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Encyclopedia > Tokugawa Ieyasu

Tokugawa Ieyasu (徳川 家康? January 31, 1543June 1, 1616)was the founder and first shogunof the Tokugawa shogunateof Japanwhich ruled from the Battle of Sekigaharain 1600until the Meiji Restorationin 1868. Ieyasu seized power in 1600, received appointment as shogun in 1603, abdicated from office in 1605, but remained in power until his death in 1616. His given name is sometimes spelled Iyeyasuowing to the historical use of the wekana; とくがわ いゑやす. is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events February 21 - Battle of Wayna Daga - A combined army of Ethiopian and Portuguese troops defeat the armies of Adal led by Ahmed Gragn. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1616 (MDCXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Minamoto no Yoritomo, the first shogun of the Kamakura shogunate Shōgun )   is supreme general of the samurai,a military rank and historical title in Japan. ... The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. ... Combatants Forces loyal to Toyotomi Hideyori, many clans from Western Japan Forces of Tokugawa Ieyasu, Clans of Eastern Japan Commanders Ishida Mitsunari, Mōri Terumoto, others Tokugawa Ieyasu, others Strength Approximately 100000 Approximately 80000 Casualties 5000-32000 dead Otani Yoshitsugu Shimazu Toyohisa Unknown; but not excessive The Battle of Sekigahara... 1600 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Meiji Restoration ), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution, or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to enormous changes in Japans political and social structure. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1605 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... ã‚‘, in hiragana, or ヱ in katakana, is an obsolete Japanese kana, each of which represent one mora. ... Japanese writing Kanji 漢字 Kana 仮名 Hiragana 平仮名 Katakana 片仮名 Manyogana 万葉仮名 Uses Furigana 振り仮名 Okurigana 送り仮名 Rōmaji ローマ字 For other meanings of Kana, see Kana (disambiguation). ...

Tokugawa Ieyasu
Shogun (1st)
Tokugawa Ieyasu
Tokugawa Ieyasu
Term 16031605
Predecessor Sengoku period
Successor Shogun:
Tokugawa Hidetada
Issue
Matsudaira Nobuyasu
Kamohime
Yūki Hideyasu
Toku-hime
Tokugawa Hidetada
Others
Born 31 January 1543(1543-01-31)
Died 01 June 1616
Father Matsudaira Hirotada

Contents

Download high resolution version (640x667, 94 KB)Tokugawa Ieyasu Source: [1], copyright expired due to age of image. ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1605 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... “Sengoku” redirects here. ... Shogun Tokugawa Hidetada Tokugawa Hidetada May 2, 1579—March 14, 1632) was the second shogun of the Tokugawa dynasty, who ruled from 1605 until his abdication in 1623. ... Matsudaira Jirō-Saburō Nobuyasu 13 April 1559—5 October 1579) was the eldest son of Tokugawa Ieyasu. ... YÅ«ki Hideyasu YÅ«ki Hideyasu ) (March 1, 1574–June 2, 1607) was a daimyo in Japan who lived during the Azuchi-Momoyama and Edo periods. ... Toku-hime (督姫: 1565–March 3, 1615) was a princess during the Azuchi-Momoyama and Edo periods of Japanese history. ... Shogun Tokugawa Hidetada Tokugawa Hidetada May 2, 1579—March 14, 1632) was the second shogun of the Tokugawa dynasty, who ruled from 1605 until his abdication in 1623. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events February 21 - Battle of Wayna Daga - A combined army of Ethiopian and Portuguese troops defeat the armies of Adal led by Ahmed Gragn. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... Year 1616 (MDCXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Matsudaira Hirotada (松平広忠; June 9, 1526 - April 3, 1549) was the lord of Okazaki Castle (岡崎城) in Mikawa province (三河国). Hirotada was the son of Matsudaira Kiyoyasu (7th head of Mikawa Matsudaira clan) and an unknown lady, probably the daughter of Aoki Kaga no Kami Norimune. ...

Biography

Early life (1542–1556)

Tokugawa Ieyasu was born on December, 1542 in the Mikawa province. Originally named Matsudaira Takechiyo (松平竹千代), he was the son of Matsudaira Hirotada (松平広忠), the daimyo of Mikawa, and O-Dai-no-kata (於大の方), the daughter of a neighboring samurai lord Mizuno Tadamasa (水野忠政). Oddly, his mother and father were step-brother and step-sister to each other. They were just 17 and 15 years old, respectively, when Ieyasu was born. Two years later, O-Dai-no-kata was sent back to her family and the couple never lived together again. Both husband and wife remarried and both had children so Ieyasu ended up with 11 half-brothers and sisters. Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... Mikawa (三河国, Mikawa no kuni) is an old province in the area that today forms the eastern half of Aichi Prefecture. ... Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu The Tokugawa clan crest This is a Japanese name; the family name is Tokugawa Tokugawa Ieyasu (previously spelled Iyeyasu) January 31, 1543 – June 1, 1616) was the founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan which ruled from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until... Matsudaira Hirotada (松平広忠; June 9, 1526 - April 3, 1549) was the lord of Okazaki Castle (岡崎城) in Mikawa province (三河国). Hirotada was the son of Matsudaira Kiyoyasu (7th head of Mikawa Matsudaira clan) and an unknown lady, probably the daughter of Aoki Kaga no Kami Norimune. ... Daimyo Matsudaira Katamori visits the residence of a retainer. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Mizuno Tadashige. ...


The Matsudaira family was split in 1550: one side wanted to be vassals of the Imagawa clan, while the other side preferred the Oda. As a result, much of Ieyasu's early years were spent in danger as wars with the Oda and Imagawa clans were fought. This family feud was the reason behind the murder of Hirotada's father (Takechiyo's grandfather), Matsudaira Kiyoyasu (松平清康). Unlike his father and the majority of his branch of the family, Ieyasu's father, Hirotada, favored the Imagawa clan. The Imagawa clan crest The Imagawa clan family tree A feudal Japanese clan founded by Kuniuji Imagawa. ... The Oda clan crest The Oda clan is a daimyo family descended from Taira no Sukemori. ... Matsudaira Kiyoyasu (????-1535) the 7th lord over the Matsudaira clan during the Sengoku period (16th century) of Japan. ...


In 1548, when the Oda clan invaded Mikawa, Hirotada turned to Imagawa Yoshimoto, the head of the Imagawa clan, for help to repel the invaders. Yoshimoto agreed to help under the condition that Hirotada send his son Ieyasu (Takechiyo) to Sumpu as a hostage. Hirotada agreed. Oda Nobuhide, the leader of the Oda clan, learned of this arrangement and had Ieyasu abducted from his entourage en route to Sumpu. Ieyasu was just six years old at the time. Events Mary I of Scotland sent to France Births September 2 - Vincenzo Scamozzi, Italian architect (died 1616) September 29 - William V, Duke of Bavaria (died 1626) Francesco Andreini, Italian actor (died 1624) Giordano Bruno, Italian philosopher, astronomer, and occultist (burned at the stake) 1600 (died 1600) Honda Tadakatsu, Japanese general... Sunpu (駿府) is the former name of Shizuoka City in Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. ... Oda Nobuhide (織田 信秀 Oda Nobuhide 1510 – April 21, 1551) was a warlord and magistrate of lower Owari province during the Sengoku Period of Japan. ...


Nobuhide threatened to execute Ieyasu unless his father severed all ties with the Imagawa clan. Hirotada replied that sacrificing his own son would show his seriousness in his pact with the Imagawa clan. Despite this refusal, Nobuhide chose not to kill Ieyasu but instead held him for the next three years at the Manshoji Temple in Nagoya. Nagoya ) is the fourth largest city in Japan. ...


In 1549, at the age of 24, Ieyasu's father Hirotada died of natural causes. At about the same time, Oda Nobuhide died during an epidemic. The deaths dealt a heavy blow to the Oda clan. An army under the command of Imagawa Sessai laid siege to the castle where Oda Nobuhiro, Nobuhide's eldest son and the new head of the Oda, was living. With the castle about to fall, Imagawa Sessai offered a deal to Oda Nobunaga (Oda Nobuhide's second son). Sessai offered to give up the siege if Ieyasu was handed over to the Imagawa clan. Nobunaga agreed and so Ieyasu (now nine) was taken as a hostage to Sumpu. Here he lived a fairly good life as hostage and potentially useful future ally of the Imagawa clan until he was 15. Events July - Ketts Rebellion Francis Xavier arrives in Japan. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Rise to power (1556–1584)

In 1556, Ieyasu came of age, and, following tradition, changed his name to Matsudaira Jirōsaburō Motonobu (松平次郎三郎元信). One year later, at the age of 16 (according to East Asian age reckoning), he married his first wife and changed his name again to Matsudaira Kurandonosuke Motoyasu (松平蔵人佐元康). Allowed to return to his native Mikawa, the Imagawa ordered him to fight the Oda clan in a series of battles. Ieyasu won his first battle at the Siege of Terabe and later succeeded in delivering supplies to a border fort through a bold night attack. Events January 16 - Abdication of Emperor Charles V. His son, Philip II becomes King of Spain, while his brother Ferdinand becomes Holy Roman Emperor January 23 - The Shaanxi earthquake, the deadliest earthquake in history, occurs with its epicenter in Shaanxi province, China. ... East Asian age reckoning is a concept that originated in China and is used in East Asian countries. ... The Siege of Terabe took place in 1558. ...


In 1560 the leadership of the Oda clan had passed to the brilliant leader Oda Nobunaga. Yoshimoto, leading a large Imagawa army (perhaps 20,000 strong) then attacked the Oda clan territory. Ieyasu with his Mikawa troops captured a fort at the border and then stayed there to defend it. As a result, Ieyasu and his men were not present at the Battle of Okehazama where Yoshimoto was killed by Oda Nobunaga's surprise assault. Events February 27 - The Treaty of Berwick, which would expel the French from Scotland, is signed by England and the Congregation of Scotland The first tulip bulb was brought from Turkey to the Netherlands. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Combatants forces of Imagawa Yoshimoto forces of Oda Nobunaga Commanders Imagawa Yoshimoto, Matsudaira Motoyasu Oda Nobunaga Strength ~25,000 ~3000 The battle of Okehazama (桶狭間の戦い Okehazama-no-tatakai) took place in June 1560. ...


With Yoshimoto dead, Ieyasu decided to ally with the Oda clan. A secret deal was needed because Ieyasu's wife and infant son, Nobuyasu were held hostage in Sumpu by the Imagawa clan. In 1561, Ieyasu openly broke with the Imagawa and captured the fortress of Kaminojo. Ieyasu was then able to exchange his wife and son for the wife and daughter of the ruler of Kaminojo castle. Matsudaira Jirō-Saburō Nobuyasu 13 April 1559—5 October 1579) was the eldest son of Tokugawa Ieyasu. ... // Events The Edict of Orleans suspends the persecution of the Huguenots. ...


For the next few years Ieyasu set about reforming the Matsudaira clan and pacifying Mikawa. He also strengthened his key vassals by awarding them land and castles in Mikawa. They were: Honda Tadakatsu, Ishikawa Kazumasa, Koriki Kiyonaga, Hattori Hanzō, Sakai Tadatsugu, and Sakakibara Yasumasa. Honda Tadakatsu ) (1548 – December 3, 1610), also called Honda Heihachirō (本多平八郎), was a Japanese general (and later a daimyo) of the late Sengoku through early Edo period, who served Tokugawa Ieyasu. ... Ishikawa Kazumasa (1534-1609) Ishikawa Kazumasa, a very notable retainer under Tokugawa Ieyasu, even serving him since his childhood, since they were both hostages under the Imagawa at that time. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Hanzo Hattori redirects here. ... Sakai Tadatsugu (1527-1596) Sakai Tadatsugu, one of the most notable officers under Tokugawa Ieyasu. ... Sakakibara Yasumasa (1548-1606) Sakakibara Yasumasa, one of the Four Guardians of the Tokugawa. Being one of the closest retainers to Tokugawa Ieyasu. ...


Ieyasu defeated the military forces of the Mikawa Monto within Mikawa province. The Monto were a warlike group of monks that were ruling Kaga Province and had many temples elsewhere in Japan. They refused to obey Ieyasu's commands and so he went to war with them, defeating their troops and pulling down their temples. In one battle Ieyasu was nearly killed when he was struck by a bullet which did not penetrate his armor. Both Ieyasu's Mikawa troops and the Monto forces were using the new gunpowder weapons which the Portuguese had introduced to Japan just 20 years earlier. The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ...


In 1567, Ieyasu changed his name yet again, his new family name was Tokugawa and his given name was now Ieyasu. In so doing, he claimed descent from the Minamoto clan. No proof has actually been found for this claimed descent from Seiwa tennō, the 56th Emperor of Japan.[1] Events The Duke of Alva arrives in the Netherlands with Spanish forces to suppress unrest there. ... Last name redirects here. ... Look up Appendix:Most popular given names by country in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Minamoto (源) was an honorary surname bestowed by the Emperors of Japan of the Heian Period to their sons and grandsons after accepting them as royal subjects. ... Seiwa can refer to: Emperor Seiwa, the 56th imperial ruler of Japan. ...


Ieyasu remained an ally of Oda Nobunaga and his Mikawa soldiers were part of Nobunaga's army which captured Kyoto in 1568. At the same time Ieyasu was expanding his own territory. He and Takeda Shingen, the head of the Takeda clan in Kai Province made an alliance for the purpose of conquering all the Imagawa territory. In 1570, Ieyasu's troops captured Tōtōmi Province while Shingen's troops captured Suruga province (including the Imagawa capital of Sumpu). For other uses, see Kyoto (disambiguation). ... Events March 23 - Peace of Longjumeau ends the Second War of Religion in France. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Takeda clan mon (coat-of-arms) The Takeda ) was one of many clans of daimyō (feudal lords) in Japans Sengoku period; its importance derives almost entirely from the power and fame of Takeda Shingen. ... Kai province (甲斐国; -no kuni) is an old province in Japan that corresponds to Yamanashi prefecture today. ... Events January 23 - The assassination of regent James Stewart, Earl of Moray throws Scotland into civil war February 25 - Pope Pius V excommunicates Queen Elizabeth I of England with the bull Regnans in Excelsis May 20 - Abraham Ortelius issues the first modern atlas. ... Tōtōmi ) is an old province in the area of Japan that is today western Shizuoka prefecture. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ...


Ieyasu ended his alliance with Takeda and sheltered their former enemy, Imagawa Ujizane; he also allied with Uesugi Kenshin of the Uesugi clan—an enemy of the Takeda clan. Later that year, Ieyasu led 5,000 of his own men supporting Nobunaga at the Battle of Anegawa against the Azai and Asakura clans. (1538-1614) Son of Yoshimoto Imagawa. ... Uesugi Kenshin February 18, 1530—April 19, 1578) was a daimyo who ruled Echigo province in the Sengoku Period of Japan. ... Combatants forces of Tokugawa Ieyasu and Oda Nobunaga Azai and Asakura forces Commanders Tokugawa Ieyasu, Oda Nobunaga, Inaba Ittetsu Azai Nagamasa, Asakura Yoshikage The 1570 battle of Anegawa (姉川の戦い) came as a reaction to the sieges of the castles of Odani and Yokoyama. ... The Asai family ), sometimes written as Azai, was a line of daimyo (feudal lords) which, along with the Asakura family, opposed Oda Nobunaga in the late 16th century. ... The Asakura family (朝倉氏) was a line of daimyō (feudal lords) which, along with the Asai family, opposed Oda Nobunaga in the late 16th century. ...


In October 1571, Takeda Shingen, now allied with the Hōjō clan, attacked the Tokugawa lands of Tōtōmi. Ieyasu asked for help from Nobunaga, who sent him some 3,000 troops. Early in 1573 the two armies met at the Battle of Mikatagahara. The Takeda army, under the expert direction of Shingen, hammered at Ieyasu's troops till they were broken. Ieyasu fled with just 5 men to a nearby castle. This was a major loss for Ieyasu, but Shingen was unable to exploit his victory because Ieyasu quickly gathered a new army and refused to fight Shingen again on the battlefield. Events January 11 - Austrian nobility is granted Freedom of religion. ... The Late Hōjō clan ) was one of the most powerful warrior clans in Japan in the Sengoku period. ... Year 1573 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... The Battle of Mikatagahara was fought in 1572 in Japan. ...


Fortune smiled on Ieyasu a year later when Takeda Shingen died at a siege early in 1573. Shingen was succeeded by his less capable son Takeda Katsuyori. In 1575, the Takeda army attacked Nagashino Castle in Mikawa province. Ieyasu appealed to Nobunaga for help and the result was that Nobunaga personally came at the head of his very large army (about 30,000 strong). The Oda-Tokugawa force of 38,000 won a great victory on June 28, 1575, at the Battle of Nagashino, though Takeda Katsuyori survived the battle and retreated back to Kai province. Year 1573 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Statue of Takeda Katsuyori (Yamato (Kōshū, Yamanashi), Japan) Takeda Katsuyori (武田勝頼: 1546 – 3 April 1582) was a Japanese samurai of the Sengoku Period, who was famed as the head of the Takeda clan and the successor to the legendary warlord Takeda Shingen. ... Year 1575 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1575 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Combatants Takeda forces combined Oda-Tokugawa forces Commanders Takeda Katsuyori, Anayama Nobukimi, Takeda Nobukado, Takeda Nobutoyo Oda Nobunaga, Tokugawa Ieyasu, Okudaira Sadamasa Strength 15,000 38,000 Casualties 10,000 dead, incl. ...


For the next seven years, Ieyasu and Katsuyori fought a series of small battles. Ieyasu's troops managed to wrest control of Suruga province away from the Takeda clan.


In 1579, Ieyasu's wife, and his eldest son, Matsudaira Nobuyasu, were accused of conspiring with Takeda Katsuyori to assassinate Nobunaga. Ieyasu's wife was executed and Nobuyasu was forced to commit seppuku. Ieyasu then named his third and favorite son, Tokugawa Hidetada, as heir, since his second son was adopted by another rising power: Toyotomi Hideyoshi, the future ruler of all Japan. Events January 6 - The Union of Atrecht united the southern Netherlands under the Duke of Parma, governor in the name of king Philip II of Spain. ... Matsudaira Jirō-Saburō Nobuyasu 13 April 1559—5 October 1579) was the eldest son of Tokugawa Ieyasu. ... Hara-kiri redirects here. ... Shogun Tokugawa Hidetada Tokugawa Hidetada May 2, 1579—March 14, 1632) was the second shogun of the Tokugawa dynasty, who ruled from 1605 until his abdication in 1623. ... Hideyoshi redirects here. ...


The end of the war with Takeda came in 1582 when a combined Oda-Tokugawa force attacked and conquered Kai province. Takeda Katsuyori, as well as his eldest son Takeda Nobukatsu, were defeated at the Battle of Temmokuzan and then committed seppuku. Gregorian Calendar switch: Year 1582 involved conversion to the Gregorian calendar. ... The Battle of Temmokuzan was fought in 1582 between the combined forces of Tokugawa Ieyasu and Oda Nobunaga and those of Takeda Katsuyori. ... Hara-kiri redirects here. ...


In late 1582, Ieyasu was near Osaka and far from his own territory when he learned that Nobunaga had been assassinated by Akechi Mitsuhide. Ieyasu managed the dangerous journey back to Mikawa, avoiding Mitsuhide's troops along the way, as they were trying to find and kill him. One week after he arrived in Mikawa, Ieyasu's army marched out to take revenge on Mitsuhide. But they were too late, Hideyoshi—on his own—defeated and killed Akechi Mitsuhide at the Battle of Yamazaki. Gregorian Calendar switch: Year 1582 involved conversion to the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Osaka (disambiguation). ... Shrine to Akechi Mitsuhide, Kyoto Akechi Mitsuhide 1528? – July 2, 1582 Japanese calendar 6th month 13th day), nicknamed JÅ«bei or Koretō HyÅ«ga no Kami ), was a samurai who lived during the Sengoku period of Feudal Japan. ... The Battle of Yamazaki was fought in 1582 in Yamazaki, Japan. ...


The death of Nobunaga meant that some provinces, ruled by Nobunaga's vassals, were ripe for conquest. The leader of Kai province made the mistake of killing one of Ieyasu's aides. Ieyasu promptly invaded Kai and took control. Hōjō Ujimasa, leader of the Hōjō clan responded by sending his much larger army into Shinano and then into Kai province. No battles were fought between Ieyasu's forces and the large Hōjō army and, after some negotiation, Ieyasu and the Hōjō agreed to a settlement which left Ieyasu in control of both Kai and Shinano provinces, while the Hōjō took control of Kazusa province (as well as bits of both Kai and Shinano province). Hōjō Ujimasa )(1538-1590) was the fourth head of the late Hōjō clan, and daimyo of Odawara. ... Shinano (信濃国; -no kuni) is an old province of Japan that is now present day Nagano prefecture. ...


At the same time (1583) a war for rule over Japan was fought between Toyotomi Hideyoshi and Shibata Katsuie. Ieyasu did not take a side in this conflict, building on his reputation for both caution and wisdom. Hideyoshi defeated Katsuie at the Battle of Shizugatake—with this victory, Hideyoshi became the single most powerful daimyo in Japan. 1583 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... Hideyoshi redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Combatants forces of Toyotomi Hideyoshi forces loyal to Oda Nobunaga Commanders Toyotomi Hideyoshi, Kato Kiyomasa, Fukushima Masanori Shibata Katsuie, Sakuma Morimasa Strength 20,000 men Unknown In May, 1583, a former general of Nobunagas named Shibata Katsuie coordinated a number of simultaneous attacks on these fortresses, believing that Hideyoshi... Daimyo Matsudaira Katamori visits the residence of a retainer. ...


Ieyasu and Hideyoshi (1584–1598)

In 1584, Ieyasu decided to support Oda Nobukatsu, the eldest son and heir of Oda Nobunaga, against Hideyoshi. This was a dangerous act and could have resulted in the annihilation of the Tokugawa. 1584 was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Oda Nobuo. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

Hideyoshi and Ieyasu played go at this board.
Hideyoshi and Ieyasu played go at this board.

Tokugawa troops took the traditional Oda stronghold of Owari, Hideyoshi responded by sending an army into Owari. The Komaki Campaign was the only time any of the great unifiers of Japan fought each other: Hideyoshi vs. Ieyasu. In the event, Ieyasu won the only notable battle of the campaign at Nagakute. After months of fruitless marches and feints, Hideyoshi settled the war through negotiation. First he made peace with Oda Nobuo, and then he offered a truce to Ieyasu. The deal was made at the end of the year; as part of the terms Ieyasu's second son, O Gi Maru, became an adopted son of Hideyoshi. Combatants forces of Toyotomi Hideyoshi forces of Tokugawa Ieyasu Commanders Mori Nagayoshi, Ikeda Tsuneoki, Hori Hidemasa Sakai Tadatsugu, Mizuno Tadashige, Tokugawa Ieyasu The Battle of Komaki and Nagakute ) were two battles in 1584 between the forces of Hashiba Hideyoshi (who would become Toyotomi Hideyoshi in 1586) and the forces of... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1500x1008, 518 KB) This maki-e go board is at the temple named Ryōgenin 龍源院 at Daitoku-ji, Kyoto, Japan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1500x1008, 518 KB) This maki-e go board is at the temple named Ryōgenin 龍源院 at Daitoku-ji, Kyoto, Japan. ...


Ieyasu's aide, Ishikawa Kazumasa, chose to join the pre-eminent daimyo and so he moved to Osaka to be with Hideyoshi. However, only a few other Tokugawa retainers followed this example. Ishikawa Kazumasa (1534-1609) Ishikawa Kazumasa, a very notable retainer under Tokugawa Ieyasu, even serving him since his childhood, since they were both hostages under the Imagawa at that time. ...


Hideyoshi was understandably distrustful of Ieyasu, and five years passed before they fought as allies. The Tokugawa did not participate in Hideyoshi's successful invasions of Shikoku and Kyūshū. This article is about the island. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 1590 Hideyoshi attacked the last independent daimyo in Japan, Hōjō Ujimasa. The Hōjō clan ruled the eight provinces of the Kantō region in eastern Japan. Hideyoshi ordered them to submit to his authority and they refused. Ieyasu, though a friend and occasional ally of Ujimasa, joined his large force of 30,000 samurai with Hideyoshi's enormous army of some 160,000. Hideyoshi attacked several castles on the borders of the Hōjō clan with most of his army laying siege to the castle at Odawara. Hideyoshi's army captured Odawara after six months (oddly for the time period, deaths on both sides were few). During this siege, Hideyoshi offered Ieyasu a radical deal. He offered Ieyasu the eight Kantō provinces which they were about to take from the Hōjō in return for the five provinces that Ieyasu currently controlled (including Ieyasu's home province of Mikawa). Ieyasu accepted this proposal. Bowing to the overwhelming power of the Toyotomi army, the Hōjō accepted defeat, the top Hōjō leaders killed themselves and Ieyasu marched in and took control of their provinces, so ending the clan's over 100 year reign. Bold text{| align=right cellpadding=3 id=toc style=margin-left: 15px; |- | align=center colspan=2 | Years: 1587 1588 1589 - 1590 - 1591 1592 1593 |-vdsf gno[gldw[pvkijxaiamknn csogfhbvdowkhbfkqhjkhrjkhwgfhbjkpnkfokfgok3pkpk9pjhkt9erktyujkip9kijker9thhrkg9hkitr9gtkih9t0ykltk[u0jo0iey9uhyit90ertyhige9rity9riyh9ujirtyuhjnh-4e9tyigh9thiuy0h8tyh34tu8uy8u8u8u8rtu5y8ru8thu0tru0ut0rhutuh0trhu0hseogtrhr8uyhju8t89er9te9r8fy8shit ass dick bitch fuck | align=center colspan=2 | Decades: 1560s 1570s 1580s - 1590s - 1600s 1610s 1620s |- | align=center | Centuries... Hōjō Ujimasa )(1538-1590) was the fourth head of the late Hōjō clan, and daimyo of Odawara. ... Combatants forces of Toyotomi Hideyoshi Hōjō clan army Commanders Toyotomi Hideyoshi, Tokugawa Ieyasu Hōjō Ujimasa Strength 200,000 50,000 Casualties Unknown Unknown The third siege of Odawara ) occurred in 1590, and was the primary action in Toyotomi Hideyoshis campaign to eliminate the Hōjō clan as... Kantō region, Japan The Kantō region (Japanese: 関東地方, Kantō-chihō) is a geographical area of HonshÅ«, the largest island in Japan. ...


Ieyasu now gave up control of his five provinces (Mikawa, Tōtōmi, Suruga, Shinano, and Kai) and moved all his soldiers and vassels to the Kantō region. He himself occupied the castle town of Edo in Kantō. This was possibly the riskiest move Ieyasu ever made — to leave his home province and rely on the uncertain loyalty of the formerly Hōjō samurai in Kantō. In the event, it worked out brilliantly for Ieyasu. He reformed the Kantō provinces, controlled and pacified the Hōjō samurai and improved the underlying economic infrastructure of the lands. Also, because Kantō was somewhat isolated from the rest of Japan, Ieyasu was able to maintain a unique level of autonomy from Hideyoshi's rule. Within a few years, Ieyasu had become the second most powerful daimyo in Japan. There is a Japanese proverb which likely refers to this event "Ieyasu won the Empire by retreating." [2] Edo (Japanese: , literally: bay-door, estuary, pronounced //), once also spelled Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of the Japanese capital Tokyo. ...


In 1592, Hideyoshi invaded Korea as a prelude to his plan to attack China (see Hideyoshi's attack on Korea for more information about this campaign). The Tokugawa samurai never took part in this campaign. Early in 1593, Ieyasu was summoned to Hideyoshi's court in Nagoya (in Kyūshū, different from similarly spelled city in Owari Province), as a military advisor. He stayed there, off and on for the next five years. Despite his frequent absences, Ieyasu's sons, loyal retainers and vassals were able to control and improve Edo and the other new Tokugawa lands. Year 1592 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... Combatants Joseon Dynasty Korea, Ming Dynasty China Japan under Toyotomi Hideyoshi Commanders Korea: Yi Sun-sin, Gwon Yul, Won Gyun, Kim Myung Won, Yi Il, Sin Lip, Gwak Jae-u, Kim Shi-min China: Li Rusong , Li Rubai, Ma Gui , Qian Shi-zhen, Ren Ziqiang, Yang Yuan, Zhang Shijue, Chen... Events May 18 - Playwright Thomas Kyds accusations of heresy lead to an arrest warrant for Christopher Marlowe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 1593, Hideyoshi fathered a son and heir, Toyotomi Hideyori. Events May 18 - Playwright Thomas Kyds accusations of heresy lead to an arrest warrant for Christopher Marlowe. ... For other uses, see inheritance (disambiguation). ... Grave of Toyotomi Clan at Mount Koya Toyotomi Hideyori (豊臣 秀頼 Toyotomi Hideyori), 1593-1615, was the son and designated successor of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, the general who first united all of Japan. ...


In 1598, with his health clearly failing, Hideyoshi called a meeting that would determine the Council of Five Elders who would be responsible for ruling on behalf of his son after his death. The five that were chosen as regents (tairō) for Hideyori were Maeda Toshiie, Mōri Terumoto, Ukita Hideie, Uesugi Kagekatsu, and Ieyasu himself, who was the most powerful of the five. This change in the pre-Sekigahara power structure became pivotal as Ieyasu turned his attention towards Kansai; and at the same time, other ambitious (albeit ultimately unrealized) plans, such as the Tokugawa initiative establishing official relations with Mexico and New Spain, continued to unfold and advance.[3] Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I. April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ... The council of five regents, also known as the five Tairō (五大老 go-tairō), was formed by Toyotomi Hideyoshi to rule Japan in the place of his son, Hideyori, until such time as he came of age. ... Tairō (大老, lit. ... Maeda Toshiie Maeda Toshiie (前田 利家 Maeda Toshiie; January 15, 1539 - April 27, 1599) was one of the leading generals of Oda Nobunaga following the Sengoku period of the 16th century extending to the Azuchi-Momoyama period. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ukita Hideie (宇喜多秀家, 1573-1655) was the daimyo of Bizen and Mimasaka provinces (modern Okayama Prefecture), and one of the council of Five Elders appointed by Toyotomi Hideyoshi. ... Uesugi Kagekatsu (上杉 景勝, January 8, 1556-March 19, 1623) was a daimyo during the Sengoku and Edo periods of Japanese history. ...


The Sekigahara Campaign (1598–1603)

Hideyoshi, after three more months of increasing sickness, died on September 18, 1598. He was nominally succeeded by his young son Hideyori but as he was just five years old, real power was in the hands of the regents. Over the next two years Ieyasu made alliances with various daimyo, especially those who had no love for Hideyoshi. Happily for Ieyasu, the oldest and most respected of the regents died after just one year. With the death of Regent Toshiie in 1599, Ieyasu led an army to Fushimi and took over Osaka Castle, the residence of Hideyori. This angered the three remaining regents and plans were made on all sides for war. is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I. April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ... Grave of Toyotomi Clan at Mount Koya Toyotomi Hideyori (豊臣 秀頼 Toyotomi Hideyori), 1593-1615, was the son and designated successor of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, the general who first united all of Japan. ... Year 1599 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Fushimi can refer to: Emperor Fushimi of Japan, 92nd Emperor of Japan. ... Osaka Castle Osaka Castle (大坂城・大阪城; Ōsaka-jō) is a castle in Chuo-ku, Osaka, Japan. ...


Opposition to Ieyasu centered around Ishida Mitsunari, a powerful daimyo but not one of the regents. Mitsunari plotted Ieyasu's death and news of this plot reached some of Ieyasu's generals. They attempted to kill Mitsunari but he fled and gained protection from none other than Ieyasu himself. It is not clear why Ieyasu protected a powerful enemy from his own men but Ieyasu was a master strategist and he may have concluded that he would be better off with Mitsunari leading the enemy army rather than one of the regents, who would have more legitimacy.[4] Ishida Mitsunari (石田 三成 Ishida Mitsunari 1560 - November 6, 1600) was a samurai who led the West side in the Battle of Sekigahara. ...


Nearly all of Japan's daimyo and samurai now split into two factions—Mitsunari's group and anti-Mitsunari Group. Ieyasu supported anti-Mitsunari Group, and formed them as his potential allies. Ieyasu's allies were the Date clan, the Mogami clan, the Satake clan and the Maeda clan. Mitsunari allied himself with the three other regents: Ukita Hideie, Mori Terumoto, and Uesugi Kagekatsu as well as many daimyo from the eastern end of Honshū. Grave of ÅŒshÅ« Sendai Date clan at Mount Koya The Date clan (伊達氏) was a samurai family. ... The Mogami clan ) were Japanese daimyo, and it was a branch of the Ashikaga family. ... Satake clan (佐竹氏)- Japanese clan that had the pinnacle of its power during the 16th century. ... The Maeda Clan was one of the most powerful samurai families in Japan. ... Ukita Hideie (宇喜多秀家, 1573-1655) was the daimyo of Bizen and Mimasaka provinces (modern Okayama Prefecture), and one of the council of Five Elders appointed by Toyotomi Hideyoshi. ... Mōri Terumoto (毛利 輝元) (January 22, 1553 – April 27, 1625) was the son of Mori Takamoto, fought against Toyotomi Hideyoshi but was eventually overcome, participated in the Kyushu campaign (1587) on Hideyoshis side and built Hiroshima Castle. ... Uesugi Kagekatsu (上杉 景勝, January 8, 1556-March 19, 1623) was a daimyo during the Sengoku and Edo periods of Japanese history. ...


In June 1600, Ieyasu and his allies moved their armies to defeat the Uesugi clan who was accused of planning to revolt against Toyotomi administration (Led by Ieyasu, top of Council of Five Elders). Before arriving to Uesugi's territory, Ieyasu had got information that Mitsunari and his allies moved their army against Ieyasu. Ieyasu held a meeting with daimyo, and they agreed to ally Ieyasu. He then led the majority of his army west towards Kyoto. In late summer, Ishida's forces captured Fushimi. 1600 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Ieyasu and his allies marched along the Tōkaidō, while his son Hidetada went along the Nakasendō with 38,000 soldiers. A battle against Sanada Masayuki in Shinano Province delayed Hidetada's forces, and they did not arrive in time for the main battle. Nissaka, the 25th station on the Tōkaidō, as illustrated by the Ukiyo-e master Hiroshige. ... The Nakasendō (中山道) was one of two Tokugawa-era roads connecting Edo (modern-day Tokyo) to Kyoto in Japan. ... Shinano (信濃国; -no kuni) is an old province of Japan that is now present day Nagano prefecture. ...

Main article: Battle of Sekigahara

This battle was the biggest and likely the most important battle in Japanese history. It began on October 21, 1600 with a total of 160,000 men facing each other. The Battle of Sekigahara ended with a complete Tokugawa victory.[5] The Western bloc was crushed and over the next few days Ishida Mitsunari and many other western nobles were captured and killed. Tokugawa Ieyasu was now the de facto ruler of Japan. Combatants Forces loyal to Toyotomi Hideyori, many clans from Western Japan Forces of Tokugawa Ieyasu, Clans of Eastern Japan Commanders Ishida Mitsunari, Mōri Terumoto, others Tokugawa Ieyasu, others Strength Approximately 100000 Approximately 80000 Casualties 5000-32000 dead Otani Yoshitsugu Shimazu Toyohisa Unknown; but not excessive The Battle of Sekigahara... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1600 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without...


Immediately after the victory at Sekigahara, Ieyasu redistributed land to the vassals who had served him. Ieyasu left some western daimyo un-harmed, such as the Shimazu clan, but others were completely destroyed. Toyotomi Hideyori (the son of Hideyoshi) lost most of his territory which were under management of western daimyo, and he was degraded to an ordinary daimyo, not a ruler of Japan. In later years the vassals who had pledged allegiance to Ieyasu before Sekigahara became known as the fudai daimyo, while those who pledged allegiance to him after the battle (in other words, after his power was unquestioned) were known as tozama daimyo. Tozama daimyo were considered inferior to fudai daimyo. Grave of Shimazu family at Mount Koya. ...


Shogun Ieyasu (1603–1605)

Tokugawa Ieyasu as shogun.
Tokugawa Ieyasu as shogun.

In 1603, Tokugawa Ieyasu received the title of shogun from Emperor Go-Yozei.[6] Ieyasu was 60 years old. He had outlasted all the other great men of his times: Nobunaga, Hideyoshi, Shingen, Kenshin. He was the shogun and he used his remaining years to create and solidify the Tokugawa shogunate (That was eventually to become the Edo period, about two hundred years under Ieyasu's Shogunate) , the third shogunal government (after the Minamoto and the Ashikaga). He claimed descent from the Minamoto clan by way of the Nitta family{disputed}. Ironically Ieyasu descendants would marry into the Taira and Fujiwara Clans. The Tokugawa Shogunate would rule Japan for the next 250 years. Image File history File links Tokugawa_1. ... Image File history File links Tokugawa_1. ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Minamoto no Yoritomo, the first shogun of the Kamakura shogunate Shōgun )   is supreme general of the samurai,a military rank and historical title in Japan. ... Emperor Go-Yōzei (後陽成天皇) (December 31, 1572 - September 25, 1617) was the 107th imperial ruler of Japan. ... The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. ... Minamoto (源) was an honorary surname bestowed by the Emperors of Japan of the Heian Period to their sons and grandsons after accepting them as royal subjects. ... Ashikaga (足利市; -shi) is a city located in Tochigi, Japan. ... Seiryoji, a temple in Kyoto, was once a villa of Minamoto no Toru (d. ... The Nitta clan ) was one of several major families descended from the Seiwa Genji, and numbered among the chief enemies of the Ashikaga shogunate, and later the Hōjō clan regents. ... Taira (平) is a Japanese surname. ... Fujiwara (藤原) can refer to: The Fujiwara clan and its members Kamatari Fujiwara Keiji Fujiwara Fujiwara-no-Sai, character of Hikaru no Go Takumi Tak Fujiwara, character of Initial D Zakuro Fujiwara, character of Tokyo Mew Mew (Known as Renee Roberts in the Mew Mew Power English anime) This is...

Main article: Tokugawa Shogun

Following a well established Japanese pattern, Ieyasu abdicated his official position as shogun in 1605. His successor was his son and heir, Tokugawa Hidetada. This may have been done, in part to avoid being tied up in ceremonial duties, and in part to make it harder for his enemies to attack the real power center.[7] The abdication of Ieyasu had no effect on the practical extent of his powers or his rule; but Hidetada nevertheless assumed a role as formal head of the bakufu bureaucracy. The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. ... 1605 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Shogun Tokugawa Hidetada Tokugawa Hidetada May 2, 1579—March 14, 1632) was the second shogun of the Tokugawa dynasty, who ruled from 1605 until his abdication in 1623. ... For the James Clavell novel, see Shogun or for the TV Miniseries. ...

The Tokugawa clan crest
The Tokugawa clan crest

Image File history File links Mitsubaaoi2. ... Image File history File links Mitsubaaoi2. ... The Tokugawa clan crest The Tokugawa clan ) was a powerful daimyo family of Japan. ...

Ogosho Ieyasu (1605–1616)

Ieyasu, acting as the Cloistered Shogun or Ogosho (大御所), was the effective ruler of Japan, remaining so until his death. Ieyasu retired to Sunpu, but he also supervised the building of Edo Castle, a massive construction project which lasted for the rest of Ieyasu's life. The end result was the largest castle in all of Japan, the costs for building the castle being borne by all the other daimyo, while Ieyasu reaped all the benefits. The central donjon, or tenshu, burned in the 1657 Meireki fire. Today, the Imperial Palace stands on the site of the castle. Sunpu (駿府) is the former name of Shizuoka City in Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. ... Edo Castle (江戸城 -jō) was built in 1457 by ÅŒta Dōkan in what is now the Chiyoda ward of Tokyo, but was then known as Edo, Toshima District, Musashi Province. ... Another word for the keep of a castle. ... Meireki (明暦) was a Japanese era name after Jōō and before Manji and spanned from 1655 to 1658. ...


Ogosho Ieyasu also supervised diplomatic affairs with the Netherlands and Spain. He chose to distance Japan from the Europeans starting in 1609, although the bakufu did give the Dutch exclusive trading rights and permitted them to maintain a "factory" for trading purposes. From 1605 till his death, Ieyasu consulted with an English Protestant pilot in Dutch employ, William Adams, who played a noteworthy role in forming and furthering the Shogunate's evolving relations with Spain and the Roman Catholic Church.[8] // Events April 4 – King of Spain signs an edit of expulsion of all moriscos from Spain April 9 – Spain recognizes Dutch independence May 23 - Official ratification of the Second Charter of Virginia. ... William Adams (September 24, 1564–May 16, 1620), also known in Japanese as Anjin-sama (anjin, pilot; sama, a Japanese social title or honorific more or less equivalent to lord) and Miura Anjin (三浦按針: the pilot of Miura), was an English navigator who travelled to Japan and is believed to be... Catholic Church redirects here. ...


In 1611, Ieyasu, at the head of 50,000 men, visited Kyoto to witness the coronation of Emperor Go-Mizunoo. In Kyoto, Ieyasu ordered the remodeling of the imperial court and buildings, and forced the remaining western daimyo to sign an oath of fealty to him. In 1613, he composed the Kuge Shohatto' a document which put the court daimyo under strict supervision, leaving them as mere ceremonial figureheads. The influences of Christianity, which was beset by quarreling over the Protestant Reformation and its aftermath, on Japan were proving problematic for Ieyasu. In 1614, he signed the Christian Expulsion Edict which banned Christianity, expelled all Christians and foreigners, and banned Christians from practicing their religion. As a result, many Kirishitans (early Japanese Christians) fled to the Spanish Philippines. Events June 23 - Henry Hudsons crew maroons him, his son and 7 others in a boat November 1 - At Whitehall Palace in London, William Shakespeares romantic comedy The Tempest is presented for the first time. ... Emperor Go-Mizunoo (後水尾天皇) (June 29, 1596 - September 11, 1680) was the 108th imperial ruler of Japan. ... Reformation redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 1615, he prepared the Buke Shohatto, a document setting out the future of the Tokugawa regime. Events June 2 - First Récollet missionaries arrive at Quebec City, from Rouen, France. ...


Siege of Osaka

Main article: Siege of Osaka
Grave of Ieyasu in Toshogu shrine
Grave of Ieyasu in Toshogu shrine

The climax of Ieyasu's life was the siege of Osaka Castle (16141615). The last remaining threat to Ieyasu's rule was Hideyori, the son and rightful heir to Hideyoshi. He was now a young daimyo living in Osaka Castle. Many samurai who opposed Ieyasu rallied around Hideyori, claiming he was the rightful ruler of Japan. Ieyasu found fault with the opening ceremony of a temple built by Hideyori—it was as if Hideyori prayed for Ieyasu's death and the ruin of Tokugawa clan. Ieyasu ordered Toyotomi to leave Osaka Castle, but those in the castle refused and started to gather samurai into the castle. Then the Tokugawa, with a huge army led by Ogosho Ieyasu and Shogun Hidetada, laid siege to Osaka castle in what is now known as "the Winter Siege of Osaka." Eventually, Tokugawa made a deal threatening Hideyori's mother, Yodogimi, firing cannons towards the castle to stop the fighting. However, as soon as the treaty was agreed upon, Tokugawa filled Osaka Castle's moats with sand so his troops could go across them. Ieyasu returned to Sumpu once, but after Toyotomi refused another order to leave Osaka, he and his allied army of 155,000 soldiers attacked Osaka Castle again in "the Summer Siege of Osaka." Finally in late 1615, Osaka Castle fell and nearly all the defenders were killed including Hideyori, his mother (Hideyoshi's widow, Yodogimi), and his infant son. His wife, Senhime (a granddaughter of Ieyasu), was sent back to Tokugawa alive. With the Toyotomi finally extinguished, no threats remained to Tokugawa domination of Japan. Combatants Tokugawa shogunate Toyotomi clan Commanders Tokugawa Ieyasu Toyotomi Hideyori Strength 164,000 (winter) 150,000 (summer) 113,000 (winter) 60,000 (summer) Inscription on bell at Hokoji in Kyoto The Siege of Osaka ), more commonly called ), was a series of battles undertaken by the Tokugawa shogunate against the Toyotomi... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1350x900, 452 KB) Cast gate at Toshogu, Nikko, Tochigi Prefecture, Japan, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1350x900, 452 KB) Cast gate at Toshogu, Nikko, Tochigi Prefecture, Japan, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. ... Yomeimon at Nikko Toshogu Toshogu (東照宮) is any Shinto shrine in which Tokugawa Ieyasu, the founder of the last shogunate of Japan, is enshrined with the name Tosho Dai Gongen. ... Events April 5 - In Virginia, Native American Pocahontas marries English colonist John Rolfe. ... Events June 2 - First Récollet missionaries arrive at Quebec City, from Rouen, France. ... Senhime or Princess Sen (千姫) was the eldest daughter of the shogun Tokugawa Hidetada and his wife Oeyo. ...


In 1616, Ieyasu died at age 75.[9]. The cause of death is considered as cancer or syphilis. The first Tokugawa shogun was posthumously deified as Gongen or Gongen-sama. The name gongen is derived from divine title, Tōshō Dai-Gongen (東照大権現). Gongen means a buddha appeared in the shape of Kami. In life, Ieyasu expressed the wish to be deified after his death in order to protect his descendant from the evil; and the Gongen's mausoleum at Nikkō Shrine, Nikkō Tōshō-gū (日光東照宮) hold his remains. The mausoleum's architectural style became known as gongen-zukuri or gongen- style. [10] Year 1616 (MDCXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... “Megami” redirects here. ... Nikkō Tōshō-gÅ« (日光東照宮) is a Shinto shrine dedicated to Tokugawa Ieyasu, the founder of the Tokugawa line of shoguns in Japan. ...


Ieyasu as a person

Handprint of Ieyasu at Kunozan Toshogu
Handprint of Ieyasu at Kunozan Toshogu

Ieyasu had a number of qualities that enabled him to rise to greatness. He was both careful and bold — at the right times, and at the right places. Calculating and subtle, Ieyasu switched alliances when he thought he would benefit from the change. He allied with the Hōjō clan, then he joined Hideyoshi's army of conquest which destroyed the Hōjō clan and he himself took over their lands. In this he was like other daimyo of his time. This was an era of violence, sudden death and betrayal. He was not very well liked, and he was not personally popular. But he was feared and he was respected for his leadership and his cunning. For example he wisely kept his soldiers out of Hideyoshi's disastrous campaign in Korea. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2136x2848, 1097 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Tokugawa Ieyasu Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2136x2848, 1097 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Tokugawa Ieyasu Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ...


He was capable of great loyalty; once he allied with Oda Nobunaga, he never went against Nobunaga, and both leaders profited from their long alliance. He was known for being loyal towards his personal friends and vassals whom he rewarded. However, he also remembered those who wronged him in the past. It is said that Ieyasu executed a man who came into his power because he had insulted him when Ieyasu was young.


Ieyasu protected many former Takeda retainers from the wrath of Oda Nobunaga, who was known to harbor a bitter grudge towards the Takeda. He managed to successfully transform many of the retainers of the Takeda, Hōjō, and Imagawa clans — all whom he defeated himself or helped to defeat — into loyal followers.


He had nineteen wives and concubines, by whom he had eleven sons and five daughters. The eleven sons of Ieyasu were Matsudaira Nobuyasu (松平信康), Yūki Hideyasu (結城秀康), Tokugawa Hidetada (徳川秀忠), Matsudaira Tadayoshi (松平忠吉), Takeda Nobuyoshi (武田信吉), Matsudaira Tadateru (松平忠輝), Matsuchiyo (松千代), Senchiyo (仙千代), Tokugawa Yoshinao (徳川義直), Tokugawa Yorinobu (徳川頼宣), and Tokugawa Yorifusa (徳川頼房). (In this listing, the two sons without surnames died before adulthood.) His daughters were Kame hime (亀姫), Toku hime (徳姫), Furi hime (振姫), Matsu hime (松姫) , Eishōin hime (_姫), and Ichi hime (市姫). He is said to have cared for his children and grandchildren, establishing three of them, Yorinobu, Yoshinao, and Yorifusa as the daimyo of Kii, Owari, and Mito provinces, respectively. At the same time, he could be ruthless when crossed. For example, he ordered the executions of his first wife and his eldest son-a son-in-law of Oda Nobunaga; Oda was also an uncle of Hidetada's wife Oeyo. Matsudaira Jirō-Saburō Nobuyasu 13 April 1559—5 October 1579) was the eldest son of Tokugawa Ieyasu. ... YÅ«ki Hideyasu YÅ«ki Hideyasu ) (March 1, 1574–June 2, 1607) was a daimyo in Japan who lived during the Azuchi-Momoyama and Edo periods. ... Shogun Tokugawa Hidetada Tokugawa Hidetada May 2, 1579—March 14, 1632) was the second shogun of the Tokugawa dynasty, who ruled from 1605 until his abdication in 1623. ... Takeda Nobuyoshi (武田 信吉 October 18, 1583- October 15, 1603) was a daimyo in the Edo period. ... Tokugawa Tadateru (1598-1683) Tokugawa Tadateru, the sixth son of the famed shogun, Tokugawa Ieyasu. ... Tokugawa Yoshinao (徳川 義直, 1600 - 50) is Tokugawa Ieyasus 7th son and founder of the Owari branch of the Tokugawa family. ... Tokugawa Yorinobu (1602 - 71) is Tokugawa Ieyasus 8th son and founder of the Kii branch of the Tokugawa family. ... Tokugawa Yorifusa (1603 - 61) is Tokugawa Ieyasus ninth son and founder of the Mito branch of the Tokugawa family. ... Hime ) is the Japanese word for princess or a lady of higher birth. ... Toku-hime (督姫: 1565–March 3, 1615) was a princess during the Azuchi-Momoyama and Edo periods of Japanese history. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

The butterfly mon of the Taira is called Ageha-cho (揚羽蝶) in Japanese.
The butterfly mon of the Taira is called Ageha-cho (揚羽蝶) in Japanese.

After Hidetada became shogun he married Oeyo of the Oda family of the Taira clan and they had two sons, Tokugawa Iemitsu and Tokugawa Tadanaga. They also had two daughters, one of whom, Sen hime, married twice. The other daughter, Kazuko hime, married Emperor Go-Mizunoo of descent from the Fujiwara clan. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Heraldry of Japan The chrysanthemum (kiku), seen in gold between the four bursts of this Breast Star of the Order of Chrysanthemum (a medal), is the mon of the Japanese Emperor. ... Oeyo (於江与) or Satoko (達子) or Sūgenin (崇源院: 1573–September 15, 1626) was the wife of Tokugawa Hidetada (the second Tokugawa shogun of Japan) and the mother of his successor Iemitsu. ... See also: Iwakura Oda - alternate Oda clan The Oda clan crest The Oda clan (織田家) was a family of Japanese daimyo dating back to roughly the 14th century, who were to become an important political force in the unification of Japan in the mid-16th century. ... Taira (å¹³) is a Japanese surname. ... Tokugawa Iemitsu (previously spelled Iyemitsu); 徳川 家光 (August 12, 1604 — June 8, 1651) was the third shogun of the Tokugawa dynasty who reigned from 1623 to 1651. ... Tokugawa Tadanaga (徳川忠長: 1606–1633) was a grandson of Ieyasu (the first), son of Hidetada (the second) and younger brother of Iemitsu (the third Tokugawa shogun of Japan). ... Senhime or Princess Sen (千姫) was the eldest daughter of the shogun Tokugawa Hidetada and his wife Oeyo. ... Hime ) is the Japanese word for princess or a lady of higher birth. ... Tokugawa Kazuko (1607-1678) daughter of Tokugawa Hidetada married to the Emperor Go-Mizunoo in 1620 When the Emperor Go-Mizunoo abdicated in 1629, their daughter Imperial Princess Kazu-no-miya Okiko (Tokugawa Ieyasu’s great granddaughter) became the Meisho Empress (reigned 1629-43) Barocca of Totalwar. ... Emperor Go-Mizunoo (後水尾天皇) (June 29, 1596 - September 11, 1680) was the 108th imperial ruler of Japan. ... The Fujiwara clan (藤原氏 Fujiwara-shi) was a clan of regents who had sort of monopoly to the Sekkan positions, Sesshō and Kampaku. ...


Ieyasu's favorite pastime was hawking. He regarded it as excellent training for a warrior. "When you go into the country hawking, you learn to understand the military spirit and also the hard life of the lower classes. You exercise your muscles and train your limbs. You have any amount of walking and running and become quite indifferent to heat and cold, and so you are little likely to suffer from any illness."[11]. Ieyasu swam often; even late in his life he is reported to have swum in the moat of Edo Castle. Hawking may refer either to: The tradition and sport of hunting with hawks, see falconry Selling in the street by open outcry The theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Later in life he took to scholarship and religion, patronizing scholars like Hayashi Razan.[12] Hayashi Razan (1583-1657) was a Japanese Neo-Confucianist philosopher, serving as an advisor to the first three shoguns of the Tokugawa bakufu. ...


Two of his famous quotes:

"Life is like unto a long journey with a heavy burden. Let thy step be slow and steady, that thou stumble not. Persuade thyself that imperfection and inconvenience are the natural lot of mortals, and there will be no room for discontent, neither for despair. When ambitious desires arise in thy heart, recall the days of extremity thou has passed through. Forbearance is the root of quietness and assurance forever. Look upon the wrath of the enemy. If thou knowest only what it is to conquer, and knowest not what it is like to be defeated, woe unto thee; it will fare ill with thee. Find fault with thyself rather than with others."
"The strong manly ones in life are those who understand the meaning of the word patience. Patience means restraining one's inclinations. There are seven emotions: joy, anger, anxiety, love, grief, fear, and hate, and if a man does not give way to these he can be called patient. I am not as strong as I might be, but I have long known and practiced patience. And if my descendants wish to be as I am, they must study patience."

He claimed that he fought, as a warrior or a general, in 90 battles.


In some sources Ieyasu is known to have the bad habit of biting his nails when nervous, especially before and during battle.


He was interested in various kenjutsu skills, was a patron of the Yagyū Shinkage-ryū school and also had them as his personal sword instructors. Kenjutsu ) is the Japanese martial art specializing in the use of the Japanese sword (katana). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Era of Ieyasu's rule

Ieyasu ruled directly as shogun or indirectly as Ogosho during the Keichō era (1596-1615). Keichō (慶長) was a Japanese era after Bunroku and before Genna and spanned from 1596 to 1615. ... Japanese era name (年号, nengō, lit. ...


References

  1. ^ Screech, T. (2006). Secret Memoirs of the Shoguns: Isaac Titsingh and Japan, 1779-1882. p.82.
  2. ^ Sadler, A.L. (1937). The Maker of Modern Japan, p. 164.
  3. ^ Nutail, Zelia. (1906). The Earliest Historical Relations Between Mexico and Japan, p. 2; "Japan to Decorate King Alfonso Today; Emperor's Brother Nears Madrid With Collar of the Chrysanthemum for Spanish King." New York Times, November 3, 1930.
  4. ^ Sadler, A.L. p. 187
  5. ^ Titsingh, I. (1834). Annales des empereurs du Japon, p. 405.
  6. ^ Titsingh, p. 409.
  7. ^ Wolferen, K. The Enigma of Japanese Power. p. 28
  8. ^ Nutail, pp. 6-45.
  9. ^ Minamoto no Ieyasu was born in Tenbun 11, on the 26th day of the 12th month (1542) and he died in Genna 2, on the 17th day of the 4th month (1616); and thus, his contemporaries would have said that he lived 75 years. In this period, children were considered on year old at birth and became two the following New Year's Day; and all people advanced a year that day, not on their actual birthday. Screech, pp. 85, 234; Titsingh, p. 10.
  10. ^ JAANUS / gongen-zukuri 権現造
  11. ^ Sadler, p. 344.
  12. ^ Ponsonby-Fane, Richard. (1956). Kyoto: the Old Capital of Japan, 794-1969, p. 418.
  • Bolitho, Harold. (1974). Treasures among men; the fudai daimyo in Tokugawa Japan. New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • McClain, James. (1991). The Cambridge History of Japan Volume 4. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • McLynn, Frank. (2008). The Greatest Shogun, BBC History Magazine, Vol. 9, No. 1, pp 52-53.
  • Nutail, Zelia. (1906). The Earliest Historical Relations Between Mexico and Japan. Berkeley: University of California Press....Link to digitized version from the collection of Harvard University
  • Ponsonby-Fane, Richard A.B. (1956). Kyoto: the Old Capital of Japan. Kyoto: Ponsonby-Fane Memorial Society.
  • Sadler, A.L. (1937). The Maker of Modern Japan.
  • Sansom, George. (1961). A History of Japan, 1334-1615. Stanford: Stanford University Press. ISBN 0-8047-0525-9
  • Screech, Timon. (2006). Secret Memoirs of the Shoguns: Isaac Titsingh and Japan, 1779-1822. London: RoutledgeCurzon. ISBN 0-7007-1720-X
  • Titsingh, Isaac. (1822). Illustrations of Japan. London: Ackerman.
  • Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). [Siyun-sai Rin-siyo/Hayashi Gahō, 1652], Nipon o daï itsi ran; ou, Annales des empereurs du Japon. Paris: Oriental Translation Fund of Great Britain and Ireland. ...Click link for digitized, full-text copy of this book (in French)
  • Totman, Conrad. (1967). Politics in the Tokugawa Bakufu, 1600-1843. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
Preceded by
Sengoku period
Edo Shogun:
Tokugawa Ieyasu

1603-1605
Succeeded by
Tokugawa Hidetada

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Tokugawa Ieyasu - definition of Tokugawa Ieyasu in Encyclopedia (592 words)
Tokugawa Ieyasu (also (archaic) Iyeyasu; 徳川 家康 Tokugawa Ieyasu January 31 1543–June 1 1616) was the founder of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan, and is commonly known as one of the "three great unifiers" of feudal Japan (the other two are Oda Nobunaga and Toyotomi Hideyoshi).
Ieyasu was originally daimyo (大名) of Mikawa (eastern part of present-day Aichi prefecture) but was displaced to the Kanto region during Hideyoshi's rule.
The senior house was the Owari Tokugawa, with its castle at Nagoya, a strategically important location on the Tokaido in present-day Aichi Prefecture.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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