, known for his biographies, novels and works of popular and cultural history. ... My Name Is Legion is a novel by A. N. Wilson first published in 2004. ... Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... Alistair Beaton Alistair Beaton (born 1947) is a Scottish left wing political satirist, journalist, radio presenter, novelist and television writer. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... March 16 is the 75th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (76th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... Martin Scorsese appears briefly in an uncredited role in this scene from his feature film Taxi Driver. ... Tate as Donna (left) in Doctor Who Catherine Tate née Ford, (born 12th May, 1968) is an English comedienne and actress best known for the BBC Two sketch comedy series The Catherine Tate Show. ... The following characters appear in the comedy sketch show The Catherine Tate Show on BBC Two. ... The Catherine Tate Show is an award-winning television sketch comedy which airs on BBC Two. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... For a description of the origin of the term comic relief see comic relief. ...

Works

  • Blair, Tony (2003). Iraq's Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Assessment of the British Government Diane Publishing, ISBN 0-7567-3102-X
  • Blair, Tony (2002). The Courage of Our Convictions Fabian Society, ISBN 0-7163-0603-4
  • Blair, Tony (2000). Superpower: Not Superstate? (Federal Trust European Essays) Federal Trust for Education & Research, ISBN 1-903403-25-1
  • Blair, Tony (1998). The Third Way: New Politics for the New Century Fabian Society, ISBN 0-7163-0588-7
  • Blair, Tony (1998). Leading the Way: New Vision for Local Government Institute for Public Policy Research, ISBN 1-86030-075-8
  • Blair, Tony (1997). New Britain: My Vision of a Young Country Basic Books, ISBN 0-8133-3338-5
  • Blair, Tony (1995). Let Us Face the Future Fabian Society, ISBN 0-7163-0571-2
  • Blair, Tony (1994). What Price Safe Society? Fabian Society, ISBN 0-7163-0562-3
  • Blair, Tony (1994). Socialism Fabian Society, ISBN 0-7163-0565-8

The Fabian Society is a British socialist intellectual movement, whose purpose is to advance the socialist cause by reformist, rather than revolutionary, means. ... The Fabian Society is a British socialist intellectual movement, whose purpose is to advance the socialist cause by reformist, rather than revolutionary, means. ... The Institute for Public Policy Research is a think tank in the United Kingdom, with close links to the ruling Labour Party. ... Basic Books is a book publisher founded in 1952. ... The Fabian Society is a British socialist intellectual movement, whose purpose is to advance the socialist cause by reformist, rather than revolutionary, means. ... The Fabian Society is a British socialist intellectual movement, whose purpose is to advance the socialist cause by reformist, rather than revolutionary, means. ... The Fabian Society is a British socialist intellectual movement, whose purpose is to advance the socialist cause by reformist, rather than revolutionary, means. ...

See also

Policy Network is an international think tank based in London devoted to progressive centre-left policy reform. ... Tony Blair is currently serving his third successive term as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. ... The Blair-Brown deal is a shorthand term for a widely-held belief in British politics, that Tony Blair and Gordon Brown made a leadership pact after the death of Labour Leader John Smith. ... Cash for Peerages is the name given by some in the British media to a political scandal in the United Kingdom in 2006 concerning the connection between political donations and the award of life peerages. ... UK Prime Minister Tony Blair. ... This is a List of national leaders, showing heads of state and heads of government where different, mainly in parliamentary systems; it should be noted that often a leader is both in presidential systems or dictatorships. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005. ... Tony Blair William Hague Charles Kennedy The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... Politics of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland take place in the framework of a constitutional monarchy in which the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom is the head of government. ... The Queen is an Academy Award-winning 2006 film directed by Stephen Frears. ...

References

  1. ^ a b "Tony Blair". Encyclopædia Britannica.
  2. ^ However, since Blair and his wife at the time had three children living with them, it was announced in 1997 that the Blairs would be living in the flat above number 11 Downing Street, whereas Chancellor Gordon Brown, who was unmarried and childless at the time, would live in the smaller flat, above number 10.
  3. ^ a b "I will quit within a year - Blair", BBC News, 2006-09-07. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  4. ^ a b "Blair's birthplace is bulldozed in Edinburgh", Edinburgh Evening News, Johnston Press plc, 2006-08-09. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  5. ^ "Tony's big adventure", The Observer, Guardian Newspapers Ltd., 2003-04-27. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  6. ^ "Blair in a boater, a crude hand gesture, and the Class of '75", The Daily Mail, Associated Newspapers Ltd., 2006-03-03. Retrieved on 2007-03-08.
  7. ^ Mary Harron Biography. Yahoo! Movies. Yahoo! Inc. (2006). Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  8. ^ Blair, Tony. "The full text of Tony Blair's letter to Michael Foot written in July 1982", The Daily Telegraph, Telegraph Media Group Ltd., July 1982. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  9. ^ Navrozov, Lev (2006-04-21). On Democracy. newsmax.com. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  10. ^ Seddon, Mark (2004). America's Friend: Reflections on Tony Blair. Logos 3.4. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  11. ^ About Labour. The Labour Party (2006). Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  12. ^ Biography: The Prime Minister Tony Charles Lynton Blair. www.number-10.gov.uk. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  13. ^ PM: Saddam and his regime will be removed. www.number10.gov.uk (2003-03-25). Retrieved on 2006-11-21.
  14. ^ Tempest, Matthew. "Tony Blair's press conference", The Guardian, Guardian Newspapers Ltd., 2004-09-07. Retrieved on 2006-11-21.
  15. ^ A MORI opinion poll published in the Sunday Times on 15 May found that among the general public, Blair had the support of 32%, John Prescott, 19%, Margaret Beckett 14%, Gordon Brown 9%, and Robin Cook 5%.
  16. ^ Andrew Rawnsley. "A marriage on the rocks", The Observer, Guardian Newspapers Ltd., October 5, 2003. Retrieved on 2007-03-05.
  17. ^ Cracknell, David, Oakeshott, Isabel. "Blair fails to back Brown", The Times, Times Newspapers Ltd., 2006-09-17. Retrieved on 2006-11-21.
  18. ^ "Blair 'prayed to God' over Iraq", BBC News, 2006-03-03. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  19. ^ [1]
  20. ^ Campbell interrupted Blair as he spoke of his faith: 'We don't do God', The Daily Telegraph, 3 May 2003
  21. ^ http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,3604,1004735,00.html
  22. ^ "Mandela condemns US stance on Iraq", BBC News, 2003-01-30. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  23. ^ "Blair battles "poodle" jibes", BBC News, 2003-02-03. Retrieved on 2006-11-30.
  24. ^ "Bush 'routinely ignoring Blair'", BBC News, 2006-11-30. Retrieved on 2006-11-30.
  25. ^ President Declares "Freedom at War with Fear"
  26. ^ Guardian/ICM poll finds strong public opposition to Tony Blair's close working relationship with President Bush
  27. ^ Euan Ferguson. "There was once a jolly bagman", Guardian, March 19, 2006.
  28. ^ Jewish Care, Fundraising Dinner 2006
  29. ^ Wavell, Stuart (2006-03-19). Lord Cashpoint's touch of money magic. The Sunday Times. Retrieved on 2007-02-21.
  30. ^ Diplomats attack Blair's Israel policy, Guardian Unlimited, Matthew Tempest, April 26, 2004
  31. ^ Cabinet in open revolt over Blair's Israel policy, The Observer, July 30, 2006
  32. ^ a b "'Deluded': Extraordinary attack on Blair by Cabinet", The Independent, 2006-09-04.
  33. ^ Life without Margaret Thatcher, Didcock, Barry, The Sunday Herald, February 13, 2005

The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general encyclopedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica Inc. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Edinburgh Evening News is a local newspaper based in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Daily Mail and its Sunday edition the Mail on Sunday are British newspapers, first published in 1896. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Opinion polls are surveys of opinion using sampling. ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... Robert Finlayson Cook, known as Robin Cook, (February 28, 1946 – August 6, 2005), was a politician in the British Labour Party. ... Andrew Nicholas James Rawnsley (born January 5, 1962) is a British political journalist and broadcaster. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (65th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 31 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 31 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 21 is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Front page of Guardian Unlimited from August 16, 2005 Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Matthew Tempest is the political correspondent for Guardian Unlimited, the Guardian newspapers website. ... April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (117th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... July 30 is the 211th day (212th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 154 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The Independent is a British compact newspaper published by Tony OReillys Independent News & Media. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... The Sunday Herald is a Scottish Sunday newspaper. ...

Further reading

  • Abse, Leo (2001). Tony Blair: The Man Behind the Smile. Robson Books. ISBN 1-86105-364-9. 
  • Beckett, F. & Hencke, D. (2004). The Blairs and Their Court, Aurum Press, ISBN 1-84513-024-3
  • ――― (2003). Tony Blair: The Man Who Lost His Smile. Robson Books. ISBN 1-86105-698-2. 
  • Blair, Tony (1998). in (ed.) Iain Dale: The Blair Necessities: Tony Blair Book of Quotations. Robson Books. ISBN 1-86105-139-5. 
  • ――― (2004). in (ed.) Paul Richards: Tony Blair: In His Own Words. Politico's Publishing. ISBN 1-84275-089-5. 
  • Gould, Philip (1999). The Unfinished Revolution: How the Modernisers Saved the Labour Party. Abacus. ISBN 0-349-11177-4. 
  • Naughtie, James (2001). The Rivals: The Intimate Story of a Political Marriage. Fourth Estate. ISBN 1-84115-473-3. 
  • ――― (2004). The Accidental American: Tony Blair and the Presidency. Macmillan. ISBN 1-4050-5001-2. 
  • Rawnsley, Andrew (2000). Servants of the People: The Inside Story of New Labour. Hamish Hamilton. ISBN 0-241-14029-3. 
  • ――― (2001). Servants of the People: The Inside Story of New Labour, 2nd edition, Penguin Books. ISBN 0-14-027850-8. 
  • Rentoul, John (2001). Tony Blair: Prime Minister. Little Brown. ISBN 0-316-85496-4. 
  • Riddell, Peter (2004). The Unfulfilled Prime Minister: Tony Blair and the End of Optimism. Politico's Publishing. ISBN 1-84275-113-1. 
  • Seldon, Anthony (2004). Blair. Free Press. ISBN 0-7432-3211-9. 
  • Short, Clare (2004). An Honourable Deception? New Labour, Iraq, and the Misuse of Power. Free Press. ISBN 0-7432-6392-8. 
  • Stephens, Philip (2004). Tony Blair: The Making of a World Leader. Viking Books. ISBN 0-670-03300-6. 
  • Wheatcroft, Geoffrey (2007). Yo, Blair!. Politico's Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84275-206-7. 

Leopold Abse (born April 22, 1917) is a British politician from Wales. ... Iain Dale is a British Conservative politician and pundit, broadcaster and owner of Politicos Bookstore and Publishing. ... Paul Richards is a British Labour Party politician and author. ... Philip Gould, Baron Gould of Brookwood is a British political adviser closely linked with theLabour Party andTony Blair. ... James Naughtie, normally known as Jim, (born August 9, 1952 in Milltown of Rothiemay, near Huntly, Aberdeenshire, Scotland) is a BBC journalist and radio news presenter, especially of Radio 4s Today programme. ... Andrew Nicholas James Rawnsley (born January 5, 1962) is a British political journalist and broadcaster. ... Dr Anthony F. Seldon MA, PhD, FRSA, MBA, FRHisS is a political commentator best known as Tony Blairs biographer and the Master of Wellington College. ... Clare Short (born 15 February 1946) is a British politician and a member of the British Labour Party. ... Philip Stevens was First Secretary of the Admiralty in the late 1700s and later a Lord Commissioner of the British Admiralty between 1795 and 1806. ...

Miscellany

A & C Black is a British book publishing company. ... Halsburys Laws of England (also known as Halsburys Laws or simply Halsburys) is a definitive encyclopedic treatise on the laws of England. ... Constitutional law is the study of foundational or basic laws of nation states and other political organizations. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... The Queen is an Academy Award-winning 2006 film directed by Stephen Frears. ...

External links

Find more information on Tony Blair by searching Wikipedia's sister projects
 Dictionary definitions from Wiktionary
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 Quotations from Wikiquote
 Source texts from Wikisource
 Images and media from Commons
 News stories from Wikinews
 Learning resources from Wikiversity
  • 10 Downing Street official site
  • A Day in the Life an on-line documentary by Tony Blair on life as Prime Minister
  • Guardian Unlimited Politics - Ask Aristotle: Tony Blair MP
  • TheyWorkForYou.com - Tony Blair MP
  • The Public Whip - Tony Blair MP voting record
  • Impeach Blair Campaign
  • Tony Blair at the Internet Movie Database
  • "The September Dossier"
  • "The Dodgy Dossier"
  • Tuition Fee Time Table
  • 'Cross-dressing' on political policy is here to stay, says PM, Guardian Unlimited, Patrick Wintour, July 31, 2006.
  • "Whatever happened to Cool Britannia? The UK after eight years of Blair" Thirty British, US, French and Canadian scholars assess Blair's policies and style after two terms, in May 2005. Links to papers and video.
  • "Think Again: Tony Blair" - by James G. Forsyth (requires registration) from Foreign Policy Magazine
  • Her Majesty's Government (2004). "The Prime Minister: A Biography".

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about motion pictures, actors, movie stars, TV shows, TV stars, production crew personnel, movie pictures, cast, crew as well as video games. ... Front page of Guardian Unlimited from August 16, 2005 Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Patrick Wintour is political editor of The Guardian, known for the quality of his contacts inside the Labour government. ... July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Wikimedia Commons has media related to: May 2005 Deaths in May May 26: Eddie Albert May 25: Ismail Merchant May 25: Sunil Dutt May 25: Graham Kennedy May 22: Thurl Ravenscroft May 21: Howard Morris May 21...

Political offices

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
(constituency re-created)
Member of Parliament for Sedgefield
1983 – present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Roy Hattersley
Shadow Home Secretary
1992 – 1994
Succeeded by
Jack Straw
Preceded by
Margaret Beckett
Leader of the Opposition
1994 – 1997
Succeeded by
John Major
Leader of the British Labour Party
1994 – present
Incumbent
Preceded by
John Major
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
1997 – present
Persondata
NAME Blair, Tony
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Blair, Anthony Charles Lynton
SHORT DESCRIPTION Politician; Prime minister of the United Kingdom
DATE OF BIRTH 6 May 1953
PLACE OF BIRTH Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

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