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Encyclopedia > Tom Stoppard
Tom Stoppard

Pseudonym: William Boot (as a theatre critic)
Born: July 3, 1937 (1937-07-03) (age 70)
Zlín, Czechoslovakia
Occupation: Playwright and screenwriter
Nationality: British
Genres: dramatic comedy
Subjects: various, clever wordplay, quick-cut banter[1]
Debut works: Novel: Lord Malquist and Mr Moon
Play: Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead
Influences: Henry James, Samuel Beckett

Sir Tom Stoppard, OM, CBE (born as Tomáš Straussler on July 3, 1937)[1] is an Academy Award winning British playwright of more than 24 plays.[1] Born in Czechoslovakia, he is famous for plays such as The Coast of Utopia,[2] The Real Thing,  and Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead, and also for co-writing screenplays for Brazil and Shakespeare in Love.[1] Image File history File linksMetadata Tom_Stoppard_from_What_Is_Brazil. ... A pseudonym (Greek pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons true name. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ... Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish dramatist, novelist and poet. ... The Order of Merit is a British and Commonwealth Order bestowed by the Monarch. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... The Coast of Utopia is a 2002 trilogy of plays by Tom Stoppard, focused on the philosophical debates in pre-revolutionary Russia between 1833 and 1866. ... The Real Thing is a play by Tom Stoppard, first performed in 1982. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Shakespeare in Love is an award-winning 1998 romantic comedy film. ...

Contents

Biography

Stoppard was born on July 3, 1937 in Czechoslovakia[1] and moved to Singapore[1] with other Jews on March 15, 1939, the day the Nazis invaded. However, in 1941 the family had to be evacuated to India, escaping the Japanese invasion of Singapore.[1] His father, Eugene Straussler, remained behind and died in a Japanese prison camp.[1] is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... National Socialism redirects here. ...


In India, Stoppard received an American education. In late 1945, his mother Martha married a British army major named Kenneth Stoppard,[1] who gave the boys his English surname and moved the family with him to England after the war, in 1946.[1] Tom was sent to boarding schools in Nottinghamshire and Yorkshire.[1] The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total...


Stoppard left school at seventeen and began work as a journalist for Western Daily Press in Bristol.[1] In 1958, the Bristol Evening World offered Stoppard his position as a feature writer, humor columnist and secondary drama critic, which took Stoppard into the world of theater.[1] At the Bristol Old Vic (at the time a well-regarded regional repertory company),[1] Stoppard formed friendships with director John Boorman and actor Peter O'Toole, early in their careers.[1] Stoppard became a somewhat notorious figure in Bristol, being known more for his strained attempts at humor[1] and unstylish clothes than for his writing.[1] The Coopers Hall (right) became the theatre foyer in the 1970s. ... John Boorman (born January 18, 1933 in Shepperton, Surrey, United Kingdom), is a British filmmaker, currently based in Ireland, best known for his feature films such as Point Blank, Deliverance, Excalibur, and The General. ... Peter Seamus OToole (Peter James OToole) (b. ...


By 1960, he had completed his first play A Walk on the Water,[1] (which was later re-packaged as 1968's Enter a Free Man). Stoppard noted that this first play owed much to Robert Bolt's "Flowering Cherry" (and Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman").[1] Within a week after sending A Walk on the Water to an agent, Stoppard received his version of the "Hollywood-style telegrams that change struggling young artists' lives."[1] His first play was optioned, later staged in Hamburg, and then broadcast on British Independent Television in 1963.[1] Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Location Coordinates Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE6 First Mayor Ole von Beust (CDU) Governing party CDU Votes in Bundesrat 3 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  755 km² (292 sq mi) Population 1,754,317 (11/2006)[1]  - Density 2,324 /km² (6,018...


From September 1962 until April 1963, Stoppard worked in London as a drama critic for Scene magazine,[1] writing reviews and interviews both under his name and under the pseudonym William Boot (taken from Evelyn Waugh's Scoop). In 1964, a Ford Foundation grant enabled Stoppard to spend 5 months writing in a Berlin mansion, emerging with a one-act play titled "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Meet King Lear"[1] (which later evolved into his Tony-winning play re-titled Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead).[1] Evelyn Waugh, as photographed in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten Arthur Evelyn St. ... The Ford Foundation is a charitable foundation based in New York City created to fund programs that promote democracy, reduce poverty, promote international understanding, and advance human achievement. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Human rights activity

By 1977, Stoppard had become concerned with human rights issues, in particular with the situation of political dissidents in Central and Eastern Europe. In February 1977, he visited the Soviet Union (and several Eastern European countries) with a member of Amnesty International.[1] In June, Stoppard met Vladimir Bukovsky in London and travelled to Czechoslovakia (then under communist control), where he met dissident playwright and future president Václav Havel.[1] Stoppard became involved with Index on Censorship, Amnesty International, and the Committee Against Psychiatric Abuse[1] and wrote various newspaper articles and letters about human rights.[1] Stoppard was also instrumental in translating Havel's works into English. Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ... Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is a pressure group that promotes human rights. ... Vladimir Bukovsky early photo Vladimir Konstantinovich Bukovsky (Russian: ; b. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Václav Havel, GCB, CC, (IPA: ) (born October 5, 1936 in Prague) is a Czech writer and dramatist. ... Index on Censorship is a magazine founded by the British writer Stephen Spender in 1972 to monitor and promote freedom of speech. ...


The Tom Stoppard Prize was created in 1983 (in Stockholm, under the Charter 77 Foundation) and is awarded to authors of Czech origin. In August 2005 Stoppard visited Minsk to give a seminar on playwriting, and to learn first-hand about various human rights and political problems in Belarus. The Charter 77 (Charta 77 in Czech and in Slovak) was an informal civic initiative in Czechoslovakia from 1977 to 1992, named after the document Charter 77 from January 1977. ... Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ...


Work for the theatre

Stoppard's plays are plays of ideas that deal with philosophical issues, yet he combines the philosophical ideas he presents with verbal wit[1] and visual humour. His linguistic complexity, with its puns, jokes, innuendo, and other wordplay,[1] is a chief characteristic of his work. Many also feature multiple timelines. A pun (also known as paronomasia) is a figure of speech, or word play which consists of a deliberate confusion of similar words within a phrase or phrases for rhetorical effect, whether humorous or serious. ... A joke is a short story or series of words spoken or communicated with the intent of causing laughter or being found humorous by either listener/reader or performer/writer. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Word play is a literary technique in which the nature of the words used themselves become part of the subject of the work. ...

  • (1966) Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead[1] is one of Stoppard's most famous works — a comedic play which casts two minor characters from Hamlet as its leads, but with the same lack of power to affect their world or exterior circumstances as they have in Shakespeare's original. Hamlet's role is similarly reversed in terms of his stage time and lines, but it is in his wake that the heroes drift helplessly toward their inevitable demise. Rather than shaping events, they pass the time playing witty word games and pondering their predicament. It is similar in many ways to Samuel Beckett's absurdist Waiting for Godot, particularly in the main characters' lack of purpose and (in)comprehension of their situation.
  • (1968) Enter a Free Man examines a fabulist's world, which, at the end, sadly collapses into the reality of a mundane and unfulfilled life. It was developed from a 1963 television play A Walk on the Water and first performed on the stage on 28 March 1968 with Michael Hordern in the leading role.
  • (1968) The Real Inspector Hound is one of his best-known short plays. In it two theatre critics are watching a Country House Murder Mystery, and become involved in the action by accident. The viewer is watching a play within a play. In a particularly Stoppardian touch, he based the whodunnit the critics are watching very closely on Agatha Christie's The Mousetrap, knowing full well that the producers of that play (still running in London's West End) could not complain without drawing attention to the very thing they want to conceal, that Stoppard's play (even its title alone) gives away their "surprise" ending.
  • (1970) After Magritte is a surreal piece which manages to place the characters, through perfectly rational means, into situations worthy of a Magritte painting. It features a husband-and-wife dance team, the rather confused mother of one of them, a detective named Foot and a constable named Holmes; Stoppard notes that it is frequently performed as a companion piece to The Real Inspector Hound.
  • (1972) Jumpers explores the field of academic philosophy, likening it to a highly skilful competitive gymnastics display. Jumpers raises questions such as what do we know? Where do values come from? It is set in an alternate reality where some British astronauts have landed on the moon and "Radical Liberals" (read Communists) have taken over the British government.
  • (1974) Travesties is a parody of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest. The play starts from the fact that Tristan Tzara, Vladimir Lenin, and James Joyce were all in Zürich, Switzerland, in 1917 (in fact they were there at slightly different times, but Stoppard gets round this by telling the story through the memory of a confused old man, Henry Carr - hence also the facts getting mixed up with the plot of The Importance of Being Earnest, which Carr performed in at the time). There are clear relationships between Joyce's literary work and Tzara's dada art. The relation to Lenin's ideas is less well explained.
  • (1976) Dirty Linen and New-Found-Land combines two one act plays, written to celebrate the British naturalisation of Ed Berman, founder of London’s Almost Free Theatre, where the work was first performed on 6 April 1976 as part of the theatre’s season to celebrate the American bicentennial. Dirty Linen is a farce that portrays a special committee of the House of Commons, appointed to investigate reports that a large number of MPs have been having sex with the same woman. Naturally it contains implied commentary on the government, its workings, its members, and its relationship to the press and to the public. New-Found-Land is a brief interlude in which two government officials try to decide whether to give British citizenship to an eccentric American (based on Berman) and contains an imaginative rhapsody about America.
  • (1977) Every Good Boy Deserves Favour is one of Stoppard's most unusual works. It was written at the request of André Previn and was inspired by a meeting with Russian exile Viktor Fainberg. The play calls for a small cast, but also a full orchestra, which not only provides music throughout the play but also forms an essential part of the action. The play concerns a dissident under an oppressive regime (obviously meant to be taken for a Soviet-controlled state) who is imprisoned in a mental hospital, from which he will not be released until he admits that his statements against the government were caused by a (non-existent) mental disorder.
  • (1978) Night and Day is about journalism. Set in a fictional African country governed by the tyrant Mageeba, the plot involves the interactions of two British reporters and a British photographer and the family of a British mine owner during a period of unrest in the country. The playbill for a Chicago theater company's 1996 performance of this play stated that it was based on Evelyn Waugh's 1938 novel Scoop.
  • (1979) Dogg's Hamlet, Cahoot's Macbeth are two works. In Dogg's Hamlet we find the actors speaking a language called Dogg, which consists of ordinary English words but with meanings completely different from the ones we assign them. Three schoolchildren are rehearsing a performance of Hamlet in English, which is to them a foreign language. Cahoot's Macbeth is usually performed with Dogg's Hamlet, and shows a shortened performance of Macbeth carried out under the eyes of a secret policeman who suspects the actors of subversion against the state.
  • (1979) 15-Minute Hamlet The entire play of Hamlet, only in fifteen minutes. An excerpt from Dogg's Hamlet, it is often performed and published on its own.
  • (1979) Undiscovered Country is an adaptation of Das Weite Land by the esteemed Austrian playwright Arthur Schnitzler.
  • (1981) On the Razzle is a comedic farce based on a play by 19th century Austrian playwright Johann Nestroy, Einen Jux will er sich machen (which is the source for Thornton Wilder's plays "The Merchant of Yonkers" and The Matchmaker and the musical Hello, Dolly! as well).
  • (1982) The Real Thing examines love and fidelity, and makes extensive use of play within a play.
  • (1984) Rough Crossing is based on a classic farce by Molnar and takes place on shipboard as two playwrights struggle to finish a musical comedy and rehearse it before docking in New York. Contains numerous references to famous musical comedies such as produced by Gilbert and Sullivan.
  • (1986) Dalliance
  • (1988) Hapgood mixes the themes of espionage and quantum mechanics, especially exploring the idea that in both fields, observing an event changes the nature of the event. He also compares the dual nature of light (is it a wave that sometimes seems like particles, or vice versa) with a double agent who is not sure which side he is really working for.
  • (1993) Arcadia alternates between a pair of present day researchers investigating an early 19th century literary mystery and the real incident they are investigating. It touches on mathematics, thermodynamics, literature, and landscape gardening as it examines the quest for knowledge.
  • (1995) Indian Ink is based on his radio play In The Native State, and examines British rule in India from both sides.
  • (1997) The Invention of Love investigates the life and death of Oxford poet and classicist A. E. Housman, especially his repressed homosexual love for his friend Moses Jackson, contrasting Housman with Oscar Wilde's public fall from grace.
  • (2002) The Coast of Utopia is a trilogy about the origins of modern political radicalism in 19th century Russia. The central figures in the action are Michael Bakunin, Vissarion Belinsky, and Alexander Herzen. The work consists of three plays: "Voyage", "Shipwreck", and "Salvage".
  • (2006) Rock 'n' Roll spans the years from 1968 to 1990 from the double perspective of Prague, where a rock 'n' roll band comes to symbolise resistance to the Communist regime, and of Cambridge where the verities of love and death are shaping the lives of three generations in the family of a Marxist philosopher. Stoppard gives the character Max Morrow a surprising number of lines relating to fish pie, thought to be a way of teasing Brian Cox (who played Morrow in the first performances) about an embarrassing TV ad for Young's Fish Pie he had done many years before. Its first public performance (a preview) was 3 June 2006 at the Royal Court Theatre. It was a controversial addition to the Royal Court's 50th anniversary season, due to the left-leaning nature of much of the Royal Court's work and the anti-communist nature of much of Stoppard's work (including "Rock 'n' Roll" itself).
  • Henry IV is a play written by Luigi Pirandello in Italian. Tom Stoppard's translation of the work is noted for its colloquial dialog.

This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Hamlet and Horatio in the cemetery by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish dramatist, novelist and poet. ... Waiting for Godot is a play by Samuel Beckett. ... Sir Michael Hordern (October 3, 1911-May 2, 1995) was a British actor, knighted in 1983 for his services to the theatre. ... The Real Inspector Hound is a short play by Tom Stoppard. ... Agatha Mary Clarissa, Lady Mallowan, DBE (15 September 1890—12 January 1976), also known as Dame Agatha Christie, was an English crime fiction writer. ... St. ... Jumpers is a 1972 play by Tom Stoppard. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... This article is about communism as a form of society, as an ideology advocating that form of society, and as a popular movement. ... Travesties is a comedic play by Tom Stoppard, first produced in 1975. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... The Importance of Being Earnest The Importance of Being Earnest is a play by Oscar Wilde, a comedy of manners in either three or four acts (depending on edition) inspired by W. S. Gilberts Engaged. ... Tristan Tzara () (April 16, 1896 – December 25, 1963) was a Romanian poet and essayist. ... Vladimir Ilyich Lenin ( Russian: Влади́мир Ильи́ч Ле́нин  listen?), original surname Ulyanov (Улья́нов) ( April 22 (April 10 ( O.S.)), 1870 – January 21, 1924), was a... James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (Irish Séamus Seoighe; 2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish expatriate writer, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. ... View of the inner city with the four main churches visible, and the Albis in the backdrop Zürich (German: , Zürich German: Züri , French: , in English generally Zurich, Italian: ) is the largest city in Switzerland (population: 366,145 in 2004; population of urban area: 1,091,732) and... The United States Bicentennial was celebrated on Sunday, July 4, 1976, the 200th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Every Good Boy Deserves Favour is a stage play by Tom Stoppard. ... André Previn (born April 6, 1929)¹ is a prominent pianist, orchestral conductor, and composer. ... A psychiatric hospital (also called a mental hospital or asylum) is a hospital specializing in the treatment of persons with mental illness. ... Night and Day was a 1978 play by Tom Stoppard. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and more broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... Evelyn Waugh, as photographed in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten Arthur Evelyn St. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... Scoop is a 1938 novel by English writer Evelyn Waugh about the rush of war reporters to a thinly disguised Abyssinia (now Ethiopia). ... Doggs Hamlet, Cahoots Macbeth are two plays by Tom Stoppard, written to be performed together. ... JYolkowski // talk 22:05, 22 Jun 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Hamlet and Horatio in the cemetery by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... Doggs Hamlet, Cahoots Macbeth are two plays by Tom Stoppard, written to be performed together. ... Macbeth and Banquo meeting the witches on the heath by Théodore Chassériau. ... Arthur Schnitzler Arthur Schnitzler (May 15, 1862 - October 21, 1931) was an Austrian writer and doctor. ... On the Razzle is Tom Stoppards take on a Viennese play by Johann Nestroy, called Einen Jux will er sich machen (roughly, He Will Have His Way). ... Look up farce in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Johann Nepomuk Eduard Ambrosius Nestroy (born December 7, 1801 at Vienna, Austria; died May 25, 1862 at Graz, Austria) was an opera singer, actor and, primarily, a playwright. ... Einen Jux will er sich machen is a play by Austrian playwright Johann Nestroy. ... Image:Thorntonwilderteeth. ... Hello, Dolly! is a musical with lyrics and music by Jerry Herman and a book by Michael Stewart, based on Thornton Wilders 1938 farce The Merchant of Yonkers, which Wilder revised and retitled The Matchmaker in 1955. ... The Real Thing is a play by Tom Stoppard, first performed in 1982. ... Rough Crossing is a 1985 comedic play by British playwright Tom Stoppard, freely adapted from Ferenc Molnars Play at the Castle. ... W. S. Gilbert Arthur Sullivan Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian era partnership of librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900). ... Hapgood, by Tom Stoppard, is a play that takes place almost entirely in the mens changeroom of a municipal swimming baths. ... Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ... Fig. ... Arcadia is a play by Tom Stoppard which first opened at the Royal National Theatre in London on 13 April 1993 and has played at many theatres since. ... Indian Ink is a 1995 play by Tom Stoppard, based upon his 1991 radio play In the Native State. ... The Invention of Love is a play by Tom Stoppard portraying the life of poet A.E. Housman, focusing specifically on his homosexuality and love for a college roommate. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Alfred Edward Housman (March 26, 1859 – April 30, 1936), usually known as A.E. Housman, was an English poet and classical scholar, now best known for his cycle of poems A Shropshire Lad. ... The Coast of Utopia is a 2002 trilogy of plays by Tom Stoppard, focused on the philosophical debates in pre-revolutionary Russia between 1833 and 1866. ... Radical Left can refer to: 18th century Radicalism was a separate ideology, which was absorbed into liberalism and socialism. ... Mikhail Alexandrovich Bakunin (Russian — Михаил Александрович Бакунин), (May 30, 1814–June 13, 1876) was a well-known Russian anarchist contemporaneous to Karl Marx. ... Vissarion Grigorievich Belinskii (Виссарио́н Григо́рьевич Бели́нский) (1811 - 1848) was Russian writer, literary critic, philosopher and revolutionary activist (a Westernizer). ... Aleksandr Ivanovich Herzen (Алекса́ндр Ива́нович Ге́рцен) (April 6 [O.S. 25 March] 1812 in Moscow - January 21 [O.S. 9 January] 1870 in Paris) was a major Russian pro-Western writer and thinker known as the father of Russian socialism. He is held responsible for creating a political climate leading to the emancipation... Rock n Roll is a play by Tom Stoppard that premiered at the Royal Court Theatre, London, in 2006. ... Brian Denis Cox, CBE (born June 1, 1946 in Dundee, Scotland) is a Scottish actor, notable for being the first actor to play Hannibal Lecter, a role he took in the Michael Mann film Manhunter (in which the characters surname was spelled Lecktor). Image:Http://www. ... June 3 is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The Royal Court Theatre is a non-commercial theatre in Sloane Square, in the Chelsea area of London noted for its contributions to modern theatre. ... Henry IV can refer to Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV of England Henry IV of France Henry IV of Castile Henry IV, Duke of Breslau or plays by William Shakespeare: Henry IV, part 1 Henry IV, part 2 This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which... Luigi Pirandello (June 28, 1867 – December 10, 1936) was an Italian dramatist, novelist, and short story writer awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1934. ...

Work for radio, film, and TV

In his early years Stoppard wrote extensively for BBC radio, in many cases introducing a touch of surrealism. His original works for radio are: The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ...

  • (1964) The Dissolution of Dominic Boot, a 15 minute play in which Dominic travels around London in a taxi trying to raise the money for the mounting fare.
  • (1964) ‘M’ is for Moon amongst Other Things
  • (1966) If you’re Glad I’ll be Frank; bus-driver Frank attempts to liberate his wife Gladys who is trapped as the voice of the speaking clock.
  • (1967) Albert’s Bridge, in which Albert finds solace in his never-ending task as a solitary bridge painter.
  • (1968) Where are They Now?, written for schools radio, the play intercuts a 1969 Old Boys' dinner with the same characters' 1945 school dinner.
  • (1972) Artist Descending a Staircase, a story told by means of multiple levels of nested flashback from the present to 1914 and back again.
  • (1982) The Dog it was that Died
  • (1991) In the Native State, set both in colonial India and present-day England, examining the relationship of the two countries. Stoppard later expanded the work to become the stage play Indian Ink (1995)

Stoppard has also adapted many of his stage works for radio. The Dog It Was That Died is a play by Tom Stoppard. ...


In his television play Professional Foul (1977), an English philosophy professor visits Prague, officially to speak at a colloquium, unofficially to watch a football international between England and Czechoslovakia. He meets one of his former students and is persuaded to smuggle the student's dissident thesis out of the country. Professional Foul is a play written by Tom Stoppard. ...


He has also adapted many of his own plays for film and TV, notably the 1990 production of Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead. Tom Stoppard has written extensively for film and television. Some of his better-known scripts and adaptations include: This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ...

It is rumoured that Stoppard assisted George Lucas in polishing up some of the dialogue for Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade and Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith, though Stoppard received no official or formal credit in this role. He worked in a similar capacity with Tim Burton on his film Sleepy Hollow. He is also rumoured to be writing the script for the 22nd James Bond film, currently under the title of Bond 22.[1] Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog), published 1889, is a humorous account by Jerome K. Jerome of a boating holiday on the Thames between Kingston and Oxford. ... Jerome K. Jerome Jerome Klapka Jerome (May 2, 1859–June 14, 1927) was an English author, best known for the humorous travelogue Three Men in a Boat. ... clive exton was a big fat ugly basterd that lived on the street eating garbage. ... Professional Foul is a play written by Tom Stoppard. ... Václav Havel, GCB, CC, (IPA: ) (born October 5, 1936 in Prague) is a Czech writer and dramatist. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Empire of the Sun is a 1987 film directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Christian Bale, John Malkovich, and Miranda Richardson. ... The Russia House is a novel by John Le Carré published in 1989. ... Shakespeare in Love is an award-winning 1998 romantic comedy film. ... Marc Norman (born Los Angeles, 1941) is an American screenwriter. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Enigma is a 2001 film set in World War II. It stars Dougray Scott and Kate Winslet and is based on a novel of the same title by Robert Harris (Enigma). ... His Dark Materials: The Golden Compass, is a film based upon the first novel in Philip Pullmans trilogy His Dark Materials, slated for release in 2006 by New Line Cinema. ... For the 1990 novel by Robert Ludlum, see The Bourne Ultimatum (novel). ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade is a 1989 adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Harrison Ford, Sean Connery, Denholm Elliott, Julian Glover, Alison Doody, River Phoenix, and John Rhys-Davies. ... Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is the third episode of the Star Wars film series (but the sixth film to be produced), to be released on Thursday, May 19, 2005. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award-nominated American film director, writer and designer known for his off-beat and quirky style. ... Sleepy Hollow may mean: Sleepy Hollow, New York, the historical location of Washington Irvings fictional story The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. ... Flemings image of James Bond; commissioned to aid the Daily Express comic strip artists. ... Bond 22 is the working title of a future EON Productions James Bond film to follow the 2006 film, Casino Royale. ...


Awards

He was appointed CBE in 1978 and knighted in 1997. He has been co-opted into the Outrapo group. The Evening Standard Awards are presented annually for oustanding achievements in London Theatre. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Prix Italia is an Italian broadcasting award. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Jumpers is a 1972 play by Tom Stoppard. ... The Evening Standard Awards are presented annually for oustanding achievements in London Theatre. ... Travesties is a comedic play by Tom Stoppard, first produced in 1975. ... Travesties is a comedic play by Tom Stoppard, first produced in 1975. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Night and Day was a 1978 play by Tom Stoppard. ... The Evening Standard Awards are presented annually for oustanding achievements in London Theatre. ... The Real Thing is a play by Tom Stoppard, first performed in 1982. ... The Evening Standard Awards are presented annually for oustanding achievements in London Theatre. ... The Real Thing is a play by Tom Stoppard, first performed in 1982. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Arcadia is a play by Tom Stoppard which first opened at the Royal National Theatre in London on 13 April 1993 and has played at many theatres since. ... The Critics Circle Theatre Awards (Drama Theatre Awards in 1989 and 1990) are presented annually for the years theatrical achievements. ... The Evening Standard Awards are presented annually for oustanding achievements in London Theatre. ... Arcadia is a play by Tom Stoppard which first opened at the Royal National Theatre in London on 13 April 1993 and has played at many theatres since. ... The Invention of Love is a play by Tom Stoppard portraying the life of poet A.E. Housman, focusing specifically on his homosexuality and love for a college roommate. ... The Evening Standard Awards are presented annually for oustanding achievements in London Theatre. ... Shakespeare in Love is an award-winning 1998 romantic comedy film. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Coast of Utopia is a 2002 trilogy of plays by Tom Stoppard, focused on the philosophical debates in pre-revolutionary Russia between 1833 and 1866. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ...


Novel

Stoppard has written one novel, Lord Malquist and Mr Moon (1966). It is set in contemporary London and its cast includes not only the eighteenth century figure of the dandified Malquist and his ineffectual Boswell, Moon, but also a couple of cowboys with live bullets in their six-shooters, a lion (banned from the Ritz) and a donkey-borne Irishman claiming to be the Risen Christ. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... James Boswell, 9th Laird of Auchinleckand 1st Baronet (October 29, 1740 - May 19, 1795) was a lawyer, diarist, and author born in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Ritz (disambiguation). ...


Personal life

He has been married twice, to Josie Ingle (1965–1972), a nurse, and to Miriam Stoppard (née Miriam Moore-Robinson), (1972–1992), whom he left to begin a relationship with actress Felicity Kendal. He has two sons from each marriage, including the actor Ed Stoppard and Will Stoppard, married to violinist, Linzi Stoppard. Miriam Stoppard (nee Miriam Moore-Robinson) is a British physician, author, television presenter and agony aunt. ... Felicity Kendal in The Good Life. ... Edmund Stoppard (born on September 1974), credited as Ed Stoppard is an English actor, son of Tom Stoppard by his second marriage. ... // Linzi Stoppard was born in Surrey in 1979 and started her classical training on the violin at the age of four. ...


Art Charity Involvement

Stoppard is a participant in The one million masterpiece project. His work can be found here: http://www.millionmasterpiece.com/profile-503203 The One Million Masterpiece. ...


Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae "Salon.com People | Tom Stoppard" (biography), Amy Reiter, November 2001, webpage: Salon-TStoppard.
  2. ^ "BBC NEWS | Entertainment | Stoppard play sweeps Tony awards" BBC News Online, June 2007, webpage: BBC739885.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Tom Stoppard
  • Tom Stoppard at the Internet Movie Database
  • Tom Stoppard at the Internet Broadway Database
  • A Tom Stoppard Bibliography
  • More extensive biography
  • Tom Stoppard on the Faber and Faber website
  • The Times Interview (11/06/2006)
  • New York Times Magazine article, 11/26/06
  • An analysis of Tom Stoppard's work and career is available in About Stoppard by Jim Hunter (Faber and Faber, London ISBN 978-0571-22023-6)
Persondata
NAME Stoppard, Tom, Sir
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Straussler, Tomáš; Boot, William
SHORT DESCRIPTION British playwright and screenwriter
DATE OF BIRTH July 3, 1937
PLACE OF BIRTH Zlín, Czechoslovakia
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tom Stoppard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1754 words)
Sir Tom Stoppard OM, CBE (born Tomáš Straussler on 3 July 1937) is a British playwright.
The Tom Stoppard Prize was created in 1983 (in Stockholm, under the Charter 77 Foundation) and is awarded to authors of Czech origin.
Stoppard's plays are plays of ideas that deal with philosophical issues, yet he combines the philosophical ideas he presents with verbal wit and visual humor.
Tom Stoppard biography (1045 words)
Stoppard, his mother, and his older brother were evacuated to India shortly before the Japanese invasion of Singapore in 1941; his father, Eugene Straussler, remained behind and was killed.
Stoppard has referred to this as his 'first' play in that he claims A WALK ON THE WATER was an unoriginal composite of several plays he admired.
Tom Stoppard has established an international reputation as a writer of "serious comedy"; his plays are plays of ideas that deal with philosophical issues, yet he combines the philosophical ideas he presents with verbal wit and visual humor.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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