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Encyclopedia > Tom Hanks
Tom Hanks

Tom Hanks jokes with 82nd Airborne soldier.
Born Thomas Jeffrey Hanks
July 9, 1956 (1956-07-09) (age 52)
Concord, California, USA
Occupation Actor, producer, director, voice over artist, writer
Years active 1979 - present
Spouse(s) Rita Wilson (1988-present)
Samantha Lewes (1978-1987)

Thomas Jeffrey "Tom" Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is an American film actor, director, voice-over artist, writer and film producer. Hanks worked in television and family-friendly comedies before achieving success as a dramatic actor portraying several notable roles, including Andrew Beckett in Philadelphia, the title role in Forrest Gump, Commander James A. Lovell in Apollo 13, Captain John H. Miller in Saving Private Ryan and Michael Sullivan in Road to Perdition. Hanks is the third most successful actor in terms of box office totals which exceed USD$3.3 billion.[1] Download high resolution version (690x955, 45 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location of Concord in California. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Rita Wilson (born October 26, 1956)[1] is an American actress and producer. ... Samantha Dillingham (29 November 1952–12 March 2002) was an American actress. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actor who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Philadelphia is an Academy Award-winning 1993 drama film revolving around the HIV/AIDS epidemic, written by Ron Nyswaner and directed by Jonathan Demme. ... Forrest gump redirects here. ... An Emmy Award. ... Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie or Dramatic Special is a Primetime Emmy Award given out during the primetime Emmys telecast. ... For the song We Are a Band of Brothers, see The Bonnie Blue Flag. ... The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries is the most prestigious of all the awards annually presented. ... From the Earth to the Moon is a twelve-part HBO television miniseries (1998) co-produced by Ron Howard, Brian Grazer, Tom Hanks, and Michael Bostick detailing the landmark Apollo expeditions to the Moon during the 1960s and early 1970s. ... For the song We Are a Band of Brothers, see The Bonnie Blue Flag. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture - Drama was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... Philadelphia is an Academy Award-winning 1993 drama film revolving around the HIV/AIDS epidemic, written by Ron Nyswaner and directed by Jonathan Demme. ... Forrest gump redirects here. ... For other uses, see Castaway (disambiguation). ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... Big is a 1988 comedy film which tells the story of a teenaged boy who is aged to adulthood by a magical fortune telling machine. ... The Actor: The Screen Actors Guild Award Statue The Screen Actors Guild Awards are an annual award given by the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) to recognize outstanding performances by members. ... The SAG Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role - Motion Picture is an award given by the Screen Actors Guild to honor the finest acting achievements: Winners and nominees 1990s 1994: Tom Hanks - Forrest Gump Morgan Freeman - The Shawshank Redemption Paul Newman - Nobodys Fool Tim... For other uses, see Forrest Gump (disambiguation). ... The SAG Award for Best Cast in a Motion Picture is an award given by the Screen Actors Guild to honor the finest acting achievements in film. ... Apollo 13 is a 1995 film portrayal of the ill-fated Apollo 13 lunar mission in 1970. ... The following are a list of Saturn Award winners for Best Actor (in a film): ... Big is a 1988 comedy film which tells the story of a teenaged boy who is aged to adulthood by a magical fortune telling machine. ... The Berlin International Film Festival, also called the Berlinale, is one of the most important film festivals in Europe and the world. ... Philadelphia is an Academy Award-winning 1993 drama film revolving around the HIV/AIDS epidemic, written by Ron Nyswaner and directed by Jonathan Demme. ... The New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor is one of the awards given by the New York Film Critics Circle to honor the finest achievements in filmmaking. ... For other uses, see Castaway (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor is one of the annual awards given by the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. ... For other uses, see Big (disambiguation). ... Punchline is a 1988 film starring Tom Hanks and Sally Field. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Director Herbert Brenon with actress Alla Nazimova on the set of War Brides, 1916 A director is a person who directs the making of a film. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Philadelphia is an Academy Award-winning 1993 drama film revolving around the HIV/AIDS epidemic, written by Ron Nyswaner and directed by Jonathan Demme. ... Forrest gump redirects here. ... Captain James Jim Arthur Lovell, Jr. ... Apollo 13 is a 1995 film portrayal of the ill-fated Apollo 13 lunar mission in 1970. ... Saving Private Ryan is a 1998 war film set during the D-Day invasion of Normandy during World War II. It was directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Robert Rodat. ... Road to Perdition is a graphic novel written by Max Allan Collins and illustrated by Richard Piers Rayner that was made into a motion picture of the same name in 2002. ... USD redirects here. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Hanks was born in Concord, California. His father, Amos Mefford Hanks, was a chef and a distant relation of President Abraham Lincoln's mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln. His mother, Janet Marylyn (née Frager), was a hospital worker; the two divorced in 1960.[2] The family's three oldest children, Sandra, (now Sandra Hanks Benoiton, a writer),[3][4] Larry (now Lawrence M. Hanks, Ph.D., an entomology professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign),[5] and Tom, went with their father; while the youngest, Jim, now an actor and film maker, remained with his mother in Red Bluff, California. Both parents remarried. The first stepmother for Sandra, Larry, and Tom came to the marriage with five children of her own. Hanks once told Rolling Stone magazine: "Everybody in my family likes each other. But there were always about fifty people at the house. I didn't exactly feel like an outsider, but I was sort of outside it". That marriage ended in divorce after just 2 years, and Amos Hanks became a single parent, working long hours and relying on the children to fend for themselves often, an exercise in self-reliance that served the siblings well. In school, Hanks was unpopular with students and teachers alike, telling Rolling Stone magazine: "I was a geek, a spaz. I was horribly, painfully, terribly shy. At the same time, I was the guy who'd yell out funny captions during filmstrips. But I didn't get into trouble. I was always a real good kid and pretty responsible". Amos Hanks remarried in 1965 to Frances Wong, a San Francisco native of Chinese descent. Frances had three children, two of whom lived with Tom during his high school years. Tom acted in school plays, including South Pacific, while attending Skyline High School in Oakland, California. Hanks studied theater at Chabot College, and after two years, transferred to California State University, Sacramento. Hanks told the New York Times: "Acting classes looked like the best place for a guy who liked to make a lot of noise and be rather flamboyant. I spent a lot of time going to plays. I wouldn't take dates with me. I'd just drive to a theater, buy myself a ticket, sit in the seat, and read the program, and then get into the play completely. I spent a lot of time like that, seeing Bertolt Brecht, Tennessee Williams, Henrik Ibsen, and all that." Location of Concord in California. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... For the passenger train, see Nancy Hanks (passenger train). ... Née redirects here. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... Not to be confused with Etymology, the study of the history of words. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... James M. Hanks is the brother of Tom Hanks. ... This article is about the music magazine. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... This article is about the stage musical. ... Skyline High School is a public high school in Oakland, California, USA. // Skyline High School is nestled in the hills of Oakland, CA, near the Redwood Regional Park. ... Oakland redirects here. ... Chabot College is one of Californias community colleges, part of the Los Positas-Chabot Community College District. ... California State University, Sacramento, more commonly referred to as Sacramento State or Sac State, is a public university located in the city of Sacramento, California, USA. It is part of the California State University system. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... {{dy justified his choice of form, and from about 1929 on he began to interpret its penchant for contradictions, much as had Eisenstein, in terms of the dialectic. ... Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known as Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright who received many of the top theatrical awards. ... Ibsen redirects here. ...


It was during his years studying theater that Hanks met Vincent Dowling, head of the Great Lakes Theater Festival in Cleveland. At Dowling's suggestion, Hanks became an intern at the Festival, which stretched into a three-year experience that covered everything from lighting to set design to stage management. Such a commitment required that Hanks drop out of college, but with this under his belt, a future in acting was in the cards. Hanks won the Cleveland Critics Circle Award for best actor for his performance as Proteus in Shakespeare's The Two Gentlemen of Verona, one of the few times he played a villain. Irish-American actor, formerly married to the late Irish actress, Brenda Doyle (who died in a car crash in 1981). ... The Great Lakes Theater Festival is the oldest theater company in Greater Cleveland. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... This article is about Proteus in Greek mythology. ... The Two Gentlemen of Verona is a comedy by William Shakespeare from early in his career. ...


Early career

Hanks in 1989
Hanks in 1989

In 1979, Hanks moved to New York City, where he made his film debut in the low-budget slasher film, He Knows You're Alone, and got a part in a television movie entitled Mazes and Monsters. Early in 1979, Hanks was cast in the lead role of Callimaco in the Riverside Shakespeare Company's production of Niccolò Machiavelli's The Mandrake, directed by Daniel Southern, featuring an original jazz score by Michael Wolff, original masks and costumes designed by Broadway designer Jane Stein, and was produced by W. Stuart McDowell and Gloria Skurski. This remains Hank's only New York stage performance to date; as a high profile Off Off Broadway showcase, the production helped Tom land an agent, Joe Ohla with the J. Michael Bloom Agency. The next year Hanks landed a lead role on an ABC television pilot called Bosom Buddies, playing the role of Kip Wilson. Hanks moved to Los Angeles, California where he was teamed with Peter Scolari as a pair of young advertising men forced to dress as women so they could live in an inexpensive all-female hotel. He had previously partnered with Scolari in the 1970s game show, Make Me Laugh. Bosom Buddies ran for two seasons, and, although the ratings were never strong, television critics gave the program high marks. "The first day I saw him on the set", the show's co-producer, Ian Praiser told Rolling Stone, "I thought, 'Too bad he won't be in television for long.' I knew he'd be a movie star in two years." But if Praiser knew it, he was not able to convince Hanks. "The television show had come out of nowhere", Hanks’ best friend Tom Lizzio told Rolling Stone. "Then out of nowhere it got canceled. He figured he'd be back to pulling ropes and hanging lights in a theater." Image File history File links Size of this preview: 397 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (458 × 692 pixels, file size: 327 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 397 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (458 × 692 pixels, file size: 327 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... He Knows You’re Alone is a 1980 horror film directed by Armand Mastroianni and written by Scott Parker. ... (VHS Cover) (DVD Cover) Mazes and Monsters is a made-for-TV movie about a group of college students and their interest in the eponymous role-playing game (RPG). ... // The Riverside Shakespeare Company of New York City was founded in 1977 as an Equity theatre company on the Upper West Side of New York City, by W. Stuart McDowell and Gloria Skurski. ... Machiavelli redirects here. ... The Mandrake (Italian: La Mandragola; written in 1518 and first printed in 1524) is an acclaimed satirical play by Niccolò Machiavelli. ... Michael Wolff is an American jazz pianist, composer and actor. ... Off-Off-Broadway refers to theatrical productions including plays, musicals or performance art pieces performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway productions or off-Broadway productions. ... A showcase is a performance or exhibit highlighting the work of a performer or group of performers, a particular culture or ethnic group, or of a nationality. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... Bosom Buddies is an American sitcom starring Tom Hanks and Peter Scolari created by Robert L. Boyett, Thomas L. Miller and Chris Thompson. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... This article is about the U.S state. ... Peter Scolari (born September 12, 1955 in New Rochelle, New York) is an American television, film and stage actor who was seen early in his career in the television programs Bosom Buddies (1980 - 1982), Newhart (1984-1990), and later in Honey, I Shrunk the Kids: The TV Show (1997 - 2000). ... Make Me Laugh was an American game show in which contestants watched three stand-up comedians performing their acts, one at a time, earning one dollar for every second that they could make it through without laughing. ... This article is about the magazine. ...


It was Bosom Buddies and a guest appearance on a 1982 episode of Happy Days ("A Case of Revenge") where he played a disgruntled former classmate of The Fonz that drew director Ron Howard to contact Hanks. Howard was working on Splash (1984), a romantic comedy fantasy about a mermaid who falls in love with a human. At first, Howard considered Hanks for the role of the main character's wisecracking brother, a role which eventually went to John Candy. Instead, Hanks got the lead role and a career boost from Splash, which went on to become a box-office hit, grossing more than US$69 million. He also had a sizable hit with the sex comedy Bachelor Party, also in 1984. For other uses, see Happy Days (disambiguation). ... Arthur The Fonz Fonzarelli was a character in the American sitcom Happy Days (1974-1984) played by Henry Winkler. ... Ronald William Howard (born March 1, 1954 in Duncan, Oklahoma) is an American actor, and an Academy Award winning film director, and producer, known for his roles on sitcoms, movies and television. ... Splash is a 1984 fantasy film and romantic comedy film directed by Ron Howard and written by Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandel. ... For other uses, see Mermaid (disambiguation). ... John Franklin Candy (October 31, 1950 – March 4, 1994) was a Canadian comedian and actor. ... Bachelor Party is a 1984 comedy film starring Tom Hanks, Tawny Kitaen, Adrian Zmed and Deborah Harmon. ...


From 1983-84, Hanks made three guest appearances on Family Ties as Elyse Keaton's alcoholic brother Ned Donnelly. Hanks also appears for a moment as an uncredited extra in the movie Real Genius (1985), when the lead character, Mitch, bumps into him in a crowd. For other uses, see Family Ties (disambiguation). ... Real Genius is a 1985 comedy film starring Val Kilmer and Gabriel Jarret. ...


Period of hits and misses

More film roles followed, but none clicked with audiences. With Nothing in Common (1986)—about a young man alienated from his parents who must re-establish a relationship with his father, played by Jackie Gleason—Hanks began to establish the credentials of not only a comic actor but of someone who could carry a serious role. "It changed my desires about working in movies", Hanks told Rolling Stone. "Part of it was the nature of the material, what we were trying to say. But besides that, it focused on people's relationships. The story was about a guy and his father, unlike, say, The Money Pit (1986), where the story is really about a guy and his house." Nothing in Common is a 1986 comedy-drama film, directed by Garry Marshall and starring Tom Hanks and comedian Jackie Gleason, in his last film performance. ... Herbert Walton Gleason, Jr. ... The Money Pit (American) is a 1986 film comedy remake of Mr. ...


After three more flops, Hanks succeeded with the fantasy Big (1988), both at the box office and within the industry, establishing Hanks as a major Hollywood talent. It was followed later that year by Punchline, in which he co-starred with Sally Field as a pair of struggling stand-up comedians, which grossed a respectable US$21 million. Hanks's character, Steven Gold, a failing medical student trying to break into standup, was somewhat edgy and complex, offering a glimpse of the far more dramatic roles Hanks would master in films to come. Hanks's next project was the 1989 movie Turner and Hooch. In a 1993 issue of Disney Adventures, Hanks said, "I saw Turner and Hooch the other day in the SAC store and couldn't help but be reminiscent. I cried like a babe." He did admit to making a couple of "bum tickers", however, and blamed his "...deductive reasoning and decision making skills." This article is about the movie. ... ... Punchline is a 1988 film starring Tom Hanks and Sally Field. ... Sally Margaret Field (born November 6, 1946) is a two-time Academy Award winning American actress. ... Turner & Hooch is a 1989 comedy film starring Tom Hanks, Mare Winningham, Craig T. Nelson, and Reginald VelJohnson. ... Disney Adventures was a childrens entertainment and educational magazine published ten times per year by The Walt Disney Company. ...


Hanks had another pile of box-office failures. First, there was The 'Burbs (1989), then Joe Versus the Volcano (1990) and finally The Bonfire of the Vanities (1990), which saw Hanks as a greedy Wall Street type who gets enmeshed in a hit-and-run accident. The Burbs is a 1989 black comedy directed by Joe Dante and starring, amongst others, Tom Hanks, Carrie Fisher, Rick Ducommun, Corey Feldman, and Bruce Dern, and written by Dana Olsen, who also briefly appears in the movie. ... Joe Versus the Volcano is a 1990 comedy film starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan and was the first film directed by screenwriter John Patrick Shanley. ... Movie In 1990, a film adaptation directed by Brian De Palma was released and starred Tom Hanks as Sherman McCoy, Bruce Willis as Peter Fallow, an uncredited F. Murray Abraham as Abe Weiss, Melanie Griffith as Maria Ruskin, and Kim Cattrall as Judy McCoy, Shermans wife. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ...


Progression into dramatic roles

Hanks again climbed back to the top with his portrayal of an unsuccessful baseball manager in A League of Their Own (1992). Hanks admits that his acting in earlier roles was not great and that he has improved. In an interview with Vanity Fair, Hanks called the work that he's done since his "modern era of moviemaking ... because enough self-discovery has gone on.... My work has become less 'pretentiously fake and over the top." This article is about the sport. ... A League of Their Own is a 1992 film that tells a fictionalized account of the real-life All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL). ... American actress Demi Moore, on a typical Vanity Fair cover (August, 1991) Vanity Fair is a glossy American glamour magazine monthly that offers a mixture of articles based on sensational exaggerations, jet-set and entertainment-business personalities, politics, and lies. ...


This "modern era" welcomed in a spectacular 1993 for Hanks, first with Sleepless in Seattle and then with Philadelphia. The former was a blockbuster success about a widower who finds true love (in the character of Meg Ryan) over the airwaves. Richard Schickel of Time called his performance "charming", and most agreed that his portrayal ensured him a place among the premiere romantic-comedy stars of his generation, making him bankable. In Philadelphia Hanks played a gay lawyer with AIDS who sues his firm for discrimination (Hanks lost thirty-five pounds and thinned his hair in order to appear sickly for the role.) In a review for People, Leah Rozen stated "Above all, credit for "Philadelphia's" success belongs to Hanks, who makes sure that he plays a character, not a saint. He is flat-out terrific, giving a deeply felt, carefully nuanced performance that deserves an Oscar." Sleepless in Seattle is a 1993 American comedy-drama film written and directed by Nora Ephron. ... Philadelphia is an Academy Award-winning 1993 drama film revolving around the HIV/AIDS epidemic, written by Ron Nyswaner and directed by Jonathan Demme. ... Meg Ryan (born November 19, 1961) is an American actress who specializes in romantic comedies but has also worked in other film genres. ... TIME redirects here. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ...


Hanks won the 1993 Academy Award for Best Actor for his role in Philadelphia. During his acceptance speech he revealed that his high school drama teacher Rawley Farnsworth and former classmate John Gilkerson were gay.[6] The revelation inspired the 1997 film In & Out, starring Kevin Kline as an English Literature teacher who is outed by a former student in a similar way. Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Film poster for In & Out. ... Kevin Delaney Kline (born October 24, 1947) is an Academy Award- and Tony Award-winning American stage and film actor. ...


Forrest Gump

Hanks followed Philadelphia with the 1994 summer hit Forrest Gump, where the lead character moves in and out of cultural events in American history from the '50s onward. Forrest gump redirects here. ...


Hanks explained what appealed to him about the script: "When I read the script for Gump, I saw it as one of those kind of grand, hopeful movies that the audience can go to and feel ... some hope for their lot and their position in life... I got that from the movies a hundred million times when I was a kid. I still do."


Hanks won his second Best Actor Academy Award for his role in Forrest Gump, becoming only the second actor to have accomplished the feat of winning back-to-back Best Actor Oscars. (Spencer Tracy was the first, winning in 1937-38. Hanks and Tracy were the same age at the time they received their Academy Awards: 37 for the first and 38 for the second.) Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ...


Apollo 13 and on

Hanks's next project reunited him with Ron Howard in the movie Apollo 13, in which he played astronaut and commander James Lovell. Critics generally applauded the film and the performances of the entire cast, which included actors Kevin Bacon, Bill Paxton, Gary Sinise, Ed Harris, and Kathleen Quinlan. The movie also earned nine nominations for an Academy Award in 1996, winning two. That same year, Hanks starred in the animated blockbuster Toy Story as the voice of Sheriff Woody. Ronald William Howard (born March 1, 1954 in Duncan, Oklahoma) is an American actor, and an Academy Award winning film director, and producer, known for his roles on sitcoms, movies and television. ... Apollo 13 is a 1995 film portrayal of the ill-fated Apollo 13 lunar mission in 1970. ... James Lovell has been the name of miore than one prominent man: James Lovell (1736-1814), Continental Congress delegate from Massachusetts James A. Lovell, Jr. ... Kevin Norwood Bacon[1] (born July 8, 1958) is an American film and theater actor who has starred in Footloose, Animal House, Stir of Echoes, Wild Things, JFK, and Apollo 13, among many others. ... William Bill Paxton (born May 17, 1955) is a Golden Globe-nominated, Saturn Award-winning American actor and film director. ... Gary Alan Sinise (born March 17, 1955) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning, Golden Palm- and Academy Award-nominated American actor and film director. ... For other persons of the same name, see Edward Harris. ... Kathleen Denise Quinlan (born November 19, 1954) is an Oscar nominated American actress, mostly seen on television and in motion pictures. ... Toy Story is a 1995 CGI animated feature film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution. ... Look up woody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Hanks turned to directing and producing with his next movie That Thing You Do!, about a 1960s pop group which Hanks co-stars as a music producer. Hanks and producer Gary Goetzman went on to create Playtone, a record and film production company named for the record company in the film. A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... For the song featured in this film, see That Thing You Do (song). ... In the music industry, record producer designates a person responsible for completing a master recording so that it is fit for release. ... The Playtone Company is an American film and television production company and record label established by actor Tom Hanks and producer Gary Goetzman. ...


Hanks executive produced, co-wrote and co-directed the HBO docudrama From the Earth to the Moon. The twelve-part series chronicles the space program from its inception, through the familiar flights of Neil Armstrong and Jim Lovell, to the personal feelings surrounding the reality of moon landings. The Emmy Award-winning US$68 million project is one of the most expensive ventures taken for television. Hanks' next project was no less expensive. For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... From the Earth to the Moon is a twelve-part HBO television miniseries (1998) co-produced by Ron Howard, Brian Grazer, Tom Hanks, and Michael Bostick detailing the landmark Apollo expeditions to the Moon during the 1960s and early 1970s. ... This article is about the former American astronaut. ... Captain James Jim Arthur Lovell, Jr. ... An Emmy Award. ...


For Saving Private Ryan he teamed up with Steven Spielberg to make a film about D-Day, the landing at Omaha Beach, and a quest through war-torn France to bring back a soldier who has a ticket home. It earned the praise and respect of the film community, critics, and the general public; it was labeled one of the finest war films ever made, earning Spielberg his second Academy Award for direction and Hanks a Best Actor nomination. Later in 1998, Hanks re-teamed with his Sleepless in Seattle co-star Meg Ryan for another romantic comedy, You've Got Mail, a remake of 1940's The Shop Around the Corner, which starred Jimmy Stewart and Margaret Sullavan. Saving Private Ryan is a 1998 war film set during the D-Day invasion of Normandy during World War II. It was directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Robert Rodat. ... Steven Allan Spielberg, (Honorary KBE, born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... Combatants United States Germany Commanders Omar Bradley, Norman Cota, Clarence R. Huebner Dietrich Kraiss Strength 43,250 Unknown Casualties 3,000 1,200 Omaha Beach was the code name for one of the principal landing points of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on June... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Meg Ryan (born November 19, 1961) is an American actress who specializes in romantic comedies but has also worked in other film genres. ... Youve Got Mail is an American romantic comedy released in 1998 by Warner Brothers. ... The Shop Around the Corner (1940) is a romantic comedy film, directed by Ernst Lubitsch, and starring James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan. ... Jimmy Stewart, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1934 James Maitland Stewart (May 20, 1908 – July 2, 1997) was an American film actor beloved for his persona as an average guy who faces adversity and tries to do the right thing, an image which was largely reflected in his own personality. ... Margaret Sullavan Margaret Brooke Sullavan (May 16, 1911 - January 1, 1960) was an American actress. ...


In 1999, Hanks starred in an adaptation of Stephen King's novel The Green Mile. He also returned as the voice of Woody in Toy Story 2. The following year he won a Golden Globe for Best Actor and an Academy nomination for his portrayal of a shipwrecked FedEx systems analyst in Robert Zemeckis's Cast Away. In 2001, Hanks helped direct and produce the acclaimed HBO mini-series Band of Brothers. He also appeared in the September 11 television special America: A Tribute to Heroes and the documentary Rescued From the Closet. For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 1999 film adaptation. ... -1... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Federal Express redirects here. ... Robert Lee Bob Zemeckis (born May 14, 1952) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American movie director, producer and writer. ... For other uses, see Castaway (disambiguation). ... For the song We Are a Band of Brothers, see The Bonnie Blue Flag. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... America: A Tribute to Heroes was a benefit concert organized in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and United States television networks. ...


Next he teamed up with American Beauty director Sam Mendes for the adaptation of Max Allan Collins's and Richard Piers Rayner's graphic novel Road to Perdition, in which he played an anti-hero role as a hitman on the run with his son. That same year, Hanks collaborated with director Spielberg again, starring opposite Leonardo DiCaprio in the hit crime comedy Catch Me if You Can, based on the true story of Frank Abagnale, Jr. The same year, he and wife Rita Wilson produced the hit movie My Big Fat Greek Wedding. In August 2007, he along with co-producers Rita Wilson and Gary Goetzman, and writer and star Nia Vardalos, initiated a legal action against the production company Gold Circle Films for their share of profits from the movie.[7][8] At the age of 45, he became the youngest ever recipient of the American Film Institutes's Life Achievement Award on June 12, 2002. American Beauty is a 1999 drama film that explores themes of love, freedom, self-liberation, the search for happiness, and family against the backdrop of modern American suburbia. ... Samuel Alexander Mendes CBE (born 1 August 1965) is an English stage and film director. ... Max Allan Collins in 1982, posing with a drawing of Dick Tracy. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Road to Perdition is a graphic novel written by Max Allan Collins and illustrated by Richard Piers Rayner that was made into a motion picture of the same name in 2002. ... In literature and film, an anti-hero is a central or supporting character that has some of the personality flaws and ultimate fortune traditionally assigned to villains but nonetheless also have enough heroic qualities or intentions to gain the sympathy of readers or viewers. ... Leonardo Wilhelm DiCaprio (born November 11, 1974[1]) is a three-time Academy Award-nominated, SAG Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor who garnered world wide fame for his role as Jack Dawson in Titanic (1997). ... Catch Me If You Can is a 2002 motion picture set in the 1960s. ... Frank William Abagnale, Jr. ... Rita Wilson (born October 26, 1956)[1] is an American actress and producer. ... My Big Fat Greek Wedding is a 2002 romantic comedy film written by and starring Nia Vardalos and directed by Joel Zwick. ... Rita Wilson (born October 26, 1956)[1] is an American actress and producer. ... Gary Michael Goetzman is an American film and television producer. ... Antonia Eugenia Vardalos, better known as Nia Vardalos (born September 24, 1962 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada), is a Canadian actress, screenwriter and producer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


Hanks was absent from the screen in 2003; in 2004, he appeared in three films: The Coen Brothers' The Ladykillers, another Spielberg helmed film, The Terminal, and The Polar Express, a family film from Robert Zemeckis. In a USA Weekend interview, Hanks talked about how he chooses projects: "[Since] A League of Their Own, it can't be just another movie for me. It has to get me going somehow.... There has to be some all-encompassing desire or feeling about wanting to do that particular movie. I'd like to assume that I'm willing to go down any avenue in order to do it right". In August 2005, Hanks was voted in as vice president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.[9] Joel and Ethan Coen, known as The Coen Brothers, are Oscar-winning American filmmakers. ... The Ladykillers is a 2004 remake of the 1955 Ealing comedy of the same name. ... This section contains a list of trivia items. ... The Polar Express is a 2004 feature film based on the childrens book of the same title by Chris Van Allsburg. ... Robert Lee Bob Zemeckis (born May 14, 1952) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American movie director, producer and writer. ... An Issue of USA WEEKEND USA WEEKEND Magazine is a national publication distributed through more than 600 quality newspapers in the United States. ... Fairbanks Center for Motion Picture Study building on La Cienega Boulevard in Beverly Hills, California Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study in the Hollywood, district. ...


Hanks next starred in the highly anticipated film The Da Vinci Code, based on the bestselling novel by Dan Brown. The film was released May 19, 2006 in the US and grossed over US$750 million worldwide. In Ken Burns's 2007 documentary "The War", Hanks did voice work, reading excerpts from World War II-era columns by Al McIntosh. In 2006, Hanks topped a 1,500-strong list of 'most trusted celebrities' compiled by Forbes magazine.[10] Hanks next appeared in a cameo role as himself in The Simpsons Movie, in which he appears in an advertisement claiming that the US government has lost its credibility and is hence buying some of his. He also makes an appearance in the credits, stating that he wishes to be left alone when he is out in public. This article is about the film. ... Dan Brown (born June 22, 1964) is an American author of thriller fiction, best known for the 2003 bestselling novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... USD redirects here. ... Kenneth Lauren Burns (born July 29, 1953) is an American director and producer of documentary films known for his style of making use of original prints and photographs. ... The War is a 2007 World War II documentary produced by American filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, narrated by Keith David and others. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Al McIntosh was editor of the Rock County Star-Herald, of Luverne, Minnesota. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ... The Simpsons Movie is a 2007 animated comedy film based on the animated television series The Simpsons, directed by David Silverman, and scheduled to be released worldwide by July 27, 2007. ...


In 2007, Hanks starred in Mike Nichols' film Charlie Wilson's War (written by acclaimed screenwriter Aaron Sorkin) in which he plays Democratic Texas Congressman Charles Wilson. The film opened on December 21, 2007 and Hanks got a Golden Globe nomination for his acting. Mike Nichols (born Michael Igor Peschkowsky) is an Academy Award winning movie director of films such as The Graduate and Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?. He was born on November 6, 1931 in Berlin, to a Jewish Russian family. ... Charlie Wilsons War is a 2007 Academy Award-nominated biographical drama film based on the true story of Democratic Texas Congressman Charlie Wilson, who conspired with a bare knuckle attitude CIA operative named Gust Avrakotos to launch an operation to help the Afghan mujahideen resist and ultimately defeat the... Aaron Benjamin Sorkin (born June 9, 1961) is an American screenwriter, producer and playwright. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Charles Nesbitt Wilson, (born June 1, 1933), is a former United States naval officer and former Democratic United States Representative from the 2nd congressional district in Texas. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ...


In a play on the expression "art imitating life", Hanks will play an on screen dad to a young man (Colin Hanks) who chooses to follow in the footsteps of a fading magician (John Malkovich) in The Great Buck Howard. Hanks' character is less than thrilled about his son's career decision. A film adaptation of Angels and Demons, the prequel to The Da Vinci Code, has been announced, and on April 11, 2007 it was revealed that Hanks would reprise his role as Robert Langdon and that he reportedly will receive the highest salary ever for an actor.[11][12] Colin Lewes Hanks (born November 24, 1977) is an American actor. ... John Gavin Malkovich (born December 9, 1953) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, producer and director. ... The Great Buck Howard is a schduled 2006 film featuring sean mcginly as director. ... Angels and Demons is an upcoming feature film based on the 2000 novel of the same name by Dan Brown. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Personal life

Hanks was married to Samantha Lewes from 1978 to 1987. The couple had two children, son Colin Hanks (now also an actor) and daughter Elizabeth Ann.[13][14] In 1988, Hanks married actress Rita Wilson; raised in several different Christian denominations, Hanks converted from Roman Catholicism to Eastern Orthodox Christianity when marrying Wilson.[15] The two first met on the set of Hanks's television show Bosom Buddies but later developed a romantic interest while working on the film Volunteers. They have two sons: Chester, or "Chet" (who has a small part as a student in Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull), and Truman. Samantha Dillingham (29 November 1952–12 March 2002) was an American actress. ... Colin Lewes Hanks (born November 24, 1977) is an American actor. ... Rita Wilson (born October 26, 1956)[1] is an American actress and producer. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... Bosom Buddies is an American sitcom starring Tom Hanks and Peter Scolari created by Robert L. Boyett, Thomas L. Miller and Chris Thompson. ... Indy 4 redirects here. ...


He is a big sports fan, and as a teenager he was a peanut vendor at The Oakland Coliseum, home of the Oakland Athletics.[16][17] His favorite team is the Oakland Athletics.[16] Hanks is also a fan of the Oakland Raiders football team,[18] English Premier League football team Aston Villa.[19][20][21] Hanks lists "old manual typewriters" as a hobby on his MySpace page, owning about 80 of the classic mechanical types and traveling with one where ever he goes.[22][23] For other uses, see Coliseum. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Western Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC West (1970–present) Current uniform Team colors Silver and Black Personnel Owner Al Davis General Manager Al Davis Head Coach Lane Kiffin Team history Oakland Raiders (1960... The FA Premier League (often referred to as the Barclays English Premier League for sponsorship reasons) comprises the top 20 football clubs in the league system of English football. ... Aston Villa Football Club play at Villa Park in Birmingham, England. ... Although still popular with a few writers and in less developed countries, the typewriter has largely been replaced by the word processor. ... MySpace is a social networking website offering an interactive, user-submitted network of friends, personal profiles, blogs, groups, photos, music, and videos. ...


Other activities

A fan of NASA's manned space program, Hanks said that he originally wanted to be an astronaut but "didn't have the math." Hanks is a member of the National Space Society, serving on the Board of Governors of the nonprofit educational space advocacy organization founded by Dr. Wernher Von Braun and was the producer of the HBO miniseries From the Earth to the Moon about the Apollo program to send astronauts to the moon. In addition, Hanks co-wrote and co-produced Magnificent Desolation: Walking on the Moon 3D, an IMAX film about the moon landings. Hanks also provided the voice over for the first new planetarium show following the opening of the new Rose Center for Earth & Space in the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... National Space Society logo The National Space Society (NSS) is an international nonprofit 501(c)(3), educational, and scientific organization specializing in space advocacy. ... A board of governors is usually the governing board of a public entity. ... A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) can be seen as an organization that doesnt have a goal to make a profit. ... Space advocacy is a political position that favors the exploration, utilization, and colonization of outer space. ... For other uses of von Braun, see von Braun (disambiguation). ... HBO (Home Box Office) is a premium cable television network with headquarters in New York City. ... From the Earth to the Moon is a twelve-part HBO television miniseries (1998) co-produced by Ron Howard, Brian Grazer, Tom Hanks, and Michael Bostick detailing the landmark Apollo expeditions to the Moon during the 1960s and early 1970s. ... The Apollo program was a human spaceflight program undertaken by NASA during the years 1961 – 1975 with the goal of conducting manned moon landing missions. ... IMAX theatre at the Melbourne Museum complex, Australia BFI London IMAX by night IMAX (short for Image Maximum) is a film format created by Canadas IMAX Corporation that has the capacity to display images of far greater size and resolution than conventional film display systems. ... The term voice-over refers to a production technique where a disembodied voice is broadcast live or pre-recorded in radio, television, film, theater and/or presentation. ... For the song by Ai Otsuka, see Planetarium (song) // A planetarium is a theatre built primarily for presenting educational and entertaining shows about astronomy and the night sky, or for training in celestial navigation. ... Main Lobby in the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial. ...


In June 2006 Hanks was inducted as an honorary member of the United States Army Rangers Hall of Fame for his accurate portrayal of a Captain in the movie Saving Private Ryan; Hanks, who was unable to attend the induction ceremony, was the first actor to receive such an honor.[24] In addition to his role in Saving Private Ryan, Hanks was cited for serving as the national spokesperson for the World War II Memorial Campaign, for being the honorary chairperson of the D-Day Museum Capital Campaign, and for his role in writing and helping to produce the Emmy Award-winning miniseries, Band of Brothers. The 75th Ranger Regiment—also known as the United States Army Rangers—is an elite light infantry special operations force of the United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) headquartered in Fort Benning, Georgia. ... Please see Captain (military) for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the United States armed forces that ranks between a First Lieutenant and Major (O-3 in the United States Army, U.S. Air Force, and United States Marines), or a rank between a Commander and... Saving Private Ryan is a 1998 war film set during the D-Day invasion of Normandy during World War II. It was directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Robert Rodat. ... Part of the ceremony of the Changing of the Guard in Whitehall, London. ... A spokesperson (person could be replaced with the gender of the person), or spokesmodel is a person who speaks on behalf of others, but is understood not to be necessarily part of the others (e. ... A chairperson is the political correct term for the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... An Emmy Award. ...


While he gives money to many Democratic politicians, Hanks usually keeps his opinions about politics to himself, though he has been open about his support for environmental causes and alternative fuels.[25] Hanks, however, has made public his candidate choice in the 2008 election, when he uploaded a video to his MySpace in which he announced his endorsement of Senator Barack Obama. [26] “Barack” redirects here. ...


Hanks is one of several celebrities who frequently participate in planned comedy bits on Late Night with Conan O'Brien while they are guests. On one visit, Hanks asked Conan to join his run for president on the "Bad Haircut Party" ticket, with confetti and balloons and a hand held sign with the slogan "You'd be stupid to vote for us". On another, O'Brien, noting that Hanks was missing Christmas on his promotional tour, brought the season to him, including a gift (the skeleton of Hooch), and a mass of snow burying them both. On yet another episode, Conan gave Hanks a painting he had commissioned reflecting two of his interests: Astronauts landing on the beach at Normandy. Late Night with Conan OBrien is an Emmy Award-winning American late-night talk show on NBC. The second incarnation of NBCs Late Night franchise, OBriens debuted in 1993 after previous host David Letterman moved to CBS to host the Late Show opposite The Tonight Show. ... This article is about the assault phase of Operation Overlord. ...


Hanks appeared on Late Night with Conan O'Brien to publicize his new film, The Da Vinci Code. He told the audience he had met, had a conversation with, and given a present to the Japanese Prime Minister, "Fujimori". The Japanese Prime Minister Hanks met was Junichiro Koizumi; Alberto Fujimori was the former President of Peru. A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Junichiro Koizumi , born January 8, 1942) is a Japanese politician who served as Prime Minister of Japan from 2001 to 2006. ... Alberto Kenya Fujimori (Japanese name: Kenya Fujimori )) (born in Lima, Peru on July 28, 1938) is a Peruvian and Japanese[1] politician who served as President of Peru from July 28, 1990 to November 17, 2000. ...


On March 10, 2008, Tom Hanks was on hand at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame to induct sixties sensation The Dave Clark Five. He praised the group for both the joy of their music and for never signing away their publishing rights. During the speech he also mentioned his boyhood hero Marshal J whom he grew up watching on local San Francisco television station KGO. "Time is not told by watches or clocks but by whatever is on TV. After Marshal J and the cartoons you go to school."[27] is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Filmography

Main article: Tom Hanks filmography

Altogether, Tom Hanks films have grossed over US$3.3 billion for films as an actor.[28] Main article: Tom Hanks Categories: Hidden categories: | | | ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ...


Top worldwide film grosses

Hanks has been involved with nineteen films grossing over US$100 million at the box office:[29]

Year Title Role Gross
1984 Bachelor Party Rick Gassko US$38,400,000
Splash Allen Bauer US$69,821,334
1986 Money Pit Walter Fielding, Jr. US$37,499,651
1987 Dragnet Pep Streebeck US$57,387,000
1988 Big Adult Josh Baskin US$151,668,774
1989 Turner and Hooch Detective Scott Turner US$71,079,915
The 'Burbs Ray Peterson US$41,101,993
1992 A League of Their Own Jimmy Dugan US$132,440,069
1993 Sleepless in Seattle Sam Baldwin US$227,799,884
Philadelphia Andrew Beckett US$206,678,440
1994 Forrest Gump Forrest Gump US$677,387,716
1995 Apollo 13 Jim Lovell US$355,237,933
Toy Story (voice) Woody US$361,958,736
1998 Saving Private Ryan Captain John H. Miller US$481,840,909
You've Got Mail Joe Fox US$250,821,495
1999 Toy Story 2 (voice) Woody US$485,015,179
The Green Mile Paul Edgecombe US$286,801,374
2000 Cast Away Chuck Noland US$429,632,142
2002 Road to Perdition Michael Sullivan, Sr. US$181,001,478
Catch Me if You Can FBI Agent Carl Hanratty US$352,114,312
2004 The Terminal Viktor Navorski US$219,417,255
The Polar Express (voice) Express Conductor US$303,200,434
2006 The Da Vinci Code Professor Robert Langdon US$758,239,851
2007 The Simpsons Movie (voice) Himself US$526,759,734
Charlie Wilson's War Charlie Wilson US$118,081,987

Bachelor Party is a 1984 comedy film starring Tom Hanks, Tawny Kitaen, Adrian Zmed and Deborah Harmon. ... Splash is a 1984 fantasy film and romantic comedy film directed by Ron Howard and written by Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandel. ... The Money Pit is the site of numerous unsuccessful excavations on Oak Island in Nova Scotia to recover treasure believed by many to be buried there. ... Dragnet is a 1987 film starring Dan Aykroyd, Tom Hanks, Christopher Plummer, Dabney Coleman, Harry Morgan, and Alexandra Paul, directed by Tom Mankiewicz. ... This article is about the movie. ... Turner & Hooch is a 1989 comedy film starring Tom Hanks, Mare Winningham, Craig T. Nelson, and Reginald VelJohnson. ... The Burbs is a 1989 black comedy directed by Joe Dante and starring, amongst others, Tom Hanks, Carrie Fisher, Rick Ducommun, Corey Feldman, and Bruce Dern, and written by Dana Olsen, who also briefly appears in the movie. ... A League of Their Own is a 1992 film that tells a fictionalized account of the real-life All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL). ... Sleepless in Seattle is a 1993 American comedy-drama film written and directed by Nora Ephron. ... Philadelphia is an Academy Award-winning 1993 drama film revolving around the HIV/AIDS epidemic, written by Ron Nyswaner and directed by Jonathan Demme. ... Forrest gump redirects here. ... Forrest Gump is a fictional character in the novel and movie Forrest Gump. ... Apollo 13 is a 1995 film portrayal of the ill-fated Apollo 13 lunar mission in 1970. ... Captain James Jim Arthur Lovell, Jr. ... Toy Story is a 1995 CGI animated feature film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution. ... Sheriff Woody or just Woody (born on May 26, 1995) is a fictional character that first appeared in the CGI animated film Toy Story, its sequel Toy Story 2, and will appear in a second sequel, Toy Story 3, due to be released in 2010. ... Saving Private Ryan is a 1998 war film set during the D-Day invasion of Normandy during World War II. It was directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Robert Rodat. ... Youve Got Mail is an American romantic comedy released in 1998 by Warner Brothers. ... -1... Sheriff Woody or just Woody (born on May 26, 1995) is a fictional character that first appeared in the CGI animated film Toy Story, its sequel Toy Story 2, and will appear in a second sequel, Toy Story 3, due to be released in 2010. ... This article is about the 1999 film adaptation. ... For other uses, see Castaway (disambiguation). ... Road to Perdition is a graphic novel written by Max Allan Collins and illustrated by Richard Piers Rayner that was made into a motion picture of the same name in 2002. ... Catch Me If You Can is a 2002 motion picture set in the 1960s. ... This section contains a list of trivia items. ... The Polar Express is a 2004 feature film based on the childrens book of the same title by Chris Van Allsburg. ... This article is about the film. ... Robert Langdon (June 22, 1964 in Exeter, New Hampshire, United States) is a fictional professor of religious iconology and symbology at Harvard University who appeared in the Dan Brown novels Angels and Demons (2000) and The Da Vinci Code (2003). ... The Simpsons Movie is a 2007 animated comedy film based on the animated television series The Simpsons, directed by David Silverman, and scheduled to be released worldwide by July 27, 2007. ... Charlie Wilsons War is a 2007 Academy Award-nominated biographical drama film based on the true story of Democratic Texas Congressman Charlie Wilson, who conspired with a bare knuckle attitude CIA operative named Gust Avrakotos to launch an operation to help the Afghan mujahideen resist and ultimately defeat the... Charles Nesbitt Wilson, (born June 1, 1933), is a former United States naval officer and former Democratic United States Representative from the 2nd congressional district in Texas. ...

Awards and nominations

Year Award Category Film Result
1988 Academy Award Best Actor Big Nominated
Saturn Award Best Actor Won
Golden Globe Award Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy Won
1993 Academy Award Best Actor Philadelphia Won
Sliver Berlin Bear Best Actor Won
Golden Globe Award Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama Won
Golden Globe Award Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy Sleepless in Seattle Nominated
1994 Academy Award Best Actor Forrest Gump Won
Saturn Award Best Actor Nominated
BAFTA Award Best Actor Nominated
Golden Globe Award Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama Won
NBR Award Best Actor Won
SAG Award Outstanding Actor - Motion Picture Won
1998 Academy Award Best Actor Saving Private Ryan Nominated
BAFTA Award Best Actor Nominated
Empire Award Best Actor Won
Golden Globe Award Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama Nominated
SAG Award Outstanding Actor - Motion Picture Nominated
Outstanding Cast - Motion Picture Nominated
1999 SAG Award Outstanding Cast - Motion Picture The Green Mile Nominated
2000 Academy Award Best Actor Cast Away Nominated
BAFTA Award Best Actor Nominated
Golden Globe Award Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama Won
NYFCC Award Best Actor Won
SAG Award Outstanding Actor - Motion Picture Nominated
2002 Empire Award Best Actor Road to Perdition Nominated
2007 Golden Globe Award Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy Charlie Wilson's War Nominated

// Michael Jacksons first film was Moonwalker Rain Man, starring Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise Who Framed Roger Rabbit, starring Bob Hoskins Coming to America, starring Eddie Murphy Big, starring Tom Hanks Twins, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito Crocodile Dundee II Die Hard, starring Bruce Willis The Naked Gun... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Big is a 1988 comedy film which tells the story of a teenaged boy who is aged to adulthood by a magical fortune telling machine. ... The Saturn Award is an award presented annually by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films to honor the top works in science fiction, fantasy, and horror in film, television, and home video. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The year 1993 in film involved many significant films. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Philadelphia is an Academy Award-winning 1993 drama film revolving around the HIV/AIDS epidemic, written by Ron Nyswaner and directed by Jonathan Demme. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Sleepless in Seattle is a 1993 American comedy-drama film written and directed by Nora Ephron. ... The year 1994 in film involved some significant events. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Forrest gump redirects here. ... The Saturn Award is an award presented annually by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films to honor the top works in science fiction, fantasy, and horror in film, television, and home video. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The National Board of Review of Motion Pictures was founded in 1909 in New York City, just 13 years after the birth of cinema, to protest New York City Mayor George McClennans revocation of moving-picture exhibition licenses on Christmas Eve 1908. ... The Screen Actors Guild Awards are an annual award given by the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) to recognize outstanding performances by members. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Saving Private Ryan is a 1998 war film set during the D-Day invasion of Normandy during World War II. It was directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Robert Rodat. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Screen Actors Guild Awards are an annual award given by the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) to recognize outstanding performances by members. ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... The Screen Actors Guild Awards are an annual award given by the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) to recognize outstanding performances by members. ... This article is about the 1999 film adaptation. ... The year 2000 in film involved some significant events. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... For other uses, see Castaway (disambiguation). ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... New York Film Critics Circle Awards are given annually to honor excellence in cinema worldwide by an organization of film reviewers from New York City-based publications. ... The Screen Actors Guild Awards are an annual award given by the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) to recognize outstanding performances by members. ... The year 2002 in film involved some significant events. ... Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... Road to Perdition is a graphic novel written by Max Allan Collins and illustrated by Richard Piers Rayner that was made into a motion picture of the same name in 2002. ... 2007 has been referred to, by film and media critics, as the year of the threequels, a nickname referring to both the 2004 summer movie season and several film franchises which premiered or had installments released in 2004, which appear again this year: Spider-Man 3, Shrek the Third, Ocean... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Charlie Wilsons War is a 2007 Academy Award-nominated biographical drama film based on the true story of Democratic Texas Congressman Charlie Wilson, who conspired with a bare knuckle attitude CIA operative named Gust Avrakotos to launch an operation to help the Afghan mujahideen resist and ultimately defeat the...

Eponym

Asteroid 12818 Tomhanks has been named after him.[30] 12818 Tomhanks (1996 GU8) is a Main-belt Asteroid discovered on April 13, 1996 by Spacewatch at Kitt Peak. ...


Further reading

Books

  • Trakin, Roy, Tom Hanks: Journey to Stardom, 1987; rev. ed.1995
  • Salamon, Julie, The Devil's Candy: The Bonfire of the Vanities Goes to Hollywood, Boston, 1991
  • Wallner, Rosemary, Tom Hanks: Academy Award-Winning Actor, Edina, Minnesota, 1994
  • Pfeiffer, Lee, The Films of Tom Hanks, Secaucus, New Jersey, 1996
  • Gardner, David, Tom Hanks: The Unauthorized Biography, London, England 1999
  • Gardner, David, Tom Hanks: Enigma 2007

Periodicals

  • Films, July 1984
  • Photoplay (London), September 1984
  • Time Out (London), October 26, 1988
  • Film Comment (New York), March/April 1989
  • Interview (New York), March 1992
  • Interview (New York), December 1993
  • Advocate, December 14, 1993
  • Maclean's (Toronto), July 11, 1994

is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... July 11 is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  1. ^ People Index from Box Office Mojo
  2. ^ Reitwiesner, William Addams. "Ancestry of Tom Hanks" - William Addams Reitwiesner Genealogical Services
  3. ^ Sandra Hanks Benoiton - Seychelles.net
  4. ^ Paradise Preoccupied
  5. ^ Lawrence M. Hanks, Associate Professor - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  6. ^ Winner Speeches
  7. ^ "Hanks files big fat 'Greek' lawsuit" - United Press International - (c/o NewsDaily.com) - August 8, 2007
  8. ^ "Hanks sues over unpaid 'My big fat Greek wedding' profits" - Irish Examiner - August 8, 2007
  9. ^ "Actor Hanks voted in by Academy" - BBC - August 25, 2005
  10. ^ "Hanks tops 'most trusted' index" - BBC - September 27, 2006
  11. ^ Tyler, Joshua. "Tom Hanks Confirmed For Da Vinci Code Sequel" - Cinema Blend - April 10, 2007
  12. ^ Fleming, Michael. "Howard moves fast with 'Code' sequel" - Variety - October 24, 2007
  13. ^ Tom Hanks - Us Magazine
  14. ^ Tom Hanks - E! Entertainment Television
  15. ^ Religious Affiliation of actor Tom Hanks - LDSFilm.com - December 7, 2005
  16. ^ a b "Tom Hanks, friends making ballpark tour" - Associated Press - (c/o MSNBC) - July 20, 2006
  17. ^ Urban, Mychael. "A's cant help Windsor in debut" - MLB.com - July 17, 2006
  18. ^ Hanks, Tom, Frank Deford. Rebels of Oakland: The A's, the Raiders, the '70's. New York, New York: HBO Sports. 2003.
  19. ^ "Aston Villa" - The Guardian - August 8, 2005
  20. ^ Brett, Anwar. Interview: "Tom Hanks: The Polar Express" - BBC - December 12, 2004
  21. ^ "O'Neill thanks new fan Hanks". The Sun (12 January 2008). Retrieved on 2008-01-12.
  22. ^ "Last word on typewriter not written yet". ABC News (November 7, 2007). Retrieved on 2008-01-11.
  23. ^ "Jonathan kicks off new season with Tom Hanks and Chris Rock" (January 11, 2008). Retrieved on 2008-01-11.
  24. ^ "Army honors Tom Hanks" - Associated Press - (c/o News24) - June 30, 2006
  25. ^ "Hollywood Loves Hybrid Cars" - Washington Post - (c/o AllAboutHyBridCars.com)
  26. ^ Vidéos MySpaceTV : Beware: Celebrity Endorsement par Tom Hanks
  27. ^ Marshal J WMT KPIX KGO Kids Show Host Jay Alexander
  28. ^ Tom Hanks Movie Box Office Results from Box Office Mojo
  29. ^ Box Office Mojo
  30. ^ Minor Planet Names: Alphabetical List from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... Front of UPI Headquarters, Washington, D.C. “UPI” redirects here. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Irish Examiner (Formerly: Cork Examiner, The Examiner) is an Irish national daily newspaper which primarily circulates in the Munster region surrounding its base in Cork, though it is available throughout the country. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Us Weekly (a. ... E!: Entertainment Television is an American cable television and direct broadcast satellite network. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... News24 is Southern Africa and Africas premier online news resource, with round-the-clock coverage to bring you local and international news as it happens, when it happens. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) is located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Film portal
Awards
Preceded by
Robin Williams
for Good Morning, Vietnam
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
for Big

1989
Succeeded by
Morgan Freeman
for Driving Miss Daisy
Preceded by
Jack Nicholson
for Ironweed & The Witches of Eastwick
& Steve Martin
Roxanne
Best Actor Los Angeles Film Critics Association Awards
for Big & Punchline

1989
Succeeded by
Daniel Day-Lewis
for My Left Foot
Preceded by
Denzel Washington
for Malcolm X
Silver Bear for Best Actor – Berlin Film Festival
for Philadelphia

1994
Succeeded by
Paul Newman
for Nobody’s Fool
Preceded by
Al Pacino
for Scent of a Woman
Academy Award for Best Actor
1993
for Philadelphia
1994
for Forrest Gump
Succeeded by
Nicolas Cage
for Leaving Las Vegas
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama
1993
for Philadelphia’’
1994
for
Forrest Gump
Preceded by
N/A
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role - Motion Picture
for Forrest Gump

1994
Preceded by
Anthony Hopkins
for Shadowlands
National Board of Review award for Best Actor
for Forrest Gump

1994
Preceded by
Richard Farnsworth
for The Straight Story
New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor
for Cast Away

2001
Succeeded by
Russell Crowe
for A Beautiful Mind
Preceded by
Denzel Washington
for The Hurricane
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama
for Cast Away

2001
Succeeded by
Tom Wilkinson
for In The Bedroom
Preceded by
Barbra Streisand
AFI Life Achievement Award
2001
Succeeded by
Robert De Niro
Persondata
NAME Hanks, Tom
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Hanks, Thomas Jeffrey
SHORT DESCRIPTION actor
DATE OF BIRTH July 9, 1956
PLACE OF BIRTH Concord, California, United States
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location of Concord in California. ... This article is about the U.S state. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tom Hanks - WhoABC Celebrities Guide (4391 words)
Hanks was absent from the screen in 2003; in 2004, he appeared in three films: The Coen Brothers' The Ladykillers, another Spielberg helmed film, The Terminal, and The Polar Express, a family film from Robert Zemeckis.
Hanks next appeared in a cameo role as himself in The Simpsons Movie, in which he appears in an advertisement claiming that the US government has lost its credibility and is hence buying some of his.
Hanks was married to Samantha Lewes from 1978 to 1987.
Tom Hanks - definition of Tom Hanks - Labor Law Talk Dictionary (436 words)
Hanks is generally known for his ability to imbue "nice-guy" roles with warmth, for example in the romantic comedy Sleepless in Seattle, but is quite capable of taking the role of a mob hitman in Road to Perdition.
Hanks was married previously to Samantha Lewes from 1978 to 1987.
Hanks claims to be a relative of James Hanks, one of several possible fathers of Nancy Hanks, mother of United States president Abraham Lincoln.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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