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Encyclopedia > Tom Stewart
Tom Stewart
Tom Stewart

Photo credited to the United States Senate Historical Office


In office
January 16, 1939January 3, 1949
Preceded by George L. Berry
Succeeded by Estes Kefauver

Born January 11, 1892
Dunlap, Tennessee
Died October 10, 1972 (aged 80)
Nashville, Tennessee
Political party Democratic

Arthur Thomas Stewart (January 11, 1892October 10, 1972), more commonly known as Tom Stewart, was a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee from 1939 to 1949. Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George L. Berry (September 12, 1882–December 4, 1948) was president of the International Pressmen and Assistants Union of North America from 1907 to 1948 and a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee, 1937 - 1938. ... The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Dunlap is a city in Sequatchie County, Tennessee, United States. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nashville redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Stewart was born in Dunlap, Tennessee. He attended the former Pryor Institute, a private school, in Jasper, Tennessee and Emory College (now Emory University) in Atlanta, Georgia. He returned to Tennessee and attended Cumberland School of Law at Cumberland University in Lebanon. Upon admission to the bar in 1913, he set up practice in Birmingham, Alabama. He moved back to Jasper, Tennessee in 1915 and practised there until 1919, then moved to Winchester, Tennessee. Dunlap is a city in Sequatchie County, Tennessee, United States. ... Jasper is a town located in Marion County, Tennessee. ... Emory University is a private university located in the metropolitan area of the city of Atlanta and in western unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Cumberland Law Schools Center for Biotechnology, Law and Ethics be merged into this article or section. ... This institution is unrelated, other than by similarity of name, to the University of the Cumberlands in Williamsburg, Kentucky. ... A bar association is a body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Location in Jefferson County in the state of Alabama Coordinates: , Country State Counties Jefferson, Shelby Incorporated December 19, 1871 Government  - Type Mayor - Council  - Mayor Bernard Kincaid (Current) Larry Langford (Mayor-Elect) Area  - City 151. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Winchester is a city located in Franklin County, Tennessee 6. ...


In private practice in Winchester, he was elected district attorney for the former 18th Circuit for a term beginning in 1923. He served in this position until 1939. In 1925 Stewart was the chief prosecutor in the Scopes Trial. Stewart designed the prosecution's argument to preserve political control over the schools exclusively within the state legislature, thereby keeping the trial to the narrow, legal matter and forestalling attempts by the defense to introduce scientific testimony to show there was not a conflict between evolution and the story of divine creation set forth in Genesis. Except for the willingness of William Jennings Bryan to be cross-examined by Clarence Darrow, Stewart's positions controlled the trial and the Scopes defense had no recourse but to ask the jury to convict the defendant so the case could be appealed to the Tennessee Supreme Court (which overturned the conviction on a legal technicality but upheld the constitutionality of the Butler Act). A district attorney is, in some U.S. jurisdictions, the title of the local public official who represents the government in the prosecution of criminals. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scopes Trial (, often called the Scopes Monkey Trial) was an American legal case that tested a law passed on March 13, 1925, which forbade the teaching, in any state-funded educational establishment in Tennessee, of any theory that denies the story of the Divine Creation of man as taught... In most litigation under the common law adversarial system the defendant, perhaps with the assistance of counsel, may allege or present defenses (or defences) in order to avoid liability, civil or criminal. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... Creationism is a religious belief that humanity, life, the Earth, and the universe were created in their original form by a deity or deities (often the Abrahamic God of Judaism, Christianity and Islam), whose existence is presupposed. ... For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... Clarence Seward Darrow (April 18, 1857 Kinsman Township, Trumbull County, Ohio - March 13, 1938 Chicago) was an American lawyer and leading member of the American Civil Liberties Union, best known for defending teenage thrill killers Leopold and Loeb in their trial for murdering 14-year-old Bobby Franks (1924) and... The Tennessee Supreme Court is the highest appellate court of the State of Tennessee. ... For the United Kingdom Butler Education Act, see Education Act 1944. ...


In 1938 he entered the race for the balance of the unexpired term of the late Senator Nathan L. Bachman, who had died in office. In the August Democratic primary he defeated labor union leader George L. Berry, who had been appointed to the seat upon Bachman's death by Governor Gordon Browning, and was elected Senator on November 8. Eligible to begin serving immediately, he instead waited until the expiry of his term as district attorney on January 16, 1939 to take his Senate seat. Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nathan Lynn Bachman (August 8, 1878–April 23, 1937) was a United States Senator from Tennessee from 1933 until his death. ... For other uses, see Primary. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... George L. Berry (September 12, 1882–December 4, 1948) was president of the International Pressmen and Assistants Union of North America from 1907 to 1948 and a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee, 1937 - 1938. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Gordon Weaver Browning (November 22, 1895–May 23, 1976) was an American politician who represented Tennessee in the United States Congress and was later Governor of Tennessee from 1937 to 1939 and again from 1949 to 1953. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Stewart was somewhat typical of the Democratic Party's Southern wing of that era. He has been considered by some to be at least somewhat an ally of Memphis political boss E. H. Crump, but less so than Tennessee's other Senator of the time, Memphian Kenneth McKellar. Stewart was reelected in 1942, but in 1948 was challenged for renomination by Estes Kefauver, a progressive East Tennessean who defeated him. The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the system of organization called a political machine. ... Edward Hull Crump (October 2, 1874–October 16, 1954) was a Memphis, Tennessee insurance broker, businessman, and political figure in the early 20th century. ... Another Kenneth McKellar was a famous Scottish singer. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... For other uses, see Progressivism (disambiguation). ... East Tennessee is a name given to approximately the eastern third of the state of Tennessee. ...


Stewart returned to the private practice of law. He died in Nashville and was interred at Winchester's Memorial Park Cemetery. For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Nashville redirects here. ...


He Love Beavers and battenburg, and especially DR Pepper.


External links

Preceded by
George L. Berry
United States Senator (Class 2) from Tennessee
1939-1949
Served alongside: Kenneth D. McKellar
Succeeded by
Estes Kefauver
Find A Grave is an online database of seventeen million cemeteries and burial records. ... George L. Berry (September 12, 1882–December 4, 1948) was president of the International Pressmen and Assistants Union of North America from 1907 to 1948 and a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee, 1937 - 1938. ... Tennessee was admitted to the Union on June 1, 1796. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Another Kenneth McKellar was a famous Scottish singer. ... The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... Tennessee was admitted to the Union on June 1, 1796. ... William Cocke William Cocke (September 6, 1747–August 22, 1828) was an American lawyer, pioneer, and statesman. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Daniel Smith (October 29, 1748–June 16, 1818) was a surveyor, an American Revolutionary War patriot, and twice a United States Senator from Tennessee. ... Joseph Anderson (November 5, 1757–April 17, 1837) was a U.S. political figure who served as a United States Senator from Tennessee and later as the first Comptroller of the United States Treasury. ... George W. Campbell George Washington Campbell (February 9, 1769–February 17, 1848) was an American statesman. ... John Henry Eaton (June 18, 1790–November 17, 1856) was an American politician from Tennessee. ... Felix Grundy (September 11, 1777–December 19, 1840) was a U.S. Congressman and U.S. Senator from Tennessee who also served as the 13th Attorney General of the United States. ... Epharim Hubbard Foster (September 17, 1794 – September 6, 1854) twice served as a United States Senator from Tennessee. ... Felix Grundy (September 11, 1777–December 19, 1840) was a U.S. Congressman and U.S. Senator from Tennessee who also served as the 13th Attorney General of the United States. ... Alfred Osborn Pope Nicholson (August 31, 1808 – March 23, 1876), a Tennessee Democratic politician and attorney, was twice a United States Senator from that state. ... Epharim Hubbard Foster (September 17, 1794 – September 6, 1854) twice served as a United States Senator from Tennessee. ... Hopkins Lacy Turney (October 3, 1797–August 1, 1857) was a Democratic U.S. Representative and United States Senator from Tennessee. ... James Chamberlain Jones (April 20, 1809–October 29, 1859) was governor of Tennessee from 1841 to 1845, and a United States Senator from that state from 1851 to 1857. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... David Trotter Patterson (February 28, 1818 – November 3, 1891) was a United States Senator from Tennessee at the beginning of the Reconstruction Period. ... William Gannaway Brownlow William Gannaway Brownlow (August 29, 1805 – April 29, 1877) was Governor of Tennessee from 1865 to 1869 and a Senator from Tennessee from 1869 to 1875. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... David Key David McKendree Key (January 27, 1824 – February 3, 1900) was a Democratic U.S. Senator from Tennessee from 1875 to 1877 as well as the U.S. Postmaster General under President Hayes. ... James Edmund Bailey (August 15, 1822 – December 29, 1885 was a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee from 1877 to 1881. ... Howell Edmunds Jackson (April 8, 1832–August 8, 1895) was an American jurist and politician. ... Washington Curran Whitthorne (April 19, 1825 – September 21, 1891) was a Tennessee attorney and Democratic politician. ... William Brimage Bate (October 7, 1826– March 9, 1905) was governor of Tennessee fron 1883 to 1887 and subsequently United States Senator from Tennessee from 1887 until his death. ... James Beriah Frazier (October 18, 1856–March 28, 1937) was Governor of Tennessee from 1903 to 1905 and subsequently a United States Senator from Tennessee from 1905 to 1911. ... Luke Lea (April 12, 1879 – November 18, 1945) was a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee from 1911 to 1917. ... Another Kenneth McKellar was a famous Scottish singer. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Sr. ... Peters Grandpa III (born November 23, 1930) was a Republican United States U.S. senator from Tennessee from 1971 to 1977. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... William Harrison Bill Frist, Sr. ... Bob Corker Robert Phillips Bob Corker, Jr. ... Italic text:For the English scholar see William Blount, 4th Baron Mountjoy. ... Joseph Anderson (November 5, 1757–April 17, 1837) was a U.S. political figure who served as a United States Senator from Tennessee and later as the first Comptroller of the United States Treasury. ... William Cocke William Cocke (September 6, 1747–August 22, 1828) was an American lawyer, pioneer, and statesman. ... Daniel Smith (October 29, 1748–June 16, 1818) was a surveyor, an American Revolutionary War patriot, and twice a United States Senator from Tennessee. ... Jenkin Whiteside (1772–1822) was an attorney who served as a United States Senator from Tennessee. ... George W. Campbell George Washington Campbell (February 9, 1769–February 17, 1848) was an American statesman. ... Jesse Wharton (July 29, 1782–July 22, 1833) was an attorney who briefly represented Tennessee in each house of Congress. ... John Williams (1778–1837) was an American lawyer, soldier, and statesman from Knoxville, Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... This is about the 19th century Tennessee politician; for the 20th century Mississippi politician, see Hugh L. White. ... Alexander O. Anderson (November 10, 1794–May 23, 1869) was an attorney from Tennessee who briefly served as a Democrat in the United States Senate. ... Spencer Jarnagin (1792–1853) was a United States Senator from Tennessee from 1843 to 1847. ... John Bell (also known as The Great Apostate) (February 15, 1797–September 10, 1869) was a U.S. politician, attorney, and plantation owner. ... Alfred Osborn Pope Nicholson (August 31, 1808 – March 23, 1876), a Tennessee Democratic politician and attorney, was twice a United States Senator from that state. ... Joseph Smith Fowler (August 31, 1820 – April 1, 1902) was a United States Senator from Tennessee from 1866 to 1871. ... Henry Cooper (April 22, 1827 – February 4, 1884) was a Tennessee attorney, judge, and politician who served one term in the United States Senate, 1871-1877. ... Isham Green Harris (February 10, 1818 – July 8, 1897) was an American politician. ... Thomas Battle Turley (April 5, 1845 – July 1, 1910) was a Tennessee attorney who served as a Democratic United States Senator from 1897 to 1901. ... Edward Ward Carmack (November 5, 1858 – November 8, 1908) was an attorney, newspaperman, and political figure who served as a U.S. Senator from Tennessee from 1901 to 1907. ... Robert Love Taylor (July 31, 1850–March 31, 1912) was a U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1879 to 1881, Governor of Tennessee from 1887 to 1891 and from 1897 to 1899, and subsequently a United States Senator from that state from 1907 until his death. ... Newell Sanders (July 12, 1850 – January 26, 1938) was a Chattanooga businessman who served for a relatively brief time as a United States Senator from Tennessee. ... William R. Webb (November 11, 1842–December 19, 1926) was an educator who served briefly as a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee. ... John Knight Shields (August 15, 1858 – September 30, 1934) was a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee from 1913 to 1925. ... Lawrence Tyson was a Democratic U.S. Senator from Tennessee (1925-1929) This article is a stub. ... William Emerson Brock (March 14, 1872–August 5, 1950) was a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee from 1929 to 1931. ... Cordell Hull (October 2, 1871–July 23, 1955) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Nathan Lynn Bachman (August 8, 1878–April 23, 1937) was a United States Senator from Tennessee from 1933 until his death. ... George L. Berry (September 12, 1882–December 4, 1948) was president of the International Pressmen and Assistants Union of North America from 1907 to 1948 and a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee, 1937 - 1938. ... The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... Herbert S. Walters (November 17, 1881–October 17, 1973) was a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee from 1963 to 1964. ... Ross Bass (March 17, 1918–January 1, 1993) was a United States Senator from Tennessee from 1964 to 1967. ... Howard Henry Baker, Jr. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Harlan Mathews (born January 17, 1927) was a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee from 1993 to 1994. ... This article is about the actor/politician. ... Andrew Lamar Alexander (born July 3, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Tennessee and a member of the Republican Party. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
NWRS – Conservation Summit Chat Transcripts – Tom Stewart (2988 words)
Tom Stewart: Performance goals and guidelines require us to document the progress we are making "on the ground." We think that a "habitat condition index" of some kind would provide a scorecard to demonstrate our fiscal accountability and project accomplishments in a format familiar to our leaders and legislators.
Tom Stewart: Invasives are the single greatest threat to bio diversity in the U.S. We continue to combat this threat.
Tom Stewart: While many elements of wildlife and habitat could be priority issues for the next 15 years, ultimately, the team chose to focus on two key trust resources – migratory birds and threatened and endangered species – and their habitats.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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