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Encyclopedia > Togo
République Togolaise
Togolese Republic
Flag of Togo
Flag Coat of Arms
Motto"Travail, Liberté, Patrie"  (French)
"Work, Liberty, Homeland"
AnthemSalut à toi, pays de nos aïeux  (French)
"Hail to thee, land of our forefathers"

Capital
(and largest city)
Lomé
6°7′N, 1°13′E
Official languages French
Demonym Togolese
Government Republic
 -  President Faure Gnassingbé
 -  Prime Minister Komlan Mally
Independence
 -  from France April 27, 1960 
Area
 -  Total 56,785 km² (125th)
21,925 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) 4.2
Population
 -  July 2005 estimate 5.7million (102nd1)
 -  Density 108/km² (93rd²)
280/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2005 estimate
 -  Total $8.945 billion (144th1)
 -  Per capita $1,700 (193rd1)
HDI (2007) 0.512 (medium) (152nd)
Currency CFA franc (XOF)
Time zone GMT (UTC+0)
Internet TLD .tg
Calling code +228
1 Estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected. Rankings based on 2005 figures CIA World Factbook - Togo
² Rankings based on 2005 figures (source unknown)

Togo, officially the Togolese Republic, is a country in West Africa bordering Ghana in the west, Benin in the east and Burkina Faso in the north. In the south, it has a short Gulf of Guinea coast, on which the capital Lomé is located. Togo may refer to: Togo (the Togolese Republic), a country in West Africa Togoville, a town formerly known as Togo in the southern part of the country Togo (dog) a sled dog who became famous during 1925 serum run to Nome across the U.S. territory of Alaska. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Togo. ... Image File history File links Togocoa. ... Flag ratio: 3:5 The flag of Togo was adopted on April 27, 1960. ... Coat of arms of Togo The coat of arms of Togo was adopted on 14 March 1962. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Terre de nos aïeux (Land of our forefathers) is the national anthem of Togo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Togos population of 4. ... Lomé, estimated population 700,000 (1998), is the capital of Togo. ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This page contains a list of presidents of Togo. ... Faure Essozimna Gnassingbé (born June 6, 1966), also known as Faure Eyadéma, has been the President of Togo since May 4, 2005; he was previously president for twenty days from February 5 to February 25, 2005. ... List of Heads of Government of Togo (Dates in italics indicate de facto continuation of office) Political Affiliations CFN – Coordination of New Forces CPP – Patriotic Pan-African Convergence CUT – Committee of Togolese Unity PTP – Togolese Progress Party RPT – Rally of the Togolese People UTD – Togolese Union for Democracy See Also... Komlan Mally (born Komlan Laphasha Mally Hen Fap, April 12, 1960) is a Togolese politician who has been Prime Minister of Togo since December 3, 2007. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 10,000 km² and 100,000 km². ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... Map of countries by population for the year 2007. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... This article includes two lists of countries of the world[1] sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year divided by the average population for the same year. ... This page talks about Human Development Index, for other HDIs see HDI (disambiguation) World map indicating Human Development Index (2007). ... This talks about the countries in the Human Development Index, for information on the Human Development Index, please Click Here World map indicating Human Development Index (2007) (Colour-blind compliant map) For red-green color vision problems. ... now. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... GMT redirects here. ... UTC redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .tg is the Internet country code top-level domain ( ccTLD) for Togo. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... +228 is the international dialing code for Togo. ...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... Map of the Gulf of Guinea, showing the chain of islands formed by the Cameroon line of volcanoes. ... Lomé, estimated population 700,000 (1998), is the capital of Togo. ...

Contents

History of Togo

Main article: History of Togo

Western history does not record what happened in Togo before the Portuguese arrived in the late fifteenth century. During the period from the eleventh century to the sixteenth century, various tribes entered the region from all directions: the Ewé from Nigeria and Benin; and the Mina and Guin from Ghana. Most settled in coastal areas. When the slave trade began in earnest in the sixteenth century, the Mina benefited the most. For the next two hundred years, the coastal region was a major raiding center for Europeans in search of slaves, earning Togo and the surrounding region the name "The Slave Coast." The Ewes moved into the area which is now Togo from the Niger River valley between the 12th and 14th centuries. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Ewe is an ethnic group from West Africa, in Ghana, Benin and Togo. ... Gen (also called Gẽ, Gen-Gbe, or Mina) is a Gbe language spoken in the southeast of Togo and in the Mono province of Benin. ... Guin is a city located in Marion County, Alabama. ... The Slave Coast is the name of the coastal areas of present Togo, Benin (formerly Dahomey) and western Nigeria, a fertile region of coastal Western Africa along the Bight of Benin. ...


In an 1884 treaty signed at Togoville, Germany declared a protectorate over a stretch of territory along the coast and gradually extended its control inland. This became the German colony Togoland in 1905. After the German defeat during World War I in August 1914 at the hands of British troops (coming from the Gold Coast) and the French troops (coming from Dahomey), Togoland became two League of Nations mandates, administered by the United Kingdom and France. After World War II, these mandates became UN Trust Territories. The residents of British Togoland voted to join the Gold Coast as part of the new independent nation of Ghana, and French Togoland became an autonomous republic within the French Union. Independence came in 1960 under Sylvanus Olympio. Sylvanus Olympio was assassinated in a military coup on January 13, 1963 by a group of soldiers under the direction of Sergeant Etienne Eyadema Gnassingbe. Opposition leader Nicolas Grunitzky was appointed president by the "Insurrection Committee" headed by Emmanuel Bodjollé. However, on January 13, 1967, Eyadema Gnassingbe overthrew Grunitzky in a bloodless coup and assumed the presidency, which he held from that date until his sudden death on February 5, 2005. Togoville is a town in southern Togo, lying on the northern shore of Lake Togo. ... The German Colony of Jerusalem was one of several German Colonies built in the Holy Land at the second half of the 19th century. ... Togoland was a German protectorate in West Africa. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Dahomey was a kingdom in Africa, situated in what is now the nation of Benin. ... Mandates in the Middle east and Africa. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... United Nations Trust Territories were the successors of the League of Nations mandates and came into being when the League of Nations ceased to exist in 1946. ... British Togoland was a League of Nations Mandate in Africa, formed by the splitting of German Togoland into French Togoland and British Togoland. ... Flag of Gold Coast Map from 1896 of the British Gold Coast Colony. ... French Togoland was a France Mandate territory in West Africa, which later became the Togolese Republic. ... Established by the French constitution of October 27, 1946, the French Union (French: Union Française) was a political entity created to replace the old French colonial system, the French Empire (Empire français). ... Sylvanus Epiphanio Olympio (September 1902 - 13 January 1963) was a Togolese political figure. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... General Gnassingbé Eyadéma, formerly Étienne Eyadéma (December 26, 1937 – February 5, 2005), was the President of Togo from 1967 until his death. ... Nicolas Grunitzky (1913-1969) was the second president of Togo. ... Emmanuel Bodjollé (born 1928) served as Chairman of the Insurrection Committee in Togo from 13 January 1963 to 15 January 1963 following the overthrow of President Sylvanus Olympios government. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Eyadema Gnassingbe (many wrongly think Eyadema was his last name) died in early 2005 after thirty-eight years in power, as Africa's longest sitting dictator. The military's immediate but short-lived installation of his son, Faure Gnassingbe, as president provoked widespread international condemnation, except from France. However, surprisingly, some democratically elected African leaders, such as Abdoulaye Wade of Senegal and Olusegun Obasanjo of Nigeria, supported that move and created a rift within the African Union. Faure Gnassingbe stood down and called elections which he won two months later. The opposition claimed that the election was fraudulent. The developments of 2005 led to renewed questions about a commitment to democracy made by Togo in 2004 in a bid to normalize ties with the European Union, which cut off aid in 1993 over the country's human rights record. Moreover, up to 400 people were killed in the political violence surrounding the presidential poll, according to the United Nations. Around 40,000 Togolese fled to neighboring countries. General Gnassingbé Eyadéma, formerly Étienne Eyadéma (December 26, 1937 – February 5, 2005), was the President of Togo from 1967 until his death. ... Faure Gnassingbé Faure Essozimna Gnassingbé (born June 6, 1966), also known as Faure Eyadéma, was President of Togo for twenty days from February 5 to February 25, 2005. ... Abdoulaye Wade (born May 29, 1926 in Kébémer[2]) is the third and current President of Senegal, in office since 2000. ... General (rtd. ... Anthem Let Us All Unite and Celebrate Together [1] Administrative Centre Working languages Arabic English Spanish French Portuguese Swahili Membership 53 African states Leaders  -  Chairman Jakaya Kikwete  -  Jean Ping Establishment  -  as the OAU May 25, 1963   -  as the African Union July 9, 2002  Area  -  Total 29,757,900 km² (1st1...


Economy

Main article: Economy of Togo

Togo's small sub-Saharan economy is heavily dependent on both commercial and subsistence agriculture, which provides employment for 65% of the labor force. Cocoa, coffee, and cotton together generate about 30% of export earnings. Togo is self-sufficient in basic foodgoods when harvests are normal, with occasional regional supply difficulties. In the industrial sector, phosphate mining is by far the most important activity, although it has suffered from the collapse of world phosphate prices and increased foreign competition. Togo's GNI per capita is US$380 (World Bank, 2005). // Agriculture Subsistence agriculture is the main economic activity in Togo; the majority of the population depends on subsistence agriculture. ... A political map showing national divisions in relation to the ecological break (Sub-Saharan Africa in green) A geographical map of Africa, showing the ecological break that defines the sub-Saharan area Sub-Saharan Africa is the term used to describe the area of the African continent which lies south... For other uses, see Cocoa (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Coffee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... A phosphate, in inorganic chemistry, is a salt of phosphoric acid. ... Gross National Income (GNI) comprises the total value k produced within a country (i. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...

Phosphate mining by SNPT company
Phosphate mining by SNPT company

Togo serves as a regional commercial and trade center. The government's decade-long effort, supported by the World Bank and the IMF, to implement economic reform measures, encourage foreign investment, and bring revenues in line with expenditures, has stalled. Political unrest, including private and public sector strikes throughout 1992 and 1993, jeopardized the reform program, shrank the tax base, and disrupted vital economic activity. The 12 January 1994 devaluation of the currency by 50% provided an important impetus to renewed structural adjustment; these efforts were facilitated by the end of strife in 1994 and a return to overt political calm. Progress depends on increased openness in government financial operations (to accommodate increased social service outlays) and possible downsizing of the military, on which the regime has depended to stay in place. Lack of aid, along with depressed cocoa prices, generated a 1% fall in GDP in 1998, with growth resuming in 1999. Assuming no deterioration of the political atmosphere, growth should rise to 5% a year in 2000-2001. The World Bank logo The World Bank (the Bank) is a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), is a bank that makes loans to developing countries for development programs with the stated goal of reducing poverty. ... The flag of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is the international organization entrusted with overseeing the global financial system by monitoring foreign exchange rates and balance of payments, as well as offering technical and financial assistance when asked. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...


Religion

About half the population adheres to indigenous, animist beliefs [1]. Christianity is the second largest religious group, to which 29% of the country's population belong. The remaining 21% of Togolese follow Islam. The term Animism is derived from the Latin anima, meaning soul.[1][2] In its most general sense, animism is simply the belief in souls. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...


Politics

Main article: Politics of Togo

Togo's transition to democracy is stalled. Its democratic institutions remain nascent and fragile. President Gnassingbé Eyadéma, who ruled Togo under a one-party system for nearly twenty-five of his thirty-seven years in power, died of a heart attack on February 5, 2005. Under the constitution, the speaker of parliament, Fambaré Ouattara Natchaba, should have become president, pending a new election. Natchaba was out of the country, returning on an Air France plane from Paris. The Togolese army closed the nation's borders, forcing the plane to land in nearby Benin. With an engineered power vacuum, the army announced that Eyadéma's son Faure Gnassingbé, also known as Faure Eyadéma, who had been the communications minister, would succeed him. The constitution of Togo declared that in the case of the president's death, the speaker of Parliament takes his place, and has sixty days to call new elections. However, on February 6th, Parliament retroactively changed the Constitution, declaring that Faure would hold office for the rest of his father's term, with elections deferred until 2008. The stated justification was that Natchaba was out of the country.[2] . The government also moved to remove Natchaba as speaker [3] and replaced him with Faure Gnassingbé, who was sworn in on February 7, 2005, despite the international criticism of the succession. [3] Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Togos transition to democracy is stalled. ... General Gnassingbé Eyadéma, formerly Étienne Eyadéma (December 26, 1937 – February 5, 2005), was the President of Togo from 1967 until his death. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fambaré Ouattara Natchaba (b. ... Faure Essozimna Gnassingbé (born June 6, 1966), also known as Faure Eyadéma, has been the President of Togo since May 4, 2005; he was previously president for twenty days from February 5 to February 25, 2005. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The African Union described the takeover as a military coup d'état. [4] International pressure came also from the United Nations. Within Togo, opposition to the takeover culminated in riots in which several hundred died. In the village of Aného reports of a general civilian uprising followed by a large scale massacre by government troops went largely unreported. In response, Gnassingbé agreed to hold elections and on February 25, Gnassingbé resigned as president, but soon afterwards accepted the nomination to run for the office in April. On April 24, 2005, Gnassingbé was elected president of Togo, receiving over 60% of the vote according to official results. However fraud was suspected as cause of his election, due to a lack of presence of the European Union or other such oversight. See the History section of this article for details. Parliament designated Deputy Speaker Bonfoh Abbass as interim president until the inauguration of the election winner.[5] Coup redirects here. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... Aneho is a town in south eastern Togo, lying between the Atlantic Ocean and Lake Togo. ... Flag of Togo, a West African country. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... El-Hadj Bonfoh Abbass (b. ...


Current political situation

On May 3, 2005, Faure Gnassingbe was sworn in as the new president, garnering 60% of the vote according to official results. Discontent has continued however, with the opposition declaring the voting rigged, claiming the military stole ballot boxes from various polling stations in the South, as well as other election irregularities, such as telecommunication shutdown. [6] The European Union has suspended aid in support of the opposition claims, while the African Union and the United States have declared the vote "reasonably fair" and accepted the outcome. The Nigerian president and Chair of the AU, Olusẹgun Ọbasanjọ, has sought to negotiate between the incumbent government and the opposition to establish a coalition government, but rejected an AU Commission appointment of former Zambian president, Kenneth Kaunda, as special AU envoy to Togo ([7] and [8]). Later in June, President Gnassingbe named opposition leader Edem Kodjo as the prime Minister. is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Matthew Olusẹgun Aremu Ọbasanjọ (born March 5, 1937) (GCFR, Grand Commander of the Federal Republic[1]; transliterated: ) is a retired Nigerian Army General and politician. ... Kenneth David Kaunda, commonly known as KK (born April 28, 1924) served as the first President of Zambia, from 1964 to 1991. ... Edouard Kodjovi Kodjo, better known as Edem Kodjo, (born May 23, 1938) is a Togolese politician and diplomat. ...


As of April 2006 reconciliation talks between the government and the opposition are in progress; said talks were suspended after Eyadema's death in 2005. In August the government and the opposition signed an accord providing for the participation of opposition parties in a transitional government.


Culture

Traditional Taberma houses
Traditional Taberma houses
See also: Music of Togo

Togo's culture reflects the influences of its thirty-seven ethnic groups, the largest and most influential of which are the Ewe, Mina, and Kabre. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,592 × 1,944 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,592 × 1,944 pixels, file size: 2. ... Togohas produced a number of internationally known popular entertainers including Bella Bellow and Jimi Hope. ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... Look up ewe, Ewe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Mina can refer to: // MiNa, the Microsystems and Nanotechnology Research Group at The University of British Columbia Mina, Gabon Mina, Greece Mina, Iloilo, in the Philippines. ... Kabye is the name for both the Kaybe or Kabiyé language and peoples of the northern plains of Togo. ...


French is the official language of Togo. The many indigenous African languages spoken by Togolese include: Gbe languages such as Ewe, Mina, and Aja; Kabiyé; and others. Map showing the distribution of African language families and some major African languages. ... The Gbe languages (pronounced )[1] form a cluster of about twenty related languages stretching across the area between eastern Ghana and western Nigeria. ... Ewe (native name , the language) is a Kwa language spoken in Ghana and Togo by approximately three million people. ... Gen (also called Gẽ, Gen-Gbe, or Mina) is a Gbe language spoken in the southeast of Togo and in the Mono province of Benin. ... Kabiyé (also Kabiye, Kabyé, Kabye) is a Grusi language spoken primarily in Togo, and also in Benin and Ghana. ...


Despite the influences of Christianity and Islam, over half of the people of Togo follow native animistic practices and beliefs. This article is in need of attention. ...


Ewe statuary is characterized by its famous statuettes which illustrate the worship of the twins, the ibéji. Sculptures and hunting trophies were used rather than the more ubiquitous African masks. The wood-carvers of Kloto are famous for their "chains of marriage": two characters are connected by rings drawn from only one piece of wood. Look up ewe, Ewe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Statues redirects here. ... Prefectures of Plateaux Kloto is a prefecture located in the Plateaux Region of Togo. ...


The dyed fabric batiks of the artisanal center of Kloto represent stylized and coloured scenes of ancient everyday life. The loincloths used in the ceremonies of the weavers of Assahoun are famous. Works of the painter Sokey Edorh are inspired by the immense arid extents, swept by the harmattan, and where the laterite keeps the prints of the men and the animals. The plastics technician Paul Ahyi is internationally recognized today. He practices the "zota", a kind of pyroengraving, and his monumental achievements decorate Lome. This article is about the textile dyeing technique. ... Prefectures of Plateaux Kloto is a prefecture located in the Plateaux Region of Togo. ... Three varieties of Zota Zota Soda is a fairly new soda made with green tea. ... Lomé, estimated population 700,000 (1998), is the capital of Togo. ...


Sport

As in much of Africa, football is the most popular sporting pursuit. Until 2006, Togo was very much a minor force in world football, but like fellow West African nations such as Senegal, Nigeria and Cameroon before them, the Togolese national team finally qualified for the World Cup. Until his dismissal from the team over a long-standing bonus dispute[9], Emmanuel Adebayor was largely considered the side's star player. He currently plays for English Premiership club, Arsenal. Togo was knocked out of the tournament in the group stage after losing to South Korea, Switzerland and France. Photo of the team A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Soccer redirects here. ... First international Togo 1 - 1 Gold Coast (Togo; 13 October 1956) Biggest win 4 - 0, 7 times Biggest defeat Morocco 7 - 0 Togo (Morocco; 28 October 1979) Tunisia 7 - 0 Togo (Tunis, Tunisia; 7 January 2000) World Cup Appearances 1 (First in 2006) Best result Round 1, 2006 African Nations... The 2006 FIFA World Cup was the 18th staging of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international association football world championship tournament. ... Emmanuel Adebayor (born 26 February 1984 in Lomé) is a Togolese football player of Nigerian descent who currently plays for Arsenal. ... For the Scottish equivalent see Scottish Premier League The FA Premier League (often referred to as the Barclays Premiership in England and the Barclays English Premier League or just simply The EPL internationally) is a league competition for football clubs located at the top of the English football league system... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are an English professional football club based in Holloway, north London. ...


Togo's 2006 World Cup appearance was marred by a dispute over financial bonuses, a situation that almost led to the team boycotting their match against Switzerland. Eventually, Togo did fulfil all three fixtures, failing to qualify for the second round of the competition. Over the following months, the stalemate has continued to mar Togolese football, and eventually resulted in the dismissal of strike pair Emmanuel Adebayor and Kader Cougbadja, and defender Nibombe Dare in March 2007, ostensibly for "indecent remarks concerning the FTF management"[4]. Emmanuel Adebayor (born 26 February 1984 in Lomé) is a Togolese football player of Nigerian descent who currently plays for Arsenal. ...


After their outings as World Cup underdogs, Togo gained support throughout the world. For example, Togo has a 'Supporters Club' in Levenmouth in Scotland, whilst the Newry Togo Supporters Club has its own bar as a venue in Newry, Northern Ireland.


See also

Membership badge of the Association Scoute du Togo Association Scoute du Togo, the national Scouting organization of Togo, was founded in 1920, and became a member of the World Organization of the Scout Movement in 1977. ... Buranda is a fictional West African developing country (or LDC (less developed country) at the time of filming) that features in the second episode of Yes Minister (The Official Visit) and (briefly) Yes, Prime Minister. ... Yes Minister is a satirical British sitcom written by Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn that was first transmitted by BBC television and radio between 1980 and 1984, split over three seven-episode series. ... Cokossi is a traditional monarchy in Togo existent from the 17th century,or before. ... Telephones - main lines in use: 22,000 (1995) Telephones - mobile cellular: NA Telephone system: fair system based on network of microwave radio relay routes supplemented by open-wire lines and cellular system domestic: microwave radio relay and open-wire lines for conventional system; cellular system has capacity of 10,000... Togos population of 4. ... Togo is a transit hub for Nigerian heroin and cocaine traffickers. ... First international Togo 1 - 1 Gold Coast (Togo; 13 October 1956) Biggest win 4 - 0, 7 times Biggest defeat Morocco 7 - 0 Togo (Morocco; 28 October 1979) Tunisia 7 - 0 Togo (Tunis, Tunisia; 7 January 2000) World Cup Appearances 1 (First in 2006) Best result Round 1, 2006 African Nations... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require rewriting and/or reformatting. ...

Lists

German colonial empire This is a list of former German Empire colonies and protectorates (German: Schutzgebiete), the German colonial empire. ... This page aims to list articles on Wikipedia that are related to Togo. ... African Writers (by country): This is a list of prominent and notable literary figures from the African continent, listed by country, including poets, novelists, childrens writers, essayists, and scholars, listed by country. ...

References

Bibliography

This article contains material from the CIA World Factbook which, as a U.S. government publication, is in the public domain. The World Factbook (ISSN 1553-8133; also known as the CIA World Factbook)[2] is an annual publication of the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with almanac-style information about the countries of the world. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

German East Africa (German: Deutsch-Ostafrika) was Germanys colony in East Africa, including what is now Burundi, Rwanda, and Tanganyika, the mainland part of present Tanzania. ... ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ...

External links

Find more about Togo on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
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Government
Aid Work
  • Apis-Togo.org - Association pour l'Alphabétisation et la Promotion des Infrastructures et de la Santé au Togo et en Afrique
  • [10] - Synergie des Jeunes pour Demain, la plus grande association de volontariat jeune pour le development.
News
  • AllAfrica.com - Togo news headline links
  • IFEX - Togo alerts, news articles and dossiers
Overviews
  • BBC News Country Profile - Togo
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica, Country Page - Togo
  • CIA World Factbook - Togo
  • Open Directory Project - Togo directory category
  • US State Department - Togo includes Background Notes, Country Study and major reports
Sports
  • Photo of the national football team
Tourism


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ethnologue report for Togo (1182 words)
In Togo in the southeast corner of the Plateau Province north and south of the 'Forêt de Togodo', in the prefecture of Moyen-Mono, as well as in the prefecture 'des Lacs' and the prefecture of Yoto.
Dialects: Adan, Agu, Anglo (Anlo, Awlan), Aveno, Be, Gbin, Ho, Kpelen, Togo, Vlin, Vo.
Central Togo, in the East Mono Prefecture, Kpessi and Nyamassila cantons and in Blitta Prefecture, Langabou Canton.
Togo - MSN Encarta (461 words)
Togo, republic in West Africa, bounded on the north by Burkina Faso, on the east by Benin, on the south by the Gulf of Guinea (an arm of the Atlantic Ocean), and on the west by Ghana.
Togo extends about 550 km (about 340 mi) in a north-south direction and ranges from about 40 to 130 km (about 25 to 80 mi) in width.
In the south of Togo is a narrow, low-lying coastal belt containing a series of inland lagoons.
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