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Encyclopedia > Tokyopop
For the music movie, see Tokyo Pop.

TOKYOPOP, formerly known as Mixx, is a distributor of manga in English, German, and Japanese. Founded in 1997 by Stu Levy[1], the company is incorporated in Tokyo, Japan, with its largest office in Los Angeles, California and branches in the UK and Germany. TOKYOPOP also licenses and publishes manga, Manhua, manhwa, anime and translated Japanese novels, and produces "Cine-Manga" (also called "ani-manga" or Anime-books; a line of graphic novels using still shots taken from animated or live-action television shows and movies) and original manga-style comics in English and German. They sell their products through bookstores and comic stores throughout the USA, Canada, Ireland, the UK, Germany, Austria, and German-speaking Swiss markets. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links TOKYOPOP-logo. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup, as it does not appear to have been written by a native English speaker. ... This article is about the comics published in East Asian countries. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... This article is about the comics published in East Asian countries. ... Manhua (Traditional Chinese: 漫畫; Simplified Chinese: 漫画; Pinyin: ) is a general term for comics produced in China, often including Chinese translations of Japanese manga. ... Manhwa (Hangul: 만화, Hanja: 漫畫) is the general Korean term for comics and cartoons (including animated cartoons). ... “Animé” redirects here. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... The cover of a Di Gi Charat films comic Films comics ) are a variant of Japanese manga which are available in manga style books and digitally as e-books, occasionally called e-manga. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... Amerimanga, (also Ameri-manga or AmeriManga,) is a comic influenced by Japanese anime and manga, created by an American, Canadian, European or Asian comic artist outside of Japan. ... Categories: Bookstores | Stub ... Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ...


In May 2004, in a rare move for an American comic book publisher, TOKYOPOP launched a television advertising campaign, targeting several cable television channels: Cartoon Network, Spike TV, MTV, TechTV and G4. 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... From the earliest days of the medium, television has been used as a vehicle for advertising in some countries. ... Coaxial cable is often used to transmit cable television into the house. ... For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... TechTV is also the name of a closed-circuit television network based in Ruston, Louisiana TechTV (May 11, 1998 – May 28, 2004) was a 24-hour cable and satellite channel based in San Francisco, California featuring news and shows about computers, technology, and the Internet. ... G4 is a United States cable and satellite television channel geared toward viewers aged 12–34 and devoted to the world of video games and the people who play them. ...


When they were known as Mixx, they sold MixxZine, a manga magazine. Mixx also sold the shōjo manga anthology Smile. Mixxzine later became TOKYOPOP before it was discontinued. In 2005 TOKYOPOP began a new, free publication, called Manga (originally Takuhai), to feature their latest releases. Shōjo or shoujo (少女 lit. ... SMILE is an international magazine of multiple origins. ... Tokyopop magazine, originally named MixxZine, was a manga anthology published in North America by Tokyopop (originally named Mixx). MixxZine at the start published four series, two of which were shōjo and two of which were seinen: Ice Blade Magic Knight Rayearth Parasyte Sailor Moon As the seinen and sh... Manga, formerly known as Takuhai, is a free quarterly magazine published by TOKYOPOP, which gives preview chapters of a selection of the companys new manga titles, as well as fan art and short articles. ...


In March 2006, TOKYOPOP and HarperCollins Publishers announced a co-publishing agreement in which the sale and distribution rights of all TOKYOPOP manga and books are transferred to HarperCollins in mid-June 2006. The agreement also enables TOKYOPOP to produce manga adaptations of HarperCollins' books. Meg Cabot's books will be the first to be adapted into the manga format, while another popular series will be the Warriors series by Erin Hunter. The first line of TOKYOPOP-HarperCollins manga will be released in 2007 with the goal to publish up to 24 titles each year.[2] March 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Fijian Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase announces that the 2006 Fiji general elections will be held in the second week of May 2006 from the 6th to the 13th. ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by News Corporation. ... Meg Cabot (born Meggin Patricia Cabot on February 1, 1967) is an American author of romantic comedies for teens and adults. ... Warriors is a series of fantasy novels written by Kate Cary and Cherith Baldry, with their editor Victoria Holmes, under the pen name Erin Hunter, that follows the adventures of various wild cats as they try to survive in their forest homes. ...


As of Spring 2006, TOKYOPOP is making efforts to reach out to their fans by means of the creation of a message board and, as of April 21, 2006 a MySpace account.[3] is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... MySpace is a social networking website offering an interactive, user-submitted network of friends, personal profiles, blogs, groups, photos, music, and videos. ...

Contents

Success and criticism

Many people[Who?] in the publishing industry credit TOKYOPOP for transforming the American manga market to its current state of popularity. The company achieved this by first lowering the price of their manga per volume, to a consistent price point of about $10 (US), €10.50 (Ireland) and £7.50 (UK). They achieved this by not translating sound effects (which required much touching up of the original art), and not flipping the pages like was done in most English manga in the 1990s. This was advertised as trying to make English translated manga more "authentic". The lower price point was also more appealing to bookstores, because lower prices meant better sales. Other manga companies, such as Viz Media have restructured and lowered their prices as a response to this move. The German versions of the TOKYOPOP manga cost €6.50; the quality of the paper is lower than the U.S. paper. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... This article is about the comics published in East Asian countries. ... Viz Media, LLC, headquartered in San Francisco, California, is a major American anime, manga and Japanese entertainment company formed by the merger of Viz, LLC, and ShoPro Entertainment. ...


In addition to lowering prices of manga, the company licensed a wider variety of titles than other companies had previously. While most translators had concentrated on shōnen manga and titles thought to have "crossover" potential with the male-dominated American comics market, TOKYOPOP's lineup included many shōjo manga titles that appealed to teenage girls who were not well served by the domestic manga market. The company also eschewed the so-called "direct market" of comic book stores, many of which specialized primarily in superhero titles and had a reputation of being "boy's clubs" uninviting or hostile to casual readers, opting instead to concentrate on sales through bookstores. As a result, the manga section in most mainstream bookstores has increased dramatically. (Nevertheless, they do make their products available to the direct market through distributors such as Diamond Comic Distributors.) Shōnen or shounen (å°‘å¹´) is a Japanese word usually translated as young boy, although it is commonly used to refer to males of up to high-school age as well. ... Shōjo or shoujo (少女 lit. ... Direct market in the comic book industry is the dominant distribution and retail network in North America and elsewhere in the market for English-language comics. ... Diamond Comic Distributors, Inc. ...


In July, 2006, TOKYOPOP launched their new website, featuring the ability for fans to create blogs, post artwork, videos, and manga, and generally create a more user-focused website as an attempt to bridge the gap between publisher and consumer.


The company has been criticized, most notably by Toren Smith of the competing company Studio Proteus, in a piece published as part of an analysis of the American manga translation industry in The Comics Journal.[4] This critics' main charges are that TOKYOPOP's quality control is poor and frequently fails to catch typos and other rudimentary errors before books go to print, and that its approach to licensing titles from Japan stresses quantity over quality. Some feel that this would eventually lead to a bubble in the manga industry unless something was done to make the comics less disposable [original research?]. Additionally, the practice of not flipping pages has been criticized; critics[Who?] assert that, as the English language is typically read from left to right, printing manga in right-to-left format results in pages that do not flow well to English readers. However, almost every manga released in graphic novel format, including those of other labels such as Dark Horse Comics, Del Rey and Viz Media is translated unflipped at this time; advocates of non-flipping hold the view that this increases authenticity, as original sound effects in katakana and hiragana (if left untranslated, as by TOKYOPOP) become readable. Also, the number of characters in flipped manga that appeared to be left-handed was amazing.[5] Furthermore, nonflipping preserves the artists' original creations and intentions, especially as to background or tertiary writing. (Signs, clothes, etc.) Studio Proteus was a Japanese manga import and translation company, founded in 1986 by Toren Smith and based in San Francisco. ... The cover of TCJ #115 (April 1987) celebrated their court victory in defending a libel suit. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Del Rays Logo Del Rey Manga is the manga-publishing imprint of Del Rey Books, a branch of Ballantine Books, which in turn is part of Random House, the publishing division of Bertelsmann. ... Viz Media, LLC, headquartered in San Francisco, California, is a major American anime, manga and Japanese entertainment company formed by the merger of Viz, LLC, and ShoPro Entertainment. ... Katakana ) is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system along with hiragana, kanji, and in some cases the Latin alphabet. ... Hiragana ) is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system, along with katakana and kanji; the Latin alphabet is also used in some cases. ...


One possible reason for Mixx/TOKYOPOP's early low translation quality is that in at least one instance, the original translator for Magic Knight Rayearth, Rika Takahashi [citation needed] was never paid for her work, then unceremoniously replaced by a new "translator", whose work was suspiciously similar to an existing, widely-known fan-made translation. [citation needed],Magic Knight Rayearth is now translated by Anita Sengupta. Rika Takahashi has since moved on to anime translation and subtitle scripting, never again to work in the booming English-language manga market[original research?]. “MKR” redirects here. ...


Not translating the Japanese sound effects into English has been an issue. [citation needed] While most of the manga published by TOKYOPOP contains the average of 0-2 SFX per page, the other series (such as Love Hina and Initial D) have at least 3-7 SFX per page and these sound effects are usually used to describe the action that's happening in the story, and therefore considered to be important. And due to that, an American reader must be able to read Japanese, in order to completely understand the Japanese SFX. However, others[Who?] believe it is better to have the original Japanese sound effects, and usually the situation is self explanatory for what the sound effects mean, such as explosions, sword fights, and someone falling down. However, there are certain instances in the manga, that TOKYOPOP occasionally, puts an English subtitle next to the Japanese sound effect. Several titles also have a sound-effects glossary in the back, such as in Tokyo Babylon or Fruits Basket. Serialized in Weekly Shonen Magazine Original run October 21, 1998 – October 31, 2001 Volumes 14 (28 volumes in Brazil and Mexico) TV anime Director Yoshiaki Iwasaki Studio XEBEC Licensor King Records Madman Entertainment Bandai Entertainment (original), Funimation (new) Network TV Tokyo Original run April 19, 2000 – September 27, 2000 Episodes... For other uses, see Initial D (disambiguation). ...


TOKYOPOP has also been criticized with regards to changes in music and the naming of characters in their published anime. [citation needed] Critics charge that these changes compromise the anime viewing experience, watering down and Americanizing it, making it less "authentic." [citation needed] This has spread to their manga series, with the renaming of Ikki Tousen as Battle Vixens, and Karin as Chibi Vampire, when Karin is nearly equal to the average height of women in Japan eliminating her from being chibi. In addition, the ultra-violent Battle Royale manga was rewritten to be a Reality TV show, when the original novel (published by competitor Viz Media) never made such a distinction. Ikki Tousen , literally one with the strength of a thousand) or BakunyÅ« Hyper-Battle Ikki Tōsen is a 13 episode anime series loosely based on the manga by Yuji Shiozaki, which is in turn based on the classic Chinese novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms. ... Serialized in Dragon AGE Original run October 1, 2003 – Ongoing No. ... It is realy supposed to be spelled chibbie and it means awesom This article is about the Japanese word Chibi. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Reality television is a genre of television programming in which the fortunes of real life people (as opposed to fictional characters played by actors) are followed. ... Viz Media, LLC, headquartered in San Francisco, California, is a major American anime, manga and Japanese entertainment company formed by the merger of Viz, LLC, and ShoPro Entertainment. ...


Most notably, after several well-translated Anime releases, TOKYOPOP has been criticized of Initial D, with an "Americanized" dub of the anime and translation of the manga. [citation needed] The Americanization included adding "street slang" and replacing the Eurobeat soundtrack for the sounds of their in-house DJ (DJ Milky) which at times would be classified as a fusion of hip-hop and Electronica music. Also, TOKYOPOP renamed characters in both the manga and anime to more English sounding alternatives (Takumi became Tak and Mogi became Natalie, for example). Faced with doing a completely (and costly) new dub, TOKYOPOP released the Americanized dub. Their translation of Initial D in the subtitled version remained intact and free of any Americanization. Its inclusion on the DVDs managed to satisfy fans of Initial D who opt to watch only the subtitled version of the anime.[6] For other uses, see Initial D (disambiguation). ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Electronica refers to a wide range of contemporary electronic music designed for a wide range of uses, including foreground listening, some forms of dancing, and background music for other activities; but unlike electronic dance music, is not specifically focused on the dance floor. ...


In a completely different case, TOKYOPOP released Rave Master on DVD in a dub-only format à la 4Kids Entertainment with Americanization of the music and some of the script. However, the Rave Master manga usually sells well in the United States. It is usually on the top 100 best selling manga lists[citation needed]. RAVE ) or Groove Adventure RAVE, known in the USA as Rave Master, is an anime and manga series by Hiro Mashima. ... 4Kids Entertainment (NYSE: KDE) (commonly known as 4Kids) is an American film and television production company specializing in the acquisition, production and licensing of childrens entertainment around the world. ...


TOKYOPOP and HarperCollins have also been both hailed and criticized for their decision to classify as "manga" the comics they are to produce under their new publishing agreement. [citation needed] Critics[Who?] feel that the word "manga," which means book (or Anime) in Japanese, is not the appropriate term for an American-produced, English-language comic. They suggest that the term is being used to exploit the current popularity of Japanese manga in the United States, at the expense of the term "comic."[7] Yet others[Who?] feel the move to call their original titles "manga" is a conscious step away from the spandex-clad superhero stereotype of the word "comics" and towards a more open, global view of the graphic novel and comics medium. In order to better disguish Japanese manga from their original English-language titles, they now use the term OEL manga. To classify all manga, they use the terms "global manga" or "world manga" which is also used by Seven Seas--one of the other few manga companies in the U.S. producing original, manga-influenced graphic novels. This article is about the comics published in East Asian countries. ... Original English-language manga or OEL manga are comic books or graphic novels whose language of original publication is English and which are created by comic artists and writers influenced by Japanese anime and manga. ... Original English-language manga or OEL manga are comic books or graphic novels whose language of original publication is English and which are created by comic artists and writers influenced by Japanese anime and manga. ...


TOKYOPOP is the biggest manga publisher outside of Japan and as such has been attributed with popularizing Manhwa in the United States. TOKYOPOP "published many Korean artists' work, possibly without Western fans even realizing the strips don't come from Japan. Series like King of Hell by Kim Jae-Hwan and Ra In-Soo, and the gothic vampire tale Model by Lee So-Younf are both Korean, but could easily be mistaken for manga." [8] Manhwa (Hangul: 만화, Hanja: 漫畫) is the general Korean term for comics and cartoons (including animated cartoons). ... -1...


Foreign markets

In summer 2004, TOKYOPOP founded its first foreign branch in Germany, headquartered in Hamburg. The first manga and manhwa by TOKYOPOP Germany were published in November 2004, and the first anime in fall 2005. This article is about the city in Germany. ...


Also in 2004, TOKYOPOP set up a London, UK office that mainly imports books from the USA and distributes them into bookstores in the United Kingdom. TOKYOPOP released an anime collection in the United Kingdom market in late 2006, including titles such as Initial D and Great Teacher Onizuka. Vampire Princess Miyu was released on DVD by MVM Entertainment, and Kids TV channel Toonami aired the first half of Rave Master in early 2005. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... “Animé” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Initial D (disambiguation). ... Serialized in Weekly Shonen Magazine Manga Mania Manga Mania Original run 16 May 1997 – 17 April 2002 No. ... Vampire Princess Miyu ) is a horror anime series by Narumi Kakinouchi and Toshiki Hirano, as well as a manga series based on this anime. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... MVM Entertainment is a company which is part of the MVM Group, which releases Anime in the UK http://www. ... For Toonami, the television channel in the United Kingdom, see Toonami (UK). ... RAVE ) or Groove Adventure RAVE, known in the USA as Rave Master, is an anime and manga series by Hiro Mashima. ...


TOKYOPOP also distributes some of their titles to Australia and New Zealand through Funtastic who recently acquired Madman Entertainment. Madmans Logo Madman Entertainment is an Australian company that specialises in the distribution of Japanese anime and manga in Australia and New Zealand. ...


In Greece, TOKYOPOP-owned properties are licensed by AnubisComics. Compupress SA: Greek publishing company formed in 1982. ...


Translated Publications

Further information: List of Tokyopop publications

// Besides the abbreviated list below, many titles may be found within Category:Tokyopop. ...

References

  1. ^ Jarvis, Michael (October 26, 2003), "The Godzilla-Sized Appeal of Japan's Pop Culture", Los Angeles Times Magazine: 9
  2. ^ Crum, Erin (2006). HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS AND TOKYOPOP ANNOUNCE INNOVATIVE CO-PUBLISHING, SALES AND DISTRIBUTION AGREEMENT. HarperCollins Publishers. Retrieved on 10 April 2006.
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ Dean (2004). 2004: A good year to get out of the manga business?. Retrieved on 2 May 2006.
  5. ^ Randall (2005). English, For Better or Worse. Retrieved on 2 May 2006.
  6. ^ TOKYOPOP Staff (2002). TOKYOPOP Open Letter regarding Initial D. Retrieved on 2 May 2006.
  7. ^ Reliak (2006). Re: NEWS: HarperCollins, TOKYOPOP Announce Co-Publishing Dea. Anime News Network. Retrieved on 2 May 2006.
  8. ^ Brooks, Brad; Pilcher, Tim (2005). The Essential Guide to World Comics. London: Collins & Brown. ISBN 1-84340-300-5. 

is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
TOKYOPOP's "I Luv Halloween" Manga Creator Contest (267 words)
TOKYOPOP is hosting an "I Luv Halloween" Manga Creator Contest and they want you to show off your manga talents.
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Tokyopop - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1358 words)
Tokyopop, formerly known as Mixx, is a distributor of manga in English, German, and Japanese.
Tokyopop also licenses and publishes manhwa, anime and translated Japanese novels, and produces "Cine-Manga" (also called "animanga"; a line of graphic novels using still shots taken from animated or live-action television shows and movies) and original manga-style comics in English and German.
Tokyopop and HarperCollins have also been criticized for their decision to classify as "manga" the comics they are to produce under their new publishing agreement.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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