FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Tom Coburn
The neutrality of this article is disputed.
Please see the discussion on the talk page.
Please do not remove this message until the dispute is resolved.
Tom Coburn
Tom Coburn

Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 3, 2005
Serving with Jim Inhofe
Preceded by Don Nickles
Succeeded by Incumbent (2011)

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Oklahoma's 2nd district
In office
January 4, 1995 – January 3, 2001
Preceded by Mike Synar
Succeeded by Brad Carson

Born March 14, 1948 (1948-03-14) (age 59)
Casper, Wyoming
Political party Republican
Spouse Carolyn Coburn
Alma mater Oklahoma State University
Religion Baptist
Oklahoma

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Oklahoma
Image File history File links Circle-question-red. ... Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Shortcut: WP:NPOVD Articles that have been linked to this page are the subject of an NPOV dispute (NPOV stands for Neutral Point Of View; see below). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1105x1400, 217 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tom Coburn Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... For the ecclesiastical office, see Incumbent (ecclesiastical). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Mountain Jim Inhofe (born November 17, 1934) is a conservative American politician from Oklahoma. ... Image:Don Nickles. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Oklahomas 2nd Congressional District Oklahomas Second Congressional District is one of the largest Congressional districts in the United States. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Congressman Mike Synar represented Oklahomas 2nd district in Congress until he was defeated in 1994 Primary by Vigil Hastings, a retired high-school principal, whose campaign was funded in large party by the tobacco industry. ... Brad Rogers Carson (born March 11, 1967) is a American lawyer and politician, a Rhodes Scholar, educated at Oklahoma and Trinity, graduating in 1989. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Downtown Casper Casper is a city located in Natrona County, Wyoming. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Oklahoma State University Logo The Oklahoma State University System comprises of five educational instututes across Oklahoma. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States cooperative ministry agency serving missionary Baptist churches around the world. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Oklahoma. ... Until very recently, Oklahoma was considered a swing state in American politics, meaning, Oklahoma went back and forth between supporting the two major parties (Democrats and Republicans). ...


Constitution







Other countries · Atlas
 Politics Portal
view  talk  edit

Thomas Allen "Tom" Coburn, M.D. (born March 14, 1948) is a medical doctor and a Republican U.S. Senator from Oklahoma. He is considering running for President in 2008.[1] Flag of the State of Oklahoma The government of the US State of Oklahoma, established by the Oklahoma Constitution, is a republican democracy modeled after the Federal government of the United States. ... Brad Henry, the 26th and current Governor of Oklahoma The Best Governor of the State of Oklahoma is the head of state for the State of Oklahoma. ... Charles Bradford Brad Henry (born June 10, 1963) is the Governor of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... Great Seal of the State of Oklahoma Mary Fallin, the 13th and current Lieutenant Governor of Oklahoma The Lieutenant Governor of Oklahoma is the second-highest executive official of the state government of Oklahoma. ... Jari Askins (April 27, 1953) is an American lawyer and Democratic politician from the US State of Oklahoma. ... Great Seal of the State of Oklahoma Susan Savage, the 29th and current Secretary of State of Oklahoma The Secretary of State of Oklahoma is Oklahoma’s chief elections officer and the only appointed core member of the executive branch of the Oklahoma state government. ... Susan Savage, the 29th and current Secretary of State of Oklahoma M. Susan Savage is an American Democratic politician currently serving as the current and 29th Secretary of State of Oklahoma. ... Jeff McMahan, the 10th and current Oklahoma State Auditor and Inspector. ... Jeff McMahan, the 10th and current Oklahoma State Auditor and Inspector. ... Great Seal of the State of Oklahoma Drew Edmondson, the 16th and current Attorney General of Oklahoma The Attorney General of Oklahoma is the chief legal and law enforcement officer of the State of Oklahoma. ... William Andrew Drew Edmondson (born October 12, 1946), is an American lawyer and politician from Oklahoma. ... Great Seal of the State of Oklahoma Scott Meacham, the 17th and current State Treasurer of Oklahoma The State Treasurer of Oklahoma is the chief custodian of Oklahoma’s cash deposits, monies from bond sales, and other securities and collateral and directs the investments of those assets. ... Scott Meacham, the 17th and current State Treasurer of Oklahoma Scott Meacham is currently the State Treasurer of Oklahoma. ... Sandy Garrett, the current Oklahoma State Superintendent of Public Instruction. ... Sandy Garrett is an American Democratic politician from the US state of Oklahoma. ... Lloyd Fields serves as the Labor Commissioner of Oklahoma. ... Kim Holland is an American politician from the US state of Oklahoma. ... The Oklahoma Corporation Commission is a state agency, run by three 3 commissioners, with 600 employees. ... The Oklahoma State Cabinet is part of the executive branch of the Government of the U.S. state of Oklahoma, consisting of the appointed heads of the Oklahoma state executive departments. ... The State Capitol of Oklahoma The Legislature of the State of Oklahoma is the biennial meeting of the legislative branch of the Government of Oklahoma. ... The Oklahoma Senate meets in the State Capitol of Oklahoma The Oklahoma Senate is the smaller body of the two houses of the Legislature of Oklahoma, the other being the Oklahoma House of Representatives. ... Great Seal of the State of Oklahoma Mary Fallin, the 13th and current Lieutenant Governor of Oklahoma The Lieutenant Governor of Oklahoma is the second-highest executive official of the state government of Oklahoma. ... Jari Askins (April 27, 1953) is an American lawyer and Democratic politician from the US State of Oklahoma. ... Mike Morgan, the 40th and current President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee, the 41st President Pro Tempore and 1st Co-President Pro Tempore The President Pro Tempore of the Oklahoma Senate is the second-highest-ranking official of the Senate and the highest-ranking senator. ... Mike Morgan (born 1955) is an American lawyer and Democratic politician from the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... Mike Morgan, the 40th and current President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee, the 41st President Pro Tempore and 1st Co-President Pro Tempore The President Pro Tempore of the Oklahoma Senate is the second-highest-ranking official of the Senate and the highest-ranking senator. ... Glenn Coffee (born 1967) is an American lawyer and Republican politician from the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... The Oklahoma House of Representatives meets in the State Capitol of Oklahoma The Oklahoma House of Representatives is the larger body of the two houses of the Oklahoma Legislature, the other being the Oklahoma Senate. ... Todd Hiett, the 38th and current Speaker of the House The Speaker of the Oklahoma House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the lower house of the Oklahoma Legislature, the Oklahoma House of Representatives. ... The current website for Rep. ... The Oklahoma Capitol in Oklahoma City is the home of the Oklahoma Supreme Court whose Chief Justice is concurrently the administrator-in-chief of the Oklahoma Court System. ... The Supreme Court of Oklahoma is one of the highest judicial body in the U.S. state of Oklahoma and leads the judicial branch of the Oklahoma state government. ... Great Seal of the State of Oklahoma The Oklahoma Court on the Judiciary is one of the two independent courts in the Oklahoma judiciary and has exclusive jurisdiction over hearing cases involving the removal of any judge of any court, excluding the Oklahoma Supreme Court, exercising judicial power under the... The Oklahoma Senate meets in the State Capitol of Oklahoma The Oklahoma Senate is the smaller body of the two houses of the Legislature of Oklahoma, the other being the Oklahoma House of Representatives. ... The Oklahoma Judicial Nominating Commission is the body which selects potential justices and judges for gubernatorial appointments for judicial positions on Oklahomas appellate courts. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      This list of political parties in the United States contains past and present political parties in the... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... List of Oklahoma counties and county seats: Adair County : Stilwell Alfalfa County : Cherokee Atoka County : Atoka Beaver County : Beaver Beckham County : Sayre Blaine County : Watonga Bryan County : Durant Caddo County : Anadarko Canadian County : El Reno Carter County : Ardmore Cherokee County : Tahlequah Choctaw County : Hugo Cimarron County : Boise City Cleveland County... This article describes the government of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... James Mountain Jim Inhofe (born November 17, 1934) is a conservative American politician from Oklahoma. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... John A. Sullivan (born January 1, 1965) is an American politician. ... David Daniel Dan Boren (born August 2, 1973) is a Democratic U.S. politician from the state of Oklahoma, representing Oklahomas 2nd congressional district in the U.S. House of Representatives (map). ... Frank D. Lucas (b. ... Rep. ... Mary Fallin is the Lt. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential republic... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Doctor by Luke Fildes This article is about the term physician, one type of doctor; for other uses of the word doctor see Doctor. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial election for president and vice president of the United States. ...

Contents

Early life and career

Coburn was born in Casper, Wyoming to Anita Joy Allen and Orin Wesley Coburn,[2] and graduated with a B.S. in accounting from Oklahoma State University. In 1968, he married Carolyn Denton; their three daughters are Callie, Katie, and Sarah. After recovering from a case of malignantmelanoma Coburn pursued a medical doctorate and graduated from the University of Oklahoma Medical School in 1983. He then opened a medical practice in Muskogee, Oklahoma, and served as a deacon in a Southern Baptist Church. Coburn is one of only two licensed doctors currently serving in the US Senate. During his career in obstetrics, he has treated over 15,000 patients and delivered 4,000 babies and was subject to one malpractice lawsuit.[3][4] Downtown Casper Casper is a city located in Natrona County, Wyoming. ... Oklahoma State University Logo The Oklahoma State University System comprises of five educational instututes across Oklahoma. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes which are found predominantly in skin but also in the bowel and the eye (see uveal melanoma). ... University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma founded in 1890. ... Location within the state of Oklahoma County Muskogee County Mayor Wren Stratton Area    - City 100. ... Deacon is a role in the Christian Church which is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based cooperative ministry agency serving Baptist churches around the world. ... Obstetrics (from the Latin obstare, to stand by) is the surgical specialty dealing with the care of a woman and her offspring during pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (the period shortly after birth). ...


In 1994 he ran for the House of Representatives in Oklahoma's heavily Democratic 2nd Congressional District, which was based in Muskogee and included 22 counties in northeastern Oklahoma. Coburn initially expected to face eight-term incumbent Mike Synar. However, Synar was defeated in a runoff for the Democratic nomination by 71-year-old retired principal, Virgil Cooper. According to Breach of Trust, Coburn and Cooper got along very well and both had a dislike for the liberal Mike Synar. The general election was very cordial since both men knew Synar would not be returning to Washington regardless of the outcome. Coburn won by a 52%–48% margin, becoming the first Republican to represent the district since 1921. Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... As of the 2000 census, there are five Oklahoma United States congressional districts. ... Congressman Mike Synar represented Oklahomas 2nd district in Congress until he was defeated in 1994 Primary by Vigil Hastings, a retired high-school principal, whose campaign was funded in large party by the tobacco industry. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Political career

House career

Coburn was considered one of the "true believers" in the Republican freshman class of 1995, and was one of the most conservative members of the House. He supported reducing the size of the federal budget and opposed abortion and supported the proposed V-chip legislation. Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... If you are going to delete the definition of operation budget without so much as an explanation, then i will return the favor. ... V-chip is a generic term used for a feature of television receivers allowing the blocking of programs based on their ratings category. ...


Despite representing a heavily Democratic district, Coburn was reelected in 1996 (even as Bill Clinton easily carried the district) and 1998 without difficulty.[citation needed] Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


While he served in the House, he earned a reputation as a maverick due to his frequent battles with House Speaker Newt Gingrich.[citation needed] Most of these stand-offs stemmed from his belief that the Republican caucus was moving toward the political left and away from the more conservative "Contract With America" policy proposals that had placed the Republicans into power in Congress in 1994 for the first time in 40 years. Specifically, Coburn was concerned that the Contract's term limits had not been implemented, and that the Republicans were continuing the excessive federal spending (also called pork barrel spending) that they had so vigorously opposed when the Democrats were in the majority.[citation needed] Dennis Hastert of Illinois, the current Speaker of the House (since January 6, 1999) The Speaker of the House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the United States House of Representatives. ... Newton Leroy Gingrich (born June 17, 1943), Ph. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... The Contract with America was a document released by the Republican Party of the United States during the 1994 Congressional election campaign. ... A term limit is a legal restriction that limits the number of terms a person may serve in a particular elected office. ... Pork barrel, in a literal sense, is a barrel in which pork is kept, but figuratively is a supply of money; often the source of ones livelihood. ...


Coburn endorsed conservative activist and former diplomat Alan Keyes in the 2000 Republican presidential primaries, although he supported George W. Bush after the nomination was sewn up. Coburn's congressional district returned to the Democratic fold, as attorney Brad Carson easily defeated a Republican endorsed by Coburn. After leaving the House and returning to private medical practice, Coburn wrote a book in 2003 about his experiences in Congress called Breach of Trust: How Washington Turns Outsiders Into Insiders. The book detailed Coburn's perspective on the internal Republican Party debates over the "Contract With America" and displayed his disdain for career politicians. Some of the figures he criticized (such as Gingrich) were already out of office at the time of publishing, but others (such as former House Speaker Dennis Hastert) remained very influential in Congress, which resulted in speculation that some congressional Republicans wanted no part of Coburn's return to politics. Alan Keyes (born August 7, 1950) is a former Reagan administration diplomat, a Harvard-educated constitutional scholar, and a conservative political activist. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Brad Rogers Carson (born March 11, 1967) is a American lawyer and politician, a Rhodes Scholar, educated at Oklahoma and Trinity, graduating in 1989. ... Medicine is the science and art of maintaining andor restoring human health through the study, diagnosis, and treatment of patients. ... John Dennis Denny Hastert (born January 2, 1942) is an American politician. ...


Senate career

In 2004, Coburn chose to challenge the establishment Republican candidate for the open Senate seat being vacated by Don Nickles. Former Oklahoma City Mayor Kirk Humphreys (the favorite of the state and national Republican establishment) and Corporation Commissioner Bob Anthony joined the field before Coburn. However, Coburn easily won the primary with 61% of the vote over Humphreys' 25%. In the general election, he faced Rep. Brad Carson (D), who was giving up his seat after only two terms to run for the Senate. During the Senate campaign, Coburn said that homosexuality was the biggest threat to America.[citation needed] He also promised to maintain his medical practice in Muskogee and return there during the weekend as he had while serving in the House. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image:Don Nickles. ... Downtown Oklahoma City The State Capitol of Oklahoma From The South Motto: Nickname: Capital of the New Century Founded 1889 Incorporated County Oklahoma County Cleveland County Canadian County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Mick Cornett Area  - Total  - Water 1,608. ... Kirk Humphreys (born 1950) is a former Mayor of Oklahoma City. ... Bob Anthony is an American Republican politician from the US state of Oklahoma. ... Brad Rogers Carson (born March 11, 1967) is a American lawyer and politician, a Rhodes Scholar, educated at Oklahoma and Trinity, graduating in 1989. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ...


The election was one of the most closely-watched of the 2004 cycle.[citation needed] Coburn won by a margin of 53% to Carson's 42%. While Carson defeated Coburn in the heavily Democratic 2nd District, Coburn swamped Carson in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area and the closer-in Tulsa suburbs. Coburn won the state's two largest counties, Tulsa and Oklahoma, by a combined 86,000 votes — more than half of his overall margin of 166,000 votes. Downtown Oklahoma City The State Capitol of Oklahoma From The South Motto: Nickname: Capital of the New Century Founded 1889 Incorporated County Oklahoma County Cleveland County Canadian County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Mick Cornett Area  - Total  - Water 1,608. ... Downtown Tulsa Tulsa is the second-largest city in Oklahoma. ... Tulsa County is a county located in the state of Oklahoma. ... Oklahoma County is a county located in the state of Oklahoma. ...


Coburn's Senate voting record is as conservative as his House record. He received a perfect 100% rating from the American Conservative Union for the year 2005. The American Conservative Union (ACU) is a large conservative political lobbying group in the United States. ...


Committee membership

After taking office in January 2005, Coburn, along with fellow conservative Sam Brownback, was selected to serve on the Senate Judiciary Committee. Coburn is a rare non-attorney on the Judiciary Committee. The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ...


On April 19, 2007, Coburn became the first Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee to call for the firing of Attorney General Alberto Gonzales as a result of the controversy concerning the dismissal of eight United States Attorneys.[5][6] April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... Alberto Gonzales (born August 4, 1955), is the 80th and current Attorney General of the United States. ... The dismissal of U.S. Attorneys controversy is an ongoing political dispute initiated by the unprecedented dismissal of seven United States Attorneys by the George W. Bush administrations Department of Justice (DOJ) on December 7, 2006, and their replacement by interim appointees under provisions of the 2005 Patriot Act... United States Attorneys (also known as federal prosecutors) represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court and United States court of appeals. ...


Senator Coburn is a member of the following committees:

The United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs has jurisdiction over matters related to the Department of Homeland Security and other homeland security concerns, as well as the functioning of the government itself, including the National Archives, budget and accounting measures other than appropriations, the Census, the... The United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs is responsible for dealing with matters related to the American Indian, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Native peoples. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ...

Political Positions

Abortion

In 2000, Coburn sponsored a bill to prevent the Food and Drug Administration from developing, testing or approving the abortifacient RU-486. On July 13, the bill failed in the House of Representatives by a vote of 182 to 187.[7] On the issue, Coburn sparked controversy with his remark about feticidal gynecologists "I favor the death penalty for abortionists and other people who take life."[8] Coburn also objects to legal abortion in cases of rape, and he has justified his position by noting that his great-grandmother was raped by a sheriff.[9] In the U.S. Senate confirmation hearings concerning Samuel Alito, Coburn asserted that his grandmother was a product of that rape. 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... hi “FDA” redirects here. ... An abortifacient is a substance that induces abortion. ... Mifepristone is a synthetic steroid. ... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ...


Fiscal conservatism

In October 2005, Coburn, a staunch fiscal conservative, made several attempts to combat pork barrel spending in the federal budget. The best-known of these was an amendment to the fiscal 2006 appropriations bill that funds transportation projects.[10] Coburn's amendment would have transferred funding from the infamous Bridge to Nowhere in Alaska to rebuild Louisiana's "Twin Spans" bridge, which was devastated by Hurricane Katrina. The amendment was defeated in the Senate, 82-14, after Ted Stevens, the senior senator from Alaska, threatened to resign his office if the amendment was passed. Coburn's actions did result in getting the funds made into a "block grant" to the State of Alaska, which can use the funds for the bridge or other projects. Pork barrel, in a literal sense, is a barrel in which pork is kept, but figuratively is a supply of money; often the source of ones livelihood. ... The Gravina Island Bridge is a proposed $315 million bridge to replace the ferry that currently connects Ketchikan, Alaska (population 8,000) to developable land on Gravina Island and improve access to Ketchikan International Airport. ... Official language(s) English[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... Theodore Fulton Ted Stevens (born November 18, 1923) is the senior United States Senator from Alaska. ...


Coburn is also a member of the Fiscal Watch Team, a group of seven senators led by John McCain, whose stated goal is to combat wasteful government spending.[11] For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ...


On April 6, 2006, Coburn and Senator Barack Obama introduced the Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006. The bill would require the full disclosure of all entities or organizations receiving federal funds beginning in fiscal year (FY) 2007 on a website maintained by the Office of Management and Budget. The bill was signed into law on September 26, 2006. Barack Hussein Obama (born August 4, 1961) is the junior United States Senator from Illinois and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 (S. 2590)[1] is bill that would require the full disclosure of all entities or organizations receiving federal funds beginning in fiscal year (FY) 2007 on a website maintained by the Office of Management and Budget. ... The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is a body within the Executive Office of the President of the United States which is tasked with coordinating United States Federal agencies. ...


Coburn, along with Arizona Senator John McCain, has introduced legislation to attempt to reduce overall federal government spending by requiring U.S. Senators to vote, individually, on federal budget earmarks. Coburn and McCain recently noted that the practice of members of Congress adding earmarks (and thus, increasing government spending) has risen dramatically over the years, from 121 "earmarks" in 1987 to 15,268 earmarks in 2005, according to the Congressional Research Service. Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... The United States federal budget is a piece of legislation passed by the American Congress to allocate funding for the next fiscal year, which begins on October 1st. ... It has been suggested that some sections of this article be split into a new article entitled Earmark (USA). ... The Congressional Research Service is the public policy research arm of the United States Congress. ...


In July 2007, Coburn criticized pork barrel spending fellow Senator Ben Nelson had inserted into the 2007 defense spending bill. Coburn alleged that the earmarks would benefit Nelson's son Patrick's employer with millions in federal dollars and that the situation violated terms of the Transparency Act, which was passed by the Senate but has not yet been voted on in the House. Nelson's spokesperson said the Senator did nothing wrong.[12] Pork barrel (or pork barrel politics) is a derogatory term used to describe United States government spending that is intended to enrich constituents of a politician in return for their political support, either in the form of campaign contributions or votes. ... Earl Benjamin Ben Nelson (born May 17, 1941) is the junior U.S. Senator from Nebraska, where he was born and has lived for most of his life. ...


Genetic Discrimination and HIV Prevention

According to the Boston Globe, Tom Coburn has blocked passage of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA), a bill that would prevent health insurers and employers from using genetic information in decisions of employment or insurability. Senator Coburn objected to provisions in the bill that allow discrimination based on genetic information from embryos and fetuses. Recently, the Boston Globe stated that the embryo loophole has been closed, and that Tom Coburn is reevaluating his opposition to the bill.[13] The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) is designed to prohibit the improper use of genetic information in health insurance and employment. ...


In 1997, Coburn introduced a bill called the HIV Prevention Act of 1997, which would have amended the Social Security Act. The bill would have mandated HIV testing in some situations, would have allowed physicians to demand an HIV test before providing medical care, and would have allowed insurance companies to demand an HIV test as a condition of issuing health insurance.[14] Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... The HIV Prevention Act of 1997 bill was introduced to the House on March 13, 1997 as H.R. 1026 by Tom Coburn (R-Oklahoma). ... Social Security in the United States is a social insurance program funded through dedicated payroll taxes called FICA (Federal Insurance Contributions Act). ... Randal Tobias, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, being publicly tested for HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia in an effort to reduce the stigma of being tested. ... The Doctor by Luke Fildes This article is about the term physician, one type of doctor; for other uses of the word doctor see Doctor. ... It has been suggested that Health plan be merged into this article or section. ...


Block of Rachel Carson commemoration

On May 23, 2007, Coburn threatened to block two bills honoring the 100th birthday of Rachel Carson. Coburn called Carson's work "junk science", proclaiming that Silent Spring, "was the catalyst in the deadly worldwide stigmatization against insecticides, especially DDT."[15] is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Rachel Louise Carson (May 27, 1907 — April 14, 1964) was an American marine biologist and nature writer whose landmark book, Silent Spring, is often credited with having launched the global environmental movement. ... Junk or bunk science is a term used to describe purportedly scientific data, research, analyses or claims which are perceived to be driven by political, financial or other questionable motives. ... Silent Spring is a book written by Rachel Carson and published by Houghton Mifflin in September 1961. ... DDT or Dichloro-Diphenyl-Trichloroethane is the first modern pesticide and is one of the best known synthetic pesticides. ...


Controversies

Allegations of non-consensual sterilization and Medicaid fraud

A sterilization Coburn performed on a 20-year-old woman in 1990 became what was called "the most incindiary issue" of his Senate campaign.[16] Coburn performed the sterilization on the woman during an emergency surgery to treat a life-threatening ectopic pregnancy, removing her intact fallopian tube as well as the one damaged by the surgery. The woman sued Coburn, alleging that he did not have consent to sterilize her, while Coburn claimed he had her oral consent. The lawsuit was ultimately dismissed with no finding of liability on Coburn's part. Sterilization is a surgical technique leaving a male or female unable to procreate. ... The Fallopian tubes, also known as oviducts, uterine tubes, and salpinges (singular salpinx) are two very fine tubes leading from the ovaries of female mammals into the uterus. ...


The state attorney general claimed that Coburn committed Medicaid fraud by not reporting the sterilization when he filed a claim for the emergency surgery. Medicaid did not reimburse doctors for sterilization procedures for patients under 21, and according to the attorney general, Coburn would not have been reimbursed at all had he not withheld this information. Coburn says since he did not file a claim for the sterilization, no fraud was committed. No charges were filed against Coburn for this claim. [17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27] Medicaid is the US health insurance program for individuals and families with low incomes and resources. ...


Homosexuality

According to The American Prospect, during Coburn's 2004 senatorial campaign, he quoted a local resident that in the town of Coalgate, Oklahoma, "Lesbianism is so rampant in some of the schools in Southeast Oklahoma that they'll only let one girl go to the bathroom. Now think about it."[28] School officials have denied his statement.[29] Coburn has also been quoted as saying: The American Prospect is a monthly magazine which focuses on US politics and public policy. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Coalgate is a city in Coal County, Oklahoma, United States. ...

"The gay community has infiltrated the very centers of power in every area across this country, and they wield extreme power... That agenda is the greatest threat to our freedom that we face today. Why do you think we see the rationalization for abortion and multiple sexual partners? That's a gay agenda."[30]

The idea of a gay community is complex reflecting the diverse nature of the individuals who make up that community. ... The term gay agenda is primarily a talking point (a political tool) used by those who oppose gay rights. ...

Roberts confirmation hearings

On September 14, 2005, during the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee John Roberts, Coburn began his opening statement with a critique of Beltway partisan politics while, according to news reports, "choking back a sob."[31] Coburn had earlier been completing a crossword puzzle during the hearings,[31] and this fact was used by The Daily Show to ridicule Coburn's pathos.[32] Coburn then began his questioning by revealing his confusion regarding the various legal terms bandied about during the previous day's hearings. Proceeding to questions regarding both abortion and end-of-life issues, Coburn, who noted that during his tenure as an obstetrician he had delivered some 4,000 babies, asked Roberts whether the judge agreed with the proposition that "the opposite of being dead is being alive." is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Glover Roberts Jr. ... Inside the Beltway is a phrase used to characterize parts of the real or imagined American political system. ... Crossword Puzzle was the second to last album made by The Partridge Family, and was not one of the most popular albums. ... The Daily Show (currently The Daily Show with Jon Stewart) is a Peabody and Emmy Award-winning American satirical television program produced by and airing on Comedy Central. ... Look up Pathos in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article needs cleanup. ...

You know I'm going somewhere. One of the problems I have is coming up with just the common sense and logic that if brain wave and heartbeat signifies life, the absence of them signifies death, then the presence of them certainly signifies life.

And to say it otherwise, logically is schizophrenic. And that's how I view a lot of the decisions that have come from the Supreme Court on the issue of abortion.[33] Schizophrenia (from the Greek word σχιζοφρένεια, or shjzofreneja, meaning split mind) is a psychiatric diagnosis that describes a mental disorder characterized by impairments in the perception or expression of reality and by significant social or occupational dysfunction. ...

Schindler's List television broadcast

As a congressman in 1997, Coburn protested NBC's plan to air the R-rated Academy Award-winning Holocaust drama Schindler's List during prime time. Coburn stated that, in airing the movie without editing it for television, TV had been taken "to an all-time low, with full-frontal nudity, violence and profanity." He also said the TV broadcast should outrage parents and decent-minded individuals everywhere. Coburn described the airing of Schindler's List on television as "...irresponsible sexual behavior...I cringe when I realize that there were children all across this nation watching this program." Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... The MPAA film rating system is a system used in the United States and territories and instituted by the Motion Picture Association of America to rate a movie based on its content. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... “Clothes free” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up Profanity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Since the film deals mainly with the Holocaust, many people showed disgust with this statement, including a number of fellow Republican Congressmen who criticized Coburn in their speeches. Coburn apologized after heavy criticisms "to all those I have offended" and clarified that he agreed with the movie being aired on television, but insisted it should have been on later in the evening. In apologizing, Coburn said that at that time of the evening there are still large numbers of children watching without parental supervision, and stated that he stood by his message of protecting children from violence, but had expressed it poorly. He also said, "my intentions were good, but I've obviously made an error in judgment in how I've gone about saying what I wanted to say." For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ...


He later wrote in his book Breach of Trust that he considered this one of the biggest mistakes in his life and that, while he still feels the material was unsuitable for an 8 p.m. television broadcast, he handled the situation poorly.


Possible 2008 Presidential Candidacy

Sources close to Coburn have stated he is considering running for President in 2008. A longtime advisor of his said, "What's important for him is that there is no other true, Reagan conservative in the race, and he thinks he can fill that void."[34] Ronald Wilson Reagan, GCB (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ...


Electoral History

Oklahoma U.S. Senate Election 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Tom Coburn 763,433 52.9
Democratic Brad Carson 596,750 41.2

This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... Brad Rogers Carson (born March 11, 1967) is a American lawyer and politician, a Rhodes Scholar, educated at Oklahoma and Trinity, graduating in 1989. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Sooner Rather Than Later. The American Spectator (2006-05-27).
  2. ^ http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~battle/senators/coburn.htm
  3. ^ David Austin. "Delivering Babies and Legislation: The anatomy of Sen. Tom Coburn's maverick practice of politics". Urban Tulsa Weekly, January 17, 2007
  4. ^ Clayton Bellamy, "Allegations of Medicaid fraud, sterilization haunt Senate candidate in Oklahoma", Associated Press, September 15, 2004
  5. ^ White House insiders: Gonzales hurt himself before panel (2007-04-19). Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  6. ^ Dr. Coburn Calls for Resignation of Attorney General Alberto Gonzales (2007-04-19). Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  7. ^ RU-486 Abortion Pill: Developments during 1999 & 2000. Retrieved on 2006-07-15.
  8. ^ [1]
  9. ^ Quindlen, Anna. "Life Begins at Conversation", Newsweek. Retrieved on 2006-07-15. 
  10. ^ [2]
  11. ^ McCain calls for spending offsets to ensure fiscal responsibility (2005-10-25). Retrieved on 2006-07-15.
  12. ^ Brendan Dougherty, Michael (2007-07-24). Omaha Company's Windfall, Hiring of Lawmaker's Son Irks Senator. Fox News. Retrieved on 2007-07-24.
  13. ^ Boston Globe: Tom Coburn's position on the Genetic Discrimination Bill
  14. ^ Text of HIV Prevention Act, accessed 14 Sept 2006.
  15. ^ Coburn, Tom. "Dr. Coburn Stands for Science:Opposes Congressional efforts to honor debunked author linked to failed global malaria control", Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, and International Security, 2007-05-22. Retrieved on 2007-05-23. 
  16. ^ Michael Barone with Richard E. Cohen, The Almanac of American Politics, 2006, page 1370
  17. ^ Clayton Bellamy, "Allegations of Medicaid fraud, sterilization haunt Senate candidate in Oklahoma", Associated Press, September 15, 2004
  18. ^ Ron Jenkins, "Attorney general says Senate candidate committed fraud", Associated Press, October 14, 2004
  19. ^ Lois Romano, "Woman Who Sued Coburn Goes Public; She Calls GOP Candidate's Remarks on Case 'Not True'", Washington Post, September 17, 2004
  20. ^ Schlesinger, Robert. "Medicine man", Salon.com, 2004-09-13. Retrieved on 2005-07-16. 
  21. ^ Gizzi, John. "Coburn Badgered With Dismissed Suit", Human Events, 2004-09-27. Retrieved on 2006-07-16. 
  22. ^ Meet the Press, NBC, October 3, 2004
  23. ^ Hannity & Colmes, Fox News, September 24, 2004
  24. ^ Capital Gang, CNN, October 2, 2004
  25. ^ Sheryl Gay Stolberg, "Old Suit Roils Senate Race In Oklahoma", New York Times, September 15, 2004
  26. ^ "Tom Coburn, the Republican Senate candidate from Oklahoma, is a strong conservative.", National Review, Oct 11, 2004 v56 i19 p8
  27. ^ "Nose to nose, and glaring; Oklahoma's Senate race", The Economist, Oct 9, 2004 v373 i8396 p29
  28. ^ Pierce, Charles P.. "In Praise of Oklahoma", The American Prospect, 2005-02-23. Retrieved on 2006-07-16. 
  29. ^ sfgate.com
  30. ^ Schlesinger, Robert. "Medicine man", Salon.com, 2004-09-13. Retrieved on 2005-07-16. 
  31. ^ a b Milbank, Dana. "A Day of Firsts, Overshadowed", The Washington Post, 2005-09-13, p. A07. Retrieved on 2006-07-16. 
  32. ^ TDS on the Roberts Hearing. Crooks and Liars (2005-09-14). Retrieved on 2006-07-16.
  33. ^ "Transcript: Day Three of the Roberts Confirmation Hearings", The Washington Post, 2005-09-14. Retrieved on 2006-07-16. 
  34. ^ [3]

The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Barone is a political expert and commentator. ... Richard E. Cohen is a journalist and author. ... The Almanac of American Politics is a reference work published biennially by the National Journal Group. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... ... Salon. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Human Events is a weekly conservative magazine founded in 1944. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Meet the Press (MTP) is a weekly television news show produced by NBC. It started as a radio show in 1945 as American Mercury Presents: Meet the Press, originating from WRC-AM in Washington. ... The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Hannity & Colmes is an American talk show program on the Fox News Channel featuring host Alan Colmes, presenting a liberal angle, and host Sean Hannity, presenting a conservative angle from the Republican Party. ... Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ... The Economist is a weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London, UK. It has been in continuous publication since September 1843. ... The American Prospect is a monthly magazine which focuses on US politics and public policy. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Salon. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Crooks and Liars is an American political blog aimed at liberals and progressives. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Official sites
  • United States Senator Tom Coburn official Senate site
  • Coburn for Senate official campaign site
Documentaries, topic pages and databases
Media coverage
Political offices
Preceded by
Mike Synar
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Oklahoma's 2nd congressional district

1995 – 2001
Succeeded by
Brad Carson
Preceded by
Don Nickles
United States Senator (Class 3) from Oklahoma
2005–
Served alongside: Jim Inhofe
Incumbent
Persondata
NAME Coburn, Thomas Allen
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Medical doctor, politician
DATE OF BIRTH March 14, 1948
PLACE OF BIRTH Casper, Wyoming, United States of America
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
U.S. Senate: Senators Home > Senator Tom Coburn (716 words)
Tom A. Coburn, M.D. was elected to the U.S. Senate November 2, 2004.
From 1970-78, Coburn was the manufacturing manager at the Ophthalmic Division of Coburn Optical Industries in Colonial Heights, Virginia.
After the family business was sold, Coburn changed the course of his life by returning to school to become a physician.
Bambooweb: Tom Coburn (216 words)
Coburn was a physician and a deacon in the Southern Baptist Church until he ran for the House of Representatives as a Republican.
As a Congressman, Coburn opposed abortion and the V-chip.
Coburn is a candidate for the United States Senate in 2004 and he is facing Brad Carson.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m