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Encyclopedia > Tomorrow Never Dies
Tomorrow Never Dies

Tomorrow Never Dies film poster
James Bond Pierce Brosnan
Also starring Michelle Yeoh
Jonathan Pryce
Teri Hatcher
Directed by Roger Spottiswoode
Produced by Barbara Broccoli
Michael G. Wilson
Novel/Story by Bruce Feirstein
Screenplay Bruce Feirstein
Cinematography by Robert Elswit
Music by David Arnold
Main theme Tomorrow Never Dies
Composer Sheryl Crow
Mitchell Froom
Performer Sheryl Crow
Distributed by United Artists
Released December 19, 1997
Running time 119 min.
Budget $110,000,000
Worldwide gross $333,000,000
Admissions (world) 75.5 million
Preceded by GoldenEye (1995)
Followed by The World Is Not Enough (1999)
IMDb profile

Tomorrow Never Dies, released in 1997, is the eighteenth spy film in the James Bond series, and the second to star Pierce Brosnan as MI6 agent James Bond. Bruce Feirstein is credited as writing the screenplay, although it received input from several writers, and it was directed by Roger Spottiswoode. It follows Bond as he tries to stop a media mogul from engineering world events and starting World War III. 007 - Tomorrow Never Dies movie poster File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Commander James Bond, CMG, RNVR is a fictional character created by novelist Ian Fleming, and the protagonist of the James Bond series of novels and films. ... Pierce Brendan Brosnan, OBE [1] (born May 16, 1953) is an Irish actor and producer best known for portraying James Bond in four films from 1995 to 2002: GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... Dato Michelle Yeoh Choo-Kheng (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Cantonese (Yale romanization): yèuhng jí kìhng; born August 6, 1962) is a Hong Kong-based actress and dancer, sometimes billed as Michelle Khan. Yeoh is a Chinese Malaysian born in Ipoh, Malaysia. ... Jonathan Pryce (born June 1, 1947) is a Welsh film, television, and stage actor who has starred in such Hollywood films include Brazil, Pirates of the Caribbean, Tomorrow Never Dies and The New World. ... Teri Lynn Hatcher (born December 8, 1964) is an Emmy-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actress and author as well. ... Roger Spottiswoode (born January 6, 1945) is a Canadian film director and writer, most notable for directing the 1997 James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies starring Pierce Brosnan. ... Barbara Dana Broccoli (born June 18, 1960) is the daughter of the famous James Bond producer Albert R. Broccoli. ... Michael G. Wilson (born 1943) is the stepson of the late James Bond producer Albert R. Broccoli and half brother to current James Bond producer, Barbara Broccoli. ... // James Bond Novels By Ian Fleming Ian Fleming. ... Bruce Feirstein (b. ... Bruce Feirstein (b. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... David Arnold (born February 27, 1962 in Luton in Bedfordshire, England) is one of the most popular and successful young British composers[citation needed]. He is probably best known for the film scores to Stargate (1994), Independence Day (1996) and four James Bond films. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Tomorrow Never Dies was the theme tune to the 18th James Bond film of the the same name. ... Sheryl Suzanne Crow (born February 11, 1962) is an American blues rock singer, guitarist, bassist, and songwriter. ... Mitchell Froom is an American musician and record producer. ... This article is about the film studio. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For other uses, see Goldeneye (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The World Is Not Enough (disambiguation). ... The year 1997 in film involved some significant events. ... The spy film genre deals with the subject of fictional espionage, either in a realistic way or as a basis for fantasy. ... “007” redirects here. ... The official film logo of James Bond (007) The adventures of Ian Flemings fictional secret agent, James Bond, have become a successful film series, with twenty-one titles made by EON Productions as of 2007. ... Pierce Brendan Brosnan, OBE [1] (born May 16, 1953) is an Irish actor and producer best known for portraying James Bond in four films from 1995 to 2002: GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), commonly known as MI6 (Military Intelligence, Section 6),[1] is the United Kingdoms external intelligence agency. ... Commander James Bond, CMG, RNVR is a fictional character created by novelist Ian Fleming, and the protagonist of the James Bond series of novels and films. ... Bruce Feirstein (b. ... Roger Spottiswoode (born January 6, 1945) is a Canadian film director and writer, most notable for directing the 1997 James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies starring Pierce Brosnan. ... A media proprietor is a person who controls, either through personal ownership or a dominant position in a public company, a significant part of the mass media. ...


The film was produced by Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli, and was the first James Bond film made after the death of veteran producer Albert R. Broccoli. Although not achieving the same level of success as GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies performed well in the box office and received many positive reviews; a drop in box office performance is usually credited to this movie opening the same day as Titanic. Michael G. Wilson (born 1943) is the stepson of the late James Bond producer Albert R. Broccoli and half brother to current James Bond producer, Barbara Broccoli. ... Barbara Dana Broccoli (born June 18, 1960) is the daughter of the famous James Bond producer Albert R. Broccoli. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The term box office can refer to either: A place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to a venue The amount of business a particular production, such as a movie or theatre show, does. ... Titanic is a 1997 American romantic drama film directed, written, and co-produced by James Cameron about the sinking of the RMS Titanic. ...

Contents

Plot

The plot begins at a terrorist arms bazaar on the Russian border. The MI6 has sent Bond into the field to spy on it. Via television, SIS and the British military identify American terrorist Henry Gupta whom media mogul Elliot Carver sent to buy a American GPS encoder. The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), more commonly known as MI6 (originally Military Intelligence Section 6), or the Secret Service, is the United Kingdom external security agency. ... Commander James Bond, CMG, RNVR is a fictional character created by novelist Ian Fleming, and the protagonist of the James Bond series of novels and films. ... Henry Gupta is a fictional character from the James Bond film, Tomorrow Never Dies. ... GPS redirects here. ...

Paris meeting up with Bond in Hamburg
Paris meeting up with Bond in Hamburg

The British order a missile attack on the arms bazaar, but they then realise there are two Soviet nuclear torpedoes mounted on a L-39 Albatros, destruction of which poses potential local radioactive contamination; Bond hijacks the L-39 and flies it to safety after a fight with its weaponeer, who tries to strangle him; unseen, Gupta escapes with the encoder. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Aero L-39 Albatros is a high-performance, jet trainer aircraft developed in Czechoslovakia to meet requirements for a C-39 (C for Cvičný - trainer) during the 1960s to replace the L-29 Delfín. ...


Elliot Carver (Jonathan Pryce), plans to use the encoder to provoke war between the People's Republic of China and the United Kingdom in an effort to gain an exclusive news market franchise for the Carver Media Group Network. With the encoder, Gupta deviates the frigate, HMS Devonshire, off-course in the South China Sea, where lurks Carver's stealth ship whose crew steal some of its missiles. Carver's odd job man, Mr. Stamper (Götz Otto), sinks the frigate and shoots down one of two Chinese fighter jets sent to investigate the British presence in Chinese seas. Thinking they have been attacked by the Chinese, Admiral Roebuck gives M (Judi Dench) forty-eight hours to investigate before the Royal Navy retaliate. Elliott Carver is a fictional character and the main villain from the James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies. ... Jonathan Pryce (born June 1, 1947) is a Welsh film, television, and stage actor who has starred in such Hollywood films include Brazil, Pirates of the Caribbean, Tomorrow Never Dies and The New World. ... The Type 23 frigate is a class of warship serving with the Royal Navy, also known as the Duke class. ... Filipino name Tagalog: Luzon Sea Portuguese name Portuguese: Mar da China Meridional Vietnamese name Vietnamese: The South China Sea is a marginal sea south of China. ... Mr. ... Götz Otto, (born October 15 1967 in Dietzenbach, Offenbach, Germany) is a powerfully built German actor perhaps most famous for his portrayal as Mr. ... M is a fictional character in Ian Flemings James Bond series, as well as the films in the Bond franchise. ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ...


M sends Bond to investigate Carver after Carver Media has released news with critical details hours before these have become known, and MI6 identifies a spurious signal from one of his CMGN communications satellites when the frigate was sunk. Bond travels to Hamburg and seduces Carver's wife, Paris, an ex-girlfriend; the information she tells Bond helps him sneak into Carver's newspaper headquarters and steal back the GPS encoder.

When Carver learns of it, he orders Paris and Bond killed; Paris is killed, but Bond escapes. Bond then goes to the South China Sea to investigate the Devonshire wreck, discovering several missiles gone. He and Wai Lin, a Chinese spy assigned to investigate the sunken frigate, are captured by Stamper and taken to the CMGN Vietnam bureau; they escape and begin collaborating. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Elliott Carver is a fictional character and the main villain from the James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies. ... Wai Lin is a fictional character in the 1997 James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies, portrayed by Michelle Yeoh. ...


They inform the Royal Navy and the Chinese air force to explain what is happening, then find and board Carver's stealth ship to prevent his firing the stolen British missiles at Beijing. During the fight aboard the stealth ship, Carver kills Gupta, claiming he has outlived his contract, but Bond leads a large battle against the crew and Stamper, and Carver is killed by his own drill after trying to kill Bond on his own. As Bond begins to start the process of destroying the warhead, Stamper shows that he has held Wai Lin hostage. A fight ensues when he tries to drown her. Bond traps Stamper in the missile firing mechanism and leaves him to die while saving Wai Lin as the stealth ship is destroyed. Bond and Wai Lin hide amongst the wreckage, ending the film.


Cast

A list of henchmen from the 1997 James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies from the List of James Bond henchmen // Mr. ... This is a list of allies from the film Tomorrow Never Dies // M - Judi Dench Q - Desmond Llewelyn Miss Moneypenny - Samantha Bond Jack Wade - Joe Don Baker Charles Robinson - Colin Salmon Jack Wade makes his second apperence and the main article is found at List of James Bond allies in... Image File history File links Stamper1. ... Image File history File links Stamper1. ... Mr. ... Pierce Brendan Brosnan, OBE [1] (born May 16, 1953) is an Irish actor and producer best known for portraying James Bond in four films from 1995 to 2002: GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... Commander James Bond, CMG, RNVR is a fictional character created by novelist Ian Fleming, and the protagonist of the James Bond series of novels and films. ... Jonathan Pryce (born June 1, 1947) is a Welsh film, television, and stage actor who has starred in such Hollywood films include Brazil, Pirates of the Caribbean, Tomorrow Never Dies and The New World. ... Elliott Carver is a fictional character and the main villain from the James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies. ... Dato Michelle Yeoh Choo-Kheng (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Cantonese (Yale romanization): yèuhng jí kìhng; born August 6, 1962) is a Hong Kong-based actress and dancer, sometimes billed as Michelle Khan. Yeoh is a Chinese Malaysian born in Ipoh, Malaysia. ... Wai Lin is a fictional character in the 1997 James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies, portrayed by Michelle Yeoh. ... Teri Lynn Hatcher (born December 8, 1964) is an Emmy-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actress and author as well. ... Paris Carver is a fictional character who appeared in the James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies (1997). ... Ricky Jay Ricky Jay (b. ... A list of henchmen from the 1997 James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies from the List of James Bond henchmen // Mr. ... Götz Otto, (born October 15 1967 in Dietzenbach, Offenbach, Germany) is a powerfully built German actor perhaps most famous for his portrayal as Mr. ... A list of henchmen from the 1997 James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies from the List of James Bond henchmen // Mr. ... For the Naruto jutsu, see Chakra (Naruto). ... Joe Don Baker (born February 12, 1936) is an American film actor perhaps best known for his role as sheriff Buford Pusser in the American film classic Walking Tall. ... Jack Wade is a fictional character in Pierce Brosnans first two James Bond films. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Vincent Schiavelli and his then wife Allyce Beasley (September 20, 1987) Photo by Alan Light Vincent Andrew Schiavelli (November 10, 1948 – December 26, 2005) was an American character actor noted for his work in film and television. ... A list of henchmen from the 1997 James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies from the List of James Bond henchmen // Mr. ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ... M is a fictional character in Ian Flemings James Bond series, as well as the films in the Bond franchise. ... Desmond Wilkinson Llewelyn (September 12, 1913 – December 19, 1999) was a Welsh actor, famous for playing the fictional character of Q in the James Bond series of films. ... Q is a fictional character in the James Bond novels and films. ... Samantha Bond (born November 27, 1962) is an English actress best known for her role as Miss Moneypenny in the Pierce Brosnan James Bond films. ... Jane Moneypenny, better known as Miss Moneypenny is a fictional character in the James Bond novels and films. ... Colin Salmon (1962) is an English actor best known for playing the fictional character Charles Robinson in three James Bond films. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Right Honourable Sir Geoffrey Winston Russell Palmer, AC, KCMG (born 21 April 1942), served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from August 1989 until September 1990, leading the Labour Party. ... Admiral Roebuck is a fictional character in the James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies. ... Fellowes as Lord Kilwillie Julian Fellowes (born August 17, 1949 in Egypt, although he is British) was an actor for over twenty years before winning the Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay in 2001 for Gosford Park. ...

Production

After the success of GoldenEye in reviving the Bond series, there was pressure to recreate that success in its follow-up. This pressure came both from MGM, which had recently been sold to billionaire Kirk Kerkorian who wanted the release to coincide with their public stock offering,[2] and the worldwide audience, with co-producer Michael G. Wilson saying "You realize that there's a huge audience and I guess you don't want to come out with a film that's going to somehow disappoint them."[2] This was the first Bond film to be made after the death of Albert R. Broccoli, who had been involved with the production of them since the series began. The rush to complete it meant the budget spiralled to around $110 million.[2][3] For other uses, see Goldeneye (disambiguation). ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... Kerkor Kirk Kerkorian (born June 6, 1917) is an American billionaire, and president/CEO of Tracinda Corporation, his private holding company based in Beverly Hills, California. ... Michael G. Wilson (born 1943) is the stepson of the late James Bond producer Albert R. Broccoli and half brother to current James Bond producer, Barbara Broccoli. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


The producers were unable to get Martin Campbell, the director of GoldenEye, to return; his agent saying "Martin just didn't want to do two Bond films in a row". Instead, Roger Spottiswoode was chosen in September 1996.[4] The story had its roots in a treatment written by Donald E. Westlake, although what influence it eventually had is unknown.[5] Bruce Feirstein, who had worked on GoldenEye, penned the initial script which was then passed to Spottiswoode who reworked it. He gathered seven Hollywood screenwriters in London to brainstorm, eventually choosing Nicholas Meyer to perform rewrites.[4] The script was also worked on by Dan Petrie Jr and David Campbell Wilson before Feirstein, who retained the sole writing credit, was brought in for a final polish.[5] Martin Campbell (born October 24, 1940, Hastings) is a New Zealand film and television director. ... Roger Spottiswoode (born January 6, 1945) is a Canadian film director and writer, most notable for directing the 1997 James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies starring Pierce Brosnan. ... A treatment or more properly film treatment is a short piece of prose intended to be turned into a screenplay for a motion picture. ... Donald Edwin Westlake (born July 12th, 1933 in Brooklyn, New York), is a prolific American writer, with over a hundred books, specializing in crime fiction, especially comic capers, with an occasional bit of science fiction. ... Bruce Feirstein (b. ... ... Screenwriters, or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies are made. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Nicholas Meyer at the Paramount Pictures lot in 2002. ...


Script

As had been the case previously, with no Ian Fleming novels remaining unadapted, an entirely original story was required. The scriptwriting process was finished very late and after lengthy disputes. Spottiswoode said that MGM had a script in January 1997 revolving round Hong Kong being returned to the Chinese, which happened in June; this couldn't be used for a film opening at the end of the year, so they had to start "almost from scratch at T-minus zero!"[6] Wilson said ""we didn't have a script that was ready to shoot on the first day of filming", with Pierce Brosnan saying "we had a script that was not functioning in certain areas."[2] The Daily Mail reported on arguments between Spottiswoode and the producers with the former favouring the Petrie version, but the latter reinstating Feirstein to rewrite it two weeks before filming was due to begin. They also said that Jonathan Pryce and Teri Hatcher were unhappy with their new roles, causing further rescripting.[7] The title came about by accident: one of the potential titles was Tomorrow Never Lies (referring to the Tomorrow newspaper in the story) and it was faxed to MGM. However, through an error it became Tomorrow Never Dies, which MGM liked so much they insisted on using.[6] The title was the first not to have any Fleming connection and the film is arguably the first to include no elements from his writing bar characters such as Bond himself and Miss Moneypenny. Ian Lancaster Fleming (May 28, 1908 – August 12, 1964) was a British author, journalist and Second World War Navy Commander. ... The transfer of the sovereignty of Hong Kong from the United Kingdom to China, often referred to as The Handover, occurred on July 1, 1997. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... Jonathan Pryce (born June 1, 1947) is a Welsh film, television, and stage actor who has starred in such Hollywood films include Brazil, Pirates of the Caribbean, Tomorrow Never Dies and The New World. ... Teri Lynn Hatcher (born December 8, 1964) is an Emmy-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actress and author as well. ... Jane Moneypenny, better known as Miss Moneypenny is a fictional character in the James Bond novels and films. ...


Casting

Teri Hatcher was three months pregnant at the shooting start, by her then-husband, Jon Tenney; her publicist stated the pregnancy unaffected by the production schedule.[8] Hatcher later regretted playing Paris Carver, saying "It's such an artificial kind of character to be playing that you don't get any special satisfaction from it."[9] According to Brosnan, Monica Bellucci screentested for the role but "the fools said no."[10] Jonathan F. W. Tenney (born December 16, 1961 in Princeton, New Jersey) is an American actor. ... Monica Anna Maria Bellucci (born September 30, 1964) is an Italian actress and former fashion model. ...


The role of Elliot Carver was initially offered to Anthony Hopkins (who also had been offered a role in GoldenEye), but he turned it down.[4][5] For the composer, see Antony Hopkins. ... For other uses, see Goldeneye (disambiguation). ...


Natasha Henstridge was rumoured as cast in the lead Bond Girl role,[11] but eventually, Yeoh was confirmed in that role. Brosnan was impressed, describing her as a "wonderful actress" who was "serious and committed about her work".[12] She reputedly wanted to perform her own stunts, but was prevented because director Spottiswoode ruled it too dangerous and uninsured.[13][14] Natasha Henstridge (born August 15, 1974) is a Canadian fashion model turned actress. ...


When called in for casting, Götz Otto (Mr. Stamper) was given twenty seconds to introduce himself. Saying, "I am big, I am bad, and I am German", he did it in five.[15]


Filming

James Bond performing a HALO jump.
James Bond performing a HALO jump.

Second unit filming began on 18 January 1997 with Vic Armstrong directing; they filmed the pre-credits sequence in the French Pyrenees and moved on to Portsmouth to film the scenes where the Royal Navy prepares to engage the Chinese.[5] The main unit began filming on 1 April. They were unable to use the Leavesden Film Studios, which they had constructed from an abandoned Rolls-Royce factory for GoldenEye, as George Lucas was using it for Star Wars Episode I, so instead they constructed sound stages in another derelict industrial site nearby. They also used the 007 Stage at Pinewood Studios.[4] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... “007” redirects here. ... “HALO” redirects here. ... In film, the second unit is a separate team that shoots footage which is of lesser importance for the final motion picture, as opposed to the first unit, which shoots all scenes involving actors, or at least the stars of the film. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Vic Armstrong (born October 5, 1946) is a British born stunt double, the worlds most prolific according to the Guinness Book of Records. ... Pic de Bugatetin the Néouvielle Natural Reserve Central Pyrenees For the mountains in Victoria, Australia, see Pyrenees (Victoria). ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Leavesden Film Studios is a film and media complex constructed on the site of the former Rolls Royce factory at Leavesden Aerodrome, which was an important centre of aircraft production during World War II. It is situated approximately 20 miles northwest of central London near the town of Watford. ... Rolls-Royce Limited was a British car and aero-engine manufacturing company founded by Henry Royce and C.S. Rolls on 15 March 1906 and was the result of a partnership formed in 1904. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... Film poster for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace is a 1999 film by George Lucas starring Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman, and Jake Lloyd. ... A sound stage is a hangar-like structure, building or room, that is soundproof for the production of theatrical motion pictures and television, usually inside a movie studio. ... The Albert R. Broccoli 007 Stage (commonly just 007 Stage) is one of the largest sound stages in the world. ... The gatehouse at Pinewood Studios Pinewood Studios is a major British film studio situated in Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire. ...


They planned to film some of the scenes on location in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and had been granted a visa. This was later rescinded, two months after planning had begun, forcing filming to move to Bangkok, Thailand. Some claim the Chinese government put pressure on Vietnam to do this, because they were unhappy with the story involving corrupt Chinese generals doing the bidding of a media tycoon. However, Bond spokesman Gordon Arnell claimed the Vietnamese were merely unhappy with crew and equipment needed for pyrotechnics, with a Vietnamese official saying it was due to "many complicated reasons".[16] “Saigon” redirects here. ... Location within in Thailand Coordinates: , Country Settled Ayutthaya Period Founded as capital 21 April 1782 Government  - Type Special administrative area  - Governer Apirak Kosayothin Area  - City 1,568. ... Pyrotechnics is a field of study often thought synonymous with the manufacture of fireworks, but more accurately it has a wider scope that includes items for military and industrial uses. ...


The car chase sequence took three weeks to film, with Brent Cross car park being used to simulate Hamburg (although the final leap was filmed on location[17]). A stunt involving setting fire to three vehicles produced more smoke than anticipated, causing a member of public to call the fire brigade.[18] Two locations from previous Bond films were used: Brosnan and Hatcher's love scene was filmed at Stoke Poges golf club, which had featured in Goldfinger, and the bay where they search for Carver's stealth boat is Khow-Ping-Khan island near Phuket, Thailand, previously used for The Man with the Golden Gun.[17][5] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Brent Cross in London is best known as the first shopping centre of its kind to be built in the UK. Situated on the North Circular between the southern terminus of the M1 motorway and the Brent Cross Flyover in the London Borough of Barnet and taking its name from... This article is about the city in Germany. ... Firefighter with an axe A firefighter, sometimes still called a fireman though women have increasingly joined firefighting units, is a person who is trained and equipped to put out fires, rescue people and in some areas provide emergency medical services. ... Stoke Poges is a village in Buckinghamshire, England. ... A country club is a private club that offers a variety of recreational sports facilities to its members. ... Goldfinger is the third film in the James Bond series, and the third to star Sean Connery as the MI6 agent. ... Phuket (Thai ภูเก็ต) is one of the southern provinces (changwat) of Thailand. ... The Man with the Golden Gun is the ninth film in the James Bond series and the second to star Roger Moore as MI6 agent James Bond. ...


During filming, there were reports of disputes on set. The Daily Mail reported that Spottiswoode and Feirstein were no longer on speaking terms and that crew members had threatened to resign, with one saying "All the happiness and teamwork which is the hallmark of Bond has disappeared completely."[7] This was denied by Brosnan who claimed "It was nothing more than good old creative argy-bargy",[2] with Spottiswoode saying "It has all been made up...Nothing important really went wrong."[6] Spottiswoode did not return to direct the next film; he said the producers asked him, but he was too tired.[6] Apparently, Brosnan and Hatcher feuded briefly during filming due to her arriving late onto the set one day. The matter was quickly resolved though and Brosnan apologized to Hatcher after realizing she was pregnant and was late for that reason. [19] The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ...


Release and reception

The film had a World Charity Premiere at The Odeon Leicester Square, on December 9, 1997; this was followed by an after premiere party at Bedford Square, home of original Ian Fleming publisher, Jonathan Cape.[20] The film went on general release in the UK and Iceland on December 12, and in most other countries during the following week.[21] It performed well at the box office achieving a worldwide gross of over $333 million,[22] the fourth highest of 1997;[23] it did not surpass its predecessor GoldenEye, which made almost $20 million more.[24] Odeon Cinemas is the largest chain of cinemas in the United Kingdom. ... Leicester Square at night in 2005: a view towards the northeast corner. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Bedford Square is a square in the Bloomsbury district of the London Borough of Camden in London, England. ... Ian Lancaster Fleming (May 28, 1908 – August 12, 1964) was a British author, journalist and Second World War Navy Commander. ... Jonathan Cape has been since 1987 an imprint of Random House. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The term box office can refer to either: A place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to a venue The amount of business a particular production, such as a movie or theatre show, does. ... For other uses, see Goldeneye (disambiguation). ...


The critical reception of the film was mixed, with the film review collection website Rotten Tomatoes giving it a 52% Fresh approval,[25] and similar site Metacritic rating it at 56%.[26] In the Chicago Sun-Times, Roger Ebert gave the film three out of four-stars, saying "Tomorrow Never Dies gets the job done, sometimes excitingly, often with style" with the villain "slightly more contemporary and plausible than usual", bringing "some subtler-than-usual satire into the film".[27] James Berardinelli described it as "the best Bond film in many years" and said Brosnan "inhabits his character with a suave confidence that is very like Connery's."[28] However, in the Los Angeles Times, Kenneth Turan thought a lot of Tomorrow Never Dies had a "stodgy, been-there feeling", with little change from previous films,[29] and Charles Taylor wrote for Salon.com that the film was "a flat, impersonal affair".[30] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... James Berardinelli (born September 1967, New Brunswick, New Jersey) is an online film critic. ... Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born 25 August 1930) is a retired Scottish actor and producer who is perhaps best known as the first actor to portray James Bond in cinema, starring in seven Bond films. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Kenneth Turan is an American film critic, currently writing for the Los Angeles Times. ... Salon. ...


The title song sung by Sheryl Crow was nominated for a Golden Globe for "Best Original Song - Motion Picture" and a Grammy for "Best Song Written Specifically for a Motion Picture or for Television". The film received four nominations for Saturn Awards, with Brosnan winning "Best Actor". It also won a MPSE Golden Reel Award for "Best Sound Editing - Foreign Feature" and a BMI Film Music Award.[31]
Sheryl Suzanne Crow (born February 11, 1962) is an American blues rock singer, guitarist, bassist, and songwriter. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... The Saturn Award is an award presented annually by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films to honor the top works in science fiction, fantasy, and horror in film, television, and home video. ... Founded in 1953, Motion Picture Sound Editors (M.P.S.E.) is an honorary society of motion picture sound editors. ... The MPSE Golden Reel Award is an award presented by the organization of Motion Picture Sound Editors in categories related to the craft of audio post production, such as Sound Editing, Music Editing, Dialog Editing, and Sound Effect Editing. The award was first presented in 1953 and has continued into... Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) is a collecting society that protects composers intellectual property in the communications business, especially radio. ...


Soundtrack

After Éric Serra's soundtrack for GoldenEye had been poorly received, Barbara Broccoli chose David Arnold to score Tomorrow Never Dies on a recommendation from prolific Bond composer John Barry.[32] Arnold had come to Barry's attention through his successful cover interpretations in Shaken and Stirred: The David Arnold James Bond Project, which featured major artists performing classic James Bond title songs in new arrangements. The film's score combined techno music with a recognisably Barry-inspired 'classic Bond' sound – notably Arnold borrowed from Barry's score for From Russia wiith Love. For the music for the indoor car chase sequence, Arnold enlisted the help of the band Propellerheads, who had worked with him before on Shaken and Stirred. The soundtrack's reception was good, with Filmtracks describing it as "an excellent tribute to the entire series of Bond score",[33] and Arnold was brought back to score all the subsequent films, three more to date. The theme was chosen through a competitive process. There were around twelve submissions, including songs from Swan Lee, Pulp, Saint Etienne, Marc Almond, Sheryl Crow, and David Arnold.[34] Crow's song was chosen for the main titles while David Arnold's song Surrender, performed by k.d. lang, was used for the end titles, its melody cropping up throughout the film. [33] Both songs include the title as a lyric – "tomorrow never dies" – a first for the series; and this was the fourth Bond film to have different opening and closing songs. Two different versions of the soundtrack album were released, the first lacking music from the second half of the film, and the second lacking the songs. Pulp's effort was retitled as Tomorrow Never Lies and appeared as a b-side on their single Help The Aged. Éric Serra Éric Serra (born on September 9, 1959) is a French composer. ... David Arnold (born February 27, 1962 in Luton in Bedfordshire, England) is one of the most popular and successful young British composers[citation needed]. He is probably best known for the film scores to Stargate (1994), Independence Day (1996) and four James Bond films. ... John Barry. ... Techno is a form of electronic dance music that became prominent in Detroit, Michigan during the mid-1980s with influences from electro, New Wave, Funk and futuristic fiction themes that were prevalent and relative to modern culture during the end of the Cold War in industrial America at that time. ... For the video game, see From Russia with Love (video game). ... Propellerheads is a British big beat music band made up of electronic producers Will White and Alex Gifford. ... Tomorrow Never Dies was the theme tune to the 18th James Bond film of the the same name. ... Swan Lee was a Danish band featuring Pernille Rosendahl on vocals. ... Pulp were a rock band, formed in Sheffield, England in 1978, by then 15-year-old school boy Jarvis Cocker (vocals, guitar). ... Saint Etienne are an English indie dance act, fronted by Sarah Cracknell (born April 12, 1967, Chelmsford, Essex). ... Marc Almond (born Peter Mark Sinclair Almond on 9 July 1957 in Southport, Lancashire, England) is a popular English singer, songwriter and recording artist, who originally found fame as half of the seminal synthpop/New Wave duo Soft Cell. ... Sheryl Suzanne Crow (born February 11, 1962) is an American blues rock singer, guitarist, bassist, and songwriter. ... Kathryn Dawn Lang, OC (born November 2, 1961), best known by the stage name k. ... Help the Aged is a song by British alternative rock band Pulp, and is featured on their 1998 album This Is Hardcore. ...


Other media

1997 British Coronet Books paperback edition.
1997 British Coronet Books paperback edition.

Tomorrow Never Dies was the first of three Bond films to be adapted into books by then-current Bond novelist, Raymond Benson. Benson's version is expanded from the screenplay including additional scenes with Wai Lin and other supporting characters not in the film. The book also attempts to merge his series with the films, particularly continuing a middle of the road approach to John Gardner's continuity. Continuation with the film series is also largely middle of the road. Notably it includes a reference to the film version of You Only Live Twice where he states that Bond was lying to Miss Moneypenny when he said he had taken a course in Oriental languages. This was done to counter the scene in Tomorrow Never Dies where Bond is unable to read a Chinese keyboard and type a message to his superiors, although this scene does not appear in the novelisation. Curiously, this contradicts Benson's own series since in the previous book, Zero Minus Ten, Bond is able to speak fluent Cantonese. Tomorrow Never Dies also mentions Felix Leiter, although it states that Felix had worked for Pinkertons Detective Agency which is thus far exclusive to the literary series, although this may be a continuation of Gardner's novelisation of Licence to Kill, which also attempted to bridge the literary and cinematic series. Subsequent Bond novels by Raymond Benson were affected by Tomorrow Never Dies, specifically Bond's weapon of choice being changed from the Walther PPK to the Walther P99. Download high resolution version (1344x2088, 346 KB) This work is copyrighted. ... Download high resolution version (1344x2088, 346 KB) This work is copyrighted. ... Raymond Benson (born September 6, 1955) is an American author best known for being the last official author of the adult James Bond novels. ... John Gardner, circa 1984 John Edmund Gardner (November 20, 1926 - August 3, 2007) was an English spy novelist. ... For the Ian Fleming novel, see You Only Live Twice. ... The term the Orient - literally meaning sunrise, east - is traditionally used to refer to Near, Middle, and Far Eastern countries. ... Zero Minus Ten, published in 1997, was the first James Bond novel by Raymond Benson, picking up where Ian Fleming and John Gardner left off. ... This article is about all of the Cantonese (Yue) dialects. ... Felix Leiter is a fictional character created by Ian Fleming in the James Bond series of novels and films. ... Pinkerton guards escort strikebreakers in Buchtel, Ohio, 1884 The Pinkerton National Detective Agency was a private U.S. security guard and detective agency established by Allan Pinkerton in 1850. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


The film was adapted into a third-person shooter Sony PlayStation video game, Tomorrow Never Dies. It was developed by Black Ops and published by Electronic Arts on November 16, 1999. The game was poorly-received: Game Revolution described it as "really just an empty and shallow game",[35] and IGN said it was "mediocre".[36] This does not cite its references or sources. ... The original PlayStation was produced in a light grey colour; the more recent PSOne redesign sports a smaller more rounded case. ... This article is about the video game Tomorrow Never Dies, for the film see Tomorrow Never Dies. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Electronic Arts (EA) (NASDAQ: ERTS) is an American developer, marketer, publisher, and distributor of computer and video games. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Game Revolution or GR is a gaming website created in 1996. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ...


References

  1. ^ Dye, Kerry Douglas. "His Word is Bond: An Interview With 007 Screenwriter Bruce Feirstein", LeisureSuit.net, 1999-11-15. Retrieved on 2007-01-05. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Ashton, Richard (1997). Tomorrow Never Dies. hmss.com. Retrieved on 2007-01-06.
  3. ^ Business Data for Tomorrow Never Dies. IMDB. Retrieved on 2007-01-06.
  4. ^ a b c d "Latest Bond Production Shaken, Stirred", Variety, 1996-12-08. Retrieved on 2007-01-05. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Production Notes - Tomorrow Never Dies. mi6.co.uk. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  6. ^ a b c d Collette, Kevin. "Yesterday’s 'Tomorrow': Spottiswoode Interview", ianfleming.org, 2004-04-10. Retrieved on 2007-01-05. 
  7. ^ a b Shooter, Anne. "Bond in the Crossfire", Daily Mail, 1997-05-27. Retrieved on 2007-01-06. 
  8. ^ Johns, Elizabeth. "Teri Hatcher Pregnant", E!, 1997-05-02. Retrieved on 2007-01-05. 
  9. ^ "Hatcher regrets Bond movie", Yahoo! News, 2006-11-27. Retrieved on 2007-01-05. 
  10. ^ "Brosnan Bares All For Playboy", Playboy, 2005-11-05. Retrieved on 2007-01-07. 
  11. ^ Ferguson, Amy. "Back In Action", Tribute. Retrieved on 2007-01-05. 
  12. ^ Cohen, David. "Bond girl Yeoh gets licence to thrill 007", South China Morning Post, 1997-02-11. Retrieved on 2007-01-06. 
  13. ^ "Bond Leading Lady Won't Do Stunts", Associated Press, 1997-05-21. Retrieved on 2007-01-06. 
  14. ^ "Much More Than Just A Bond Girl", South China Morning Post, 1997-05-30. Retrieved on 2007-01-07. 
  15. ^ "Promi-Porträt: Götz Otto", kwick!, 2007-10-20. Retrieved on 2007-01-06. 
  16. ^ "China Resists Western Efforts to Bond", New York Daily News, 1997-03-10. Retrieved on 2007-01-06. 
  17. ^ a b Tomorrow Never Dies filming locations. movielocations.com. Retrieved on 2007-01-07.
  18. ^ Keeling, Judith. "Bond Goes Down A Bomb In Brent Cross", Evening Standard, 1997-06-17. Retrieved on 2007-01-07. 
  19. ^ "Brosnan Bares All For Playboy", Playboy, 2005-11-05. Retrieved on 2007-01-07. 
  20. ^ Tomorrow Never Dies - The Premiere & Press. mi6.co.uk (2003-12-12). Retrieved on 2007-01-14.
  21. ^ Release dates for Tomorrow Never Dies. IMDB. Retrieved on 2006-01-14.
  22. ^ Tomorrow Never Dies. Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2007-01-14.
  23. ^ 1997 Worldwide Grosses. Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2007-01-14.
  24. ^ GoldenEye. Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2007-01-14.
  25. ^ Tomorrow Never Dies (1997). rottentomatoes.com. Retrieved on 2007-01-13.
  26. ^ Tomorrow Never Dies. metacritic.com. Retrieved on 2007-01-13.
  27. ^ Ebert, Roger. "Tomorrow Never Dies", Chicago Sun-Times, 1997-12-19. Retrieved on 2007-01-13. 
  28. ^ Berardinelli, James. "Tomorrow Never Dies", www.reelviews.net, 1997. Retrieved on 2006-01-13. 
  29. ^ Turan, Kenneth. "Tomorrow Never Dies", Los Angeles Times, 1997-12-19. Retrieved on 2007-01-13. 
  30. ^ Taylor, Charles. "Stale Bonding", Salon.com, 1997-12-19. Retrieved on 2007-01-13. 
  31. ^ Awards for Tomorrow Never Dies. IMDB. Retrieved on 2007-01-14.
  32. ^ Macnee, Patrick (Narrator). The Bond Sound: The Music of 007 [DVD (Documentary)].
  33. ^ a b Review of Original Album. filmtracks.com. Retrieved on 2007-01-16.
  34. ^ (2006). James Bond's Greatest Hits [Television]. UK: North One Television.
  35. ^ Liu, Johnny. "Tomorrow Never Dies", Game Revolution, December 1999. Retrieved on 2007-01-16. 
  36. ^ Perry, Doug. "Tomorrow Never Dies", IGN, 1999-11-19. Retrieved on 2007-01-16. 

This article is about the year. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... 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The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... E!: Entertainment Television is an American cable television and direct broadcast satellite network. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Yahoo! News is an Internet-based news aggregator provided by Yahoo!. It features Top Stories, U.S. National, World, Business, Entertainment, Science, Health, Weather, Most Popular, News Photos, Op/Ed, and Local news. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The South China Morning Post, together with its Sunday edition, the Sunday Morning Post, is the dominant English-language newspaper in Hong Kong, with a circulation of 104,000. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The South China Morning Post, together with its Sunday edition, the Sunday Morning Post, is the dominant English-language newspaper in Hong Kong, with a circulation of 104,000. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Headlines of the Evening Standard on the day of London bombing on July 7, 2005, in Waterloo Station The Evening Standard is a British tabloid newspaper published and sold in London and surrounding areas of southeast England. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... James Berardinelli (born September 1967, New Brunswick, New Jersey) is an online film critic. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kenneth Turan is an American film critic, currently writing for the Los Angeles Times. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... 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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Game Revolution or GR is a gaming website created in 1996. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... This article is about the year. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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