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Encyclopedia > Tom Waits
Tom Waits

Background information
Birth name Thomas Alan Waits
Born December 7, 1949 (1949-12-07) (age 57) in Pomona, California, United States
Genre(s) Experimental
Rock
Blues
Jazz
Folk
Occupation(s) Singer-songwriter
Composer
Musician
Actor
Instrument(s) Organ, Guitar, Piano, Harmonium, Vocals
Label(s) Asylum
Anti-
Island
Website Official Site

Thomas Alan Waits (born December 7, 1949) is an American singer-songwriter, composer, and actor. Waits has a distinctive voice, described by one critic as sounding "like it was soaked in a vat of bourbon, left hanging in the smokehouse for a few months and then taken outside and run over with a car."[1] With this trademark growl, his incorporation of pre-rock styles such as blues, jazz, and Vaudeville, and experimental tendencies verging on industrial music,[2] Waits has built up a distinctive musical persona. Waits has also worked as a composer for movies and musical plays and as a supporting actor in films, including The Fisher King and Bram Stoker's Dracula. He has been nominated for an Academy Award for his soundtrack work. Download high resolution version (374x656, 36 KB)Tom Waits Courtesy of: http://www. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location in Los Angeles County and the State of California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Government  - Mayor Norma Torres Area  - Total 22. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For experimental rock music, see experimental rock. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental musical form which evolved from African American spirituals, shouts, work songs and chants and has its earliest stylistic roots in West Africa. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Folk song redirects here. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... A Harmonium is a free-standing musical keyboard instrument similar to a Reed Organ or Pipe Organ. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... For the label known as Asylum-Curb, see Curb Records. ... Anti- Records is a record label that is a part of the Epitaph Records group. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Bourbon bottle, 19th century Oak casks in ricks used store and age bourbon. ... Blues music redirects here. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... This article is about the musical variety theatre. ... It has been suggested that Chicago Industrial be merged into this article or section. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theater combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... The Fisher King is a comedy-drama film made in 1991, written by Richard LaGravenese and directed by Terry Gilliam. ... Bram Stokers Dracula is a 1992 horror romance film produced and directed by Francis Ford Coppola, based on the novel Dracula by Bram Stoker. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...


Lyrically, Waits' songs are known for atmospheric portrayals of bizarre, seedy characters and places, although he has also shown a penchant for more conventional ballads. He has a cult following and has influenced subsequent songwriters, despite having little radio or music video support. His songs are best known to the general public in the form of cover versions by more visible artists — for example "Jersey Girl" performed by Bruce Springsteen, "Downtown Train" performed by Rod Stewart, and "Ol' '55" performed by the Eagles. In a 2005 interview Bob Seger claimed that Waits' music was an inspiration in his songs. Although Waits' albums have met with mixed commercial success in his native United States, they have occasionally achieved gold album sales status in other countries. He has been nominated for a number of major music awards, and has won Grammy Awards for two albums. Illustration by Arthur Rackham of the ballad The Twa Corbies A ballad is a story, usually a narrative or poem, in a song. ... This article does not discuss cultist groups, personality cults, or cult in its original sense of religious practice. See cult (disambiguation) for more meanings of the term cult. A cult following is a group of fans devoted to a specific area of pop culture. ... A music video is a short film or video that accompanies a complete piece of music, most commonly a song. ... In pop music a cover version is a new rendition of a previously recorded song. ... Jersey Girl is a song composed and originally sung by American musical artist Tom Waits from his 1980 album Heartattack and Vine. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... Downtown train is a song by Tom Waits, originally released on his album Rain Dogs (1985). ... Roderick Stewart (rod stewart), CBE (born January 10, 1945), is a singer and songwriter born and raised in London, England, with Scottish parentage. ... Ol 55 is a song written and recorded by Tom Waits. ... The Eagles are an American rock music group that originally came together in Los Angeles, California in the early 1970s. ... Robert Clark Seger (born May 5, 1945) is a Rock and Roll singer, songwriter, and musician from Michigan. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with RIAA certification. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music...


Waits currently lives in Sonoma County, California with his wife and their three children. Sonoma County is on the northwest coast of California, one of the northernmost parts of the greater San Francisco Bay Area, U.S. Its population at the 2000 census was 458,614. ...

Contents

Life and career

Origins and musical beginnings

Tom Waits was born on December 7 1949 in Pomona, California to Jesse Frank Waits and Alma Johnson McMurray, both schoolteachers. [3] His father was of Scottish-Irish descent and his mother of Norwegian descent.[4] Waits' parents divorced in 1960 when he was ten years old, and the young Waits lived for a while in Whittier, California, before moving with his mother to National City, near the Mexican border. Waits, who taught himself how to play the piano on a neighbour's instrument, would later claim that it was during trips to Mexico with his father, who taught Spanish, that he would first find his love of music, through a Mexican ballad that was "probably a Ranchera, you know, on the car radio with my dad." [5] Nickname: Location in Los Angeles County and the State of California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Government  - Mayor Norma Torres Area  - Total 22. ... This article is about the Scottish as an ethnic group. ... Whittier is a city in Los Angeles County, California about 12 miles (19 km) southeast of Los Angeles. ... National City is a city in San Diego County, California, United States. ... The ranchera is a genre of the traditional music of Mexico. ...


By 1965 Waits was playing in an R&B soul band called The System, and had begun his first job at Napoleone Pizza House in San Diego (about which he would later sing on "I Can't Wait to Get Off Work" from Small Change) [3]. He later admitted that he was not a fan of the 1960s music scene, stating "I wasn't thrilled by Blue Cheer, so I found an alternative, even if it was Bing Crosby."[6] He was working as a doorman at the Heritage nightclub in San Diego five years later, where artists of every genre performed, when he landed his first paid gig in 1970, for which he received $25 [3]. An avid fan of many writers and musicians, among them Frank Sinatra, Bob Dylan, Lord Buckley, Hoagy Carmichael, Marty Robbins, Raymond Chandler, and Stephen Foster, Waits began developing his own idiosyncratic musical style, combining song and monologue. Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... Blue Cheer is a San Francisco-based rock group of the late 1960s and early 1970s, who helped to pioneer heavy metal music. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... Sinatra redirects here. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Lord Buckley, or Richard Myrle Buckley, (April 5, 1906 - November 12, 1960) was an eccentric, joyous American monologist. ... Hoagland Howard Hoagy Carmichael (November 22, 1899 – December 27, 1981) was an American composer, pianist, singer, actor, and bandleader. ... Marty Robbins (September 26, 1925 – December 8, 1982) was one of the most popular and successful American country and western singers of his era. ... For other persons named Raymond Chandler, see Raymond Chandler (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Stephen Foster, see Stephen Foster (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Song (disambiguation). ... A monologue, pronounced monolog, is a speech made by one person speaking his or her thoughts aloud or directly addressing a reader, audience, or character. ...


After an interlude with the US Coast Guard he took his newly formed act to Monday nights at The Troubadour in Los Angeles, where musicians from all over stood in line all day to get the opportunity to perform on-stage that night. Shortly thereafter, in 1971, Waits relocated to the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles (at the time also home to musicians Glen Frey and J.D. Souther of the Eagles, Jackson Browne, and Frank Zappa) and signed with Herb Cohen at the age of 21. From August to December 1971, Waits made a series of demo recordings for Cohen's label Bizarre/Straight, including many songs for which Waits would later become known. These early tracks were eventually to be released twenty years later on The Early Years, Volume One and Volume Two. USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... Exterior of the Troubadour The Troubadour is a nightclub located in West Hollywood, California, USA, at 9081 Santa Monica Boulevard just east of Doheny Drive and the border of Beverly Hills. ... Echo Park is the name of a neighbourhood in Los Angeles. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Glenn Frey (born November 6, 1948 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American musician, singer, songwriter, and actor, best known as one of the founding members of rock and roll band, The Eagles. ... J.D. Souther, born John David Souther on November 3, 1945 in Detroit, Michigan and raised in Amarillo, Texas, is a singer-songwriter country rock singer and actor. ... Clyde Jackson Browne (born October 9, 1948) is an American rock music singer, songwriter, guitarist, and pianist, whose introspective lyrics made him the poster boy of the Southern California confessional singer-songwriter movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... Herb Cohen (b. ... Bizarre Records was a record label formed for artists discovered by Frank Zappa and his business partner/manager Herb Cohen. ... Straight Records was a record label formed in 1969 to distribute productions and discoveries of Frank Zappa and his business partner/manager Herb Cohen. ... The Early Years, Volume One is a retrospective album of Tom Waits songs, consisting of recordings made before Waits actual debut album Closing Time. ... The Early Years, Volume Two is a retrospective album of Tom Waits songs, consisting of recordings made before Waits actual debut album Closing Time. ...


1970s; The Asylum Years

Waits signed to Asylum Records in 1972 [7], and after numerous abortive recording sessions, his first record, the jazzy, folk-tinged Closing Time, was released in 1973. The album, which was produced and arranged by former Lovin' Spoonful member Jerry Yester, received warm reviews, but Waits did not gain widespread attention until the album's opening track, "Ol' 55", was recorded by his label mates the Eagles in 1974 for their On the Border album. For the label known as Asylum-Curb, see Curb Records. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Folk can refer to a number of different things: It can be short for folk music, or, for folksong, or, for folklore; it may be a word for a specific people, tribe, or nation, especially one of the Germanic peoples; it might even be a calque on the related German... Closing Time is the debut album of Tom Waits, released in 1973 (see 1973 in music) on Asylum Records. ... John Sebastian (born March 17, 1944) is an American songwriter and harmonica player. ... Jerry Yester (b 1942 ?) is an American folk rock musician and record producer. ... For the restaurant chain, see On the Border (restaurant). ...


He began touring and opening for such artists as Charlie Rich, Martha and the Vandellas and Frank Zappa. Waits gained increasing critical acclaim and a loyal cult audience with his subsequent albums. The Heart of Saturday Night (1974) featuring the song, "Looking For the Heart of Saturday Night", revealed Waits' roots as a nightclub performer, with half-spoken and half-crooned ballads, often accompanied by a jazz backup band [8] . Waits himself described the album as Charlie Rich (December 14, 1932 - July 25, 1995) was an American musician, songwriter, and pianist. ... Martha and the Vandellas (known from 1967 to 1972 as Martha Reeves and the Vandellas) were one of the most successful groups in the Motown roster during the 1960s and fully active from 1960 to 1972, performing at various times doo-wop, blues, pop, rock and roll and soul. ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... The Heart of Saturday Night is the second album by American pianist, singer and songwriter Tom Waits, released 1974 by Asylum Records. ...

a comprehensive study of a number of aspects of this search for the center of Saturday night, which Jack Kerouac relentlessly chased from one end of this country to the other, and I've attempted to scoop up a few diamonds of this magic that I see. [9] Jack Kerouac (pronounced ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, and artist. ...

In 1975 Waits moved to the Tropicana Motel on Santa Monica Boulevard [10], and released the double album Nighthawks at the Diner, recorded in a studio with a small audience to capture the ambiance of a live show. The record exemplifies this phase of his career, including the lengthy spoken interludes between songs that punctuated his live act, and introducing to fans his newly-discovered, exaggeratedly gruff vocal delivery which would dominate many albums to come. That year he also contributed backing vocals to Bonnie Raitt's "Sweet and Shiny Eyes," from her album Home Plate. California State Route 2; the Santa Monica Boulevard segment is highlighted in red, Alvarado Street is highlighted in green, the Glendale Freeway is highlighted in blue, and the Angeles Crest Highway is highlighted in purple. ... Nighthawks at the Diner is an album by Tom Waits, released 1975 by Asylum Records. ... Bonnie Raitt, (born November 8, 1949) is an American Blues-R&B singer, songwriter, and guitarist who was born in Burbank, California, the daughter of Broadway musical star John Raitt. ... Home plate is the final base in baseball and related games that a player must touch to score. ...


At this time Waits was drinking more and more heavily, and life on the road was starting to take its toll on him. Waits, looking back at the period said:

I was sick through that whole period [...] It was starting to wear on me, all the touring. I'd been travelling quite a bit, living in hotels, eating bad food, drinking a lot - too much. There's a lifestyle that's there before you arrive and you're introduced to it. It's unavoidable. [11]

In reaction to these hardships Waits recorded Small Change (1976), which finds Waits in much more cynical and pessimistic mood lyrically, with many songs such as "The Piano Has Been Drinking" and "Bad Liver and a Broken Heart" presenting a bare and honest portrayal of alcoholism, while also cementing Waits's hard-living reputation in the eyes of many fans. With the album Waits asserted that he "tried to resolve a few things as far as this cocktail-lounge, maudlin, crying-in-your-beer image that I have. There ain't nothin' funny about a drunk [...] I was really starting to believe that there was something amusing and wonderfully American about being a drunk. I ended up telling myself to cut that shit out." [12] The album, which also included long-time fan-favourite "Tom Traubert's Blues," featured famed drummer Shelly Manne, and was, like his previous albums, heavily jazz influenced, with a lyrical style that owed influence to Raymond Chandler and Charles Bukowski as well as a vocal delivery influenced by Louis Armstrong. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the comic book character, see Drummer (comics). ... Shelly Manne (June 11, 1920–September 26, 1984), born Sheldon Manne in New York, New York, was an American jazz drummer. ... For other persons named Raymond Chandler, see Raymond Chandler (disambiguation). ... Bukowski redirects here. ... Louis[1] Armstrong[2] (4 August 1901[3] – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo[4] and Pops, was an American jazz musician. ...


Foreign Affairs (1977) and Blue Valentine (1978) were in a similar vein, but showed further artistic refinement and exploration into jazz and blues styles. The song "Blue Valentines" features a desolate arrangement of solo electric guitar played by Ray Crawford accompanied by Waits' vocal. It was around this time that Waits had a high-profile romantic relationship with Rickie Lee Jones (who appears on the sleeve art of the Foreign Affairs and Blue Valentine albums). In 1978 Waits also appeared in his first movie role alongside Sylvester Stallone in Paradise Alley as Mumbles, a pianist, and contributed the original compositions "(Meet Me in) Paradise Alley" and "Annie's Back in Town" to the film's soundtrack [13]. Foreign Affairs is an album by Tom Waits, released in 1977 on Elektra Entertainment. ... Blue Valentine is an album by Tom Waits, first released in 1978 on Elektra Entertainment. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sylvester Stallone (born Sylvester Gardenzio Stallone on July 6, 1946) is a two-time Academy Award-nominated American actor, director, producer and screenwriter. ... Paradise Alley is a 1978 movie about 3 brothers (known as the Carboni Boys) who live in Hells Kitchen, New York City, during the 1940s. ...


Heartattack and Vine, Wait's last studio album for Asylum, was released in 1980, featuring a developing sound which included both balladeer tendencies (on "Jersey Girl", for example), as well as rougher-edged rhythm and blues. Though not entirely unprecedented, the album's grittier sound was different for Waits, and foreshadowed the major changes in his music that would take place in the following years. The same year, he began a long working relationship with Francis Ford Coppola, who asked Waits to provide music for his film One from the Heart. For Coppola's film, Waits originally wanted to work with Bette Midler, who previously sang a duet with him on the Billie Holiday-esque track "I Never Talk to Strangers" from Foreign Affairs, but due to previous engagements, Midler was unavailable. Instead, Waits ended up working with singer/songwriter Crystal Gayle as his vocal foil for the album. Heartattack and Vine is an album by Tom Waits, released in 1980 on the Elektra Entertainment label. ... For other uses, see Rhythm and blues (disambiguation). ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... One from the Heart is a 1982 musical film directed by Francis Ford Coppola. ... Bette Midler (born December 1, 1945) is an American singer, actress and comedienne, also known to her fans as The Divine Miss M. She is named after the actress Bette Davis although Davis pronounced her first name in two syllables, and Midler uses one. ... Billie Holiday (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), born Eleanora Fagan and later nicknamed Lady Day (see Jazz royalty regarding similar nicknames), was an American jazz singer, a seminal influence on jazz and pop singers, and generally regarded as one of the greatest female jazz vocalists. ... Crystal Gayle (b. ...


1980s; The Island Years

In August 1980, Waits married Kathleen Brennan, whom he had met on the set of One from the Heart. Brennan is regularly credited as co-author of many songs on his later albums, and Waits often cites her as a major influence on his work. She introduced him to the music of Captain Beefheart: despite having shared a manager with Beefheart in the 1970s, Waits says "I became more acquainted with him when I got married."[14] Waits would later describe his relationship with Brennan as a paradigm shift in his musical development. 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Kathleen Brennan was born in Johnsburg, Illinois, as noted by musician Tom Waits in the song of the same name. ... One from the Heart is a 1982 musical film directed by Francis Ford Coppola. ... Don Van Vliet (born Don Glen Vliet on January 15, 1941, in Glendale, California, U.S.) is a musician and visual artist, best known by the pseudonym Captain Beefheart. ... Paradigm shift is the term first used by Thomas Kuhn in his 1962 book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions to describe a change in basic assumptions within the ruling theory of science. ...


After leaving Asylum Records for Island Records, Waits released Swordfishtrombones in 1983, a record which marked a sharp turn in Waits' output, and which gave rise to his reputation as a musical maverick. The album advances all the musical experimentation of earlier recordings, including variations in instrumentation (e.g. the use of bagpipes in "Town with No Cheer" or the marimba on "Shore Leave") and vocalizing (e.g. the spoken word monologue of "Frank's Wild Years" or the bark of "16 Shells from a Thirty Ought Six"), and much less of the traditional piano-and-strings ballad sound with which Waits had always previously balanced his recordings. Apart from Captain Beefheart and some of Dr. John's early output, there was little precedent in popular music for Swordfishtrombones or equally idiosyncratic albums, Rain Dogs (1985) and Franks Wild Years (1987). For the label known as Asylum-Curb, see Curb Records. ... Island Records is a record label that was founded by British record producers in Jamaica. ... Swordfishtrombones is an album by American singer-songwriter Tom Waits, released in September of 1983 (see 1983 in music). ... A piper playing the Great Highland Bagpipe. ... The marimba ( ) is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ... Dr. John is the stage name of Malcolm John Rebennack Jr. ... Rain Dogs is an album by Tom Waits, released in August of 1985 (see 1985 in music). ... Frank`s [sic] Wild Years is an album by Tom Waits, released 1987 on Island Records. ...


Waits had earlier played either piano or guitar, but he began tiring of these instruments, saying, "Your hands are like dogs, going to the same places they've been. You have to be careful when playing is no longer in the mind but in the fingers, going to happy places. You have to break them of their habits or you don't explore, you only play what is confident and pleasing. I'm learning to break those habits by playing instruments I know absolutely nothing about, like a bassoon or a waterphone."[15]


The instrumentation and orchestration in these and later albums were often quite eclectic.[15] Waits' self-described "Junkyard Orchestra" included wheezing pump organs, clattering percussion (sometimes reminiscent of the music of Harry Partch), bleary horn sections (often featuring Ralph Carney playing in the style of brass bands or soul music), nearly atonal guitar (perhaps best typified by Marc Ribot's contributions) and obsolete instruments (many of Waits' albums have featured a damaged, unpredictable Chamberlin, and more recent albums have included the little-used Stroh violin). Pump organ, a version of the reed organ where the player maintains the air pressure needed for creating the sound in the free reeds by pumping with his feet. ... Percussion instruments are played by being struck, shaken, rubbed or scraped. ... Harry Partch (June 24, 1901 – September 3, 1974) was an American composer. ... Carney is an American musician. ... A brass band a musical group consisting mostly or entirely of brass instruments, often with a percussion section. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Atonality in a general sense describes music that departs from the system of tonal hierarchies that are said to characterized the sound of classical European music from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries. ... Marc Ribot (born 1954) is a Jewish American guitarist, composer and occasional singer from Newark, New Jersey. ... The Chamberlin is an electro-mechanical keyboard instrument related to the Mellotron. ... A Stroh violin has a metal horn and resonator instead of a sound box. ...


Along with a new instrumental approach, Waits gradually altered his singing style to sound less like the late-night crooner of the 70s, instead adopting a number of techniques: a gravelly sound reminiscent of Howlin' Wolf, a booming, feral bark, or a strained, nearly shrieking falsetto Waits jokingly describes as his Prince voice. Tom Moon describes Waits' voice as a "broad-spectrum assault weapon".[16] Chester Arthur Burnett (June 10, 1910 – January 10, 1976), better known as Howlin Wolf or sometimes, The Howlin Wolf, was an influential blues singer, guitarist and harmonica player. ... For another person sometimes known as The Artist, see Michael Haynes III. Prince Rogers Nelson (born June 7, 1958 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American funk musician. ...


His songwriting shifted as well, becoming somewhat more abstract and embracing a number of styles largely ignored in pop music, including primal blues, cabaret stylings, rumbas, theatrical approaches in the style of Kurt Weill, tango music, early country music and European folk music, as well as the Tin Pan Alley-era songs that influenced his early output. He also recorded a few spoken word pieces influenced by Ken Nordine's "word jazz" records of the 1950s. For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... Rumba is a family of music rhythms and dance styles that originated in Africa and were introduced to Cuba and the New World by African slaves. ... Kurt Julian Weill (March 2, 1900 – April 3, 1950), born in Dessau, Germany and died in New York City, was a German and in his later years, a German-American composer active from the 1920s until his death. ... Tango is a style of music that originated among European immigrant populations of Argentina and Uruguay. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Folk song redirects here. ... Tin Pan Alley is the name given to the collection of New York City-centered music publishers and songwriters who dominated the popular music of the United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ... Ken Nordine (born April 13, 1920) is an American voiceover and recording artist best known for his series of Word Jazz albums. ...

Music sample:

"Way Down In The Hole," by Tom Waits from Franks Wild Years Image File history File links TheWireS2intro. ...

Problems listening to the file? See media help.

Franks Wild Years was adapted as an off-Broadway musical, which Waits co-wrote with Brennan — and starred in, in a successful run at Chicago's famed Steppenwolf Theater. This continued Waits' involvement in other artistic forms; he developed his acting career with several supporting roles, and a lead role in Jim Jarmusch's Down By Law in 1986 which also included two of Waits' songs from Rain Dogs in the soundtrack. Further theatrical collaborations would follow, and with his wife Waits also wrote and performed in Big Time, a surreal concert movie and soundtrack released in 1988. Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theater combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ... Steppenwolf Theatre Company is a Chicago theatre company in Chicago, Illinois. ... Jim Jarmusch Jim Jarmusch (born January 22, 1953 in Akron, Ohio) is a noted American independent film director. ... Promotional poster for Down by Law Down by Law (1986) is the fourth feature film by director Jim Jarmusch. ... Big Time is a live album of Tom Waits performances, released in 1988 on Island Records. ...


1990s

The Black Rider: The Casting of the Magic Bullets, a theatrical collaboration between Waits, director Robert Wilson and writer William S. Burroughs premiered at Hamburg's Thalia Theatre on March 31, 1990. The project was based on a German folktale called Der Freischütz, with Wilson responsible for the design and direction, Burroughs for writing the book, and Waits for music and lyrics, which were heavily influenced by the works of Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill. In the same year Waits collaborated with photographer Sylvia Plachy; her book, Sylvia Plachy's Unguided Tour includes a short Waits record to accompany the photographs and text. This article is about the stage musical. ... Robert Wilson (born 4 October 1941) is an internationally acclaimed American avant-garde stage director and playwright who has been called [America]s — or even the worlds — foremost vanguard theater artist [1]. Over the course of his wide-ranging career, he has also worked as a choreographer, performer, painter... William Seward Burroughs II (February 5, 1914) - August 2, 1997; pronounced ), more commonly known as William S. Burroughs, was an American novelist, essayist, social critic, painter and spoken word performer. ... This article is about the city in Germany. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Folklore is the ethnographic concept of the tales, legends, or superstitions current among a particular ethnic population, a part of the oral history of a particular culture. ... Der Freischütz (English: The Freeshooter) is an opera in three acts by Carl Maria von Weber to a libretto by Friedrich Kind. ... {{dy justified his choice of form, and from about 1929 on he began to interpret its penchant for contradictions, much as had Eisenstein, in terms of the dialectic. ... Kurt Julian Weill (March 2, 1900 – April 3, 1950), born in Dessau, Germany and died in New York City, was a German and in his later years, a German-American composer active from the 1920s until his death. ... Sylvia Plachy is photographer. ...


Waits appeared on Primus' 1991 album, Sailing the Seas of Cheese as the voice of "Tommy the Cat", which exposed him to a new audience in alternative rock. This was the first of several collaborations between Waits and the group; Les Claypool (Primus' singer, songwriter and bassist) would appear on several subsequent Waits releases. Waits wrote and conducted the music for Jim Jarmusch's 1991 film Night on Earth, which was released as an album the following year. For other uses, see Primus. ... Sailing the Seas of Cheese is the second album by Primus, released on May 14, 1991. ... Tommy the Cat is a song by the alternative rock band Primus, first released in 1989 on their live debut, Suck on This. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... Leslie Edward Les Claypool (born September 29, 1963 in Richmond, California, U.S.) is a singer, lyricist, bassist, multi-instrumentalist, and composer, best known for his work with the alternative rock band Primus. ... Night on Earth is a 1991 film written and directed by Jim Jarmusch. ...


Bone Machine, Waits' first studio album in five years, was released in 1992. The stark record featured a great deal of percussion and guitar (with little piano or sax), marking another change in Waits' sound. Critic Steve Huey calls it "perhaps Tom Waits' most cohesive album ... a morbid, sinister nightmare, one that applied the quirks of his experimental '80s classics to stunningly evocative – and often harrowing – effect ... Waits' most affecting and powerful recording, even if it isn't his most accessible."[17] Bone Machine was awarded a Grammy in the Best Alternative Album category. December 19, 1992 saw the premiere of "Alice", Waits' second theatrical project with Robert Wilson, at the Thalia Theatre, Hamburg. Paul Schmidt adapted the text from the works of Lewis Carroll ("Alice in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking Glass" in particular), with songs by Waits and Kathleen Brennan presented as intersections with the text, rather than as expansions of the story, as would be the case in conventional musical theater. These songs would be recorded by Waits as a studio album ten years later on Alice [18]. Surfer Rosa Bone Machine is an album by Tom Waits, released in 1992 (see 1992 in music) on Island Records. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... Alice in Wonderland is the widely known and used title for Alices Adventures in Wonderland, a book written by Lewis Carroll -- as well as several movie adaptations of the book -- and is also the setting for several short stories. ... Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There (1871) is a work of childrens literature by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson), and is the sequel to Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... Alice is an album by Tom Waits, released in 2002 on Epitaph Records (under the Anti sub-label). ...


1993's The Black Rider contained studio versions of the songs which Waits had written for The Black Rider three years previously, with the exceptions of "Chase the Clouds Away" and "In the Morning", which appeared in the 1990 theatrical production but not on the studio album. William S. Burroughs also guests on vocals on "T'Aint No Sin." In the same year Waits also lent his vocals to Gavin Bryars' 75 minute reworking of his 1971 classical music piece Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet; he appeared in Robert Altman's film version of Raymond Carver's stories Short Cuts; and his third child, son Sullivan, was born. The Black Rider is an album by Tom Waits, released in 1993 on Island Records. ... This article is about the stage musical. ... William Seward Burroughs II (February 5, 1914) - August 2, 1997; pronounced ), more commonly known as William S. Burroughs, was an American novelist, essayist, social critic, painter and spoken word performer. ... Richard Gavin Bryars (born 1943) is an English composer and double bassist. ... Jesus Blood Never Failed Me Yet is a piece of music composed by Gavin Bryars in 1971. ... For other persons named Robert Altman, see Robert Altman (disambiguation). ... Raymond Clevie Carver, Jr. ... Short Cuts is a 1993 film directed by Robert Altman. ...


In 1998, after Island Records released the Tom Waits best of, Beautiful Maladies: The Island Years, Waits left the label for Epitaph. Epitaph president Andy Kaulkin said that the label was "blown away that Tom would even consider us. We are huge fans."[19] Waits himself was full of praise for the label, saying "Epitaph is rare for being owned and operated by musicians. They have good taste and a load of enthusiasm, plus they're nice people. And they gave me a brand-new Cadillac, of course." [19] Epitaph Records is a Hollywood, California based record label owned by Bad Religion guitarist Brett Gurewitz. ... For other uses, see Cadillac (disambiguation). ...


Waits' first album on his new label Mule Variations was issued in 1999. Billboard described the album musically as melding "backwoods blues, skewed gospel, and unruly art stomp into a sublime piece of junkyard sound sculpture" [20]. The album also was Waits' first release to feature a turntablist. Mule Variations won a Grammy in 2000, though as an indicator of how difficult it is to classify Waits' music, he was nominated simultaneously for Best Contemporary Folk Album (which he won) and Best Male Rock Vocal Performance (for the song "Hold On") — both different from the genre for which he won his previous Grammy. The album was also his highest-charting album in the US to date, reaching #30. Mule Variations is an album by Tom Waits, released 1999 by the Anti sub-label of Epitaph Records. ... It has been suggested that Billboard be merged into this article or section. ... Turntablism is a subgenre of pop music which emerged from hip hop. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music...


The same year Waits made the foray into producing music for other artists, teaming up with his old friend Chuck E. Weiss to co-produce (with his wife Kathleen Brennan) Weiss' Extremely Cool, as well as appearing on the record as a guest vocalist and guitarist. Chuck E. Weiss is an American songwriter and vocalist. ...


2000s

Singer and close personal friend of Waits John P. Hammond's released his Wicked Grin, a collection of cover songs originally written by Waits, in 2001. Waits appears on most songs playing guitar, piano or offering backing vocals. The album also includes a version of the traditional hymn "I Know I've Been Changed", which Hammond and Waits perform as a duet. John Hammond album cover John Paul Hammond (born November 13, 1942), also known as John Hammond Jr. ... In pop music a cover version is a new rendition of a previously recorded song. ...


In 2002, Waits simultaneously released two albums, Alice and Blood Money. Both collections of songs had been written almost ten years previously, and were based on theatrical collaborations with Robert Wilson; the former a musical play about Lewis Carroll and the latter an interpretation of Georg Büchner's play fragment Woyzeck. Both albums revisit the tango, Tin Pan Alley, and spoken word influences of Swordfishtrombones, while the lyrics are both profoundly cynical and melancholic, embodied by the misanthropically titled "Misery is the River of the World" and "Everything Goes to Hell". "Always Keep a Diamond in Your Mind," which Waits wrote for Wilson's "Woyzeck", did not appear on Blood Money; however it did emerge on Solomon Burke's Don't Give Up on Me album of the same year. While Waits has played the song live a number of times [21] [22], no official version has ever been released. Alice is an album by Tom Waits, released in 2002 on Epitaph Records (under the Anti sub-label). ... Blood Money is an album by Tom Waits, released in 2002 by the Anti sub-label of Epitaph Records. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... Karl Georg Büchner (October 17, 1813 – February 19, 1837) was a German dramatist and writer of prose. ... Klaus Kinski in Werner Herzogs Woyzeck Woyzeck is a stage play written by Georg Büchner. ... Tin Pan Alley is the name given to the collection of New York City-centered music publishers and songwriters who dominated the popular music of the United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Dont Give Up On Me is an album featuring Solomon Burke, released 2002 on Fat Possum. ...


Real Gone, Waits' first non-theatrical studio album since Mule Variations five years previous, was released in 2004. It is Waits' only album to date to feature absolutely no piano on any of its tracks. Waits beatboxes on the opening track, "Top of the Hill", and most of the album's songs begin with Waits' "vocal percussion" improvisations. It is also more rock-oriented, with less blues influence than he has previously demonstrated, and it contains an explicitly political song — a first for Waits. In the album-closing "The Day After Tomorrow" he adopts the persona of a soldier writing home that he is disillusioned with war and is thankful to be leaving. The song doesn't mention the Iraq war specifically, and, as Tom Moon writes, "it could be the voice of a Civil War soldier singing a lonesome late-night dirge." Waits himself does describe the song as something of an "elliptical" protest song about the Iraqi invasion, however. Thom Jurek describes "The Day After Tomorrow" as "one of the most insightful and understated anti-war songs to have been written in decades. It contains not a hint of banality or sentiment in its folksy articulation."[23] Real Gone is an album by Tom Waits, released October 3, 2004 in Europe, and October 5 in USA on Epitaph Records (under the Anti sub-label [1]). The album was supported by the Real Gone Tour, playing a few locations in North America and Europe in October and November... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Persona literally means mask , although it does not usually refer to a literal mask but to the social masks all humans supposedly wear. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... A protest song is a song which protests perceived problems in society. ... This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Anti war protest in Melbourne, Australia, 2003 Anti_war is a name that is widely adopted by any social movement or person that seeks to end or oppose a future or current war. ...


A 54-song, three-disc box set of rarities, unreleased tracks and brand new compositions called Orphans: Brawlers, Bawlers & Bastards was released in November 2006. The three discs are subdivided relating to their content;"Brawlers", features Waits' more upbeat rock blues songs, "Bawlers", his ballads and love songs, and "Bastards", songs that fit in neither category, including a number of spoken words tracks. A video for the song "Lie to Me" was produced in promotion for the collection. Orphans also continues Waits newfound interest in politics with a song about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict ('Road To Peace'). The album is also notable for containing many cover versions of songs by other artists, such as The Ramones {"The Return of Jack And Judy"), Daniel Johnston ("King Kong"), Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht ("What Keeps Mankind Alive"), and Leadbelly ("Goodnight Irene"), as well as renditions of works by poets and authors admired by Waits, such as Charles Bukowski and Jack Kerouac. Waits' albums Orphans: Brawlers, Bawlers & Bastards and Alice are both included in metacritic.com's list of the "Top 200: Best-Reviewed Albums"[24] since 2000 at #9, and #19 respectively (As of November 2007). 67 die and about 300,000 people are affected by floods in Ethiopias Somali Region of Ogaden after the Shabelle River bursts its banks. ... Israel, with the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Golan Heights The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is an ongoing dispute between the State of Israel and Arab Palestinians. ... The Ramones (L-R, Johnny, Tommy, Joey, Dee Dee) on the cover of their debut self-titled album (1976), cementing their place at the dawn of the punk movement. ... Daniel Dale Johnston (b. ... Kurt Julian Weill (March 2, 1900 – April 3, 1950), born in Dessau, Germany and died in New York City, was a German and in his later years, a German-American composer active from the 1920s until his death. ... {{dy justified his choice of form, and from about 1929 on he began to interpret its penchant for contradictions, much as had Eisenstein, in terms of the dialectic. ... Leadbelly, also known as Lead Belly (born Huddie William Ledbetter; January 20, 1889 (although this is debatable) - December 6, 1949), was an American folk and blues musician, notable for his clear and forceful singing, his virtuosity on the twelve string guitar, and the rich songbook of folk standards he introduced. ... Bukowski redirects here. ... Jack Kerouac (pronounced ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, and artist. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ...


Recently Waits has made a number of high profile television and concert appearances. In November 2006, Waits appeared on The Daily Show and performed "The Day After Tomorrow", significant for being only the third performing guest on the show, the first being Tenacious D and the second being The White Stripes. On May 4, 2007 Waits appeared on Late Night with Conan O'Brien. This was the last show of a week Conan O'Brien spent in San Francisco. Waits performed "Lucinda" and "Ain't Goin' Down to the Well" from the album Orphans: Brawlers, Bawlers & Bastards. There was a short interview after the last performance. Waits also played in the 2007 Bridge School Benefit on October 27th and 28th with Kronos Quartet. Other artists on the bill included Jerry Lee Lewis, Metallica, and Neil Young among others. 67 die and about 300,000 people are affected by floods in Ethiopias Somali Region of Ogaden after the Shabelle River bursts its banks. ... The Daily Show (currently The Daily Show with Jon Stewart) is a Peabody and Emmy Award-winning American satirical television program produced by and airing on Comedy Central. ... This article is about the band. ... This article is about the American duo. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Late Night with Conan OBrien is an Emmy Award-winning American late night talk show that is syndicated worldwide. ... Conan Christopher OBrien (born April 18, 1963)[1] is an Emmy-winning American comedian, writer and television personality best known as host of NBCs late-night talk/variety show Late Night with Conan OBrien. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Bridge School Benefit is an annual non-profit charity concert held in Mountain View, California every October at the Shoreline Amphitheatre. ... Kronos Quartet in 2006. ... Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935), also known by the nickname The Killer, is an American rock and roll and country music singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... This article is about the musician. ...


Most recently Waits' song "Trampled Rose" appeared on the critically acclaimed album Raising Sand, a collaboration between Robert Plant of Led Zeppelin and Allison Krauss, also known for her work with her band, Union Station. On July 10, 2007 Waits also released the download only digital single Diamond In Your Mind. The version of the song was recorded with The Kronos Quartet, with Greg Cohen, Philip Glass and The Dalai Lama, at the benefit concert "Healing The Divide: A Concert For Peace And Reconciliation" at NYC’s Avery Fisher Hall, recorded on September 21, 2003. Real Gone is an album by Tom Waits, released October 3, 2004 in Europe, and October 5 in USA on Epitaph Records (under the Anti sub-label [1]). The album was supported by the Real Gone Tour, playing a few locations in North America and Europe in October and November... Raising Sand is a collaboration album by Robert Plant and Alison Krauss. ... Philip Glass (born January 31, 1937) is a three-times Academy Award-nominated American composer. ... Alternative meaning: Dalai Lama (song) The 14th and current Dalai Lama giving blessings in Dharamsala - Losar, 1981 The Dalai Lama belongs to the Gelug sect of Tibetan Buddhism. ...


Lawsuits

Waits has steadfastly refused to allow the use of his songs in commercials and has joked about other artists who do. ("If Michael Jackson wants to work for Pepsi, why doesn't he just get himself a suit and an office in their headquarters and be done with it.") He has filed several lawsuits against advertisers who used his material without permission. He has been quoted, "Apparently the highest compliment our culture grants artists nowadays is to be in an ad — ideally naked and purring on the hood of a new car," he said in a statement, referring to the Mercury Cougar. "I have adamantly and repeatedly refused this dubious honor." Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... Pepsi Cola is a non-alcoholic carbonated beverage produced and manufactured by PepsiCo. ... The Mercury Cougar was an automobile sold under the Mercury brand of the Ford Motor Companys Lincoln-Mercury Division. ...


Waits has often switched to smaller independent record companies over the years: he signed to Asylum Records before they were bought out by Elektra Records and Warner Bros. During his time with Island Records, that label expanded from a small company to a music industry giant; he then signed to Anti Records, a division of Epitaph Records. For the label known as Asylum-Curb, see Curb Records. ... Elektra Records is an American record label owned by Warner Music Group, and today operates under Atlantic Records Group. ... “WB” redirects here. ... Island Records is a record label that was founded by British record producers in Jamaica. ... Epitaph Records is a Hollywood, California based record label owned by Bad Religion guitarist Brett Gurewitz. ...


Waits' first lawsuit was filed in 1988 against Frito Lay. The United States Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed an award of US$2.6 million in his favor (Waits v. Frito Lay, 978 F. 2d 1093 (9th Cir. 1992)[25]. Frito Lay had approached Waits to use one of his songs in an advertisement. Waits declined the offer, and Frito Lay hired a Waits soundalike to sing a jingle similar to Small Change's "Step Right Up", which is, ironically, a song Waits has called "an indictment of advertising." Waits won the lawsuit, becoming one of the first artists to successfully sue a company for using an impersonator without permission. Frito-Lay is an American and international company that markets corn chips, potato chips, and other snack foods. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... A jingle is a memorable slogan, set to an engaging melody, mainly broadcast on radio and sometimes on television commercials. ... Ironic redirects here. ... Advert redirects here. ...


In 1993, Levi's used Screamin' Jay Hawkins' version of Waits' "Heartattack and Vine" in a commercial. Waits sued, and Levi's agreed to cease all use of the song, and offered a full page apology in Billboard.[26] Levis is a brand of riveted denim jeans manufactured by Levi Strauss & Co. ... Screamin Jay Hawkins Jalacy Hawkins, best known as Screamin Jay Hawkins (July 18, 1929 – February 12, 2000) was an African-American singer famed for his wildly theatrical performances of songs like I Put a Spell on You and Constipation Blues. // Some sources believe that Hawkins is the long-lost brother... Billboard is a weekly American magazine devoted to the music industry. ...


In 2000, Waits found himself in a situation similar to his earlier one with Frito-Lay: Audi approached him, asking to use "Innocent When You Dream" (from Franks Wild Years) for a commercial broadcast in Spain. Waits declined, but the commercial ultimately featured music very similar to that song. Waits undertook legal action, and a Spanish court recognized that there had been a violation of Waits' moral rights, in addition to the infringement of copyright. The production company, Tandem Campany Guasch, was ordered to pay compensation to Waits through his Spanish publisher. Waits was later quoted as jokingly saying the company got the name of the song wrong, thinking it was called "Innocent When You Scheme". Audi AG is a German automobile manufacturer with headquarters in Ingolstadt, Bavaria, and has been an almost wholly owned (99. ... Not to be confused with copywriting. ...


In 2005, Waits sued Adam Opel AG, claiming that, after having failed to sign him to sing in their Scandinavian commercials, they had hired a sound-alike singer. In 2007, the suit was settled, and Waits gave the sum to charity. [27] Opel, originally and more correctly known as Adam Opel AG is an Germany. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ...


Waits has also filed a lawsuit in an instance unrelated to his music. He was arrested in 1977 outside Duke's Tropicana Coffee Shop in Los Angeles. Waits and a friend were trying to stop some men from bullying other patrons. The men were plainclothed police and Waits and his friend were taken into custody and charged with disturbing the peace. The jury found Waits not guilty, and he took the police department to court and was awarded $7,500 compensation.[28] For jury meaning makeshift, see jury rig. ... In criminal law, an acquittal is the legal result of a verdict of not guilty, or some similar end of the proceeding that terminates it with prejudice without a verdict of guilty being entered against the accused. ...


Discography and filmography

Further information: Tom Waits discography

This is a discography of releases from Tom Waits. ...

Tours

For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tom Waits tour in support of his October 2004 release of the album Real Gone. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Orphans Tour is an American concert tour by Tom Waits in August of 2006. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Graff, Gary. Musichound Rock: The Essential Album Guide. Omnibus Press. ISBN 0-8256-7256-2. 
  2. ^ Petridis, Alexis. Tom Waits live at the Hammersmith Apollo, London review. The Guardian newspaper. Retrieved on 2001-11-23.
  3. ^ a b c Montadon, Mac, Timeline and Discography in Innocent When You Dream, p.385
  4. ^ Tom Waits. Bohemian Ink (1997). Retrieved on 2006-10-06.
  5. ^ Wilonsky, Robert, The Variations of Tom Waits, in Montandon Inocent When You dream, p.213
  6. ^ Tom Waits Quotes: Influences and favourites. Tom Waits Library. Retrieved on 2001-11-23.
  7. ^ McGee, David, Smeelin' Like a Brewery, Lookin' Like a Tramp, in Montandon, Innocent When you Dream, p.27
  8. ^ In his press release for the album (Montandon, p.4) Waits outlined the album's musical influences as being Mose Allison, Thelonious Monk, Randy Newman, George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Ray Charles, Stephen Foster, and Frank Sinatra
  9. ^ Waits, Tom The Heart of Saturday Night Press release in Montandon, Mac Innocent When You Dream, p.4
  10. ^ Montandon, Mav, Timeline and Discography in Innocent When You Dream, p.386
  11. ^ McGee, David (1977), Smellin' Like a Brewery, Lookin' Like a Tramp, in Montandon, p.29
  12. ^ McGee, David (1977), Smellin' Like a Brewery, Lookin' Like a Tramp, in Montandon, p.30
  13. ^ Paradise Alley Original Soundtrack. SOundtrack Collcetor. Retrieved on 2007-11-25.
  14. ^ Tom Waits interviews. Tom Waits Library. Retrieved on 2007-11-23.
  15. ^ a b Tom Waits' instruments. Tom Waits Library. Retrieved on 2007-11-23.
  16. ^ Moon, Tom. Tom Waits: Dancing In The Dark; in interview with Harp magazine (USA). December, 2004.. Tom Waits Library. Retrieved on 2001-11-24.
  17. ^ Huey, Steve. Bone Machine review. allmusic.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-24.
  18. ^ Alice in Wonderland: The Robert Wilson and Tom Waits Adaptation. Alice in Wonderland. Retrieved on 2007-11-25.
  19. ^ a b Bambarger, Bradley, Tom Waits Joins Indie Epitaph for Mule Set, in Monanton, Innocent When You Dream, p.209
  20. ^ Bambarger, Bradley, Tom Waits Joins Indie Epitaph for Mule Set, in Monanton, Innocent When You Dream, p.207
  21. ^ Second Bridge School Benefit show setlist, October 28th, 2007. The Eyeball Kid. Retrieved on 2007-11-26.
  22. ^ Preaching to the Bridge School Choir. Press Democrat. Retrieved on 2007-11-25.
  23. ^ http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:z7d5vwnwa9uk~T1
  24. ^ www.metacritic.com/music/bests/ Top 200: Best-Reviewed Albums on Metacritic. metacritic.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-24.
  25. ^ http://markroesler.com/pdf/caselaw/Waits%20v.%20Frito-Lay%20Inc.%20_1992_.pdf
  26. ^ Tom Waits' Levis Copyright case. Tom Waits Library. Retrieved on 2007-11-23.
  27. ^ Waits settles in 'imitation' case. BBC News. Retrieved on 2007-11-24.
  28. ^ Waits and the cops. Tom Waits Library. Retrieved on 2007-11-24.

Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mose John Allison, Jr. ... Thelonious Sphere Monk (October 10, 1917 – February 17, 1982) was a jazz pianist and composer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gershwin redirects here. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989) was an American composer and lyricist, one of the most prodigious and famous American songwriters in history. ... For the composer and conductor of the Ray Charles Singers, see Ray Charles (composer). ... For other persons named Stephen Foster, see Stephen Foster (disambiguation). ... Sinatra redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Jacobs, Jay S. (2006). Wild Years The Music and Myth of Tom Waits. ECW Press. ISBN 101550227165. 
  • Montandon, Mac (ed.) (2006). Innocent When You Dream: Tom Waits - the collected interviews. Orion. ISBN 0752873946. 
  • Humphries, Patrick (2007). The Many Lives of Tom Waits. Omnibus. ISBN 184449585X. 

See also

Kazik Staszewski (born March 12, 1963) is a Polish singer, songwriter, and leader of the band Kult. ... Holly Cole (born November 25, 1963 in Halifax, Nova Scotia) is a Canadian jazz singer, particularly popular in Canada and Japan for her versatile voice and her adventurous repertoire, which spans such divergent genres as show tunes, rock, and country music. ... Kaizers Orchestra is a Norwegian rock band formed in 2000. ...

External links

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Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...

Interviews


  Results from FactBites:
 
MySpace.com - Tom Waits - LOS ANGELES, California - Experimental - www.myspace.com/tomwaits (2725 words)
Tom Waits, according to the esteemed American critic Robert Hilburn, is clearly one of the most important figures of the modern pop era.
Waits has drawn from a deep well of song idioms; folk, blues, country, jazz ballads, polkas, waltzes, cabaret, swing, popular ballads and a category which by now can only be described as Waitsian.
Tom also contributed a song to the Wim Wenders film, The End of Violence while, in 1998, Waits and Brennan composed the score and a song for Bunny, which won the Oscar for Best Short Film (Animated).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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