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Encyclopedia > Tom Lehrer

Thomas Andrew "Tom" Lehrer (born April 9, 1928) is an American singer-songwriter, satirist, pianist, and mathematician. He also lectured on mathematics and musical theater. is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ...


Lehrer is best known for the pithy, humorous songs he recorded in the 1950s and 60s. His work often parodied popular song forms, notably in "The Elements", where he sets the names of the chemical elements to a tune from Gilbert and Sullivan. Lehrer's earlier work frequently dealt with trivial subject matter, but he also produced a number of songs dealing with the social and political issues of the day, particularly when he went on to write for the TV show That Was The Week That Was. The Elements (1959) is a song by musical humorist Tom Lehrer, which recites the names of all the chemical elements known at the time of writing, up to number 102, nobelium. ... The periodic table of the chemical elements A chemical element, or element, is a type of atom that is defined by its atomic number; that is, by the number of protons in its nucleus. ... W. S. Gilbert Arthur Sullivan Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian era partnership of librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900). ... That Was The Week That Was, also known as TW3, was a satirical television comedy programme that aired on BBC Television in 1962 and 1963. ...

Contents

Biography

Musical career

Before attending college, Lehrer graduated from the Loomis School in Windsor, Connecticut. As an undergraduate student at Harvard University, he began to write comic songs to entertain his friends, including "Fight Fiercely, Harvard" (1945). Those songs later became (in a joking reference to a leading scientific journal, The Physical Review) The Physical Revue. Influenced mainly by musical theater, his style consisted of parodying various forms of popular song. For example, his appreciation of list songs led him to set the names of the chemical elements to the tune of Gilbert and Sullivan's "Major-General's Song", the resulting song has been played in chemistry classes in the UK. Motto: First in Connecticut, First for its Citizens Location in Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford Region Capitol Region Settled 1633 Named 1637 Government  - Type Council-manager[1]  - Town manager Peter Souza  - Town council Donald S. Trinks, Mayor; Timothy Curtis, Deputy Mayor; Robert B. Gegetskas II... Harvard redirects here. ... A novelty song is a usually intentionally humorous song, usually in published or recorded form. ... Physical Review is one of the oldest and most-respected scientific journals publishing research on all aspects of physics. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Popular music, sometimes abbreviated pop music, is music belonging to any of a number of musical styles that are broadly popular. ... A list song is a song based wholly or in part on a list. ... The Elements (1959) is a song by musical humorist Tom Lehrer, which recites the names of all the chemical elements known at the time of writing, up to number 102, nobelium. ... W. S. Gilbert Arthur Sullivan Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian era partnership of librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900). ... Henry Lytton as the Major-General The Major-Generals Song is a patter song from Gilbert and Sullivans 1879 comic opera The Pirates of Penzance. ...


Inspired by the success of his performances of his songs, he paid for some studio time to record an album, Songs by Tom Lehrer, which he sold by mail order. Self-published and unpromoted, the album, which included the macabre ("I Hold Your Hand in Mine"), the mildly risqué ("Be Prepared"), and the mathematical ("Lobachevsky"), became a success via word of mouth. With a cult hit, he embarked on a series of concert tours and released a second album, which came in two versions: the songs were the same but More Songs by Tom Lehrer was studio-recorded, while An Evening Wasted with Tom Lehrer was recorded live in concert. Tom Lehrers debut album. ... Mail order is a term which describes the buying of goods or services by mail delivery. ... Self-publishing is the publishing of books or other media by those who have written them. ... Nikolay Ivanovich Lobachevsky Nikolai Ivanovich Lobachevsky (Никола́й Ива́нович Лобаче́вский) (December 1, 1792–February 24, 1856 (N.S.); November 20, 1792–February 12, 1856 (O.S.)) was a Russian mathematician. ... For other uses, see Word of mouth (disambiguation). ... A concert comprises a performance, usually involving some degree of formality, and particularly a performance featuring music. ... An Evening Wasted With Tom Lehrer is an album recorded by Tom Lehrer, the well-known satirist and Harvard lecturer. ...


Lehrer's major break into the United Kingdom came as a result of the citation accompanying an honorary degree given to Princess Margaret, where she cited musical tastes as "catholic, ranging from Mozart to Tom Lehrer". This produced significant interest in his works, and helped secure distributors for his material. Ironically, it was in the UK where his music ended up more popular due to the proliferation of university newspapers referring to the material, and the willingness of the BBC to play his songs on the radio (something that was a rarity in the USA). An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... HRH The Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon Her Royal Highness The Princess Margaret (Margaret Rose Armstrong-Jones, née Windsor; (August 21, 1930—February 9, 2002) was a member of the British Royal Family, the second eldest daughter of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, and sister of the... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


By the early 1960s, Lehrer had retired from touring (which he intensely disliked) and was employed as the resident songwriter for the U.S. edition of That Was The Week That Was (TW3), a satirical TV show. An increased proportion of his output became overtly political, or at least topical, on subjects such as pollution ("Pollution"), Vatican II ("The Vatican Rag"), race relations ("National Brotherhood Week"), education ("New Math"), American militarism ("Send the Marines"), World War III nostalgia ("So Long, Mom", premiered by Steve Allen), and nuclear proliferation ("Who's Next?" and "MLF Lullaby"). He also wrote a song which satirized the alleged amorality of Wernher von Braun. A selection of these songs was released in the album That Was The Year That Was. That Was The Week That Was, also known as TW3, was a satirical television comedy programme that aired on BBC Television in 1962 and 1963. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Air pollution Pollution is the introduction of pollutants (whether chemical substances, or energy such as noise, heat, or light) into the environment to such a point that its effects become harmful to human health, other living organisms, or the environment. ... The Second Vatican Council, or Vatican II, was an Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church opened under Pope John XXIII in 1962 and closed under Pope Paul VI in 1965. ... Race relations is the area of sociology that studies the social, political, and economic relations between races at all different levels of society. ... One of Harvard mathematic graduate Tom Lehrers most famous songs was a satire named New Math which centered around the process of subtracting 173 from 342 in decimal and octal. ... Steve Allen on the cover of Steve Allen on the Bible, Religion, and Morality Stephen Valentine Patrick William Allen (December 26, 1921 – October 30, 2000) was an American musician, comedian, and writer who was instrumental in innovating the concept of the television talk show. ... World map with nuclear weapons development status represented by color. ... For other uses of von Braun, see von Braun (disambiguation). ... That Was The Year That Was (1965) is an album made up of a collection of songs performed by Tom Lehrer for the NBC version of the BBC series That Was The Week That Was. ...


The record deal with Reprise Records for the That Was The Year That Was album also gave Reprise distribution rights for Lehrer's earlier recordings as Lehrer wanted to shut down his own Lehrer Records. The Reprise issue of Songs by Tom Lehrer was a stereo re-recording. This version was not issued on CD, but the songs were issued on the live Tom Lehrer Revisited on CD instead. Reprise Records is an American record label, owned by Warner Music Group, operated through Warner Bros. ... Tom Lehrer Revisited is features live-recorded versions of songs performed in Songs & More Songs By Tom Lehrer, as well as two additional tracks performed for the television show The Electric Company // Track Listing Introduction (3:27) I Wanna Go Back to Dixie (2:56) The Wild West is Where...


Departure from the scene

There is an urban legend that Lehrer gave up political satire when the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Henry Kissinger in 1973. He did say that the awarding of the prize to Kissinger made political satire obsolete, but has denied that he stopped doing satire as a form of protest, and asserts that he had stopped doing satire several years earlier.[1] Another urban legend held that he had been sued for libel by the subject of one of his songs, Wernher Von Braun, and been forced to relinquish all of his royalty income to Von Braun. However, Lehrer firmly denied this in an interview with the Sydney Morning Herald. (He had also mentioned Frank Fontaine and Jerry Lewis in "National Brotherhood Week", in an uncomplimentary context, on the same album, but nothing ensued from that.) An urban legend or urban myth is similar to a modern folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ... Political satire is a subgenre of general satire that specializes in gaining entertainment from politics, politicians and public affairs. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger on May 27, 1923) is a German-born American politician, and 1973 Nobel Peace Prize laureate. ... “Libel” redirects here. ... For other uses of von Braun, see von Braun (disambiguation). ... ... Frank Fontaine (19 April 1920 – 4 August 1978) was a American comedian and singer. ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ...


When asked about his reasons for abandoning his musical career, he cited a simple lack of interest, a distaste for touring, and boredom with performing the same songs repeatedly. He has observed that when he was moved to write and perform songs, he did; when he wasn't, he didn't, and after a while the latter situation prevailed. It has been frequently observed that, though many of Lehrer's songs satirized the Cold War political establishment of the day, that he stopped writing and performing just as the 1960s counterculture movement gained momentum. Lehrer has stated that he doubts his songs had an impact on those not already critical of the establishment: "I don't think this kind of thing has an impact on the unconverted, frankly. It's not even preaching to the converted; it's titillating the converted... I'm fond of quoting Peter Cook, who talked about the satirical Berlin cabarets of the '30s, which did so much to stop the rise of Hitler and prevent the Second World War."[1] In 2003 he commented that his particular brand of political satire is more difficult in the modern world: "The real issues I don't think most people touch. The Clinton jokes are all about Monica Lewinsky and all that stuff and not about the important things, like the fact that he wouldn't ban landmines... I'm not tempted to write a song about George W. Bush. I couldn't figure out what sort of song I would write. That's the problem: I don't want to satirise George Bush and his puppeteers, I want to vaporise them."[2] For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... The counterculture of the 1960s began in the United States as a reaction against the conservative social norms of the 1950s, the political conservatism (and social repression) of the Cold War period, and the US governments extensive military intervention in Vietnam. ... For other persons named Peter Cook, see Peter Cook (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Cabaret is a form of entertainment featuring comedy, song, dance, and theatre, distinguished mainly by the performance venue — a restaurant or nightclub with a stage for performances and the audience sitting around the tables (often dining or drinking) watching the performance. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Monica Samille Lewinsky (born July 23, 1973) is an American woman with whom the former United States President Bill Clinton admitted to having had an inappropriate relationship[1] while Lewinsky worked at the White House in 1995 and 1996. ... “Minefield” redirects here. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Lehrer's musical career was notably brief, stating in an interview in the late 90s that he had performed a mere 109 shows, and written 37 songs across his 20-year career. Nevertheless, the cult following that had grown around his music significantly bolstered the effect that he had on a global scale.


Lehrer returns to music

In the 1970s, Lehrer concentrated on teaching mathematics and musical theater, although he also wrote 10 songs for the children's television show The Electric Company. (Harvard schoolmate Joe Raposo was the show's musical director for its first three seasons.) In the early 1980s, Tom Foolery, a revival of his songs on the London stage, was a surprise hit. Although not its instigator, Lehrer eventually gave it his full support and updated several of his lyrics for the production. The Electric Company was an educational American childrens television series produced by the Childrens Television Workshop (now Sesame Workshop) for PBS in the United States. ... Joseph Raposo Jr. ... TomFoolery is a revue musical produced by Cameron Mackintosh and is based on the words and music of Tom Lehrer. ...


On 7 June and 8 June 1998, Lehrer performed in public for the first time in 25 years at the Lyceum Theatre, London as part of the gala show Hey, Mr. Producer! celebrating the career of impresario Cameron Mackintosh (who had been the producer of Tom Foolery). The 8 June show has been his only performance before the Queen. Lehrer sang "Poisoning Pigeons in the Park" and an updated version of the nuclear proliferation song "Who's Next". The DVD of the event includes the former song. is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Lyceum Theatre is a theatre on Wellington Street near Covent Garden in the West End of London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Hey, Mr. ... Sir Cameron Mackintosh (born 17 October 1946) is a successful British theatrical producer. ... TomFoolery is a revue musical produced by Cameron Mackintosh and is based on the words and music of Tom Lehrer. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ...


In 2000, a CD box set, The Remains of Tom Lehrer, was released by Rhino Entertainment. It included live and studio versions of his first two albums, That Was The Year That Was, the songs he wrote for The Electric Company, and some previously unreleased material, accompanied by a small hardbound book containing an introduction by Dr. Demento and lyrics to all the songs. A box set (sometimes referred to as a boxed set) is one or more musical recordings, films, television programs, or other collection of related things that are contained in a box. ... Rhino Entertainment Company is an American specialty record label. ... Dr. Demento is the stage name of Barret Eugene Hansen (born April 2, 1941),[1] a radio disc jockey specializing in novelty songs and pop music parodies. ...


Lehrer as a scholar

Lehrer earned his BA in mathematics (Magna Cum Laude) from Harvard University in 1947, when he was 18. He received his MA the next year, and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa. He taught classes at MIT, Harvard and Wellesley. He remained in Harvard's doctoral program for several years, taking time out for his musical career and to work as a researcher at Los Alamos, New Mexico. He joined the Army from 1955 to 1957, working at the National Security Agency. (Lehrer has been rumored to have invented the Jello Shot during this time, as a means of circumventing liquor restrictions.[3] ) All of these experiences eventually became fodder for songs: "Fight Fiercely, Harvard", "The Wild West Is Where I Want To Be" and "It Makes a Fellow Proud to Be a Soldier", respectively. There was perhaps some truth to his comment in the intro to the latter song, in which he said he had left the Army and was now in the "Radioactive Reserve". Latin honors are Latin phrases used to indicate the level of academic distinction with which an academic degree was earned. ... Harvard redirects here. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Wellesley College (disambiguation). ... Los Alamos is an unincorporated townsite in Los Alamos County, New Mexico. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... “NSA” redirects here. ... It Makes a Fellow Proud to Be a Soldier is a song from humorist Tom Lehrers album An Evening Wasted with Tom Lehrer. ...


In 1960, Lehrer returned to full-time studies at Harvard. However, he never completed his doctoral studies, and never received a PhD in mathematics. In 1972, he joined the faculty of the University of California, Santa Cruz, teaching an introductory course entitled "The Nature of Mathematics" to liberal-arts majors — "Math for Tenors", according to Lehrer. He also taught a class in musical theater. He occasionally performed songs in his lectures, primarily those relating to the topic.[4] PhD usually refers to the academic title Doctor of Philosophy PhD can also refer to the manga Phantasy Degree This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... “UCSC” redirects here. ...


In 2001, Lehrer concluded his last math class (on the topic of Infinity) and retired from teaching. [1] He has remained in the area, and still "hangs out" around the University of California, Santa Cruz.[5] “UCSC” redirects here. ...


Legacy

Lehrer was praised by Dr. Demento as "the best musical satirist of the 20th Century." Dr. Demento is the stage name of Barret Eugene Hansen (born April 2, 1941),[1] a radio disc jockey specializing in novelty songs and pop music parodies. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


A play called Letters from Lehrer was written by Canadian Richard Greenblatt, and performed by him at CanStage, from January 16 to February 25, 2006. It follows Lehrer's musical career, the meaning of several songs, the politics of the time, and Greenblatt's own experiences with Lehrer's music, while playing some of Lehrer's songs. There are currently no plans for more performances, although low-quality audio recordings have begun to circulate around the net. Letters From Lehrer is a play written by Canadian Richard Greenblatt, and preformed by him at CanStage, from 16 January to 25 February 2006. ... Richard Greenblatt (born 1953 in Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian playwright who currently lives in Toronto. ... The Canadian Stage Company is the largest contemporary theatre company in Canada. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Other artists who cite Lehrer as an influence include "Weird Al" Yankovic, whose work generally addresses more popular and less technical or political subjects.[6] More stylistically influenced performers include American political satirist Mark Russell,[7] and the British duo Kit and The Widow.[citation needed] This article is about the musician himself. ... Mark Russell (born August 23, 1932 in Buffalo, NY) is an American comedian, pianist and singer, based in Washington, DC. For more than 25 years he has appeared on the American public broadcasting network PBS at least four times a year. ... Kit and The Widow are a double act, performing humorous songs in the vein of Tom Lehrer or Flanders and Swann; they also cite Anna Russell as an influence. ...


Interesting Facts

  • The popular ironic use of the phrase "copious free time" comes from the introduction to Lehrer's "'It Makes a Fellow Proud to Be a Soldier".[8]
  • Wernher von Braun, Hubert H. Humphrey and Pope Paul VI, three of the four living public figures Lehrer satirized in That Was The Year That Was (1965), all happened to die over a period of just over a year in 1977-1978. (The fourth, George Murphy, lived until 1992.)
  • In an interview on the BBC, Lehrer says the song "My Home Town" was inspired by "Dear Hearts and Gentle People," and "Masochism Tango" was inspired by "Kiss of Fire" (a phrase he actually used in his intro to the song).
  • Lehrer's song "Alma" [about a woman who was the wife, successively, of one of the 20th century's leading composers (Gustav Mahler), architects (Walter Gropius), and novelists (Franz Werfel)] is played as a Valentine tribute during the "Rose pattern three-lobe waltz" at the Skokie Valley Skating Club's biennial Ice Dance Weekend in Wilmette, Illinois.
  • Both "New Math" and "Who's Next" were sung on the television show Picket Fences during its first season.

Ironic redirects here. ... Copious free time (sometimes copious spare time) is used to indicate that a speaker has much free time in which to perform a task. ... For other uses of von Braun, see von Braun (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... George Lloyd Murphy (July 4, 1902–May 3, 1992) was an American dancer, actor, and politician. ... Dear Hearts and Gentle People is a popular song. ... Kiss of Fire is a popular song. ... Alma Mahler Alma Maria Mahler-Werfel (née Schindler) (August 31, 1879 – December 11, 1964) was noted in her native Vienna for her beauty and intelligence. ... “Mahler” redirects here. ... Walter Adolph Georg Gropius (May 18, 1883 – July 5, 1969) was a German architect and founder of Bauhaus. ... Franz Werfel, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1940 Werfels grave in the Zentralfriedhof, Vienna Franz Werfel (September 10, 1890 – August 26, 1945) was an Austrian-Bohemian novelist, playwright, and poet who wrote in German. ... Valentine may refer to: A card or gift given on Valentines Day // in the United States: Valentine, Nebraska Valentine Hall, dining hall at Amherst College in Australia: Valentine, New South Wales, a suburb of Lake Macquarie Valentine Island, an island off Western Australia in France Valentine, Haute-Garonne, a... Picket Fences is a 60-minute drama which initially ran from September 18, 1992 to June 26, 1996 on the CBS television network in the United States. ...

Reviews selected by Lehrer for his liner notes

The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper created in 1924 when the New York Tribune acquired the New York Herald. ... The Christian Science Monitor (CSM) is an international newspaper published daily, Monday through Friday. ... The Oakland Tribune is a daily newspaper published in Oakland, California by the ANG Newspapers, a subsidiary of MediaNews Group. ...

Discography

Many Lehrer songs are also performed (but not by Lehrer) in That Was "That Was The Week That Was" (1981) Tom Lehrers debut album. ... Tom Lehrer Revisited is features live-recorded versions of songs performed in Songs & More Songs By Tom Lehrer, as well as two additional tracks performed for the television show The Electric Company // Track Listing Introduction (3:27) I Wanna Go Back to Dixie (2:56) The Wild West is Where... An Evening Wasted With Tom Lehrer is an album recorded by Tom Lehrer, the well-known satirist and Harvard lecturer. ... That Was The Year That Was (1965) is an album made up of a collection of songs performed by Tom Lehrer for the NBC version of the BBC series That Was The Week That Was. ... The Remains of Tom Lehrer was, as the title suggests, the presumed final album by Tom Lehrer. ...


The sheet music to many of Lehrer's songs is published in Too Many Songs by Tom Lehrer (Pantheon, 1981, ISBN 0-394-74930-8).


Mathematical publications

The American Mathematical Society database shows him as co-author of two papers: The American Mathematical Society (AMS) is dedicated to the interests of mathematical research and education, which it does with various publications and conferences as well as annual monetary awards to mathematicians. ...

  • RE Fagen & TA Lehrer, "Random walks with restraining barrier as applied to the biased binary counter," Journal of the Society for Industrial Applied Mathematics, vol. 6, p.1-14 (March 1958) MR0094856
  • T Austin, R Fagen, T Lehrer, W Penney, "The distribution of the number of locally maximal elements in a random sample," Annals of Mathematical Statistics vol. 28, p.786-790 (1957) MR0091251

Mathematical Reviews is a scientific journal edited by the American Mathematical Society offering reviews of recent mathematical papers. ... Mathematical Reviews is a scientific journal edited by the American Mathematical Society offering reviews of recent mathematical papers. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Interview with the Onion AV Club, May 24, 2000.
  2. ^ Interview with the Sydney Morning Herald, February 28, 2003
  3. ^ "That Was the Wit That Was", Jack Boulware, San Francisco Weekly April 19, 2000. Accessed February 1, 2007.
  4. ^ http://www.archive.org/details/lehrer
  5. ^ Interview with the Sydney Morning Herald, February 28, 2003
  6. ^ Weird Al's FAQs
  7. ^ http://www.holecity.com/asp/newshole.asp?issue=10&sec=7&hole=1
  8. ^ Copious Free Time, The Jargon File. Accessed August 30, 2006.

is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jargon File is a glossary of hacker slang. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ink 19 :: Tom Lehrer (391 words)
Lehrer is closer to that party cut-up that can also pound the ivories like a maniac, singing, joking and downing copious amounts of alcohol without missing a single note.
Lehrer's musical talents are complemented by his astounding language skills and an eagle-eye view of society -- his songs hardly sound dated, even thirty years after they were recorded.
Lehrer, a Harvard boy, stumbled into the limelight with Songs by Tom Lehrer in 1953, a bona-fide DIY hit recorded for $15 and self-released by Lehrer in his college days.
Tom Lehrer (599 words)
Tom Lehrer's father was a tie manufacturer and led a normal childhood by his own admission.
Lehrer's first public performance was in the fall of 1952, at a nightclub called Alpini's Rendezvous in Boston, for $15 a night.
Lehrer was able to get a great deal with a recording studio in Boston, where he set up a recording session plus the LP pressings and the printing of the jackets.
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