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Encyclopedia > To Tell the Truth
To Tell the Truth

Show logo, 1973-78
Format Game show
Created by Bob Stewart,[1] for Mark Goodson-Bill Todman Productions
Starring Bud Collyer (host, 1956-1968)
Garry Moore (host, 1969-1977)
Joe Garagiola (host, 1977-1978)
Robin Ward (host, 1980-1981)
Gordon Elliott (host, 1990)
Lynn Swann (host, 1990-1991)
Alex Trebek (host, 1991)
John O'Hurley (host, 2000-2002)
Numerous regular panelists (see article)
Country of origin Flag of the United States United States
Production
Running time 30 minutes with commercials
Broadcast
Original channel CBS, Syndicated, NBC
Original run 1956 – 2002

To Tell the Truth is an American television game show created by Bob Stewart[1] and produced by Goodson-Todman Productions that has been aired intermittently in various formats since 1956, hosted by various television personalities. It is one of two game shows in the United States to have aired at least one version every decade for the past five decades. (The other is The Price Is Right, also originally created by Stewart for Goodson-Todman and currently American TV's longest running daily game.) To Tell the Truth has been seen first-run either on network television or in syndication a total of 25 seasons, just exceeding the 24 of What's My Line? and outpacing the 20 of I've Got a Secret. Charles Robert Jenkins (born February 18, 1940) is a former United States Army soldier who lived in North Korea from 1965 to 2004 after deserting his unit and crossing the DMZ. // Jenkins was born in Rich Square, North Carolina. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Quiz show redirects here. ... Mark Goodson (January 14, 1915 – December 18, 1992) was an accomplished American television producer who specialized in game shows. ... Bill Todman (July 31, 1916-July 29, 1979) was an American television producer born in New York City. ... Bud Collyer on Beat The Clock, 1957 Bud Collyer (b. ... Garry Moore smoking as he often did while hosting Ive Got A Secret Garry Moore (January 31, 1915 – November 28, 1993) was born in Baltimore, Maryland as Thomas Garrison Morfit. ... Joseph Henry Garagiola, Sr. ... Robin Ward (born 1944) is a Canadian actor and television personality. ... Gordon Elliott (Born September 30, 1956) is a reporter and actor. ... Lynn Curtis Swann (b. ... Alex Trebek, with his once-iconic mustache, hosting a 1986 episode of Jeopardy! George Alexander Trebek (born as Giorgi Suka-Alex Trebek [1] on July 22, 1940) is an Emmy Award-winning Canadian-American television personality and game show host whos best known as the host of the game... John Gerald OHurley (born October 9, 1954, in Kittery, Maine) is an American actor best known for his recurring role as J. Peterman on Seinfeld. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... This article is about the television network. ... Quiz show redirects here. ... Mark Goodson (January 14, 1915 – December 18, 1992) was an accomplished American television producer who specialized in game shows. ... Bill Todman (July 31, 1916-July 29, 1979) was an American television producer born in New York City. ... This is a list of television-related events in 1956. ... The Price Is Rights US 36th season logo. ... Whats My Line? is a weekly panel game show originally produced by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman for CBS television. ... Ive Got a Secret (abbreviated as IGAS) was a weekly panel game show produced by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman for CBS television and was created by Allan Sherman as essentially a knockoff of Whats My Line?. The original version of the show premiered in June 19, 1952...


The show has been hosted by numerous game show hosts of various backgrounds, and has aired mostly in syndication after the Collyer years, with the lone exception being the 1990-91 version. Bud Collyer hosted during the original years, with various people subbing in for him whenever he was sick, most notably Bert Convy, Merv Griffin and even producer Mark Goodson himself. The original show aired in daytime and primetime, with daytime version outlasting the primetime version by one year. Bud Collyer on Beat The Clock, 1957 Bud Collyer (b. ... Bernard Whalen Bert Convy (July 23, 1933 – July 15, 1991) was an American game show host and panelist, actor and singer known for his tenure as the host for Tattletales, Super Password, and Win, Lose or Draw. ... Mervyn Edward Merv Griffin, Jr. ... Mark Goodson (January 14, 1915 – December 18, 1992) was an accomplished American television producer who specialized in game shows. ...


Garry Moore hosted in the 70's for syndication, with Joe Garagiola taking over for the final season after Moore was diagnosed with throat cancer. Canadian comedian Robin Ward took over for the 80's version, with Gordon Elliott, Lynn Swann and Alex Trebek all hosting the 90's version. John O'Hurley hosted the recent 2000 revival. Garry Moore smoking as he often did while hosting Ive Got A Secret Garry Moore (January 31, 1915 – November 28, 1993) was born in Baltimore, Maryland as Thomas Garrison Morfit. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... Joseph Henry Garagiola, Sr. ... Robin Ward (born 1944) is a Canadian actor and television personality. ... Gordon Elliott (Born September 30, 1956) is a reporter and actor. ... Lynn Curtis Swann (b. ... Alex Trebek, with his once-iconic mustache, hosting a 1986 episode of Jeopardy! George Alexander Trebek (born as Giorgi Suka-Alex Trebek [1] on July 22, 1940) is an Emmy Award-winning Canadian-American television personality and game show host whos best known as the host of the game... John Gerald OHurley (born October 9, 1954, in Kittery, Maine) is an American actor best known for his recurring role as J. Peterman on Seinfeld. ...


Many famous celebrities have appeared on the show as guests, including Alan Freed, Orville Redenbacher, Ally Sheedy and Caroll Spinney. This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... An image of Orville Redenbacher on a popcorn container Image:Bci oriville 1. ... Alexandra Elizabeth Sheedy (born June 13, 1962) is an American screen and stage actress, possibly best known for her roles in the Brat Pack films The Breakfast Club and St. ... Spinney appears on a 1970s episode of Whats My Line Caroll Spinney, sometimes credited as Carroll Spinney or Ed Spinney (born December 26, 1933 in Waltham, Massachusetts, USA) is a puppeteer most famous for playing Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch on the childrens television show Sesame Street. ...

Contents

Gameplay

The basic premise of the show consists of a panel of four celebrities correctly uncovering a contestant's identity from a choice of three possibilities. One of the contestants normally holds an unusual occupation (a premise similar to the show's sister, What's My Line?) or has done something noteworthy, and it is this person that the panel must attempt to identify. Each of the three contestants claims to be this person, and is interrogated in turn by the panel who will then vote whom they think is telling the truth. However, if one of the panel actually knows the guest, then they would abstain from voting, which would automatically count as an incorrect vote for the panel. For other uses, see Celebrity (disambiguation). ... Whats My Line? is a weekly panel game show originally produced by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman for CBS television. ...


Once the votes have been cast, the host asks "Will the real [person's name], please stand up?" The truthful contestant stands, often after some brief playful feinting and false starts among all three guests, and the other two then reveal their proper identity. Prize money is awarded to the contestants based on how many incorrect votes were placed by the panel; the more successfully the contestants bluff, the larger their final cash award.


History

First edition (1956–1968, CBS)

To Tell the Truth premiered on Tuesday, December 18, 1956, on CBS in prime time as Nothing But the Truth but changed its name to To Tell the Truth the following week.[2] A daytime five-day-per-week edition was introduced on Monday, June 18, 1962, running at 3 p.m. Eastern, and 2 p.m. Central. is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Prime time is the block of programming on television during the middle of the evening. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Bud Collyer was the host of this version; major panelists by the 1960s included Tom Poston, Peggy Cass, Orson Bean, and Kitty Carlisle. Earlier regular panelists had included Johnny Carson, Polly Bergen, Jayne Meadows, Don Ameche, columnist Hy Gardner, Dick Van Dyke, John Cameron Swayze, and Ralph Bellamy. Betsy Palmer also appeared on several episodes in 1956. Bud Collyer on Beat The Clock, 1957 Bud Collyer (b. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... Tom Poston (October 17, 1921 – April 30, 2007) was an American television and film actor. ... Mary Margaret (Peggy) Cass (May 21, 1924 - March 8, 1999) was an Academy Award-nominated actress, comedian, game show panelist, and announcer. ... Orson Bean, born Dallas Frederick Burroughs (July 22, 1928 in Burlington, Vermont), is an American film and stage actor. ... Kitty Carlisle in Die Fledermaus, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Kitty Carlisle Hart (b. ... For other persons named John Carson, see John Carson (disambiguation). ... Polly Bergen (born Nellie Paulina Burgin on July 14, 1930, in Knoxville, Tennessee) is an American actress, singer, and entrepreneur. ... Jayne Meadows (b. ... Not to be confused with former NBA player John Amaechi. ... Hy Gardner (December 2, 1908 – June 17, 1989) was a columnist for the New York Herald Tribune, host of The Hy Gardner Show, and a regular panelist on the first incarnation of To Tell The Truth. ... Richard Wayne Dick Van Dyke (born December 13, 1925) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor, presenter and entertainer, with a career spanning 5 decades. ... John Cameron Swayze (April 4, 1906-August 15, 1995), was a popular news commentator and game show panelist in the United States, during the 1950s. ... Ralph Rexford Bellamy (June 17, 1904 – November 29, 1991) was a Tony Award-winning American actor with a career spanning sixty-two years. ... Betsy Palmer (born November 1, 1926) is an American actress. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The title card from the 1956-1968 edition.

The daytime show featured a separate panel its first three years with actress Phyllis Newman as the only regular. However, the evening panel took over the afternoon show in 1965, and in early 1968, Bert Convy replaced Poston in the first chair. In the prime time version, three panel games were played per show; the producers reduced it to two games on the daytime version. Each incorrect guess from the panel paid the challengers $250 on the prime time run, for a possible $1000. But if the entire panel was correct, the challengers split $150. A design element in the set of this series is that the challengers were introduced from an upper level stage directly above and behind the host's desk, and then traveled down a curved staircase to the main stage level. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Phyllis Newman (born March 19, 1933 in Jersey City, New Jersey) is an actress and singer who was a frequent panelist on game shows such as Whats My Line? and Match Game. ... Bernard Whalen Bert Convy (July 23, 1933 – July 15, 1991) was an American game show host and panelist, actor and singer known for his tenure as the host for Tattletales, Super Password, and Win, Lose or Draw. ...

The panelists in a color episode.

On the CBS daytime run, each wrong vote paid the team $100. During the show's final year and a half, the studio audience also voted, with the majority vote counting equally with that of each of the celebrity panelists. If two or all three challengers tied for highest vote from the audience, that counted as an incorrect vote and a guaranteed $100 for the contestants.[3]

Three challengers, with the audience' and panel's votes.
Three challengers, with the audience' and panel's votes.

Bern Bennett, Collyer's announcer on Beat the Clock, was the lead voice of To Tell the Truth in the 1950s. Upon Bennett's transfer to CBS' Los Angeles studios, Johnny Olson joined the show in 1960 and remained through the end of its CBS runs. Other CBS staff announcers filled in as the show's voices during various times. For other uses, see Beat the Clock (disambiguation). ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... John Leonard Johnny Olson (May 22, 1910 – October 12, 1985) was an American radio personality and television announcer, most notable for announcing 32 game shows from Mark Goodson-Bill Todman productions, from the late 1950s through the mid 1980s. ...


On 05/25/67 and 05/26/67, during one of Collyer's absences from the show, the guest host was packager Mark Goodson himself.[4][5] Robert Q. Lewis, a comedian and game show host as well, also hosted in place of Collyer, often in the 60's being the one asked to sub-host in the place of Bud when Bud was ill or on vacation.[6][7] Lewis substituted during Collyer's extended illness from May through July of 1967, beginning with the episode following the two Mark Goodson hosted shows. One episode during this stretch, from the nighttime edition, is one of the few from the CBS run preserved on color videotape. This is as opposed to kinescope, which at the time was still being used to record television shows. Other game show hosts who have subbed for Bud during the show were Bert Convy, Merv Griffin, Orson Bean, amongst others. Mark Goodson (January 14, 1915 – December 18, 1992) was an accomplished American television producer who specialized in game shows. ... Robert Q. Lewis (April 5, 1921 – December 11, 1991) was an American radio and television personality, game show host, and actor. ... Bottom view of VHS videotape cassette with magnetic tape exposed Videotape is a means of recording images and sound onto magnetic tape as opposed to movie film. ... Kinescope (IPA: ) originally referred to the cathode ray tube used in television monitors. ... Mervyn Edward Merv Griffin, Jr. ...


Second edition (1969–1978, syndicated)

Host Garry Moore.
Host Garry Moore.

This first version of the show was cancelled on September 6, 1968, but returned only a year later, in autumn of 1969, in first-run syndication. G-T experienced success the previous season with relaunching What's My Line? as an off-network daily feature for local stations, so the company tried emulating that approach with To Tell the Truth; it too reaped great success for the packager, who would lose all its network shows, daytime and primetime, during the 1969-1970 season. During the early years of its run, the syndicated Truth would become a highly-rated component of stations' early-evening schedules after the Federal Communications Commission imposed the Prime Time Access Rule in 1971,[8] opening up at least a half hour (a full hour, usually, on Eastern Time Zone stations) to fill with non-network fare between either the local or network evening newscast and the start of the network's primetime schedule for the evening.[8] Still other stations found success running the program in place of a daytime network game or soap opera, or in the afternoon "fringe" time period between the end of network daytime programming at 4:30/3:30 Central and the evening newscasts. Image File history File linksMetadata GarryMoore. ... Image File history File linksMetadata GarryMoore. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... FCC redirects here. ... The Prime Time Access Rule (PTAR) was instituted by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to restrict the amount of network programming that local television stations owned by or affiliated with a network may air during prime time. The first PTAR was issued in 1970 and was implemented at the beginning... Eastern Standard Time redirects here. ... The first TIME cover devoted to soap operas: Dated January 12, 1976, Bill Hayes and Susan Seaforth Hayes of Days of our Lives are featured with the headline Soap Operas: Sex and suffering in the afternoon. A soap opera is an ongoing, episodic work of fiction, usually broadcast on television...


Based again in New York, To Tell The Truth was videotaped at CBS-TV Studio 50 (later known as the Ed Sullivan Theater), until 1971, when it moved to the NBC studios in Rockefeller Center. To Tell The Truth had moved to Studio 50 late in its CBS network run after having been based at CBS-TV Studio 52, now the disco-theatre, Studio 54. Ed Sullivan. ... This article is about the television network. ... A television studio is an installation in which television or video productions take place, either for live television, for recording live on tape, or for the acquisition of raw footage for postproduction. ... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ... Discothèque redirects here. ... The original Studio 54 logo. ...

Nipsey Russell, Peggy Cass, Bill Cullen and Kitty Carlisle from the 1969-78 version.

Garry Moore, formerly host of Truth's sister show I've Got a Secret, hosted until 1977.[9] Regular panelists included Orson Bean during the first year, Peggy Cass, Kitty Carlisle and Bill Cullen, who substituted for Moore when needed.[10] In fact, Garry Moore often took vacations in the middle of a few of the seasons.[11] Bill Cullen was always the person in charge of substituting for Moore.[11] Kitty Carlisle switched places with Garry for one game in an episode, while Peggy Cass and Bill Cullen switched places during an episode that Bill subbed. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Julius Nipsey Russell (September 15, 1918 – October 2, 2005)[1] was an African-American comedian, best known today for his many appearances as a guest panelist on game shows from the 1960s through the 1990s, especially Match Game, Password, Hollywood Squares, To Tell the Truth and Pyramid. ... Mary Margaret (Peggy) Cass (May 21, 1924 - March 8, 1999) was an Academy Award-nominated actress, comedian, game show panelist, and announcer. ... William Bill Lawrence Frances Cullen (February 18, 1920 – July 7, 1990), was an Emmy Award-winning American radio and television personality. ... Kitty Carlisle Hart (also billed as Kitty Carlisle) (September 3, 1910 – April 17, 2007)[1][2][3] was an American singer, actress and spokeswoman for the arts. ... Garry Moore smoking as he often did while hosting Ive Got A Secret Garry Moore (January 31, 1915 – November 28, 1993) was born in Baltimore, Maryland as Thomas Garrison Morfit. ... Ive Got a Secret (abbreviated as IGAS) was a weekly panel game show produced by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman for CBS television and was created by Allan Sherman as essentially a knockoff of Whats My Line?. The original version of the show premiered in June 19, 1952... Orson Bean, born Dallas Frederick Burroughs (July 22, 1928 in Burlington, Vermont), is an American film and stage actor. ... Mary Margaret (Peggy) Cass (May 21, 1924 - March 8, 1999) was an Academy Award-nominated actress, comedian, game show panelist, and announcer. ... Kitty Carlisle in Die Fledermaus, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Kitty Carlisle Hart (b. ... William Bill Lawrence Frances Cullen (February 18, 1920 – July 7, 1990), was an Emmy Award-winning American radio and television personality. ...


Many of the earlier regulars appeared, including Tom Poston and Bert Convy. Other quiz-show hosts, including Tom Kennedy, Kennedy's brother Jack Narz, Hugh Downs, Allen Ludden, Gene Wood, Joe Garagiola, and Goodson-Todman stalwarts Larry Blyden and Gene Rayburn appeared as occasional guest panelists. Cullen, Rayburn, and Garagiola were all interviewer or presenters on the NBC radio show Monitor at the time, and Downs was on The Today Show. Tom Poston (October 17, 1921 – April 30, 2007) was an American television and film actor. ... Bernard Whalen Bert Convy (July 23, 1933 – July 15, 1991) was an American game show host and panelist, actor and singer known for his tenure as the host for Tattletales, Super Password, and Win, Lose or Draw. ... Tom Kennedy (born James Narz February 16, 1927, in Louisville, Kentucky) is a television game show host who had his greatest fame in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Jack Narz (born November 13, 1922, in Louisville, Kentucky), the elder brother of game show legend Tom Kennedy (Jim Narz) and the brother-in-law of another game show legend, the late Bill Cullen, is an American television announcer and game show host in his own right, who eluded the... Hugh Malcolm Downs (born February 14, 1921) is a retired American broadcaster, television host, producer, and author. ... Allen Ludden (October 5, 1918 – June 9, 1981) was an American television presenter and game show host. ... Gene Wood in an on-camera appearance on the finale of Card Sharks. ... Joseph Henry Garagiola, Sr. ... Larry Blyden (June 23, 1925 - June 6, 1975) was an American actor. ... Gene Rayburn (December 22, 1917 – November 29, 1999) was an Emmy-nominated American radio and television personality. ... This article is about the television network. ... Monitor host Dave Garroway NBC Monitor was a weekend radio program broadcast from June 12, 1955 to January 26, 1975. ... Today, commonly referred to as The Today Show to avoid ambiguity, is an American morning news and talk show airing weekday mornings on the NBC television network. ...


Each incorrect vote in this version was worth $50 to the challengers. Fooling the entire panel won the challengers a total of $500.

Three contestants.

In late 1976, Moore was diagnosed with throat cancer.[9] His place was taken originally by Bill Cullen. However, Mark Goodson noted how Bill Cullen being the host and not a panelist hurt the chemistry he had with Cass and Carlisle. Joe Garagiola was then hired and took over on an interim basis, stating that he was "pinch-hitting" for Moore.[12] At the beginning of the 1977–1978 season, Moore appeared for one final time to explain his sudden absence, banter with the panel after the first game and to formally hand the show over permanently to Garagiola. Moore's introduction that day prompted a loud applause and standing ovation.[11][13] After this episode, Garagiola hosted the program for the remaining season of its run. Esophageal cancer is malignancy of the esophagus. ...

Joe Garagiola took the place of Garry Moore in the 1977-78 season.

While there were two panel games per episode, fans and critics widely praised the 1969-1978 version for two reasons: the use of a live demonstration or video to illustrate the story after many of the games (much like I've Got a Secret), and for the warm panel banter during and after games. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ...


Possibly the most famous example of the cartoonish atmosphere of the show was an episode from 1971. Garry Moore brought out an armadillo during the introductions, which proceeded to defecate during the panelist introductions on camera. Garry was still holding on to the armadillo, everyone refusing to shake his hand (Guest panelist Carol Burnett even refusing to look at Garry,) and laughing about it. For other uses, see Armadillo (disambiguation). ... Defecation or feceation (known colloquially as pooping or shitting) is the act of eliminating solid or semisolid waste material from the digestive tract. ... Carol Creighton Burnett (born April 26, 1933 in San Antonio, Texas) is an Emmy Award-winning actress, comedian, singer, dancer, and writer. ...


Johnny Olson, the show's lead announcer in the 1960s CBS run, stayed with To Tell the Truth when it moved to syndication. He left in 1972, when Mark Goodson and Bill Todman appointed him announcer of the revivals of The Price Is Right and I've Got a Secret (which both shot in Los Angeles). NBC staff announcer Bill Wendell replaced Olson until 1977, with Alan Kalter taking over during the final season. The Price Is Rights US 36th season logo. ... Ive Got a Secret (abbreviated as IGAS) was a weekly panel game show produced by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman for CBS television and was created by Allan Sherman as essentially a knockoff of Whats My Line?. The original version of the show premiered in June 19, 1952... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Bill Wendell (born 22 March 1924 died 14 April 1999) was an NBC staff announcer. ... Alan Kalter on the Late Show with David Letterman Alan Kalter, or Big Red, began his stint as the voice of The Late Show with David Letterman on September 5, 1995. ...


To Tell The Truth used three distinctive sets throughout its nine-year syndicated run. The first set, which was designed by Ted Cooper, dubbed by some as the "psychedelic" set, recycling the one man on the door, was used from 1969 to 1971; a toned-down set was used from 1971 through early 1973, two additional men were added on that door. The longest-lived set — a blue-hued, gold-accented, block-motif set sporting the show's name in large block letters — was used for the remainder of the run. The doors on the final set bore a strong resemblance to the sliding doors on The Price is Right. The Price Is Rights US 36th season logo. ...

Larry Blyden votes in an episode from 1975.

1,715 episodes of this version had been produced by the time the show's final syndicated season ended in September 1978. Because this version of the show was syndicated, markets that added the series after its 1969 release often opted to carry the show for another season or two in order to catch up on the episodes that had not aired in their viewing area. This meant Truth was seen on some smaller stations up until the end of the decade, a fact that may have influenced Goodson, whom by now was working without Bill Todman, to revive it again, much as Ralph Edwards had done with Truth or Consequences in 1977 in response to the continuing popularity of episodes hosted by Bob Barker. Larry Blyden (June 23, 1925 - June 6, 1975) was an American actor. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... Ralph Livingstone Edwards (January 13, 1913 – November 16, 2005) was a television host and producer. ... Action Comics #127 (December 1948), featuring Superman appearing on the show with Ralph Edwards Truth or Consequences was an American quiz show, originally hosted on radio by Ralph Edwards from 1940 to 1957, and later on television by Edwards himself from 1950 to 1951, Jack Bailey from 1954 to 1955... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


During the final season with Garagiola, fancy wipes were used for the open, close and commercial bumpers, as well as canned applause and a music cue called "Brioche" (which would later be used as a prize cue on The Price is Right). The microphones in the audience were turned on so that the viewers at home could hear the audience chattering over who they thought was the real person.[11] This article is about the current version of the U.S. game show. ...


The show was first released to local stations on September 8, 1969, a date with a sad coincidence: original host Bud Collyer died that day at the age of 61 from emphysema.[14] is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Bud Collyer on Beat The Clock, 1957 Bud Collyer (b. ...


Third edition (1980–1981, syndicated)

The title card for the 1980-1981 edition.

With the Moore/Garagiola episodes still running in smaller markets, Mark Goodson, now working alone since the death of his longtime partner, interpreted their popularity as a demand for a revival. Thus, To Tell the Truth returned for a one-year run, from September 8, 1980 to September 11, 1981, with Canadian game show host Robin Ward emceeing. Each wrong vote paid the challengers $100. $500 was awarded for fooling the entire panel. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Main articles: History of Canada, Timeline of Canadian history Canada has been inhabited by aboriginal peoples (known in Canada as First Nations) for at least 40,000 years. ... Robin Ward (born 1944) is a Canadian actor and television personality. ...

Host Robin Ward.

Some fans disliked this version because the level of panel banter was decreased in favor of more game play.[15] In addition to the two regular panel games, a minigame called "One on One" was added to the program. In the "One on One" segment, the four impostors from the previous two games returned. One fact about one of them was purposely withheld from the panel in their previous introductions. After revealing that information, each of the panelists questioned the impostor directly across from them. After 20 seconds, the panelist was asked if that person was the one to whom the fact applied. An incorrect vote was worth $100 and a full stump was worth $500 to be split among the four people participating in the segment. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ...

The One on One game in progress.

This version was also known for its "disco-like" set and music. It had no regular panel, though Cullen, Cass, Carlisle, Soupy Sales, Dick Clark, and others showed up occasionally. Alan Kalter, who was the off-camera voice of the show late in the Moore-Garagiola run, was its main announcer. Recorded at Studio 6A of NBC's Rockefeller Center, this version of To Tell The Truth (along with the concurrent The $50,000 Pyramid) was the last New York City-based game show to air on broadcast television, as opposed to cable, until Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? in 1999 on ABC-TV. This article is about the music genre. ... Soupy Sales (born Milton Supman on January 8, 1926) is an American comedian and actor. ... Dick Clark redirects here. ... Alan Kalter on the Late Show with David Letterman Alan Kalter, or Big Red, began his stint as the voice of The Late Show with David Letterman on September 5, 1995. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Coaxial cable is often used to transmit cable television into the house. ... In the United States, Who Wants to Be a Millionaire (also known simply as Millionaire) is a television game show which offers a maximum prize of $1,000,000 (originally lump sum; now annuitized) for correctly answering 15 successive multiple-choice questions of increasing difficulty. ... This article is about the American broadcast network. ...

Challengers on the Ward version.

Negative factors such as the decreased interaction among the panelists, the absence of fixtures like Carlisle, Cass, and Cullen on most episodes, and a host unknown previously to American audiences (Ward) inhibited the show from getting many stations, and To Tell the Truth disappeared quietly after one season, not to return again for nearly a decade.


Fourth edition (1990–1991, NBC)

The set for the 1990-1991 edition.

To Tell The Truth returned yet again, lasting from September 3, 1990 to May 31, 1991 with Gordon Elliott, former football player Lynn Swann, and then finally Alex Trebek of Jeopardy! fame in the host's seat. The reason for all of these changes was because Elliott was fired eight weeks into the run due to a contract dispute with his former employers. Because of this dispute, Elliott could not appear on television for some time, which ended when he hosted a talk show almost four years later. Swann, a former football player for the Pittsburgh Steelers had formerly been a panelist and took over as host in the interim. After 14 weeks as emcee, due to scheduling conflicts with his job as an ABC Sports commentator, Swann was replaced at the helm by the producers of the show with Trebek.[16] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Gordon Elliott (Born September 30, 1956) is a reporter and actor. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Lynn Curtis Swann (b. ... Alex Trebek, with his once-iconic mustache, hosting a 1986 episode of Jeopardy! George Alexander Trebek (born as Giorgi Suka-Alex Trebek [1] on July 22, 1940) is an Emmy Award-winning Canadian-American television personality and game show host whos best known as the host of the game... Jeopardy redirects here. ... Steelers redirects here. ... [1] ABC Sports is a division of ABC, responsible for the televising of many sports events on the network. ...

The first host of the 90's version of To Tell the Truth, Gordon Elliott.

Besides Swann, the celebrity panelists for To Tell the Truth during this period included Carlisle and other stalwarts. Also serving were former Miss America Mary Ann Mobley, columnist Cindy Adams, actor Ron Masak, actress Betty White, producer David Niven Jr. (son of David Niven), actress Polly Bergen, attorney Gloria Allred, TV personality Sarah Purcell, and actor Tom Villard. The panelists were introduced in twos with the male panelists escorting the female panelists down the staircase, followed by Elliot, Swann, or Trebek. Mary Ann Mobley (born February 17, 1939 in Brandon, Mississippi) was Miss America in 1959, and later appeared in movies, including two with Elvis Presley; and on such television shows as Fantasy Island and The Love Boat. ... Cindy Adams on WNBCs Live at Five in July of 2006. ... Ron Masak is an actor born in Chicago, Illinois in 1936. ... Betty White (born January 17, 1922) is an Emmy Award-winning American film and television actress with a career spanning sixty years, sometimes referred to as The First Lady of Television and Americas Sweetheart. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Polly Bergen (born Nellie Paulina Burgin on July 14, 1930, in Knoxville, Tennessee) is an American actress, singer, and entrepreneur. ... Gloria Allred on the cover of her book, Fight Back and Win Gloria Rachel Allred (born Gloria Rachel Bloom on July 3, 1941) is an American lawyer and radio talk show host. ... Sarah Purcell (born 8 October 1948 in Richmond, Indiana) is known for her television acting and hosting work between 1975 and 1995. ... Tom Villard (b. ...


There are two more hosting oddities related to this show. On the first day of the show's run, NBC inadvertently aired the pilot episode of the show which was hosted by actor Richard Kline in the East Coast feed only.[17][18] The second oddity occurred when Trebek's wife went into labor just before airtime. Mark Goodson guest hosted these two shows while Trebek attended to his wife.[4][19] This would be Goodson's final appearance on the show before his death in 1992. The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Kline in the opening credits of Threes Company Richard Kline (born Richard Klein on April 29, 1944 in New York City, New York) is an American actor and television director. ... Mark Goodson (January 14, 1915 – December 18, 1992) was an accomplished American television producer who specialized in game shows. ...


Hosting To Tell The Truth made Trebek the first and only person to host three national American game shows simultaneously, as he was also hosting Classic Concentration on NBC and Jeopardy! in syndication. Concentration was a TV game show based on the childrens memory game of the same name. ... Jeopardy redirects here. ...


Fooling the whole panel won the challengers $3,000. Three wrong votes won $1,500, while any less than that awarded $1000.

Panelists Orson Bean, Peggy Cass, Chris Lemmon, and Kitty Carlisle from a December 25, 1990 episode.

Two games were played followed by a reworked "One on One" feature. In this version of the game, one additional contestant presented two stories, of which only one was correct. Each panelist asked one question of the person on each story. After this was completed, a selected member of the audience, introduced by Richardson or O'Donnell, tried to guess which story was true. If they were correct they won $500, otherwise the contestant gets $1000 for stumping that audience member. Occasionally, celebrities whose faces were not well known would attempt to stump the audience during this part of the game. For example, Hank Ketcham, creator of Dennis The Menace, almost but unsuccessfully tried during one episode to convince an audience member that he was really the songwriter to Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer.[20] Henry King Ketcham (1920-2001), commonly known as Hank Ketcham, was an American cartoonist who created the Dennis the Menace comic strip, writing and drawing it from 1951 to 1994. ... Dennis the Menace is a daily syndicated newspaper comic strip originally created, written and illustrated by Hank Ketcham since March 12, 1951, which made its debut in only 16 newspapers. ... Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is a popular Christmas story that has been told in numerous forms including songs and theatrical and television films. ...


This version show could be considered more "retro" than the 1980 edition: octogenarian Carlisle appeared more often than anyone else and old regulars Bean, Bergen, Cass and others made frequent appearances. By the end of the run, Masak and Bean alternated at the downstage end of the panel desk, with Carlisle regularly in the upstage seat. Additionally, the show's theme music was an orchestral remix of the 1969–78 theme (minus the lyrics), and the show utilized the block-letter logo from 1973–78. The effects of ageing on a human face Elderly woman Ageing or aging is the process of systems deterioration with time. ...


To Tell the Truth, after spending many years originating from New York, originated for the first time from NBC Studios in Burbank, California. Burton Richardson was its main announcer; however, Charlie O'Donnell also sub-announced for Richardson on occasion. NBC Studios are the two studio facilities belonging to the National Broadcasting Company, with one of them being located at Rockefeller Center in New York City, and the other located in Burbank, California, just outside of Los Angeles. ... Burbank is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... Burton Richardson, getting an on camera appearance as a sub-announcer on The Price is Right Burton Richardson (born September 25, 1949, in Portland, Oregon) is a premier American television announcer. ... Charlie ODonnell (born August 12, 1932 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a television announcer best known for his work on Wheel of Fortune. ...


Fifth edition (2000–2002, syndicated)

The opening title from the 2000-2002 edition.

The show then had a two-year run in syndication starting in 2000 with John O'Hurley as the host, and Burton Richardson returning as the announcer. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... John Gerald OHurley (born October 9, 1954, in Kittery, Maine) is an American actor best known for his recurring role as J. Peterman on Seinfeld. ... Burton Richardson, getting an on camera appearance as a sub-announcer on The Price is Right Burton Richardson (born September 25, 1949, in Portland, Oregon) is a premier American television announcer. ...


Actor Meshach Taylor was the only regular to appear on every episode of this edition, while Paula Poundstone was a regular during the first season. Following Poundstone's departure, several actors sat in Poundstone's former chair, including Kim Coles, Jackée Harry, Mother Love, Liz Torres, and Hattie Winston. At the time, the To Tell the Truth website touted Coles and Brooke Burns as regulars for season two, though neither panelist was featured in every show that year. The series was produced in Burbank at the NBC Studios. Meshach Taylor (born April 11, 1947 in Boston, Massachusetts) is an Emmy Award nominated American actor. ... Paula Poundstone (born December 29, 1959 in Huntsville, Alabama) is an American stand-up comic. ... Kim Coles (born January 11, 1966) is an American actress and comedian. ... Jackée Harry (August 14, 1956) is an Emmy Award-winning and two-time NAACP Image Award winning African-American actress, best known for her role as Sandra Clark on hit NBC sitcom 227 from 1985 until 1989. ... Mother Love is an American entertainer. ... Elizabeth Liz Torres (born on September 27, 1947, in New York City) is an actress, singer, and comedian of Puerto Rican descent. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Brooke Elizabeth Burns (born March 16, 1978 in Dallas, Texas) is an American actress and former fashion model, best known for her role on Baywatch and Baywatch Hawaii. ... Burbank is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... NBC Studios are the two studio facilities belonging to the National Broadcasting Company, with one of them being located at Rockefeller Center in New York City, and the other located in Burbank, California, just outside of Los Angeles. ...


Notable guest panelists on this version include Dave Coulier during season one, Brad Sherwood for season two, Cindy Margolis, Brooke Burns, Melody Thomas Scott, Patrick Duffy, Kermit the Frog, Richard Kind, Greg Proops, and for one episode, Kitty Carlisle, who had appeared on the show in six consecutive decades.[21] David The Dave Lee Coulier (born September 21, 1959) is an American comedian, actor, and voice-over artist, best known for his portrayal of Joey Gladstone on Full House. ... Brad Sherwood. ... Cynthia D. Cindy Margolis (born October 1, 1965) is an American glamour spokesmodel and actress. ... Brooke Elizabeth Burns (born March 16, 1978 in Dallas, Texas) is an American actress and former fashion model, best known for her role on Baywatch and Baywatch Hawaii. ... Melody Thomas Scott as Nikki Newman Melody Thomas Scott (born April 18, 1956 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actress. ... For other uses, see Patrick Duffy (disambiguation). ... Kermit the Frog is a Muppet, one of puppeteer Jim Hensons most famous and beloved creations, first introduced in 1955. ... Richard Kind (b. ... Gregory Everett Proops (born October 3, 1959) is an American actor and stand-up comedian, and works largely in Europe as a comic and improviser. ... Kitty Carlisle in Die Fledermaus, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Kitty Carlisle Hart (b. ...


As on the 1967-68 CBS run, the studio audience voted. Each wrong vote awarded the challengers $1,000 meaning that $5,000 could be split by the challengers for fooling the panel. In the first few weeks of the series, stumping the entire panel, including the audience, won the challengers $10,000.


According to Steve Beverly's tvgameshows.net, this edition of Truth never received a rating higher than 1.8. It was cancelled in late 2001, only 65 episodes into its second season. However, repeats continued to air through March 15, 2002.[22] GSN began airing reruns on July 18, 2007. When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are often referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


Theme music and set

Metropole Orchestra leader Dolf van der Linden composed the original series theme, "Peter Pan", used from 1956–1961. From 1961–1967, the show switched to a Bob Cobert-penned theme, with a beat similar to "Peter Pan", then to a Score Productions anthem during its final CBS daytime season. For the 1969, 1980, and 1990 versions, the music was again composed by Score Productions. Gary Stockdale supplied the score for the 2000 edition. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Robert Cobert (October 26, 1924-) is a composer who has written extensively for television and movies. ... Score Productions is an American musical production company specializing in background music and themes for television programs. ...


The 1969 version is known by many for its original psychedelic set and its lyrical theme song, penned by Score Productions chief Bob Israel and To Tell the Truth producer Paul Alter, along with veteran theme composer Charles Fox; the psychedelia was toned down somewhat in 1971, and replaced altogether with a more conservative, but decidedly modernistic, blue-toned block-motif set in early 1973. However, the lyrics—much in the style of British Invasion bands of the day—remained throughout the run. The 1990 score was an orchestral rendition of the 1969 theme sans the lyrics (a re-recorded version of the vocal theme, as performed by the a cappella group Take 6, was originally going to be used for this version, but was scrapped before the show made it to air). Psychedelia is a term describing a category of music, visual art, fashion, and culture that is associated originally with the high 1960s, hippies, and the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco, California. ... Charles Fox was born and raised in New York City. ... This article is about the vocal technique. ... Take 6 is an influential American a cappella gospel music sextet formed in 1985 on the campus of Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama. ...


Famous contestants

Several people who would go on to fame appeared on the various incarnations of this show:

  • Frank Abagnale, Jr. - He appeared on the show years after he had given up his con artistry. The biopic based on his life, Catch Me If You Can opens with his appearance on the show, with actors (Leonardo DiCaprio playing Abagnale) taking the place of the contestants. Footage of panelist Carlisle and host Garagiola from the original To Tell the Truth is used.[23]
  • Sissy Biggers - When she was 16 years old, she was one of the impostors on a 1973 show in which she was pretending to be a baton twirling magician named Abbey Lee Green. She later hosted Biggers & Summers with Marc Summers on The Lifetime Television Network. In 1996 she replaced Robin Young as host of Ready.. Set... Cook! on the Food Network.[23]
  • John E. DuPont - the heir to the DuPont fortune, appeared on a 1966 broadcast. He was training in the sport of modern pentathlon and was hoping to make the 1968 Olympic team that was to compete in Mexico City. He later would gain infamy for murdering Olympic wrestling champion Dave Schultz.[23]
  • Rock and Roll impresario and deejay Alan Freed was correctly guessed by two of the panelists, including Polly Bergen, in a 1950s episode hosted by Bud Collyer.[23]
  • American popcorn promoter and guru Orville Redenbacher was first seen on national T.V. in 1973, long before his signature commercial appearances as himself promoting his gourmet kernels. Redenbacher appeared on an episode of the show and he stumped the panelists: Kitty Carlisle, Bill Cullen, Joe Garagiola, and Peggy Cass, all of whom were shown eating and enjoying samples of Redenbacher's then-"new" novelty popcorn flavors including "chili," and "bar-b-que."[12][23][24]
  • A New York detective named Richard Buggy, known for working the city streets in various disguises, appeared on the show in 1974, with each of the three challengers dressed accordingly. At the end of the game, after Buggy's identity had been revealed, the two imposters did the same; they were revealed to be Kitty Carlisle's son Chris Hart (#2) and Joe Garagiola Jr. (#3).[23]
  • West Virginia governor Cecil Underwood was To Tell The Truth's first "Truth Teller" in 1956. He was the youngest person ever elected governor in West Virginia. He would go on to be not only the oldest person elected governor in West Virginia in 1997, but the oldest person ever to be elected governor of any state in US history.[23]
  • Caroll Spinney, better known as the man in Big Bird ever since the beginning of Sesame Street, appeared in a Moore episode from 1971.
  • Actress Ally Sheedy appeared in a Moore episode from 1975 when she was twelve years old, in a story about a book that she wrote. The book was titled She Was Nice to Mice, and later on became a best-seller. This was well before she became famous as an actress. Sheedy later on even became a panelist for a few episodes.[25][26]
  • Rosa Parks appeared in an episode of the Robin Ward version in 1980, with the three panelists being stumped by her (Nipsey Russell, the fourth panelist, knew who she was and disqualified himself).
  • Some celebrities have dressed up as imposters. Soupy Sales,[25] Bill Todman, Tom Poston, Henry Morgan, Christopher Hewett[27] and Rip Taylor[28] all dressed up in costumes to try and fool the panel.[25]
  • Famous cartoonists Chuck Jones, William Hanna, and Garry Trudeau appeared with other imposters in episodes from 1980, 1975, and 1971 respectively. In the episode with William Hanna, a person in a Yogi Bear costume picked out Bill, and Daws Butler provided the voice of Yogi Bear as Yogi introduced the panel in a cartoon.[25]
  • Stan Lee (of Marvel Comics fame) appeared on the 2000 revival. In order to prevent people from recognizing him, he and the two impostors dressed up in costumes with glasses and large colorful hats.
  • Rick Bynes, Amanda Bynes' father, appeared on the 2000 revival as an imposter. He was claiming to be the founder of an underwater hotel.

Frank William Abagnale, Jr. ... Catch Me If You Can is a 2002 motion picture set in the 1960s. ... Leonardo Wilhelm DiCaprio (born November 11, 1974[1]) is a three-time Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor who garnered world wide fame for his role as Jack Dawson in Titanic. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Marc Summers (born Marc Berkowitz November 11, 1951 in Indianapolis, Indiana) is an American television personality, popular game show host, producer, and a two-time talk show host, perhaps best known for hosting the childrens game show Double Dare on Nickelodeon. ... Lifetime Television is an American television network devoted to movies, sitcoms and dramas, all of which are either geared toward women or feature women in lead roles. ... Robin Young is a radio host for WBUR in Boston and a former local television personality in that city. ... Ready. ... Food Network is an American cable network that airs many specials and recurring (episodic) shows about food. ... John Eleuthère du Pont (born c. ... This article is about E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. ... Competitors in the final round of the Mens Modern Pentathlon pull for the finish line at the Goudi Sports Complex on August 26, 2004. ... Mexico City (in Spanish: Ciudad de México, México, D.F. or simply México) is the capital city of Mexico. ... David L. Schultz (June 6, 1959 - January 26, 1996) was an Olympic and World champion freestyle wrestler. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Polly Bergen (born Nellie Paulina Burgin on July 14, 1930, in Knoxville, Tennessee) is an American actress, singer, and entrepreneur. ... For other uses, see Popcorn (disambiguation). ... An image of Orville Redenbacher on a popcorn container Image:Bci oriville 1. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Kitty Carlisle in Die Fledermaus, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Kitty Carlisle Hart (b. ... William Bill Lawrence Frances Cullen (February 18, 1920 – July 7, 1990), was an Emmy Award-winning American radio and television personality. ... Joseph Henry Garagiola, Sr. ... Mary Margaret (Peggy) Cass (May 21, 1924 - March 8, 1999) was an Academy Award-nominated actress, comedian, game show panelist, and announcer. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Cecil Harland Underwood (b. ... Spinney appears on a 1970s episode of Whats My Line Caroll Spinney, sometimes credited as Carroll Spinney or Ed Spinney (born December 26, 1933 in Waltham, Massachusetts, USA) is a puppeteer most famous for playing Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch on the childrens television show Sesame Street. ... For other uses, see Big Bird (disambiguation). ... Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ... Alexandra Elizabeth Sheedy (born June 13, 1962) is an American screen and stage actress, possibly best known for her roles in the Brat Pack films The Breakfast Club and St. ... She Was Nice To Mice: The Other Side of Elizabeth Is Character Never Before Revealed by Previous Historians is a childrens book written by Alexandra Elizabeth Sheedy at the age of 12. ... Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) was an African American civil rights activist and seamstress whom the U.S. Congress dubbed the Mother of the Modern-Day Civil Rights Movement. Parks is famous for her refusal on December 1, 1955 to obey bus driver James Blake... Julius Nipsey Russell (September 15, 1918 – October 2, 2005)[1] was an African-American comedian, best known today for his many appearances as a guest panelist on game shows from the 1960s through the 1990s, especially Match Game, Password, Hollywood Squares, To Tell the Truth and Pyramid. ... Soupy Sales (born Milton Supman on January 8, 1926) is an American comedian and actor. ... Bill Todman (July 31, 1916-July 29, 1979) was an American television producer born in New York City. ... Tom Poston (October 17, 1921 – April 30, 2007) was an American television and film actor. ... Henry Morgan (March 31, 1915 - May 19, 1994), born in New York City, was a comedian best remembered for having been a regular panelist on the CBS game show Ive Got a Secret. ... Christopher Hewett, (April 5, 1922 – August 3, 2001), was an English actor best known for his role as Lynn Belvedere on the ABC sitcom Mr. ... Rip Taylor (born Charles Elmer Taylor, Jr. ... Chuck Jones in 1976 Charles Martin Chuck Jones (September 21, 1912 – February 22, 2002) was an American animator, cartoon artist, screenwriter, producer, and director of animated films, most memorably of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts for the Warner Bros. ... hello i am godWilliam Denby Bill Hanna (July 14, 1910 – March 22, 2001) was an American animator, director, producer, cartoon artist, and co-founder, together with Joseph Barbera, of Hanna-Barbera. ... Garry Trudeau Garretson Beekman Trudeau (born July 21, 1948, in New York City) is an American cartoonist, best known for the Doonesbury comic strip. ... Daws Butler in 1976. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Amanda Laura Bynes (born April 3, 1986) is an American actress and former show host on Nickelodeon. ...

Legacy

To Tell the Truth is the most enduring of the panel-based Goodson-Todman game shows—the type also exemplified by What's My Line? and I've Got a Secret—having been in active production at least once in every decade since the 1950s, a total of six decades. The only other game show that can claim this distinction is The Price is Right. The next longest-running US game show formats to have been produced and aired in five consecutive decades are Let's Make a Deal, starting in 1963, Jeopardy!, from 1964, The Hollywood Squares from 1966, Concentration (1958-91) and Truth or Consequences (1940-88). Match Game has been in production since 1962 and may return to air in 2008 or 2009, which would add them to the list. (You Bet Your Life and Beat the Clock were produced in five nonconsecutive decades.) Whats My Line? is a weekly panel game show originally produced by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman for CBS television. ... Ive Got a Secret (abbreviated as IGAS) was a weekly panel game show produced by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman for CBS television and was created by Allan Sherman as essentially a knockoff of Whats My Line?. The original version of the show premiered in June 19, 1952... The Price Is Rights US 36th season logo. ... Lets Make a Deal is a television game show which aired in various encarnations in the United States. ... Jeopardy redirects here. ... Hollywood Squares is a American television comedy and game show in which two contestants play tic-tac-toe to win money and prizes. ... For other uses, see Concentration (disambiguation). ... Action Comics #127 (December 1948), featuring Superman appearing on the show with Ralph Edwards Truth or Consequences was an American quiz show, originally hosted on radio by Ralph Edwards from 1940 to 1957, and later on television by Edwards himself from 1950 to 1951, Jack Bailey from 1954 to 1955... The Match Game was an American television game show, most often hosted by Gene Rayburn. ... You Bet Your Life is an American radio and television quiz show. ... For other uses, see Beat the Clock (disambiguation). ...


To Tell the Truth's place in American culture is such that the show's famous catch phrase "Will the real [name] please stand up?" became a well-known and frequently used cliché, often in a humorous context when someone's identity was in question. Rapper Eminem paraphrased the tagline in his 2000 breakout hit The Real Slim Shady, saying "Won't the real Slim Shady please stand up?" Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), better known as Eminem or Slim Shady, is a Grammy and Academy Award-winning American rapper, record producer and actor from the Detroit, Michigan area. ... The Real Slim Shady is a song by the rapper Eminem, released in 2000. ...


Almost as famous is the line used by the announcer to begin each game: "Number One, what is your name, please?"


Saturday Night Live had a parody of the 1980-81 version (using the actual theme) with three people who claim to be George Kennedy. The show would be interrupted when a camera shorted out.[29] This article is about the American television series. ... George Harris Kennedy, Jr. ...


Sesame Street had a parody of To Tell the Truth called To Tell a Face, hosted by Guy Smiley and featuring Baby Bobby as a contestant who had to tell which of the three panelists really was his grandmother. Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ... Guy Smiley was a character on Sesame Street dubbed Americas favorite game show host. ...


In 2008, Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Steve Novick of Oregon released a political ad parodying the show.[30] 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Steve Novick (born February 8, 1963) is an environmental lawyer, political activist, and candidate for the United States Senate. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Episode status

Only a handful of shows remain from the CBS daytime series' first three years because of a then-common practice known as wiping videotapes and reusing them to save money and storage space. Many daytime episodes (including some in color) from 1966 to 1968 exist, including the color finale. One particular episode was described in many newspaper obituaries in 1965 because it contained a rare appearance by Dorothy Kilgallen, best known as a regular panelist on What's My Line?. It was broadcast on the East Coast on a Monday afternoon as news of her sudden death was circulated by wire services, which prompted CBS newscaster Douglas Edwards to announce her death immediately after To Tell The Truth ended. She had videotaped it six days earlier, according to the New York Herald Tribune. The best description of how Kilgallen appeared on the air (as a contestant pretending to be Joan Crawford) was reported by a columnist for the Washington Star who watched the show. Although the episode could interest a large audience today, it is gone as far as anyone has determined. Most of the nighttime run of the Collyer series exists, along with a few color kinescope episodes.[31] The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Dorothy Mae Kilgallen (July 3, 1913 – November 8, 1965) was an Irish-American journalist and television game show panelist, perhaps best known nationally for her coverage of the Sam Sheppard trial, her syndicated newspaper column, The Voice of Broadway, and her role as panelist on the television game show What... Whats My Line? is a weekly panel game show originally produced by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman for CBS television. ... Douglas Edwards (July 14, 1917 — October 13, 1990) was Americas first network news television anchor, anchoring CBSs first nightly news broadcast from 1948-1962, which was later to be titled CBS Evening News. ... The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper created in 1924 when the New York Tribune acquired the New York Herald. ... For other persons named Joan Crawford, see Joan Crawford (disambiguation). ... The Washington Star, previously known as the Washington Star-News and the Washington Evening Star, was a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C. between 1852 and 1982. ...


The bulk of the Moore/Garagiola version is intact. However, the current status of the first season is unknown, and is presumed to be lost. A check into the Goodson-Todman catalogues by a fan yielded no episodes from the first season.[32] However, that version of To Tell the Truth had multiple copies of the same episode, due to the bicycling done by stations, so it is possible that those episodes exist in a television archive at another station. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


The Robin Ward version, the 1990-1991 edition, and the 2000-2002 series have all of their episodes intact. The Game Show Network has aired all of the versions through 1991, and began airing the O'Hurley series on July 18, 2007.[33] “GSN” redirects here. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ a b "Game Show Congress" Retrieved 4 August 2007.
  2. ^ "Nothing But the Truth" Retrieved 30 June 2007.
  3. ^ "The TTTT audience game" Retrieved 30 June 2007.
  4. ^ a b "List of U.S. Game Shows" Retrieved 7 July 2007.
  5. ^ To Tell the Truth. CBS. 1967.
  6. ^ To Tell the Truth. CBS. 1965.
  7. ^ According to kinescopes.com/TTTT_pm.html, Robert subbed on 2/11/60, and from 2/24/64 to 3/2/64, 1/25/65 to 2/15/65, and from 2/4/1966 to 2/18/1966.
  8. ^ a b "Prime Time Access Rule" Retrieved 24 September 2007.
  9. ^ a b Garry Moore, 78, the Cheery Host Of Long-Running TV Series, Dies. New York Times (1993-11-29). Retrieved on 2007-12-18.
  10. ^ "Hosts who played their own game" Retrieved 30 June 2007.
  11. ^ a b c d "To Tell the Truth 1977-78" Retrieved 30 June 2007.
  12. ^ a b "Number 1...No wait, it's number 2!...No, Number 3, definitely!...No, wait..." Retrieved 1 July 2007.
  13. ^ To Tell the Truth. Syndication. 1977.
  14. ^ "The First Game Show Superstar.....BUD COLLYER!" Retrieved 5 July 2007.
  15. ^ "To Tell the Truth 1980" Retrieved 30 June 2007.
  16. ^ To Tell the Truth. NBC. 1991-02.
  17. ^ "To Tell the Truth tribute: 1990-91" Retrieved 30 June 2007
  18. ^ "http://www.geocities.com/Hollywood/Boulevard/5410/tttt.html" Retrieved 30 June 2007.
  19. ^ To Tell the Truth. NBC. 1991-05.
  20. ^ To Tell the Truth. NBC. 1990-12-25.
  21. ^ "To Tell the Truth tribute: 2000-2002" Retrieved 30 June 2007.
  22. ^ "TVGameshows.net Big News" Retrieved 1 July 2007.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g "TTTT notables" Retrieved 30 June 2007.
  24. ^ "Orville Redenbacher on To Tell the Truth" Retrieved 30 June 2007.
  25. ^ a b c d "To Tell The Truth Show Notes" Retrieved 4 July 2007.
  26. ^ To Tell the Truth. Syndication. 1975-06-19.
  27. ^ To Tell the Truth. NBC. 1990-12-25.
  28. ^ To Tell the Truth. NBC. 1990-12-25.
  29. ^ Saturday Night Live. NBC. 1981.
  30. ^ http://youtube.com/watch?v=QFX1TCK_PS8
  31. ^ "The G-T Big 4: To Tell the Truth (CBS Nighttime)" Retrieved 3 July 2007.
  32. ^ ""To Tell The Truth" on the Web" Retrieved 11 August 2007.
  33. ^ "TVGameshows.net Big News" Retrieved 1 July 2007.

Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...

External links

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tell The Truth (163 words)
Tell The Truth's Mission is to promote truthfulness, accuracy, and accountability in both political and public policy debate in Sonoma County.
Tell The Truth incorporated in 1999 as a 501(C)(4) non-profit corporation with the stated purpose of holding all political groups and individuals in Sonoma County accountable for telling the truth in the public forum.
Tell The Truth monitors ongoing public policy debate on a variety of Sonoma County issues.
Public Trust. Should Christians Tell the Truth? (2497 words)
Two issues are fundamental to understanding the biblical basis for telling the truth about Christian sin: (1) the nature and importance of truth; and (2) biblical principles for integrity and honesty in Christian leadership [who is in sin].
Telling the truth is not merely an intellectual exercise, nor even simply a moral imperative.
Truth telling should flow naturally from our moral character, redeemed by Christ's death on the cross and nurtured by the indwelling presence of the Holy Spirit.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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