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Encyclopedia > Titus Quinctius Flamininus

Titus Quinctius Flamininus (c. 228 BC-174 BC) was a Roman politician and general.


He served as a military tribune in the Second Punic war and in 205 BC he was appointed propraetor in Tarentum. He was a curule aedile in Rome in 203 BC and a quaestor in 199 BC. He became consul in 198 BC, despite being only about 30 years old, younger than the constitutional age required to serve in that position.


After his election to the consulship he was chosen to replace Publius Sulpicius Galba as general during the Second Macedonian War. He chased Philip V of Macedon out of most of Greece, except for a few fortresses, but as his term as consul was coming to an end he attempted to establish a peace with the Macedonian king. During the negotiations, Flamininus was made proconsul, giving him the authority to continue the war rather than finishing the negotiations. In 197 BC he defeated Philip at the Battle of Cynoscephalae in Thessaly, the Roman legions making the Macedonian phalanx obsolete in the process. Philip was forced to surrender, give up all the Greek cities he had conquered, and pay Rome 1000 talents (around $600,000), but his kingdom was left intact to serve as a buffer state between Greece and Illyria. This displeased the Achaean League, Rome's allies in Greece, who wanted Macedon to be dismantled completely.


In 196 BC Flamininus appeared at the Isthmian Games in Corinth and proclaimed the freedom of the Greek states. He was fluent in Greek and was a great admirer of Greek culture, and the Greeks hailed him as their liberator; they minted coins with his portrait, and in some cities he was deified. According to Livy, this was the act of an unselfish Hellenophile, although it seems more likely that Flamininus understood freedom as liberty for the aristocracy of Greece, who would then become clients of Rome, as opposed to being subjected to Macedonian rule. With his Greek allies, Flamininus plundered Sparta, before returning to Rome in triumph along with 1200 freed slaves who had been taken captive and sold in Greece during the Second Punic War.


Meanwhile, Eumenes II of Pergamum appealed to Rome for help against the Seleucid king Antiochus III. Flamininus was sent to negotiate with him in 192 BC, and warned him not to interfere with the Greek states. Antiochus did not believe Flamininus had the authority to speak for the Greeks, and promised to leave Greece alone only if the Romans did the same. These negotiations came to nothing and Rome was soon at war with Antiochus. Flamininus was present at the Battle of Thermopylae in 191 BC, in which Antiochus was defeated.


In 183 BC he was sent to negotiate with Prusias I of Bithynia in an attempt to capture Hannibal, who had been exiled there from Carthage, but Hannibal committed suicide to avoid being taken prisoner. Although nothing is known of him after this, Flamininus seems to have died around 174.


External link

  • Plutarch's Life of Flamininus (http://whitewolf.newcastle.edu.au/words/authors/P/Plutarch/prose/plutachslives/flamininus.html)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Titus Quinctius Flamininus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (532 words)
During the negotiations, Flamininus was made proconsul, giving him the authority to continue the war rather than finishing the negotiations.
Flamininus was sent to negotiate with him in 192 BC, and warned him not to interfere with the Greek states.
Flamininus was present at the Battle of Thermopylae in 191 BC, in which Antiochus was defeated.
Battle of Cynoscephalae - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (673 words)
The Battle of Cynoscephalae was fought in Thessaly in 197 BC between the Roman army, led by Titus Quinctius Flamininus, and the Antigonid dynasty of Macedon, led by Philip V.
Flamininus, with his allies from the Aetolian League, were stationed at Thebes, and marched out towards Pherae in search of Philip, who was at Larisa.
When Flamininus began his march to Larisa he had under his command about 32,500 to 33,400 soldiers, along with troops from the Aetolian League, light infantry from Athamania, mercenary archers from Crete, and elephants and Numidian cavalry from King Masinissa of Numidia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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