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Encyclopedia > Tlemcen

Tlemcen (Arabic: تلمسان), sometimes spelled Tlemsen, is a town in Northwestern Algeria, and the seat of government for the Tlemcen Province of the same name. Its population is an estimated 130,000. The name comes from the Berber word "tilmisane," for springs. Arabic (; , less formally, ) is the largest member of the Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... Tlemcen is a province (wilayah) of Algeria. ...


Located inland, it is located in the center of a region known for its olive plantations and vineyards. The city has developed leather, carpet, and textile industries, which it ships to the port of Rashgun for export.


Its centuries of rich history and culture have made the city a center of a unique blend of music and art. Its textiles and handicrafts, its elegant blend of Arab, Berber, and French cultures, and its cool climate in the mountains have made it an important center of tourism in Algeria. It is home to two beautiful tombs - that of Sidi Bou Mediene, whose tomb adjoins to a mosque, and Houari Boumédiènne, the second president of Algeria. It also has an international airport. Yeni Camii (the New Mosque), one of the landmarks of Ä°stanbul A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Houari Boumédienne (original name Mohamed Ben Brahim Boukharouba) (August 23, 1932 - December 27, 1978) was President of Algeria from 19 June 1965 to 27 December 1978 (Chairman of the Revolutionary Council until 12 December 1976). ...


History

Tlemcen was founded by the Romans in the 4th century C.E. under the name of Pomaria as a military outpost on the Berber frontier, in the province of Mauretania Caesariensis. It was an important see of the Catholic Church in the century in which it was built, where it was the center of a diocese. Its bishop, Victor, was a prominent representative at the Council of Carthage in 411, and its bishop Honoratus was exiled in 484 by the Vandal king Huneric for denying Arianism. It was a center of a large Christian population for many centuries after the city's Arab conquest in 708. In the later eighth century and the ninth century, the city became a center of the Kharijite sect. The 11th century Almoravid settlement at Tagrart merged with the city and rose to prominence as a major trading center in the region. The Roman Forum was the central area around which ancient Rome developed. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... The Berbers (also called Imazighen, free men, singular Amazigh) are an ethnic group indigenous to Northwest Africa, speaking the Berber languages of the Afroasiatic family. ... In the first century A.D., the Emperor Claudius divided the Roman province of Mauretania into Mauretania Caesariensis and Mauretania Tingitana. ... The Roman Catholic Church believes its founding was based on Jesus appointment of Saint Peter as the primary church leader, later Bishop of Rome. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... Events The Burgundians elevate Jovinus as Roman Emperor. ... Events December 28 - Alaric II succeeds Euric as king of the Visigoths. ... The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe that entered the late Roman Empire during the 5th century and created a state in North Africa, centered on the city of Carthage. ... Huneric (d. ... This article is about theological views like those of Arius. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب Ê»arab) are a large and heterogeneous ethnic group found throughout the Middle East and North Africa, originating in the Arabian Peninsula of southwest Asia. ... Events The Japanese court moved from Heian to Nara. ... (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... (8th century - 9th century - 10th century - other centuries) Events Beowulf might have been written down in this century, though it could also have been in the 8th century Viking attacks on Europe begin Oseberg ship burial The Magyars arrive in what is now Hungary, forcing the Serbs and Bulgars south... Kharijites were members of an Islamic sect in late 7th and early 8th century AD, concentrated in todays southern Iraq. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... Almoravides (From Arabic المرابطون sing. ...


Tlemcen was the capital of the Abd-el-Wadid (Ziyyanids) kingdom of Tlemcen, whose flag was a blue crescent pointing upwards on a white field. The kingdom of Tlemcen grew rapidly after its foundations in 1282 to control most of the Atlas Mountains to Tunisia at its height in the 15th century. When the Spanish took the city of Oran from the kingdom in 1509, continuous pressure from the Berbers prompted the Spanish to attempt a counterattack against the city of Tlemcen (1543), which was deemed by the Papacy to be a crusade. The Spanish failed to take the city in the first attack, although the strategic vulnerability of Tlemcen caused the kingdom's weight to shift toward the safer and more heavily fortified corsair base at Algiers. Map showing the location of the Atlas Mountains in Morocco The Atlas Mountains are a mountain range in northwest Africa extending about 2400 km (1500 miles) through Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia, and including The Rock of Gibraltar. ... Oran (population 700,000) (Arabic: ولاية وهران ) is a city in northwest Algeria, situated on the Mediterranean Sea coast. ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events February 21 - Battle of Wayna Daga - A combined army of Ethiopian and Portuguese troops defeat the armies of Adal led by Ahmed Gragn. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... Map of Algeria showing Algiers province Algiers (French Alger, (Arabic: ولاية الجزائر) El-Jazair, The Islands) is the capital and largest city of Algeria in North Africa. ...


The ruler of Tlemcen is reported to have been advised by a Jewish viceroy named Abraham, who, in the time of the Inquisition of Torquemada, opened the gates of Tlemcen to hordes of Jews and Moors fleeing Spain. Abraham is said to have supported them with his own money and with the tolerance of the king of Tlemcen. Artistic (i. ... Grand Inquisitor Torquemada Tomás de Torquemada (1420 - September 16, 1498) was a fifteenth century Spanish Dominican, and an Inquisitor General. ... The Moors were the medieval Muslim inhabitants of al-Andalus (the Iberian Peninsula including the present day Spain and Portugal) and the Maghreb, whose culture is often called Moorish. // Origins of the name The name derives from the old tribe of the Mauri and their kingdom, Mauretania. ...


In 1553, the kingdom of Tlemcen came under the protection of the Ottoman Empire, which was fighting a naval war against the Spaniards across the Mediterranean, and the Kingdom of Tlemcen became another vassal of the Sultan in Constantinople. Tlemcen and the Algerian provinces gained effective independence in their own affairs in 1671, although Tlemcen was no longer the seat of government that it once was (transferred to ?Algiers), and its grandeur was much reduced from the days of its great kings. The Spanish were evicted from Oran in 1792, but thirty years later they were replaced by the French, who seized Algiers. A French fleet bombarded Algiers in 1834, at which point the dey capitulated to French colonial rule; a broad coalition of Berbers and Arabs continued to resist, coordinated loosely at Tlemcen. The great Kabylian warrior, Abd al-Kader, fought with incredible skill and valor, but his defeat in 1844 at Isly ended the dream of a new independent Algeria. Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (the Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power (1683) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Bursa (1335-1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Ä°stanbul (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... A sultan (Arabic: سلطان) is an Islamic title, with several historical meanings. ... Map of Constantinople. ... Events May 9 - Thomas Blood, disguised as a clergyman, attempts to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. ... Map of Algeria showing Algiers province Algiers (French Alger, (Arabic: ولاية الجزائر) El-Jazair, The Islands) is the capital and largest city of Algeria in North Africa. ... The American Captain William Bainbridge paying tribute to the Dey, circa 1800. ... Abd al-Kader (äbdäl-kädÄ“r) , c. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Tlemcen was a vacation spot and retreat for French settlers in Algeria, who found it to be far more temperate than Oran or Algiers. The city adapted and became more cosmopolitan, with a unique outlook on art and culture, and its architecture and urban life evolved to accommodate this new sense. In the independence movements of the mid-twentieth century, it was relatively quiet, reflecting the city's sense of aloofness from the turbulence of Algiers.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Tlemcen (223 words)
City in northwestern Algeria with 180,000 inhabitants (2003 estimate), in the Tlemcen Mountains, at an elevation of 807 metres.
It is the capital of Tlemcen province with 940,000 inhabitants (2005 estimate) and an area of 9,061 km².
The Ottomans of Tlemcen favoured a cooperation with the French, the Berbers for a union with Morocco.
Tlemcen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (768 words)
Tlemcen was founded by the Romans in the 4th century C.E. under the name of Pomaria as a military outpost on the Berber frontier, in the province of Mauretania Caesariensis.
Tlemcen was the capital of the Abd-el-Wadid (Ziyyanids) kingdom of Tlemcen, whose flag was a blue crescent pointing upwards on a white field.
In 1553, the kingdom of Tlemcen came under the protection of the Ottoman Empire, which was fighting a naval war against the Spaniards across the Mediterranean, and the Kingdom of Tlemcen became another vassal of the Sultan in Constantinople.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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